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Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance. Read more
Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance.

A place on the conversion year is normally offered together with a conditional offer for the MSc in Mathematical Finance in the following year, subject to successfully completing the conversion year. The normal progression requirement for progression from the conversion year to the MSc in Mathematical Finance is a final weighted average at 2:1 level (60% or above) for the modules taken in the conversion year.

Programme structure

The conversion year consists of a selection of modules to the value of 120 credits being part of the undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Finance at the University of York, with emphasis on the mathematical aspects of the course. Module choice is subject to prerequisites, timetabling constraints, availability of modules, and is subject to approval by the programme director.

The available modules may vary from year to year but are likely to include:

Term 1 (Autumn)
-Calculus (30 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Algebra (20 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Introduction to Probability and Statistics (20 credits)
-Statistics I (10 credits)
-Applied Probability (10 credits)
-Differential Equations (10 credits)
-Mathematical Finance I MAT00015H (10 credits)

Terms 2 and 3 (Spring and Summer Terms)
-Calculus (30 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Introduction to Applied Mathematics (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Real Analysis (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Linear Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Vector Calculus (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Statistics II (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Numerical Analysis (10 credits) (Spring Term only)
-Mathematical Finance II (10 credits) (Spring Term only)

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The International Summer School at the Rouen Business School is an intensive 2 or 4-week program open to undergraduates and Master’s level students of all disciplines who wish to experience France and French culture, develop cross-cultural skills and in depth understanding of Business Ethics and International Negotiation skills while at the same time earning up to 10 ECTs credits. Read more
The International Summer School at the Rouen Business School is an intensive 2 or 4-week program open to undergraduates and Master’s level students of all disciplines who wish to experience France and French culture, develop cross-cultural skills and in depth understanding of Business Ethics and International Negotiation skills while at the same time earning up to 10 ECTs credits.
The program is divided into 2 sessions of 2 weeks which can be taken separately or together. The first session focuses on Business Ethics in a Changing World while the second focuses on Global Management Practices and an intensive International Negotiation Workshop. In addition, participants will have the chance to participate in several workshops on French culture and European history, including:
• Wine tastings,
• Gastronomic meals
• Workshops on French language
• Cinema
• Art and music
• Excursions to Monet’s Garden and the impressionist museum in Giverny
• A tour of the Normandy Landing Beaches
Finally the historic city of Rouen provides an excellent location from which to explore Paris and the rest of Europe.

Programme

SESSION 1: week
Business Ethics in a Changing World
In a time of financial crisis and corporate abuse, this course explores the complex and often confusing ethical landscape of modern business. It looks at the very real ethical and moral dilemmas faced by business people in a globalized and rapidly changing world. It examines why ethics are important in business, what level of social responsibility we can expect from business leaders, what fosters an ethical culture in businesses and organizations, what contemporary forces in international business are corrupting the fragile and delicatet issue of ethical principle, value-based action, and moral constraint in the global economy as well as examining the complications caused by rapid technological innovation.

SESSION 2: 2 weeks
Global Leadership & International Negotiation – Embracing diversity in the workplace and doing business across borders
Effective global management requires excellent cross-cultural
management skills as well as a good grounding in negotiation fundamentals. Therefore, the first part of the course aims to provide students with practical tools which will enable them to effectively analyze and respond to cross-cultural conflicts that they will encounter in their professional lives by looking at the effect of culture on global business plans, human resource managerial strategies, and social & business gatherings. In the second part of the class, students go beyond theories, and through a series of practical case studies, will have the opportunity to improve their interpersonal skills in intercultural negotiation situations including preparing for negotiations, effective negotiation strategy, responding to arguments and overcoming cognitive, emotional, cultural and institutional obstacles as well as touching briefly on multi-party and agent negotiations and overcoming conflict through mediation.

Tuition fees (include courses, lunches, visits and accommodation)
SESSION 1 Business Ethics in a Changing World, 2 weeks: € 1,600
SESSION 2 Global Leadership & International Negotiation, 2 weeks: € 1,600
Special rates apply to our partner universities or group
bookings. Contact us for more information.

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European University at St. Petersburg invites students, researchers and journalists with particular interest in contemporary politics, social sciences and humanities to learn more about Russian foreign policy, culture, history and Islam in Russia with our Summer School exploring Russia and beyond. Read more
European University at St. Petersburg invites students, researchers and journalists with particular interest in contemporary politics, social sciences and humanities to learn more about Russian foreign policy, culture, history and Islam in Russia with our Summer School exploring Russia and beyond.
Participants will enjoy 2 weeks of insightful and informative courses on Russian and Eurasian Studies combined with outdoor excursions and trips to museums and palaces as well as a genuine "time travel" experience by visiting the medieval city of Novgorod. All courses are taught in English.

Application deadline:
April 15, 2015 (please apply at eu.spb.ru)

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The Creative London Summer Programme from ESCP Europe is an exciting opportunity to join a leading-edge two-week programme based in London, focusing on brand-building, entrepreneurship and innovation in one of the world’s leading creative cities. Read more
The Creative London Summer Programme from ESCP Europe is an exciting opportunity to join a leading-edge two-week programme based in London, focusing on brand-building, entrepreneurship and innovation in one of the world’s leading creative cities.

The programme will combine a mix of lively speakers with curated visits to leading creative and business venues in London, plus the chance to meet and network with an international community of fellow participants as students work together on a team brand challenge project.

It will be delivered by the world-class faculty of a leading international business school highly-ranked in the influential Financial Times survey, plus leading expert speakers from the creative and marketing industries.

This is also a unique opportunity to expand students' future career horizon - ESCP Europe’s other acclaimed MSc in Marketing & Creativity programme has an impressive record in preparing candidates each year for successful careers in some of the world’s leading marketing and creative companies.

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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/executive/index.php. The executive MBA is an integrated, 15-month, cohort-based program designed to develop future leaders and general managers in organizations serious about improving customer satisfaction, product quality, and organizational success. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/executive/index.php

The executive MBA is an integrated, 15-month, cohort-based program designed to develop future leaders and general managers in organizations serious about improving customer satisfaction, product quality, and organizational success.

A team of faculty and executives from all sectors of business and industry designed the program for professionals with substantial career experience. Through the use of practical approaches to improving business results and increasing personal productivity, participants will:

- strengthen their leadership and interactive skills by collaborating with teams of professional peers and faculty;

- develop strategic perspectives consistent with the needs of customers, stockholders, employees, the community, and other organizational stakeholders;

- apply cross-functional approaches to enhance their analytical and decision-making capabilities; and

- obtain a solid foundation in the functional areas of business.

Students must have a minimum of six years of professional work experience. Participants work in teams, studying a curriculum that focuses on developing general management skills with a strategic focus. The program is structured in an interactive fashion, with an emphasis on cross-functional integration.

Plan of study

The program consists of 15 months of alternating weekends (all day Fridays and Saturdays), a one-week on-campus session, and a one-week international study trip.

The curriculum focuses on core business concepts, providing fundamental skills, knowledge, and perspectives in accounting, statistics, leadership, finance, and economics. The program develops skills in cross-functional analysis with an emphasis on strategy, marketing, technology, and international business. Interdisciplinary examples, case analyses, and an applied orientation are key components of the program.

The program features practical experience obtained through capstone consulting projects; ongoing support for career-oriented skills such as career development planning, communications, and team building; the application of a cross-functional business simulation model; and a week-long international business trip.

Additional information

- Sponsorship

Employers sponsoring students must permit candidates to attend scheduled classes, the on-campus session, and the international trip. The program's week-long session occurs in the summer, and the international trip takes place in the student’s final semester. Business owners or individuals may sponsor themselves.

Curriculum

- First Year

Team Building and Ethics (August)
Accounting and Organizational Goals
Managerial Accounting
Statistical Analysis for Managers
Leadership
Leadership Development I
Microeconomics and Pricing
Valuation and Capital Budgeting
Financial Planning and Analysis
Power and Influence
Marketing Strategy
Strategic Thinking I
Strategic Thinking II
Business Simulation (summer)
Systems Support for Operations (summer)
Capstone Consulting Project I (summer)
Managing Technology, Innovation and Research (summer)
Leadership Development II (summer)
Managing New Product Commercialization (summer)

- Second Year

International Business
International Study Seminar
International Finance
Executive Leadership
Capstone Consulting Project II

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The MSc in Educational Assessment is an International Postgraduate Programme that has been developed to meet the need for specialists in educational assessment within schools and more widely within the education system. Read more
The MSc in Educational Assessment is an International Postgraduate Programme that has been developed to meet the need for specialists in educational assessment within schools and more widely within the education system. The programme combines the expertise of two leading institutions in assessment, the School of Education and CEM (Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring). Students learn to construct and use tests, classroom assessments, interviews, school inspections and more. The programme is 'hands on'; candidates learn about the theory of assessment and the challenges associated with assessment, but there is also a strong focus on providing training into the conducting of assessment. Completion of the programme will enable you to apply for the status of Fellow with the Chartered Institute of Educational Assessors (CIEA).

The programme aims to produce specialists who are well equipped to work in assessment within many areas of education. We want these specialists to have good knowledge and skills and be well prepared for the tasks they undertake. Specifically, the programme aims:

To develop knowledge and awareness of the importance and many roles of assessment in education, and to enable students to engage with debate and to reflect on how to meet the challenges of effective educational assessment;
To equip students with knowledge, understanding and relevant skills that will help them develop, deliver and analyse assessment at all levels of education, and to facilitate further research and scholarship in this important field.
Having effective assessment is a common challenge to any educational system. Looking around the world, we also find that trends in assessment, such as the drive towards assessment for learning and computer-based assessment, are mostly international rather than local phenomena. The techniques and understanding achieved from the MSc in Educational Assessment, for this reason, are relevant to most nations. The intention of the full-time international programme is to bring together students from different nations and educational systems, including the UK system, to demonstrate and explore general issues in a local context. Generic theories and techniques will be taught, but students are encouraged to choose examples from their own educational system when exploring these in assignments and other tasks.

It is, however, realized that studying in a different country includes extra challenges. We therefore run special tutorial groups for international students. This happens every week during term time, and students are taken through a programme designed to enhance and development the academic skills required at a UK university. These tutorials also have a strong social element, providing an opportunity to meet with staff and students on other programmes (the tutorials share many of the sessions with international students from other postgraduate programmes in the School of Education).

Although a minimum requirement is made for language skills before starting, the University also offer further English language training for students wanting this (see the English Language Centre for further details).

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The MA Education programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study education at a master's level. Working independently within a challenging but supportive environment, you will be provided with the tools and resources to undertake and use educational research. Read more
The MA Education programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study education at a master's level. Working independently within a challenging but supportive environment, you will be provided with the tools and resources to undertake and use educational research. You will also be supported in researching and reflecting on your own practice.

The programme aims to:
- improve your research, analysis and critical thinking skills
- enhance your professional practice through greater theoretical understanding of current educational issues.

The MA Education is designed for teachers, lecturers, trainers, educational leaders, managers and administrators, and those aspiring to a career in education.

Programme features:
- Choose from one of four Study Pathways to focus your learning where you want to develop.
- Flexible study options include Summer Schools, Study Centres and distance learning.
- Undertake a small scale research project in the context of your own or your institution's policy and practice.
- Optional opportunity to study for the International Baccalaureate Educators’ Certificate alongside the MA Education.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-educ/

Study Pathways

You can choose one of the following Study Pathways as part of this programme:

MA Education:
The MA Education is our most popular degree and allows you the greatest flexibility in choice of units and dissertation topic (with the exception of those opting to take the International Baccalaureate Educator Certificates who are required to take specific units).

MA Education (International Education):
This pathway is designed for those who wish to develop knowledge and an understanding of issues relating to education beyond the national context. Depending upon your interests, you can focus on issues relating to educational practices in different national systems, on international schools and/or on other issues cutting across national contexts.

MA Education (Learning and Teaching):
If you wish to develop the practice and your understanding of Learning and Teaching then this is the pathway for you. Core units draw on theory of learning and teaching processes (with children and adults) and the role of technology.

MA Education (Educational Leadership and Management):
This pathway is designed to meet the needs of experienced educational professionals who wish to inform their work as leaders and managers, or who aspire to a leadership role, through an in-depth understanding of current educational management practice, theory, research and policy.

Ways of studying - flexible study options

You can choose from a variety of ways to study this programme.

- Summer School (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/postgraduate/ways-of-studying/summer-school/)
- Study Centres (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/postgraduate/ways-of-studying/study-centres/)
- Distance Learning (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/postgraduate/ways-of-studying/distance-learning/)

If you wish, you can complete the programme entirely though distance learning, however we recommend you try to attend at least one face-to-face unit as it is valuable to spent time in a study environment with tutors and other students.

Programme structure

For the 90 credits required for the MA Education, you acquire 60 credits through taught units and 30 credits by completing a dissertation. Typically, you complete five 12 credit taught units. One of the taught units must be the Research Methods in Education which is worth 12 credits, another of the taught units must be Understanding Learners and Learning or Education and Society (your choice may depend on which pathway you choose).

- Distance learning study commences at two fixed points in the year, 1st March and 1st September.
- Units taught at Summer School start in July
- Units are taught at Study Centres throughout the year.
- You can study units in any order, but you must complete each unit within six months.
- 175 study hours is expected for each unit.
- You can study up to two units at any one time and you have between two and five years to complete the programme.

View summary table (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/images/ma-education-programme-table.jpg) or Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ed/ed-proglist-pg.html#B) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed by assignment and dissertation. As you progress through the units and successfully pass the assignments, you will receive feedback and grades, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching methods at Summer Schools and Study Centres include; lectures, student-led seminars, workshops, group work, tutorials, Moodle (virtual learning environment), and other electronic communications.

If there are less than six students enrolled on a unit scheduled at Summer School, the unit will still run, but it may be taught on a Directed Tutorial basis. You will be provided with resources to help your study and individual or group tutorials will be timetabled in order to make sure your learning needs are fully met.

Distance Learning takes place online; enabling you to study independently with the support of a tutor. The Wiki environment offers you a number of alternatives for working flexibly with your learning materials. In addition, there are opportunities to link up with other students and leave feedback about your experience.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a written 5000 word assignment for each unit of study, together with a 15,000 word Dissertation.

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

If you have studied, but not completed or received an award, for postgraduate Masters level units in education from another institution, you may be eligible to transfer credit for this prior learning.

- Depending on the programme of study, you may transfer up to 40% of the total credits required for the MA/Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma in Education.

- Credit must have been obtained recently (less than 8 years ago at the time of the award of the qualification to which it contributes).

- Claims for APL will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

- If you obtain APL you will still be required to study Research Methods in Education and either Education and Society or Understanding Learners and Learning (unless your previous study has sufficient overlap with any of the units, in which case exemption may be considered).

- Use of APL credit may affect your options when selecting a study pathway.

Careers

This programme is ideal for those wishing to progress their career within an educational organisation.

Many of our graduates have gone on to be leaders and managers within educational settings; while others started their educational careers in teaching, lecturing or administration. This degree will also prepare you for further study at Doctoral level (PhD or EdD).

About the department

The Department of Education is a thriving academic community focused on furthering our understanding of policy, culture, pedagogy and diversity within a global educational context. We hold a strong national and international reputation for our research.

We have an excellent network with a wide range of educational institutions including, schools, colleges, universities, local authorities and government departments, within the UK and also internationally.

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments. Read more

Program overview

The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments.

Health care interpreters work in various health care settings where hearing people and deaf or hard-of-hearing people need to interact and communicate. Interpreters may assist deaf patients and their families in understanding medical testing, treatments, and diagnoses; facilitate communication for deaf health care professionals with colleagues and patients; and/or provide interpretation for deaf individuals who are enrolled in health care-related degree programs or training courses designed to educate and prepare them for careers in health care-related professions. This unique program also prepares interpreters to work in administrative roles ensuring language access to patients in hospital settings. Successful completion of this program could lead to employment as a sign language health care interpreter and/or a language access coordinator of sign and spoken language interpreting services in one of the most important new fields of health care.

The program may be completed on a full- or part-time basis.

Curriculum

Health care interpretation, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Professional Seminar (summer)
-Human Body Systems/Diseases I (summer)
-Theories of Translation and Interpretation (summer) 3
-Health Care Practical Interpreting I
-Human Body Systems/Diseases II
-Research Methods
-Health Care Practical Interpreting II
-Health Care Governance and Economics
-Human Resources in Health Care
Second Year
-Health Care Interpreting Within a Diverse Deaf Community (summer)
-Capstone Professional Project or Research Paper (summer)

Other admission requirements

-Submit an ASL interpretation sample (audio/video file or text translation will be provided).
-Submit two letters of reference from individuals who have had the opportunity to observe the applicant's interpreting work.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a completed graduate application.
-Submit a personal statement describing the applicant's educational objectives.
-Provide proof of completion of a course in medical terminology. (This is required after admission to the program is offered. The course must be completed prior to the beginning of the summer session. This $99 self-paced online course is called Language of Medicine.)

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This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Read more
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Building on the range of staff at the University with interests in the area, it covers both the political and economic dimensions of international development, and gives you a foundation in economics. It also provides essential research training in the Social Sciences.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take the 'Theories and Policies of Development Governance' module in your first term, followed by one of three development modules in your second term: 'Development and Conflict', 'Politics of International Trade and Development', or 'Development Economics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics or Politics departments, with at least 20 credits being from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Politics and Development prepares you for careers in public life and development, including careers in international organisations, politics and research.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest. Read more
The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest.

Overview

The MA in Linguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in linguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in linguistic analysis
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in linguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in linguistics

Course structure

The Autumn term comprises four modules in core areas of linguistics. In the Spring term you will choose two modules from a range of options, and begin a further core module on key ideas in linguistics which you will complete in the Summer term. The programme is completed with a research dissertation.

The modules in the Autumn term assume no prior knowledge and provide introductions to the core areas. The modules in the Spring term provide preparation for the research area in which you will complete your dissertation.

Autumn Term
Students take modules worth 40 credits in Autumn Term. The typical Autumn Term modules are:
-Language variation and change (10 credits)
-Semantics (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits)
-Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term you will take two 20-credit modules of your choice. Your options may include:
-Articulatory and impressionistic phonetics (20 credits)
-Bilingualism (20 credits)
-Phonological variation and change (20 credits)
-Second Language phonology (20 credits)
-Second language syntax (20 credits)
-Semantic theory (20 credits)
-Syntactic theory (20 credits)
-The phonetics of talk-in-interaction (20 credits)
-Topics in language variation and change (20 credits)

Note that module offerings may vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.

If you have covered substantial parts of the taught MA programme in your undergraduate degree, please talk to us about whether one of our specialist degree programmes may be more appropriate.

Spring and Summer Terms
In the second half of the Spring term and first half of the Summer term you will take a further core module:
-Key ideas in linguistics (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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The MA Education is a unique modular and flexible programme designed to reflect the needs of individuals or organisational cohorts. Read more
The MA Education is a unique modular and flexible programme designed to reflect the needs of individuals or organisational cohorts.

While each module has its own particular focus, all are concerned with investigating contemporary educational issues in the light of economic and social contexts, appropriate literature and the shared experience of course members.

The overall purpose of the Masters programmes is to deepen and refine your capacity for critical reflection on your practice as well as on the mental models which inform your work. Systematic inquiry is therefore an organising principle that underpins all modules on the programme, and you will be encouraged to identify issues that are significant to you and your organisation.

A hallmark of the MA Education is its commitment to equity and diversity, and its flexibility to meet the needs of individuals and organisations. Flexibility is evident in terms of offering students:

-a range of exit points en-route to a full Masters programme
-a range of module options to create a personally and professionally meaningful qualification
-a range of modes of delivery to take account of individual needs and professional contexts

Course Content

Enhancing your capacity for systematic inquiry is fundamental to the MA in Education. There is therefore one core module which
enables you to develop the confidence and competence to embed inquiry in your everyday practice as an educator. This 30- credit module is Planning Practice Based Inquiry and it is compulsory for all course members.

To achieve an MA Education you need to successfully complete four 30-credit modules and a dissertation.

As well as general teaching modules, students are able to study a range of specialist themes including:

• Educational Leadership and Management
• Higher Education
• Human Relations
• Learning, Technology and Education
• Special Needs

Please note that all module details are subject to change.

The School of Education welcomes approaches from educational organisations looking for a bespoke programme for their own staff, perhaps in collaboration with other local organisations (e.g. feeder schools, special schools, PRU, FE colleges, integrated services) to create or develop a local network of educators learning together.

Assessment

Each 30-credit module is assessed by a written assignment of 5,000-6,000 words or equivalent.

The dissertation is an original piece of work and should be 12,000 – 15,000 words (or their equivalent) in one of the selected modules or an approved topic.

Course Structure

The MA in Education can be completed over 1 year of full-time study or part-time over 2 to 4 years.

For individuals
The MA Education offers a flexible approach to planning your study. As an individual there are different modes of study available to you:

• Ten weekday twilight sessions over the course of a semester or academic year;
• Five weekend days over the course of a semester;
• Summer School *
• Available as an online programme

*Summer School takes place annually over a two week period commencing the last week in July. Summer School offers the opportunity to study one or two 30-credit modules in intensive teaching blocks, with continued academic support available during the subsequent period of self-guided study. Summer School modules can be combined with modules provided during other semesters. It is also possible to study four modules over two Summer School periods.

For cohorts
Staff from the School of Education will deliver the modules on your own premises or in a local community setting for a group of 10 or more staff, and sessions will be scheduled by negotiation with group members. These may take place in any of the following formats or a combination of all three:

• during twilight sessions after school;
• on Inset days;
• weekend or holiday day.

We also offer a Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate in Education.

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