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Masters Degrees (Substance)

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This course will benefit individuals working in these areas. mental health; drug and alcohol sector; primary care; community care; prisons; voluntary sector; government agencies; education; youth work; social work and allied health. Read more
This course will benefit individuals working in these areas: mental health; drug and alcohol sector; primary care; community care; prisons; voluntary sector; government agencies; education; youth work; social work and allied health.

As the only programme of its kind in the UK and Europe this programme offers enormous benefits to students with aspirations of becoming leaders in the field of Mental Health and Substance Use (Dual Diagnosis). The course is specifically aimed at practitioners who are either in roles of leadership or are currently considering career options to move to such positions.


The MSc Mental Health and Substance Use (Dual Diagnosis) programme aims to:

Demonstrate mastery in Mental Health and Substance Use (Dual Diagnosis) related skills and knowledge in order to contribute to enhanced professional practice and service development in this field
Stimulate and foster leadership skills in the area of mental health and substance use (Dual Diagnosis) service and practice development
Facilitate the acquisition, critical understanding and utilisation of advanced research skills and knowledge in order to conduct Mental Health and Substance Use (Dual Diagnosis) Research.

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This course provides detailed knowledge relating to policy, theory and practice essential for the delivery of effective services to those presenting with alcohol and other drug issues. Read more
This course provides detailed knowledge relating to policy, theory and practice essential for the delivery of effective services to those presenting with alcohol and other drug issues. The programme is intended to be of interest to existing alcohol and/or other drug misuse practitioners, those considering a career in the alcohol and other drug misuse field. The programme is designed specifically to provide an opportunity for participants to work towards a designated qualification in ‘Substance Misuse’ at postgraduate level which will map directly to Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) professional standards and the Drug and Alcohol National Occupational Standards (DANOS).

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Keynote lectures, seminars, tutorials, material for self-directed learning, e-learning, workshops will form part of university based learning provision.

Students will be required to link formal learning to their practice and will be encouraged to build on existing skills/develop new skills to consolidate their learning across the academic and practice fields.

Skills, values and knowledge will be developed through group discussions, group tutorials, presentations and practice learning opportunities.

The overarching teaching and learning strategy will enable students to develop cognitive skills which are appropriate to independent learning and postgraduate study.

A range of assessment methods will include essays, presentations, case studies, practice observation, reflective writing, practice portfolios, and personal development files.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The course will:
-Enable students to critically reflect on and review their professional development to facilitate enhanced performance and service delivery in substance misuse settings
-Provide learning opportunities for students to critically reflect on complex challenges, current issues and new evidence-based practice research relating to substance misuse
-Develop and enhance students’ capacity for critically evaluating key theoretical knowledge, law and policy in relation to substance misuse
-Provide learning opportunities for students to develop and to enhance decision-making skills in complex situations associated with substance misuse allied social care and public health practice
-Enable students to demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional level

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Nova Southeastern University offers an innovative academic program designed for the working professional actively involved in or entering the field of counseling. Read more

Nova Southeastern University offers an innovative academic program designed for the working professional actively involved in or entering the field of counseling. The College offers individuals the opportunity to earn a degree in counseling with specializations in mental health counseling, substance abuse counseling and education, applied behavior analysis, and advanced applied behavior analysis. The program is designed to serve the training needs of practitioners who seek advanced training, but who cannot access quality training without the interruption of demanding schedules.

Programs will develop the skills and leadership abilities of counselors who have a desire to provide, create and maintain high quality service delivery. The online instruction offers accessibility and flexibility along with a quality educational opportunity for the mature (independent) student.

Concentrations

The master’s degree in Counseling with a Clinical Mental Health Counseling concentration (60 credit hours) provides education and training for those who will seek employment in such diverse settings as social agencies, mental health clinics, hospitals, personnel offices, and schools. This program is offered on the main campus in a ground-based semester format, at one of five other NSU regional campuses in an intensive weekend format, or fully online. Currently, there are regional campus programs offered in Florida at Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, Miami, and Palm Beach. Many graduates go on to seek licensure in Florida as mental health counselors.

The master’s degree in Counseling with a School Counseling concentration (48 credit hours) provides training to individuals seeking positions as school counselors in Pre-K to 12 grade school systems. The program is offered in Fort Lauderdale/Davie, Orlando, and Tampa, in an intensive weekend format. The School Counseling program curriculum is approved by the Florida Department of Education (DOE). Upon degree conferral, School Counseling graduates qualify for Florida certification in Guidance and Counseling.

The master’s degree in Counseling with a Substance Abuse Counseling concentration (48 credit hours) or Substance Abuse Counseling and Education concentration (60 credit hours) is an innovative academic program designed for the working professional actively involved in or entering the field of Substance Abuse Counseling or related fields. The online format is particularly designed to serve the training needs of administrators and practitioners who seek advanced training, but who cannot access quality training without the interruption of ongoing work responsibilities.

The master’s degree in Counseling with an Applied Behavior Analysis concentration (51 required credit hours) is an innovative academic program designed for the working professional actively involved in or entering the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). The online format is particularly designed to for those who seek advanced training and the convenience of distance education. The program focuses on developing clinicians informed by science, with classes taught by professors who are active clinicians and researchers in the field. The Applied Behavior Analysis concentration meets the academic and experience certification requirements as per the BACB.

SREB Electronic Campus

Nova Southeastern University (NSU) is pleased to be a participating institution of the Southern Regional Education Board's Electronic Campus. The Electronic Campus certifies that the programs and courses it lists comply with its comprehensive set of Principles of Good Practice. The school's online Master of Science degree program is part of the Electronic Campus.

The College of Psychology offers an innovative academic program designed for the working professional actively involved in or entering the field of counseling or related fields. The institute offers individuals the opportunity to earn a degree in counseling with concentrations in mental health counseling, substance abuse counseling, substance abuse counseling and education, applied behavioral analysis or advanced applied behavioral analysis. The online institute is particularly designed to serve the training needs of administrators and practitioners who seek advanced training, but who cannot access quality training without the interruption of ongoing work responsibilities.

The program's strengths include a distinguished faculty, a cutting edge curriculum, and a flexible online curriculum. NSU is a dynamic, not-for-profit independent institution dedicated to offering high quality educational programs from preschool through the professional and doctoral levels. It offers a total of 87 degree programs, 23 in undergraduate disciplines and 64 in graduate and professional disciplines. Located on a beautiful 314-acre campus in Fort Lauderdale, NSU has approximately 24,000 students and is the largest independent institution of higher education in the Southeastern United States.

Online students use Web pages to access course materials, announcements, the electronic library, and other information/resources, and participate in a range of activities that facilitate frequent interaction with their professors and fellow students. Online activities may include forums using threaded discussion boards, chat rooms, email, and electronic classroom sessions. In addition, the program provides a system that enables the student to submit assignments online in various formats and to receive his or her professor's online review.



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Enhance your understanding of the processes involved in people becoming substance users and problematic substance users and broaden your career options. Read more
Enhance your understanding of the processes involved in people becoming substance users and problematic substance users and broaden your career options.

About the programme

Addiction problems involve an interaction between the drug, the individual and the environment. This programme provides a critical perspective on substance use and misuse and looks at the evidence base for policies and interventions within the area. Full-time, part-time and distance learning study is available. Study modes are supported by the virtual learning environment, Moodle.

Applicants with a 2.1 honours degree in a relevant subject can study the MSc in one calendar year. Students successfully completing the PG Diploma can progress to the MSc in the subsequent academic session.

Pg Cert Addiction Practice (part-time) 9-21 months; Pg Dip Alcohol and Drug Studies (full-time/part-time) 9 months/up to 36 months; MSc Alcohol and Drug Studies (full-time/part-time) 11 months.

Practical experience

Postgraduate Diploma students can opt to complete a placement in a research setting or a service/workbased setting, or the module ‘Alcohol/ Drugs: Policy/Practice Review’.

Your learning

Postgraduate Certificate in Addiction Practice (3 modules at SCQF Level 11)
• Understanding Substance Use and Addiction
• Change and Intervention Methods
• Placement

Postgraduate Diploma: Alcohol and Drugs Studies (6 modules at SCQF Level 11)
• Understanding Substance Use and Addiction
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Change and Intervention Methods
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Evidence Science & Policy
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Local to Global
• Placement (in current workplace, or an alcohol/drug setting, or a research setting) or Alcohol/Drugs: Policy/Practice Review
• Research Methods – investigates research design and application

MSc (9 modules at SCQF Level 11)
Students will additionally complete a triple module research dissertation with supervised guidance and present their findings in a thesis.

Our Careers Adviser says

Many full-time students quickly find employment on graduation. Part-time and distance learning students use their qualifications for career enhancement or to develop specialisms in social work, health/ medicine or criminal justice.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info. Many part-time and distance learning students seek funding support from their employers. Independent applications can be made to Alcohol Research UK for either full-time or part-time/distance learning study routes: http://www.alcoholresearchuk.org

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

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The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Read more
The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Tuition draws upon the expertise of research staff in the University’s well established Centre for Criminology.

You will examine a range of crimes and criminal behaviour, the context of crime and responses to it. In addition to core areas of study, you can choose modules and/or pathways to suit your career development. You will explore an area of interest to you, through a 20,000-word dissertation, and gain a thorough grounding in qualitative and quantitative research methods – invaluable skills for any profession that includes planning, analysis and evaluation.

On the Substance Misuse pathway, you will study a range of criminological modules and a module on drug interventions. This specialist module provides an insight into the nature and extent of substance misuse and responses to it, including prevention, treatment, harm reduction and enforcement. Your dissertation will be related to substance misuse.

On the Youth Justice and Offender Management pathway, you will study the contexts in which offenders come into contact with the criminal justice system. The work of relevant agencies and systems that engage with those at risk of offending are also considered. Your dissertation must be related to youth justice and offender management.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/230-msc-crime-and-justice

What you will study

- Criminological theory
Explore the philosophical foundations of criminological theory and the way in which it relates to general social theory. You’ll examine the social and political contexts within which the various criminological theories have developed.

- Criminal justice – theory and practice
Learn about the general theories, principles, and models of criminal justice within a national and international context. You’ll examine the key institutions and processes that deliver criminal justice, and evaluate the interplay between them.

- Approaches to criminological research
Gain an understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted. You’ll be given a broad overview of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to research in criminology and criminal justice and will learn about the relationship between theories and methods.

- Criminological research in practice
Develop your understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted, putting into practice both qualitative and quantitative approaches considered in ‘Approaches to Criminological Research’.

- Dissertation
A significant piece of research into an appropriate area of study.

Optional modules include:
- Violence and Homicide
- Policing in a Global Age
- Drug Interventions (specified for Substance Misuse pathway)
- Youth Justice and Offender Management (specified for Youth and Offender Management pathway)

Learning and teaching methods

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials. Certificate (PgCert) and Diploma (PgDip) stages are taught in group sessions.

Teaching on the MSc Crime and Justice takes place in the evenings and at weekends specifically to enable you to continue to work alongside your studies.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course provides the knowledge and skills to pursue careers in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, prison, probation services and youth offending services. You could also choose a career in government organisations such as the Home Office, Ministry of Justice, Welsh Government and local authorities. Graduates also go on to careers within voluntary agencies such as offender rehabilitation, victim support, community safety, and drug treatment services. It is also an excellent basis for further research at MPhil and PhD levels.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods include essays, critiques, written examinations, multiple choice tests, and oral and poster presentations. The MSc award requires a dissertation of around 20,000 words on an individual piece of research, which may be work-related.

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New Master's Scholarships available. Find out more and apply. The Master of Science in International Addiction Studies (IPAS) course offers students cross‐cultural exposure to critical prevention and treatment practices, as well as research and policy issues in the field of addiction. Read more

New Master's Scholarships available. Find out more and apply.

The Master of Science in International Addiction Studies (IPAS) course offers students cross‐cultural exposure to critical prevention and treatment practices, as well as research and policy issues in the field of addiction. This programme provides unique opportunities to study addiction in its broadest sense and examine key issues from an international perspective.

Key benefits

  • A unique programme that focuses on the similar international trends in policy, global epidemiology of substance-related morbidity and mortality, and evidence-based treatment and prevention practices.
  • Exclusive online access to lectures produced exclusively for the course by International experts in the addictions field.
  • Course members are considered students of all three universities concurrently with access to all online resources available from each of the partners.
  • You will receive personalised support from our dedicated module leaders throughout the course.
  • Course graduates will receive a triple-badge diploma jointly conferred by the three teaching institutions.

Description

The Master of Science in International Addiction Studies (IPAS) course is a unique collaboration of three of the world's leading research universities in the field of Addiction Science: The Institute of Psychiatry Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London, the University of Adelaide, and Virginia Commonwealth University. This partnership offers three nested graduate programme options available to graduates around the globe via distance learning. You will have access to the latest information on topics ranging from the biological basis of addiction and treatment as well as prevention and policy. The course will help you to compare global perspectives and translate this knowledge into more effective prevention and treatment practices and evidence‐based policies worldwide.

The course is made up of eight modules totalling 200 credits. If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your programme will take two years to finish.

Course format and assessment

Pre-recorded lectures are audio-streamed within the Virtual Learning Environment and delivered online. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

The primary method of assessment for this course is based on participation in non-synchronous online discussions, written assignments and unseen examinations.

Career prospects

Graduates from this programme have taken leadership roles in clinical settings, working as drug workers, substance misuse nurse specialists, psychologists, addiction psychiatrists and managers of addiction services. 

Our graduates have also taken policy positions in national and international organisations, while others have undertaken further academic research and gone on to complete a PhD or a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.



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Despite the phenomenal technological progress of the 20th century, most people still live with the acute and chronic consequences of age-old hazards such as floods and earthquakes. Read more

Despite the phenomenal technological progress of the 20th century, most people still live with the acute and chronic consequences of age-old hazards such as floods and earthquakes. This MSc is aimed at students interested in engaging with the natural and social dimensions of environmental hazards, including disasters and climate related risk. Students receive specialised scientific training in the physical hazards that pose large risks to communities living throughout the world, from climate change and meteorological risks to flooding, earthquakes and landslides. Students on this programme will receive theoretical and practical training for understanding and quantifying risks and hazards. They will learn about how hazards persist over long periods of time instead of merely as single events, but are composed of many smaller sub-events or how their effects are widespread. 

Course Structure 

Students take the following core modules, and a selection of elective modules, which, when combined, add up to 180 credits:

Core Modules:

  • Understanding Risk (30 credits)
  • Risk Frontiers (15 credits)
  • Risk, Science and Communication (15 credits)
  • Dissertation by Research (or) Vocational Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective Modules available in previous years include:

  • Hydrological Hazards (30 credits)
  • Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Hazard (30 credits)
  • Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience (30 credits)
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East (15 credits)
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis (15 credits)
  • European Security (15 credits)
  • Social Policy and Society (30 credits) 

Course Learning and Teaching

Understanding and managing risk is ultimately about choice. All elements of society, from individuals to governments, must make decisions – conscious or not – about the ways in which they perceive, interpret, balance, and mitigate risk. Risk permeates our day-to-day lives in ways that are now recognised to be much more complex than the hazard-vulnerability paradigm, which dominated risk research until the 1990s, recognised. A deeper understanding of the nature of risk, its emergence, and its interface and position within societies, has emphasised the need to take a much more complex view in which a general understanding of the ways in which risk is generated, experienced and managed needs to be combined with a specific understanding of particular science or policy areas.

The primary aim of this Masters programme is to equip students with a general understanding of risk, whilst simultaneously providing specific training in elements of risk-related research. The MSc supports students in developing a strong social science perspective on risk. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary framework for understanding risk from a variety of perspectives. Students will learn theoretical and practical approaches to identifying and framing risk, as well as the underlying physical and social mechanisms that generate it. They will also examine the relationship of risk to knowledge and policy, and will be made aware of the array of advanced tools and techniques to assess the physical and social dimensions of risk under conditions of uncertainty. They will also be trained in the substance and methods associated with a range of science and policy areas, and be expected to demonstrate that they can combine their general training in risk with their specific understanding of the substance and method associated with the chosen area, through either a research-based or a vocational dissertation.

All students will undertake a suite of core modules (120 credits) which provide students with a range of skills and knowledge which result in a unique focus in risk combined with training in interdisciplinary research methods. These modules are Understanding Risk, Risk, Science and Communication, Risk Frontiers and the Dissertation.

Students then also select a suite of elective modules (another 60 credits). Students can choose to receive specialised scientific training in:

  • the social dimensions of risk and resilience, and/or
  • a combination of approaches to risk.

Electives can be selected from: Hydrological Hazards, Spatial Temporal Dimensions of Hazards, Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience. 

The Risk Masters (both in its MA and MSc forms) is taught jointly between Durham University’s Geography Department, the School of Government & International Affairs, and the School of Applied Social Sciences. The programme’s interdisciplinary approach encourages students to combine science and social science perspectives. Students have a broad range of modules to choose from, and in this way develop an individualized set of professional skills that, depending on the student’s preferences, speak more to either the natural sciences (e.g. via scientific modelling, GIS or science and communication) or the social sciences (e.g. via social science research methodologies and engagements with social policy and international relations). The programme is delivered in close collaboration with Durham University’s Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience (IHRR), and through IHRR’s activities students get permanent exposure to both practitioner and academic perspectives at the forefront of risk thinking and practice.



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This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. Read more

This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. The Department of Geography is especially well-suited to examine these in relation to environmental hazards, climate change and security-related risk, but students are encouraged to develop their thinking in relation to any aspect of risk research, including broader environmental change, disaster risk reduction, financial risk, risk and insurance, risk and health, risk and migration, risk and social policy, risk and governance, borders and terrorism. The MA programme foregrounds the existence of multiple ways of understanding risk, from risk as an objective phenomenon managed through scientific tools (e.g. in the case of environmental hazards) to risk as a social construct and a political technique (e.g. in the case of risk and security).

For students interested in security-related risk, the MA programme offers in-depth and advanced understanding of geo-political security challenges and politics, including the ways in which society is governed increasingly through the prism of risk. Dealing with risks as a function of both the natural and social environments we live in, the course responds to the growing realisation that many risks are being created through social processes bound to questions of security, including the ways that risk techniques are emerging and being employed as a means of securing uncertain futures.

Course Structure

Students take the following core modules, and a selection of elective modules, which, when combined, add up to 180 credits:

Core Modules: 

  • Understanding Risk (30 Credits)
  • Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience (30 Credits)
  • Risk Frontiers (15 Credits)
  • Using Geographical Skills and Techniques (15 Credits)
  • Dissertation by Research (or) Vocational Dissertation (60 Credits)

Elective Modules available in previous years include:

  • Hydrological Hazards (30 Credits)
  • Risk, Science and Communication (15 Credits)
  • Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Hazard (30 Credits)
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East (15 Credits)
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis (15 Credits)
  • European Security (15 Credits)
  • Social Policy and Society (30 Credits). 

Course Learning and Teaching

Understanding and managing risk is ultimately about choice. All elements of society, from individuals to governments, must make decisions – conscious or not – about the ways in which they perceive, interpret, balance, and mitigate risk. Risk permeates our day-to-day lives in ways that are now recognised to be much more complex than the hazard-vulnerability paradigm, which dominated risk research until the 1990s, recognised. A deeper understanding of the nature of risk, its emergence, and its interface and position within societies, has emphasised the need to take a much more complex view in which a general understanding of the ways in which risk is generated, experienced and managed needs to be combined with a specific understanding of particular science or policy areas.

The primary aim of this Masters programme is to equip students with a general understanding of risk; whilst simultaneously providing specific training in elements of risk-related research. The MA supports students in developing a strong social science perspective on risk. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary framework for understanding risk from a variety of perspectives. Students will learn theoretical and practical approaches to identifying and framing risk, as well as the underlying physical and social mechanisms that generate it. They will also examine the relationship of risk to knowledge and policy, and will be made aware of the array of advanced tools and techniques to assess the physical and social dimensions of risk under conditions of uncertainty. They will also be trained in the substance and methods associated with a range of science, social science and policy areas, and be expected to demonstrate that they can combine their general training in risk with their specific understanding of the substance and method associated with the chosen area, through either a research-based or a vocational dissertation.

All students will undertake a suite of core modules (150 credits) which provide students with a range of skills and knowledge which result in a unique focus in risk combined with training in interdisciplinary research methods. These modules are: Understanding Risk, Using Geographical Skills and Techniques, Risk Frontiers, Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience, and the Dissertation.

Students then also select a suite of elective modules (another 30 credits). Students can choose to receive specialised scientific training in:

  • international relations, geopolitics and security, and/or
  • scientific perspectives on environmental hazards
  • a combination of approaches to risk.

Electives can be selected from: Strategic Asia, European Security, International Relations in the Middle East, Social Policy and Society and Risk, Science and Communication. 

The Risk Masters (both in its MA and MSc forms) is taught jointly between Durham University’s Geography Department, the School of Government & International Affairs, and the School of Applied Social Sciences. The programme’s interdisciplinary approach encourages students to combine science and social science perspectives. Students have a broad range of modules to choose from, and in this way develop an individualized set of professional skills that, depending on the student’s preferences, speak more to either the natural sciences (e.g. via scientific modelling, GIS or science and communication) or the social sciences (e.g. via social science research methodologies and engagements with social policy and international relations). The programme is delivered in close collaboration with Durham University’s Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience (IHRR), and through IHRR’s activities students get permanent exposure to both practitioner and academic perspectives at the forefront of risk thinking and practice.



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The Social Work MA programme aims to educate and train individuals to be reflective, research-minded practitioners who are able to work critically and professionally and in accordance with the principle of anti-oppressive practice. Read more

About the course

The Social Work MA programme aims to educate and train individuals to be reflective, research-minded practitioners who are able to work critically and professionally and in accordance with the principle of anti-oppressive practice.
Graduates who successfully complete this programme are eligible to apply for Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration.

The professional and academic elements are closely integrated throughout the programme. There are 170 placement days, with the working week divided between time in placement and time in the University.

Aims

This MA Social Work degree programme aims to provide high quality post graduate social work education and training to equip students with comprehensive pre-entry skills to work in any agency employing social workers in the United Kingdom.

Although the statutory sector is the major employer, increasingly social workers are being recruited into voluntary and private sectors in a variety of service provision roles including community-based, residential or day care services in the UK and abroad.

The programme seeks to encourage the personal responsibility of students to function as independent learners and to develop a critical and reflective appreciation of the role of social work in society.

The curriculum provides teaching in both academic and practice elements, which are fully integrated at Brunel University London. It is designed to ensure that learning occurs in an incremental way, with learning outcomes that develop across levels enabling students to demonstrate progression in professional knowledge, skills and values through two years of study.

Specifically, the programme aims to:

- Prepare students for critical and reflective professional practice according to the HCPC’s approval standards of education
- Equip students to practise ethical, innovative and effective social work practice that actively promotes social justice in a diverse society
- Integrate learning in academic and practice elements of the programme so that students have a holistic understanding of social work in variety of professional contexts
- Enable students to identify, understand and critically appraise evidence and research which can inform social work practice
- Enable graduates to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council and apply for membership with the British Association of Social Workers (BASW).

Course Content

Compulsory Modules (year 1)

The Foundations of Social Work Practice
Social Work Theories and Perspectives
Life-span Behaviour and Development
Legal Frameworks for Social Justice
Social Policy and Sociology
Professional Skills Development I
Practice Learning I
Approaches to Research

Compulsory Modules (year 2)

Assessment and the Management of Risk and Complexity
Effective Practice with Domestic Violence, Mental Health and Substance Misuse
What Works in Social Work
Professional Skills Development II
Practice Learning II (100 days)
Dissertation

Year 2 Pathways (choose one)

Social Work with Children and Families
Main topics: working with children in need and child protection; theory, research, law, policy and practice; inter-professional workshops on the impact of parental problems including parental substance misuse and domestic violence; critical review of inter-agency and inter-disciplinary practice through serious case reviews; children looked after and leaving care and service user voices; theory and research specific to social work practice with children and families; risk analysis and risk management; the centrality of relation based practice in direct work and communication with children and young people; the family court system and skills in analysing and presenting case material.

Social Work with Adults
Main topics: the development of community-based care and support and integrated adult health and social care including ideological underpinnings and contemporary issues in policy and adult social work practice; person-centred and care management approaches to community-based adult social work practice; and adult practice specialisms.

Note: As this programme may involve regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email

Work Placements

Brunel University London has an excellent placement team that takes care to match students to appropriate children and families and adult social work placements within the London area. Placement providers have been consistently positive about their experience supervising post-graduate students and have frequently hired students back into permanent posts after they have completed their degree.

Teaching

A wide range of teaching methods are used in the MA Social Work programme including lectures, seminars, workshops, coupled with individual tutorials and group tutorials to ensure large group learning is translated in a more discursive way. Assessments include essays, exams and presentations and students are expected to complete a total of 180 credits of assessed academic work along with a 60 credit dissertation.

Special Features

The programme is transitionally approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.
Students enjoy first-rate facilities in the new Mary Seacole Building.

We are one of the leading providers of university-based social work and social policy research in London and have attracted funding from, amongst other sources, the ESRC, the AHRC, Nuffield Foundation, the Rowntree Trust, the European Union, the Department for Education and Skills and the NHS.

Students benefit from close links with social care providers in local government and in the voluntary sector.

Service users and carers are crucial to our work, and our BEEC (Brunel Experts by Experience Committee) enables them to be involved at all stages of the MA, from interview to assessment.

Recent groundbreaking research into personalisation, service user involvement, Family Drug and Alcohol Courts, young onset dementia and youth and religion, amongst other areas, feed into our taught programmes, making them highly relevant and up-to-date. Our academics include the authors of best selling books on citizenship, community care and child protection.

Anti-oppressive practice has been at the core of our education and training philosophy for some years and this emphasis is evident in the teaching of this programme.

Brunel University has a long history of securing a range of quality placements across London and surrounding areas. We have substantial experience in working across the statutory and independent sector and have strong partnership links.

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The MSc in Advanced Practice is aimed at all health and social care staff who are looking to develop their knowledge and skills as advanced practitioners. . Read more

The MSc in Advanced Practice is aimed at all health and social care staff who are looking to develop their knowledge and skills as advanced practitioners. 

Over the past decade, the emergence of competencies, conceptual frameworks and operational tools, together with government and educational drivers, has firmly placed the notion of advanced practice and advanced level nursing as a core development area in the practice workplace. 

Why choose this course?

This Master's course is likely to appeal to a wide range of professionals including:

  • community matrons
  • caseload managers
  • social work team leaders
  • managers from prison and probation service
  • team leaders working in sexual health and substance abuse
  • midwives
  • senior or consultant nurses (or those hoping to move into that role)
  • independent practitioners.

Pathways

You will have the choice to follow a generic or a specialist pathway within your study. At present, we offer specialist pathways in:

  • Leadership
  • Midwifery
  • Healthcare Education
  • Substance Misuse
  • Infection control (only available to those currently working as Infection Prevention and Control Practitioners).

Your specialist pathway will be reflected on your final degree award and will appear in brackets. To qualify for a particular specialist pathway, the modules you take in your second year, as well as your dissertation, must be focused on your specialist area. For example, if you wanted to receive an MSc Advanced Practice (Infection Control) your year two modules (which must add up to 60 credits at level 7) and your dissertation must be on infection control. 

Why choose the University of West London?

Our teaching staff are highly committed, passionate, subject specialists with clinical currency who will be there to support you during your course. 

During the course, you will have a personal tutor who will guide and advise you throughout your academic life, and you will receive regular, personalised feedback on your progress in theory and practice, helping you to succeed. 

You will also benefit from a fantastic range of high-tech, innovative teaching resources and have access to the University's mentoring service, making your learning fun and engaging.

Tutor Information

This course is run by the College of Nursing, Midwifery and Healthcare to provide you with both the high-quality teaching and the personal attention you need to make the most of your University education.

You will learn from highly skilled staff, many of whom conduct cutting-edge research in their specialist areas, ensuring that your period of study is both challenging and rewarding. 

The College of Nursing, Midwifery and Healthcare teaching staff includes:

Course Leader – Catherine Lynch (pictured below right with students graduating) has been running the MSc Advanced Practice for 10 years has received commendations and awards for her use of technology to deliver the electronic elements (50%) of the first year of the course.

Senior Lecturer - Mental Health Reuben Pearce who has worked within the NHS since 1995 and continues to maintain a strong presence in practice through involvement in various initiatives with NHS Trust partners. 

Professor of Evidence-based Healthcare Professor Heather Loveday a peer reviewer for a number of journals including the Journal of Hospital Infection and International Journal of Nursing Practice. 

Career and study progression

Completing the Masters programme will give you the skills and confidence to stand out in the graduate market. Since the introduction of the Graduate Curriculum in Nursing in 2010, a Masters degree will be the next stepping stone for career development for current cohorts of student nurses, so will be an advantage to those nurses currently looking to get ahead and establish their career pathways.

Opportunities for further study include progression to our MPhil programme, and onwards to a Professional Doctorate or PhD.

Course structure

Most students will take the Master's course over three years, taking 60 credits in each year. Once accepted on to the course, you will be assisted by the course leader to plot your route. You will be supported throughout your studies at the University of West London.

Some students (for example, students on the Infection Control pathway) will take the year two (optional modules) in their first year, and then take Role Development and Becoming an Advanced Practitioner second.The only course pre-requisite is the need to have successfully complete Research Methods in year three.The typical pathway for students who take the Masters course in the traditional way starts with Year one, where students take Role Development between September and December and Becoming an Advanced Practitioner between January and July.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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Successful completion of this course will result in the award of a Practice Certificate in Independent Prescribing. The course of study involves. Read more

Why this course?

Successful completion of this course will result in the award of a Practice Certificate in Independent Prescribing.

The course of study involves:
- pre-residential course activity
- distance learning material
- two residential periods
- a period of learning in practice, under the supervision of a designated medical practitioner.

You'll be awarded 30 ScotCat credits on completion of the course.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/pharmacistindependentprescribing/

What you'll study

- therapeutics from a choice of cardiovascular, respiratory disease and infection, rheumatology, diabetes, substance misuse, renal medicine and palliative care
- communicating with patients & colleagues
- prescribing & public health
- care planning

You'll also undertake a Period of Learning in Practice (PLP). The aim is to provide you with opportunities to develop competencies in prescribing. This period focuses on the patient group(s) in which you'll be expecting to prescribe.

Facilities

Our high-quality, dedicated facilities include a dispensary with consulting area, clean room facility and pharmaceutical processing and analysis suites. You will have first-hand experience of the full range of professional activities in a modern training environment.

Entry requirements

All pharmacists must meet the following requirements:
- current registration with GPhC &/or PSNI as a practising pharmacist

- have at least two years appropriate patient orientated experience practising in a hospital, community or primary care setting following their pre-registration year

- have identified an area of clinical practice and need in which to develop their prescribing skills

- have up-to-date clinical, pharmacological and pharmaceutical knowledge relevant to their intended area of prescribing practice

- demonstrate how they reflect on their own performance and take responsibility for their own continuing professional development (CPD)

- demonstrate how they'll develop their own networks for support, reflection and learning, including prescribers from other professions.

- have a designated medical practitioner who has agreed to supervise period of learning in practice

Designated medical practitioner requirements

The designated medical practitioner must be able to confirm that they:
- have had at least three years medical, treatment and prescribing responsibility for a group of patients in the relevant field of practice

- work within a GP Practice or are a specialist registrar, clinical assistant or a consultant within an NHS Trust or other NHS employer

- have some experience or training in teaching and/or supervision in practice

- agree to provide supervision, support and shadowing opportunities, and are familiar with the requirements of the programme

Course content

The course of study involves pre-residential course activity, distance learning material, two residential periods and a period of learning in practice, under the supervision of a designated medical practitioner. Students will be awarded 30 ScotCat credits on completion of the course.

Residential training

This element of the course is at Scottish Masters (SHEM) level 5 throughout. It's delivered through two residential periods that are taught here at the University of Strathclyde.

The first residential period of five days includes four classes, worth five credits each:
- therapeutics from a choice of cardiovascular, respiratory disease and infection, rheumatology, diabetes, substance misuse, renal medicine and palliative care
- communicating with patients & colleagues
- prescribing & public health
- care planning

Full attendance during the residential period is essential.

The second residential period of half a day will normally take place approximately six weeks after the first residential period. It involves peer review sessions designed to demonstrate clinical and ethical practice.

Period of Learning in Practice (PLP)

The aim is to provide you with opportunities to develop competencies in prescribing. This period focuses on the patient group(s) in which you'll be expecting to prescribe. The PLP starts after the first residential period.

The PLP is made up of a series of sessions (combination of full and/or half days) that involve prescribing and clinical activities. This should equate to a minimum of 12 days, but is subject to decision by the pharmacist and their supervisor based on the challenges of the individual prescribing roles being adopted by different pharmacists.

This PLP time will be used to develop clinical skills including:
- accurate assessment
- history-taking
- recognition and response to common signs and symptoms and formulation of a working diagnosis

During this period you'll be supervised by a designated medical prescriber who will be responsible for confirming your competence to practise.

A portfolio providing evidence that the required time has been spent (minimum 90 hours) and the learning outcomes achieved will be submitted along with a statement of assessment from the designated medical supervisor. The assessment will confirm the pharmacist's clinical competence in the area(s) for which they intend to prescribe.

The period in practice must be completed within 12 months of the residential course.

Assessment

Some assessments will be completed before attending the residential period and some will be completed after.

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ABOUT. Why do people commit crime? What can we do to prevent crime? What are the connections between mental health and substance use in relation to offending and victimisation? These are a few of the questions criminologists strives to answer. . Read more

ABOUT

Why do people commit crime? What can we do to prevent crime? What are the connections between mental health and substance use in relation to offending and victimisation? These are a few of the questions criminologists strives to answer. 

Criminology at Malmö University is a multidisciplinary subject that includes a broader range of study areas than just crime; utilising diverse theories as well as empirical research. It is a subject area that encompasses individual, societal, and situational aspects with a focus on processes and events throughout an individual’s life. 

Our students independently, critically and systematically analyse complex topics relevant to social and behavioural science generally, and criminology more specifically. The programme is composed of students from different fields and cultural backgrounds, it encourages students to discuss subjects in both a Swedish and an international context. This provides a chance to develop - emphasising multi-disciplinary, multi-professional and international work.

The programme highlights international perspectives and encourages student mobility. All courses can be taken independently and are open to national and international students, free-movers as well as exchange students.

Programme structure 

Our department profile specialises in the areas of risk-assessment, prevention, geography and crime, juvenile offending, criminal careers and victimology. The department also hosts guest researchers from both Swedish and international universities in order for our students to broaden their perspectives. Students receive supervision in writing their thesis and have the opportunity to explore research topics of their own choosing. This is an opportunity for students to establish contact with employers and identify new research projects that meet the needs of contemporary society. 

The programme is based on independent study, group work, journal clubs, seminars and workshops as well as lectures. Valuing the benefits of two-way communication and collaboration in the classroom, students are encouraged to discuss, question and think critically in all learning activities. In line with the Swedish academic model of teaching in higher education, students are responsible for their own learning development, and we provide an open and interactive teaching environment in our programme that varies between courses.

This education is provided by the Faculty of Health and Society at the department Criminology.

If you have not studied Criminology before

If you are new to Criminology, one or all of the following books can be useful as an introduction and or reference during the programme: Criminology by Tim Newburn, Introduction to Criminology by Frank Hagan, The Oxford Handbook of Criminology by Mike Maguire, Rod Morgan and Robert Reiner.

Syllabus

For more information on syllabus, course content and learning outcomes, please see here.

Career possibilities

There is a substantial demand in today’s labour market for knowledge in the field of criminology.

For example, the need for collaboration between actors in the society that offenders and victims come in contact with, for instance, the prison and probation services, the social services and the justice system, as well the psychiatric sector and other sectors involving individuals with substance use and mental health problems. This programme seeks to improve the competence of students entering existing professions within the municipality, county council and state administrations as well as institutes and organisations within the private sector and thus builds upon the students’ earlier experiences and academic studies.

Since the programme is taught in English, our students will be well-prepared for the labour market both within and beyond Swedish borders.



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EXAMINE YOUTH ISSUES FROM AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE. Read more

EXAMINE YOUTH ISSUES FROM AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE

Are you interested in themes such as adolescents' substance use and addiction problems, antisocial and criminal behaviour, marginalisation and exclusion, excessive use of social media, and social inequalities and mental and physical health? Would you like to know why Dutch youngsters are among the happiest in Europe? 

The Master’s programme Youth Studies will enable you to look beyond the limits of individual fields of study. You will learn to observe and examine specific issues by combining different social scientific disciplines (psychology, pedagogy, sociology, anthropology) in an interdisciplinary approach.

By integrating knowledge from different disciplines you will be able to advance fundamental understanding of youth issues and to address youth problems whose solutions are beyond the scope of a single discipline or area of research. Additionally, you will gain knowledge about policies and interventions regarding youth issues and develop academic skills to conduct research in the field of youth.

This one-year Master's programme relates to topics and challenges relevant and, often, unique to youth such as:

  • substance use, addiction, and risky behaviour
  • psychosocial problems
  • social inequalities and wellbeing
  • radicalisation, discrimination, intolerance
  • accessibility of health care
  • social media and the digital environment of youngsters
  • antisocial and prosocial behaviour
  • youth culture, pop music and cultural lifestyle
  • friendship, social networks and the social environment of adolescents
  • sexual development and behaviour
  • changes in youth welfare and youth policy

DEVELOP YOURSELF

Through an innovative approach in interdisciplinary science, the Master’s programme will prepare you for the challenges associated with today’s increasingly global and diverse workforce in academic institutes, policy organisations, and NGOs. It offers you an exciting choice of themes, perspectives and methodological approaches and provides you with the opportunity to personally design an important part of your Master's research. You will also participate in an internship in an organization in the professional field of youth studies. This freedom of choice stimulates your personal development and optimally prepares you for a career in research or advisory positions.

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

This Master’s programme will prepare you for a career in the field of youth research, youth welfare and youth policy. By acquiring in-depth knowledge on youth issues, academic skills and competencies you will develop into a highly-qualified science practitioner. You will receive a structured and systematic training in theoretically and methodologically advanced research that will equip you to help solve social problems in the field of youth either within or outside of academia.



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The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Read more

The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Academic study is complemented by two practice placements with different service user groups. Practice experience of statutory interventions with children and families or ‘vulnerable adults’ is complemented by opportunities for innovative practice in the voluntary and independent sectors in areas such as family justice, homelessness, substance use, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, community interventions and self-advocacy. With strong involvement of service users, carers and practice partners throughout the programme, the MSW provides strong foundations for practice in any field of social work.

Local and global perspectives 

Our approach to social work education reflects the connections between individuals, their families and communities. We offer you a broad foundation for social work practice underpinned by the global definition of social work and emphasise the connections between local and global issues in social work. Shared learning alongside postgraduate students studying International Social Work and Community Development, and Community and Youth Work, provides valuable opportunities for the exchange of ideas and experiences.

Excellent employment prospects  

There is very strong demand for Durham MSW graduates by employers in local authorities and non-government organisations regionally, nationally and internationally. Durham MSW graduates have been able to transfer their registration to other countries including Australia, Canada, Scotland and the USA. 

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1 

  • Social Work in Practice (40 credits): Understanding perspectives of service users and carers; social exclusion; social policy and law for social work 
  • Social Work in Context (40 credits): Human growth and development through the life course, disability and mental health; social work theories and methods; working in organisations
  • Professional and Personal Development (30 credits): Principles, values and ethics; critical thinking and evidence-based practice; skills development; Interprofessional working 
  • Social Work Practice 1 (50 credits): 70-day practice placement in a partner agency.

Year 2

  • Research in Social Work (45 credits): Research and evaluation design and methods; ethical issues in social welfare research; dissertation
  • Advanced Social Work (30 credits): Advanced application of theories and methods; critical analysis of social work policy; protection and empowerment of vulnerable children, young people and adults
  • Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits): 100-day practice placement. 

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full-time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There are approximately 12 weeks of vacation, including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice, and undertake a research dissertation.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods is used including essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, you will undergo a practical assessment of your communication skills in readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by critically reflective accounts of work with individuals, groups or communities and by your practice educator who provides regular supervision and observes your practice. You are also expected to seek, and reflect on, feedback from service users and professional colleagues. Research in Social Work is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements

Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.



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The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice. Read more
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice.

The MSc Social Work is an accelerated programme for applicants who already have a first degree and want to embark on a career in social work; the course will fully prepare you for a professional career in the statutory or voluntary social care field.

This Masters degree runs in close partnership with local social care agencies and local authorities based in inner and outer London boroughs. The course is a combination of a taught and practice curriculum, where you will undertake two fieldwork placements in addition to the College-based teaching over the two years.

We welcome overseas and self-funding students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/socialwork/coursefinder/mscsocialwork.aspx

Why choose this course?

Students have said the following about this course:
- “Lectures are delivered by experienced practitioners and leaders in the Health and Social Care field.”

- “The teaching is of a high standard and lectures are interactive with opportunities for small group activity.”

- “Staff are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and professional.”

- "There is excellent support for mature students, especially those with childcare and family commitments.”

- “I am a final year student and proud to be a postgraduate student at Royal Holloway.”

Department research and industry highlights

Since its inception, the department has developed a reputation for delivering high quality research across a range of areas by engaging with matters of public concern. In the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 45% of the department’s quality profile was ranked 3-4*.

- A team of researchers in the department recently conducted a major study into leadership in health and social care services.

- Two members of staff are currently completing a small-scale study into decision-making in the field of child and family welfare.

- The department hosted the Centre for Trauma and Abuse studies and continues to maintain strong links with this centre.

- The department runs the most successful Graduate Diploma in Child and Family Studies in partnership with 28 London Boroughs and has been designated a Centre of Excellence.

Course content and structure

The MSc in Social Work is a two-year course that runs over two academic years, and is based at Royal Holloway’s Egham campus. The course is full time and students are expected to attend from 9am - 5pm, both in College and while on placement. The course integrates theory, research, policy and practice in social work, and the academic and practice programmes run concurrently.

- Course structure and organisation
In the first year you'll attend College four days a week during the first term. In the second term you are on placement (70 days) from Monday to Thursday and in College on Fridays. The placement continues in the third term. There are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College.

In year two you'll attend College on Mondays and Tuesdays and are on placement (100 days) the rest of the time. Again there are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College. Please see information about placements for more details regarding the practice element of the course.

- First year courses
Practice Learning 1: preparation for practice. .

Social Policy for Social Workers: gain an understanding of social policy issues related to social work.

Human behaviour in the social environment: gain knowledge about psychology in relation to working with service users.

Child observations: develop observation skills that are relevant to social work with all service user groups.

Theories and knowledge for Social Work practice: gain knowledge of theories and approaches used to understand how to work with service users.

Law for Social Work: learn about law relating to working with services users.

- Second year courses
Critical Social Work: issues relating to working with service users and about different service user groups e.g. adult and child safeguarding, assessments, working with asylum seekers, substance misuse, working with resistant service users.

Choose one of three optional seminars depending on your area of interest: mental health, child and family welfare or vulnerable adults.

Practice Learning 2 - critical reflection: students explore and reflect upon their practice in seminar groups.

Research methods: Students learn about research methods in preparation for their dissertation.

Understanding and working in organisations: learn about the legal obligations, structures and cultures within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice.

- Support
Students are provided with one to one support from: Academic Tutors, who'll support you throughout the course; Placement tutors and Practice Educators; Dissertation Supervisors in the second year.

Royal Holloway provides range of wider services that support students including the Educational Support Office, Student Financial Advisor, Counselling Services, Students’ Union and Careers Service.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge of:
- sociology, psychology, social policy and law and their application to social work practice

- the contribution and application of social research to social work theories and practice

- the range of statutory, voluntary and private welfare organisations within social work agencies and in health, housing and educational environments

- the range of theories and methods needed for effective social work practice

- the social and individual origins of a typical range of problems presented to social care agencies

- values and ethics relevant to social work practice

- the significance of inequalities and difference in working with organisations and social service users

- the significance of cultural diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with organisations and social service users.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations, presentations and a dissertation. Students are also required to successfully complete one 70-day and one 100-day practice-learning placement.

Employability & career opportunities

The MSc in Social Work qualifies graduates for careers in statutory and voluntary social work. Qualified social workers can continue their professional/academic development through taught post-qualifying programmes or research opportunities within the department. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

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