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Masters Degrees (Summer)

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Summer Pre-sessional is an intensive English course that can be taken in the summer before starting your degree course. Read more

Summer Pre-sessional is an intensive English course that can be taken in the summer before starting your degree course.

If your degree offer is conditional on English language, this pre-sessional programme will allow you to meet your conditions without the need to take a further IELTS test.

To start the course you will need to submit a valid Secure English Language Test (SELT) result.

This programme is a suitable pathway for most University of Brighton undergraduate degree courses, and postgraduate courses that are not routed via the Extended Masters programme.

This programme is also suitable for those pursuing higher level research courses such as MPhil and PhD.

Why study Summer Pre-sessional?

  • Successful completion of this programme allows you progression onto a University of Brighton degree course.
  • This course is taught by tutors who understand what you need for academic success, and it gives you the perfect opportunity to meet other students and settle in to life in the UK.
  • Depending on your offer conditions and your level of English, Summer Pre-sessional courses are 4, 8 and 12 weeks long.

Overview

The Summer Pre-sessional programme consists of up to three 4-week stages. Where you enter the programme depends on your current level of English.

  • Stage 1: develop your English – intermediate level (12 weeks)
  • Stage 2: extend your English – higher intermediate level (8 weeks)
  • Stage 3: consolidate your English – lower advanced level (4 weeks)

If you are not sure which entry stage is right for you, please call or email us and we will help you decide.

The minimum age of enrolment for this programme is 18.

Stage 1: intermediate

You will develop your level of general English and you will begin your study of English for academic purposes.

  • Practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking
  • Introduction to English for academic purposes
  • Grammar review and vocabulary development
  • Pronunciation and intonation practice
  • Language learning strategies
  • British culture

Stage 2: higher intermediate

You will further develop your level of both general and academic English.

General English

  • Intensive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking
  • Grammar review and vocabulary development
  • Pronunciation and intonation practice
  • Language learning strategies

Academic English

  • Preparation for studying in English
  • Listening and note-taking skills from lectures
  • Extensive reading
  • Writing summaries from lectures and articles
  • Taking part in seminars
  • Introduction to British academic conventions

Stage 3: lower advanced

The final stage of the pre-sessional programme develops your academic English to the level you will need to start your chosen degree.

  • Research skills
  • Extensive academic reading and note-taking
  • Extending your academic vocabulary
  • Writing successful academic essays, reports and summaries
  • Giving academic presentations
  • Understanding British academic conventions


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Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance. Read more
Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance.

A place on the conversion year is normally offered together with a conditional offer for the MSc in Mathematical Finance in the following year, subject to successfully completing the conversion year. The normal progression requirement for progression from the conversion year to the MSc in Mathematical Finance is a final weighted average at 2:1 level (60% or above) for the modules taken in the conversion year.

Programme structure

The conversion year consists of a selection of modules to the value of 120 credits being part of the undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Finance at the University of York, with emphasis on the mathematical aspects of the course. Module choice is subject to prerequisites, timetabling constraints, availability of modules, and is subject to approval by the programme director.

The available modules may vary from year to year but are likely to include:

Term 1 (Autumn)
-Calculus (30 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Algebra (20 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Introduction to Probability and Statistics (20 credits)
-Statistics I (10 credits)
-Applied Probability (10 credits)
-Differential Equations (10 credits)
-Mathematical Finance I MAT00015H (10 credits)

Terms 2 and 3 (Spring and Summer Terms)
-Calculus (30 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Introduction to Applied Mathematics (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Real Analysis (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Linear Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Vector Calculus (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Statistics II (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Numerical Analysis (10 credits) (Spring Term only)
-Mathematical Finance II (10 credits) (Spring Term only)

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The MA in Education provides outstanding opportunities to study a wide range of educational issues. It will provide you with a clear understanding of the nature and significance of policy and practice in education, relevant to researchers as well as professionals in schools, colleges and universities. Read more

The MA in Education provides outstanding opportunities to study a wide range of educational issues. It will provide you with a clear understanding of the nature and significance of policy and practice in education, relevant to researchers as well as professionals in schools, colleges and universities.

A key feature of the programme is the facility for you to draw on your own professional and personal as well as academic and theoretical interests, through being able to choose from a range of optional modules to study (see below). And you will also be able to explore your own interests in depth through the completion of a dissertation.

In all of our modules, we aim to introduce you to key ideas and ways of thinking that enables you to engage with related issues in contexts that are relevant to you. Our programme is constructed in such a way that contexts as diverse as science education in schools, informal learning in the workplace and the management of schools outside the UK, can be explored through module assignments as well as the dissertation.

The degree has been designed to meet the needs of educational professionals, especially those in teaching, management or administration at all levels of education. Students likely to benefit from the programme are those who are interested in education, often teachers or people planning to become teachers, with a commitment to pedagogy, and educational managers in schools, colleges and universities, as well as those working in educational administration, in the UK and overseas.

Through its flexible delivery routes the MA in Education is suitable for students from all backgrounds and countries. The part-time International Summer Postgraduate Institute (ISPI) route is delivered through an intensive summer school teaching programme. The ISPI summer teaching runs in Durham throughout July each year and attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds and countries, including the UK, and is ideal for those seeking part-time study in a truly international context. ISPI students benefit from a range of extra academic and cultural activities organised by the School. 

Course Structure

You would normally be expected to take four taught modules, two modules in Year One of their programme, two modules in Year Two the Dissertation in the final year. We encourage you to return to Durham during the Dissertation year to make full use of the various support activities that are available to you.

Core Modules

  • Research Methods Education (30 credits)
  • Critical Perspectives in Education (30 credits)
  • MA Dissertation (60 credits).

Optional Modules

You must select 60 credits from a list of optional modules which in previous years have included:

  • 21st Century Technology: Implications for Teaching and Learning (30 credits)
  • Arts in Education (30 credits)
  • Curriculum Analysis (30 credits)
  • Enhancing Teaching and Learning for Productive Thought (30 credits)
  • Improving Computer Education
  • Intercultural and International Education (30 credits)
  • Intercultural Communication (30 credits)
  • Policy Studies (30 credits)
  • Psychology of the Learner (30 credits)
  • Special Educational Needs and Inclusion: Rhetoric or Reality? (30 credits).

The above are examples of modules we run at present. Modules are continually developed in response to student feedback and interests, as well as to reflect the changing nature of academic research within the department.

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities in education are wide and include classroom teaching, educational leadership and management, administration and policy development.



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A Summer School in documentary making, run in partnership with Channel 4. Have you always wanted to make your own documentary but never had the chance, or the confidence to do it alone?. Read more
A Summer School in documentary making, run in partnership with Channel 4.

COURSE OVERVIEW

Have you always wanted to make your own documentary but never had the chance, or the confidence to do it alone?

The NFTS - the world's most prestigious training ground for documentary filmmaking - offers a summer school where the expertise of professional mentors will help you begin to become the documentary maker you want to be. The 2015 course programme will be delivered under the direction of the NFTS Head of Documentary, Dick Fontaine.

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The Creative London Summer Course from ESCP Europe is an exciting opportunity to join a leading-edge, two-week programme based in London. Read more

The Creative London Summer Course from ESCP Europe is an exciting opportunity to join a leading-edge, two-week programme based in London.

It will focus on innovation, marketing and brand-building in one of the world's leading creative cities.

The programme will take place from 16th - 27th July 2018. It will cost £1,500 per person* (EU and non-EU). All sessions are delivered in English.

Students will benefit from:

-Interactive Learning Sessions

To build knowledge of business topics and leading-edge marketing practice

-Brand-Creation Project

To develop experience of team working and entrepreneurial brand-building – guided by a mentor

-Company & Market Visits

To generate understanding of the international creative and consumer environment

This programme is ideal for:

-University-level students and recent graduates

-Those due to start University in Autumn 2018

-Existing/prospective ESCP Europe students

-Those on work experience or a gap year

-Anyone considering a career in marketing or at a start-up

The Curriculum

The programme will combine a mix of lively speakers with curated visits to leading creative and business venues in London, plus the chance to meet and network with an international community of fellow participants as you work together on a team brand challenge project.

The full and rewarding schedule of activities is aimed at students and graduates of Bachelor and Master programmes who are interested in a career or further experience in the creative, marketing or start-up industries.

It will be delivered by the world-class faculty of a leading international business school highly-ranked in the influential Financial Times survey, plus leading expert speakers from the creative and marketing industries.

This is also a unique opportunity to expand your future career horizon - The course is inspired by ESCP Europe's MSc in Marketing & Creativity, a unique programme with an impressive record in preparing candidates each year for successful careers in some of the world's leading marketing and creative companies.



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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/executive/index.php. The executive MBA is an integrated, 15-month, cohort-based program designed to develop future leaders and general managers in organizations serious about improving customer satisfaction, product quality, and organizational success. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/executive/index.php

The executive MBA is an integrated, 15-month, cohort-based program designed to develop future leaders and general managers in organizations serious about improving customer satisfaction, product quality, and organizational success.

A team of faculty and executives from all sectors of business and industry designed the program for professionals with substantial career experience. Through the use of practical approaches to improving business results and increasing personal productivity, participants will:

- strengthen their leadership and interactive skills by collaborating with teams of professional peers and faculty;

- develop strategic perspectives consistent with the needs of customers, stockholders, employees, the community, and other organizational stakeholders;

- apply cross-functional approaches to enhance their analytical and decision-making capabilities; and

- obtain a solid foundation in the functional areas of business.

Students must have a minimum of six years of professional work experience. Participants work in teams, studying a curriculum that focuses on developing general management skills with a strategic focus. The program is structured in an interactive fashion, with an emphasis on cross-functional integration.

Plan of study

The program consists of 15 months of alternating weekends (all day Fridays and Saturdays), a one-week on-campus session, and a one-week international study trip.

The curriculum focuses on core business concepts, providing fundamental skills, knowledge, and perspectives in accounting, statistics, leadership, finance, and economics. The program develops skills in cross-functional analysis with an emphasis on strategy, marketing, technology, and international business. Interdisciplinary examples, case analyses, and an applied orientation are key components of the program.

The program features practical experience obtained through capstone consulting projects; ongoing support for career-oriented skills such as career development planning, communications, and team building; the application of a cross-functional business simulation model; and a week-long international business trip.

Additional information

- Sponsorship

Employers sponsoring students must permit candidates to attend scheduled classes, the on-campus session, and the international trip. The program's week-long session occurs in the summer, and the international trip takes place in the student’s final semester. Business owners or individuals may sponsor themselves.

Curriculum

- First Year

Team Building and Ethics (August)
Accounting and Organizational Goals
Managerial Accounting
Statistical Analysis for Managers
Leadership
Leadership Development I
Microeconomics and Pricing
Valuation and Capital Budgeting
Financial Planning and Analysis
Power and Influence
Marketing Strategy
Strategic Thinking I
Strategic Thinking II
Business Simulation (summer)
Systems Support for Operations (summer)
Capstone Consulting Project I (summer)
Managing Technology, Innovation and Research (summer)
Leadership Development II (summer)
Managing New Product Commercialization (summer)

- Second Year

International Business
International Study Seminar
International Finance
Executive Leadership
Capstone Consulting Project II

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The MA Education programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study education at a master's level. Working independently within a challenging but supportive environment, you will be provided with the tools and resources to undertake and use educational research. Read more

The MA Education programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study education at a master's level. Working independently within a challenging but supportive environment, you will be provided with the tools and resources to undertake and use educational research. You will also be supported in researching and reflecting on your own practice.

The programme aims to:

- improve your research, analysis and critical thinking skills

- enhance your professional practice through greater theoretical understanding of current educational issues.

The MA Education is designed for teachers, lecturers, trainers, educational leaders, managers and administrators, and those aspiring to a career in education.

Programme features:

- Choose from one of four Study Pathways to focus your learning where you want to develop.

- Flexible study options include Summer Schools, Study Centres and distance learning.

- Undertake a small scale research project in the context of your own or your institution's policy and practice.

- Optional opportunity to study for the International Baccalaureate Educators’ Certificate alongside the MA Education.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-educ/

Study Pathways

You can choose one of the following Study Pathways as part of this programme:

MA Education:

The MA Education is our most popular degree and allows you the greatest flexibility in choice of units and dissertation topic (with the exception of those opting to take the International Baccalaureate Educator Certificates who are required to take specific units).

MA Education (International Education):

This pathway is designed for those who wish to develop knowledge and an understanding of issues relating to education beyond the national context. Depending upon your interests, you can focus on issues relating to educational practices in different national systems, on international schools and/or on other issues cutting across national contexts.

MA Education (Learning and Teaching):

If you wish to develop the practice and your understanding of Learning and Teaching then this is the pathway for you. Core units draw on theory of learning and teaching processes (with children and adults) and the role of technology.

MA Education (Educational Leadership and Management):

This pathway is designed to meet the needs of experienced educational professionals who wish to inform their work as leaders and managers, or who aspire to a leadership role, through an in-depth understanding of current educational management practice, theory, research and policy.

Ways of studying - flexible study options

You can choose from a variety of ways to study this programme.

- Summer School

- Study Centres

- Distance Learning

If you wish, you can complete the programme entirely though distance learning, however we recommend you try to attend at least one face-to-face unit as it is valuable to spent time in a study environment with tutors and other students.

Programme structure

For the 90 credits required for the MA Education, you acquire 60 credits through taught units and 30 credits by completing a dissertation. Typically, you complete five 12 credit taught units. One of the taught units must be the Research Methods in Education which is worth 12 credits, another of the taught units must be Understanding Learners and Learning or Education and Society (your choice may depend on which pathway you choose).

- Distance learning study commences at two fixed points in the year, 1st March and 1st September.

- Units taught at Summer School start in July

- Units are taught at Study Centres throughout the year.

- You can study units in any order, but you must complete each unit within six months.

- 175 study hours is expected for each unit.

- You can study up to two units at any one time and you have between two and five years to complete the programme.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed by assignment and dissertation. As you progress through the units and pass the assignments, you will receive feedback and grades, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching methods at Summer Schools and Study Centres include; lectures, student-led seminars, workshops, group work, tutorials, Moodle (virtual learning environment), and other electronic communications.

If there are less than six students enrolled on a unit scheduled at Summer School, the unit will still run, but it may be taught on a Directed Tutorial basis. You will be provided with resources to help your study and individual or group tutorials will be timetabled in order to make sure your learning needs are fully met.

Distance Learning takes place online; enabling you to study independently with the support of a tutor. The Wiki environment offers you a number of alternatives for working flexibly with your learning materials. In addition, there are opportunities to link up with other students and leave feedback about your experience.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a written 5000 word assignment for each unit of study, together with a 15,000 word Dissertation.

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

If you have studied, but not completed or received an award, for postgraduate Masters level units in education from another institution, you may be eligible to transfer credit for this prior learning.

- Depending on the programme of study, you may transfer up to 40% of the total credits required for the MA/Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma in Education.

- Credit must have been obtained recently (less than 8 years ago at the time of the award of the qualification to which it contributes).

- Claims for APL will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

- If you obtain APL you will still be required to study Research Methods in Education and either Education and Society or Understanding Learners and Learning (unless your previous study has sufficient overlap with any of the units, in which case exemption may be considered).

- Use of APL credit may affect your options when selecting a study pathway.

Careers

This programme is ideal for those wishing to progress their career within an educational organisation.

Many of our graduates have gone on to be leaders and managers within educational settings; while others started their educational careers in teaching, lecturing or administration. This degree will also prepare you for further study at Doctoral level.



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Our Writing Poetry MA will develop your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You'll work with established poets and writers to refine your work. Read more

Our Writing Poetry MA will develop your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You'll work with established poets and writers to refine your work. You'll also consider the processes of writing and develop advanced editing skills.

Our flexible course allows you to enhance your writing and develop your practice. You'll receive expert tuition from distinguished and experienced poets and poetry teachers. You'll progress in a structured way, receiving formal recognition for your work.

You can choose to study either in Newcastle or London. Newcastle University leads the North East cohort. The London course is run in collaboration with The Poetry School.

The course is firmly rooted in the publishingperforming and promoting poetry world. You will work with established poets:

You will also receive tuition from guest tutors. Our guest tutors are from The Poetry School and Newcastle University's teaching communities.

Both sites offer a wide range of opportunities and experiences, including:

-Digital projects and platforms

-Live events

-Collaborative projects

-Commissioning opportunities

-Competitions

By the end of the course, you will have:

-Advanced your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision

-An advanced awareness of the processes of writing in your own work and that of others

-A range of knowledge on the writing of poetry in English

-Knowledge of the professional world of writing and publishing

-The ability to edit and prepare poetry for submission and publication

-A sensitivity to verbal creativity

-An advanced ability to understand and judge the timing and duration of creative projects

Summer school

Each year both cohorts come together for a one week summer school. The summer school alternates between the two cities each year.

The summer schools will focus on professional skills related to:

-Creative writing teaching techniques

-The publishing industry and literary world

-Residency work

-Reviewing

The summer school also offers huge scope for innovation and working with other partners. This could include galleries, poetry films and the use of digital resources.

Newcastle

The Newcastle Centre for Literary Arts (NCLA) is home to a vibrant writing community. You can get involved with readings and events featuring poets, playwrights and novelists. Past guests include Carol Ann Duffy, Carolyn Forché and Seamus Heaney.

Through our Write Around the Toon project we also have a network of placements and partners. This enables you to collaborate, make new contacts and gain experience in the creative industries.

London

You'll study at the Poetry School in Lambeth, a short walk from Waterloo and the South Bank. The Saison Poetry Library, British libraries and London's central cultural hubs are nearby.

You'll have the opportunity to enrich your practice through The Poetry School's many collaborations. The Poetry School is embedded in the poetry world with links to other poetry and arts organisations. You'll be situated at the centre of a thriving poetry community.

A large and varied short course programme runs alongside the MA. You can choose to access these courses for a supplementary fee.

Delivery

We offer the course part time over 23 months, running from October to September.

You can choose to study in either Newcastle or London. All classes are in the evening if studying at Newcastle and during the day in London.

As well as attending weekly classes, you'll take part in our one week summer schools.



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The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments. Read more

Program overview

The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments.

Health care interpreters work in various health care settings where hearing people and deaf or hard-of-hearing people need to interact and communicate. Interpreters may assist deaf patients and their families in understanding medical testing, treatments, and diagnoses; facilitate communication for deaf health care professionals with colleagues and patients; and/or provide interpretation for deaf individuals who are enrolled in health care-related degree programs or training courses designed to educate and prepare them for careers in health care-related professions. This unique program also prepares interpreters to work in administrative roles ensuring language access to patients in hospital settings. Successful completion of this program could lead to employment as a sign language health care interpreter and/or a language access coordinator of sign and spoken language interpreting services in one of the most important new fields of health care.

The program may be completed on a full- or part-time basis.

Curriculum

Health care interpretation, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Professional Seminar (summer)
-Human Body Systems/Diseases I (summer)
-Theories of Translation and Interpretation (summer) 3
-Health Care Practical Interpreting I
-Human Body Systems/Diseases II
-Research Methods
-Health Care Practical Interpreting II
-Health Care Governance and Economics
-Human Resources in Health Care
Second Year
-Health Care Interpreting Within a Diverse Deaf Community (summer)
-Capstone Professional Project or Research Paper (summer)

Other admission requirements

-Submit an ASL interpretation sample (audio/video file or text translation will be provided).
-Submit two letters of reference from individuals who have had the opportunity to observe the applicant's interpreting work.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a completed graduate application.
-Submit a personal statement describing the applicant's educational objectives.
-Provide proof of completion of a course in medical terminology. (This is required after admission to the program is offered. The course must be completed prior to the beginning of the summer session. This $99 self-paced online course is called Language of Medicine.)

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What you will study. The MSc Hazard and Disaster Management course will develop knowledge, technical skills, interpersonal and management skills, and experience. Read more

What you will study

The MSc Hazard and Disaster Management course will develop knowledge, technical skills, interpersonal and management skills, and experience. You will study a range of hazards using examples from the UK and other countries. This will provide you with the experience to assess risks and vulnerabilities from desk-based research, laboratory and field situations, consider hazard management and disaster risk reduction strategies, develop emergency plans, and critically review the concept of resilience along with techniques for its development.

You will consider the dynamic and multi-faceted nature of disasters and examine a range of aspects pertinent to the operational, political and socio-cultural issues involved in disaster relief, including aspects of international law. The course will ensure a sound working knowledge and experience with one of the mostly widely used GIS platforms, extensively used by many planning authorities, GOs and NGOs, and you will develop valuable skills in the acquisition and processing of spatial datasets with a wide variety of disaster management applications, along with the ability to visualise and depict spatial information.

Opportunities for study on residential field courses will include the use of field simulations either in Finland or in the UK, and the opportunity to examine environmental hazards and evaluate management strategies on an overseas residential field course. Currently, the field course takes place in Italy or Greece, to examine volcanic, seismic, landslide and tsunami hazards.

Modules

  • Principles and Concepts in Disasters - 20 credits
  • Multi-faceted causes and consequences of disasters, nature of disasters, disaster relief and international law.

  • Management of Coastal and Hydrological Hazards - 20 credits
  • Flooding and integrated flood risk management, coastal hazards and sea level rise, storms, heat wave, coastal pollution incidents, climate change and resilience.

  • Management of Geophysical and Technological Hazards - 20 credits
  • Landslides, chemical hazards and safety, industrial and pollution hazards, volcanic hazards, volcanic ash and aviation, seismic hazards, pandemics, terrorist incidents.

  • Personal Preparedness for Disasters - 20 credits
  • Personal preparedness, leadership, survival training, victim and refugee experiences, developed from the Disaster Summer School immersive simulation week.

  • Disaster Risk Management - 20 credits
  • Field survey training, vulnerability and risk analysis, disaster risk management strategies, emergency planning, resilience, information and communication, community engagement, disaster education, personal development in disaster management.
  • Planning for Disasters and Civil Contingencies - 20 credits
  • Emergency and civil contingency planning, multi-agency response coordination and training, crisis leadership strategies and styles.

  • Remote Sensing for Environmental Management - 20 credits
  • A practical introduction to the use of Remote Sensing and G.I.S. techniques and applications in environmental resource management; appropriate practical and analytical skills in data collection and manipulation of key environmental data.

  • Masters Research Project - 40 credits
  • Each student will prepare for a detailed research project, prepare a paper as if for submission for publication in a refereed academic journal and present their research to their peers.
  • Work Based Learning Project (optional)
  • Work placement opportunities are recommended as part of the course.

Teaching

The Disaster Management course is designed in a modular format and will be offered on a full and part time basis. Delivery will be mixed-mode, with a combination of traditional lectures, practicals and distance learning with supporting tutorials. For full time students, study will take place over 14 months, and for part time students, study may typically take two to three years.

The MSc Hazard and Disaster Management begins with a two week Summer School in August, where you will meet other students, academic tutors and visiting experts. You will:

  • Develop reflective learning skills
  • Enhance communication and team working skills in an international and multicultural setting.
  • Clarify the concepts of a disaster with experts and academic tutors.
  • Undertake a field course simulation training exercise, which focuses on survival skills
  • Reflect on experiences of victims of disaster

You will undertake a field course simulation training exercise, which will focus on survival skills. You will reflect on the experiences of victims of disasters, develop decision making through active participation and it will orientate you to the type of experiences that you may encounter in a disaster field situation.

After the summer school, lectures and self-directed learning will take place in the Autumn and Spring terms. Teaching and training will also include fieldwork within the region as well as the option for overseas residential fieldwork.

Study will utilise a range of diverse learning approaches and activities to acknowledge the rich and diverse character and content of the body of knowledge that forms this Master’s degree course. It will include:

  • Attending the Summer School
  • Lectures
  • Seminars and tutorials
  • Practical and laboratory work
  • Completing work packages by distance learning through the Virtual Learning Environment
  • Actively participating in computer workshops and laboratory work
  • Undertaking a range of field based studies and data collection
  • Participating in group based activities and simulations
  • One-to-one interactions with academic staff
  • Fieldwork including community-based learning
  • Self-directed study
  • Optional field or work-placement
  • Externally-linked activities and placements

Each week, lectures and practicals will take place. This normally involves seven to 10 hours of class contact timetabled within two days of the week. In addition, through the week you will be engaged in distance learning tutorials and activities, background reading, and working on a wide range of assessments. Some weeks will also have additional field or simulation time. For a full-time course, a minimum of 37 hours of study time per week is expected.

The course will also require attendance at a Summer School (two weeks), on another overseas residential field course (about ten days), and will also provide options for other extended field- or work-placements. UK and EU students complete the Summer School at the start of their course in August and International Students complete it at the end of their course. International students therefore begin their course in September and not August. This is to allow enough time for you to get your visa.



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This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Read more
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Building on the range of staff at the University with interests in the area, it covers both the political and economic dimensions of international development, and gives you a foundation in economics. It also provides essential research training in the Social Sciences.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take the 'Theories and Policies of Development Governance' module in your first term, followed by one of three development modules in your second term: 'Development and Conflict', 'Politics of International Trade and Development', or 'Development Economics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics or Politics departments, with at least 20 credits being from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Politics and Development prepares you for careers in public life and development, including careers in international organisations, politics and research.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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