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Masters Degrees (Studio Production)

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Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom. -Unique 12 month course,. -Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom. Read more
Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom.

-Unique 12 month course,
-Run in partnership with Sky, the largest pay-tv broadcaster in the United Kingdom
-Prepares you to work in a multicamera studio environment
-Work as a Vision Mixer, or a Camera/ Lighting or Sound specialist.
-Includes a six-week internship with Sky and some of the modules are taught at Sky Studios.
-Sky also guarantees to employ at least one graduate of the course each year.
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. This intensely practical and pioneering course aims to prepare students for a successful future in multi-camera studio entertainment production. Students are taught by NFTS staff and visiting Industry Professionals and have hands-on experience of a variety of studio roles as well as in their specialisation.

Students will apply for, and be accepted onto the course in one of three craft specialisations:

I. Cameras and Lighting
Practise the core skills of TV studio camera operators, positioning the camera, framing and focus. Learn to use broadcast cameras in a multi-camera studio, repositioning and changing shot as the director demands while the vision mixer cuts and mixes the show. Learn to develop shots, moving with artists or in sympathy with music to create dynamic and exciting television. Begin to light simple interviews and more complex multi-camera lighting techniques. You’ll need a passion for pictures, quick reactions, clear and proactive thinking with excellent co-ordination and a good sense of musical rhythm.

II. Vision Mixing
Train on sophisticated broadcast vision mixing consoles, build and realise complex live visual effects to the director’s brief. Using these high-end production tools, Vision Mixing is like editing - but in real time! Cut, mix and wipe between cameras, pre-edited clips and other video sources live. Learn how to mix a variety of genres from situation comedy to fast paced entertainment and music shows adding digital effects and captioning in real time. You’ll need to be logical, quick thinking, calm under pressure and have an excellent feel for timing and rhythm, both dramatic and musical.

III. Sound (in a broadcast studio environment)
Sound carries the story, sets the mood and the tempo. It provides the enabling structure against which TV pictures can shine. Good sound is essential to a TV programme. Learn how to choose and place microphones for the best results for a variety of shows including live music. Train to use ‘Fisher booms’ - in great demand for sitcoms and soaps - to pick up drama dialogue. Mix studio sound in real time using sophisticated broadcast desks. Enhance the show with spot effects, music cues and audio processing to create atmosphere and energy. Learn how to manage TV comms including studio talkback systems allowing key production team members to communicate and collaborate effectively. You’ll need to be a quick, logical thinker, have a ‘good ear’ and a passion for high quality sound.

These are the core disciplines of multi camera studio operations and people trained at a high level in these craft areas are hotly in demand.

CURRICULUM

Students will be exposed to the creative challenge of working across a range of entertainment programming, including: Situation Comedy, Magazine Shows, Talent Shows, Panel Shows, Game Shows etc.

The award focuses on developing students’ specific capabilities, in the following areas:
-The language of entertainment television so that they can work effectively within production teams
-A high level technical understanding of their chosen specialist area
-A critical awareness of the production workflow and the impact of multiplatform on production

Modules include:
-The Grammar of Television Entertainment
-Media Technology
-Music and Magazine Programming
-Chat Shows and Panel Shows
-Comedy

The six week internship at Sky is constituted of two distinct elements. Firstly the student will shadow a Sky Production Services member of staff working in their specialisation (Vision Mixer, Sound, Camera/Lighting). This will cement the students understanding of the wide range of professional practices and competencies associated with each role. Secondly, students will undertake a range of simulated exercises (designed by the NFTS with Sky involvement) to hone their craft and understanding on the Sky equipment.

At the end of the course, students will be well placed to work professionally in their chosen job role within broadcast production. They will also have a thorough understanding of the television production process encompassing everything from the creative to the technical and the business aspects.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making. Read more
This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making.

Whether you dream of being a cinematographer, studio camera operator or a film editor, this course will give you an excellent grounding in both the theory and the practice of media technology.

You will enjoy realistic opportunities to engage with the industry - during your studies you will be visiting leading post-production facilities in London in order to develop your professional network and gain first-hand experience of what life as a professional is really like.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/digital-film-technologies-and-production-15month#entry

Course detail

• Study a specialist course in digital film technologies, taught by an experienced team of industry professionals including acclaimed film-makers and published scholars, which gives you the opportunity to focus on practical production and post-production techniques
• Explore production roles and the wider context of the contemporary film business through participating in media-related research seminars, events and conferences
• Develop your practical skills using our excellent media production facilities
• Gain in-depth knowledge of areas including: production roles and responsibilities; digital film production technologies; practical production techniques; insights and interviews; the film business; studio technologies and techniques; project development and practical post-production and digital effects
• Benefit from a degree that prepares you for roles in broadcasting, journalism, arts and the media, administration, governmental regulation of the media, research, marketing, sales and advertising, cinematography, editing, directing, and independent film production or allows you to continue to MPhil and PhD research degrees

Modules

• Production Roles and Responsibilities
• Digital Film Production Technologies
• Practical Production Techniques
• Insights and Interviews
• The Film Business: Current Issues and Debates
• Studio Technologies and Techniques
• Project Development
• Practical Post-Production and Digital Effects
• Digital Film Technology Project

Assessment

The core units contain both formative and summative assessments, and it is during these units that you should learn the range of competencies and knowledge necessary to succeed on the course.

For your project work you can undertake either an extended digital film technology project (working in groups or individually) or a dissertation on relevant theoretical topic. The course utilises: oral presentations of academic arguments; oral pitches of stories; essays; case study projects; self-reflective logs and a wide range of practical work.

The assessment philosophy of the MSc begins with understanding your individual starting position. Hence work will be diagnostic (often at the outset, as with proficiency in academic practice and writing), formative, summative and evaluative. The procedures used for the assessment of your achievements will correspond with the knowledge, abilities and skills developed through your degree programme.

Careers

You will be encouraged to identify your strengths, interests and development needs in relation to the practices and conventions of both the media industry and of scholarship and research.

You will also be encouraged to seek out active engagement with industry, which might lead to either freelance jobs or employment.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Graduates of the Production Management Diploma go on to create successful and award winning work. Recent credits include Guy Ritchie's King Arthur. Read more
Graduates of the Production Management Diploma go on to create successful and award winning work. Recent credits include Guy Ritchie's King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, Bridget Jones's Baby, Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk and The Night Manager. If you would like to follow in their footsteps and get your own credits on top productions, apply today!

‘I wish this course had been around when I started as a Production Manager, as I would have made a lot less mistakes!’ Sue Vertue, Producer Sherlock

-Two scholarships from Sargent-Disc available.
-Delivered in partnership with BBC.
-Intensive training with practical experience on fiction films, TV Entertainment shows, documentary and animation films at the NFTS.
-Industry work experience placements.
-Course developed to meet Industry demand.
-Plenty of hands-on practice – in both locations and in studios.
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.
-Places still available for the course starting September 2017

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in September each year. So what does it take to be a Production Manager? An individual who can multi-task, be dynamic, communicate well and stay calm under pressure. Someone who is creative with budgets but keeps a sharp eye on the bottom line; someone who knows enough about Health and Safety to protect the cast and crew but not detract from getting the right shot; someone who knows about the best locations at the best price - and who knows production from start to finish!

This course combines intensive training with practical experience on fiction films, TV Entertainment shows, documentary and animation films at the NFTS and industry work experience placements.

CAREER PROGRESSION

Most production managers are freelance, moving from contract to contract, and may find themselves working anywhere in the UK, or even abroad. As a production manager, you could also work for independent production companies on feature films, documentaries, or TV shows, become a Line Producer or progress to Head of Production.

New NFTS graduates are sought-after and typically find employment soon after completing their courses. NFTS alumni are some of the most successful people working in UK film and television today, and many of our students make contacts while at the NFTS which continue in the professional world.

Sargent-Disc generously provide scholarships to support the training of talented individuals in the field of Production Management for Film & TV: http://www.sargent-disc.com/sargent-disc-uk/news-insights/news/nfts-scholarship-update.aspx

CURRICULUM

Covering the key skills required by Production Managers in today’s rapidly-changing environment, this course alternates workshops with practical experience on a range of NFTS productions including TV entertainment shows (live and multi-camera studio shoots), dramas, animation and documentary films.

The course has been developed to meet industry demand and NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors. Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School and productions are given cash production budgets.

The course covers these key skills recognised by the Industry:
-Extensive instruction and practice on scheduling & budgeting
-Health & Safety training including Production Safety Passport qualification
-Production Management for location and studio shoots
-First Aid for Film & TV Production
-Cash flow management and cost reporting
-Location Management
-Shooting abroad
-Research
-Contracts, copyright and legal
-Child licensing
-Post Production routes & delivery for film & television

This course includes opportunities for work experience throughout the year. Previous students have enjoyed placements at Film4, Eon, Carnival Films, Endemol, Kudos, Dragonfly and Revolution Films. Television productions include Big Brother, Come Dine With Me, The BBC Proms, Babylon, 24-Live Another Day and Downton Abbey and feature films such as the Bond films: SkyFall and Spectre, Assassin’s Creed, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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*New for 2017, subject to final approval. Develop your own signature sound and production style, through this forward-thinking, cutting edge music composition and production course. Read more

*New for 2017, subject to final approval.

Develop your own signature sound and production style, through this forward-thinking, cutting edge music composition and production course. The MA Sound Production programme is tailored towards individuals who are keen to hone their composition and production skills inside an intertextual and cross-disciplinary framework that pushes at the stylistic boundaries of genre.

The content will cover aesthetic considerations as well as technology and techniques utilised in modern music making. The award is deliberately unbounded by genre and there are opportunities to take an interdisciplinary approach to sound production, including contemporary electronic music, studio and field recording, experimental music and sound design for composition.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme encourages interdisciplinary and collaborative working methods with students from the wider music community at Bath Spa, as well as visual media and other departments within the University. While the programme has a music production focus, it also covers key areas of practice such as:

• Sound design

• Electronic music composition

• Soundscape and field recording

• Traditional studio practices

• Sound engineering

• Spatial audio and sound design

• Composition for visual media

You won’t be expected to cover all of these areas. You’ll be able to use the course to develop an individually-tailored portfolio of skills, experience and top-level work across them.

The course is part of a suite of courses available across music and sound, operating alongside ‘sister’ pathways in Sound Design and Sound Arts, which allow further specialism in these areas.

For more information on the 'sister' pathways please refer to the website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-production/

MODULES

In trimester one, you'll gain the skills you’ll need to fulfil the rest of the course. The Skills Portfolio module is built on the idea that you’ll already have technical skills in this area. It therefore allows you to choose a handful of skills projects from a large number of options – these cover skills right across the Sound Arts, Sound Design and Sound Production pathways and include (optional) elements of multimedia.

The Research Methodology and Context module develops skills in postgraduate-level research and writing. It is designed to give you the tools for an onward journey in academia, but not to be, in the colloquial sense, ‘academic’.

In trimester two, you’ll advance the knowledge gained in the the first trimester and begin exploring the intertextual possibilities of music composition. In addition, you’ll develop a creative project that will further extend the work undertaken on the trimester 1 Skills Portfolio module.

The module Intertextuality In Sound Production aims to capture and contextualise emerging trends and innovation at the forefront of sound production and composition, and develop composition skills that extend beyond the limits of genre.

Alongside the Sound Production modules there are additional optional modules that you can study from the other pathways. From the Sound Arts pathway, the Visual Music module explores the idea that musical thinking can be extended to the visual, and encourages students to develop multimedia projects that explore this idea. From the Sound Design pathway the Post Production module explores an industry-level workflow for audio post production for picture.

In trimester three, you'll complete the course with a independent research project. While most Masters level courses consist of a substantial written dissertation component, the MA Sound Production programme focuses more on high-level practical work and the concept of ‘practice as research’ through the creation of a large-scale practical project.

The project will fulfil the same function as the traditional dissertation; you’ll develop individual and original research, but through the creation of a portfolio of works, rather than through the written word.

For more information on modules and course structure please visit the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-sound-production/

TEACHING METHODS

Most modules are taught through small-group seminars and workshops, where you’ll benefit from close interaction with tutors and peers. The Major Project and parts of the other modules are taught through individual tutorials where the focus will be entirely on your own practice.

ASSESSMENT

You’ll be assessed entirely on coursework. The majority of this will be practical and creative work, including the dissertation-equivalent Major Project. Some practical projects are accompanied by short informal written assignments, and the for the Research Methodology and Context module you’ll produce a more substantial paper.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

You can use the course to develop an individually-tailored portfolio of skills. This will equip you for the current employment landscape, where a combination of traditional music roles are required alongside broader practice in sound and other media.The course also provides the breadth necessary for FE and HE teaching in the field, and provides the basis required for PhD research and beyond.



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Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The MA in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course MA Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGCert in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production. This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. Read more
The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production.

Course overview

This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. For a stronger emphasis on theory, please see MA Media and Cultural Studies.

If you want to improve your knowledge, build your resume and be involved in high-quality media content, with technical skills that are in demand across the TV and Film industries, then this Masters will give you an edge over people with an honours degree. You will cover areas of 360 commissioning, workflow, moving camera, advanced editing techniques and production management.

If your first degree is not directly related to media production, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course. This ensures that everyone on the course can fully participate in group projects.

‌‌‌‌Media Production (Film and Television) MA has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry.‌

‌Sunderland’s Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research. The University hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS). Our research expertise includes multi-platform production, music and moving image collaborations, independent production, and television aesthetics.

‌‌‌‌Students on this course are elgible to apply for a BAFTA scholarship. Find out more on the BAFTA website.

Sunderland is an accredited training provider for AVID software, which is the industry-leading editing system. We are also part of Avid’s worldwide network of Learning Partners, and as an MA student you will have an option to take an AVID certification that boosts your employability. ‌

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/media-production-television-video-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Media Production 1 (60 Credits)
-Media Craft Skills – these include elements of scriptwriting, editing, camera and lighting and sound techniques
-Deconstruction and reconstruction of advertisements and music videos

Media Production 2 (60 Credits)
-Production Management
-Video for New Media
-Mini Practical Project

Media Production 3 (60 Credits)
-Major Media Project

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

You will work on group production projects which will be supported by workshops, studio sessions, tutorials and seminars, as well as master classes led by industry professionals.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is a centre for excellence in training students, with continual investment in industry-standard equipment.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes multiple Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Blackmagic, Sony EX1 and EX3, with associated location DIT kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations Edit systems, including Avid Media Composer, Protools, Adobe Master Collection, four Colour Grading rooms running DaVinci Resolve. There is also a digital audio postproduction area running the Avid S6 desk with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Other media facilities
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Useful resources for your studies include:
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles in production, media management, marketing, legal and media business.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Our Postgraduate course in Film Production combines practice, theory, enterprise skills and personal and professional development. Read more
Our Postgraduate course in Film Production combines practice, theory, enterprise skills and personal and professional development. The theory is embedded in the practical teaching, so that for every new skill and convention learned the reason for its application is also explored

MA Film Production aims to emulate a real working environment in which practical learning allows you to ‘learn on the job’ by performing roles in a film production team. This ‘real word’ environment is further enhanced through student collaboration on productions of narrative drama or documentary, using high-end production methods and equipment. Alongside drama and documentary productions, postgraduate Film Production allows you to develop subject specific research skills and apply those to practical work.

INDUSTRY LINKS

Staff maintains links with Warp Films, Arri media, Made Up North, Northwest Vision and Media and many more regional and national production companies and agencies.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Most modules are delivered at the Preston campus, with the main production modules based at the Media Factory, UCLan's £15m purpose built media powerhouse, with outstanding facilities and excellent technical and academic support. Students have access to a range of High Definition production equipment including advanced camera rigs and camera support rigs. The Media Factory also offers ample studio and recording spaces including motion capture, green screen, TV studio, audio recording and mixing studios, dedicated edit suites and many more shared facilities, all of which is accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Assessment is by submission of films produced and written and oral presentations of research outcomes. Students have to meet a set of learning outcomes appropriate to masters level study to pass their modules

GRADUATE CAREERS

Students typically move into production related areas, many of them regularly in the credits of major cinema and TV releases. Some choose to embark on careers in directing, camera or writing.

Students can sit technical undergraduate workshops and seminars as required and have to take part in enterprise based activities run by Futures and Northern Lights.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Based in the £15 million, state-of-the-art Media Factory you will have access to a range of high definition production equipment including advanced camera rigs and camera support rigs. The Media Factory also houses studio and recording spaces including motion capture, green screen, TV studio, audio recording and mixing studios and dedicated editing suites.

UCLan’s postgraduate Film Production course benefits from excellent, regional and national links with film production companies. Experienced industry professionals, academics and external, high profile, guest speakers deliver the course.

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About the course. Starting in September 2017, this course is ideally suited for students progressing from undergraduate study, or professionals seeking to develop their career in filmmaking. Read more

About the course

Starting in September 2017, this course is ideally suited for students progressing from undergraduate study, or professionals seeking to develop their career in filmmaking. This course gives students the opportunity to develop a portfolio of production related skills by studying at DMU in Leicester and at Creative Media Skills (CMS), an independent training provider based at Pinewood Studios in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire

Reasons to study International Film Production at De Montfort University:

Developed in partnership with Creative Media Skills (CMS)

CMS is DMU’s partner in developing and delivering the programme. It works hand in hand with government organisations, as well as the industry, to identify skills gaps and provide high-level targeted training in many areas of the film industry. CMS bring professionals and department heads into the classroom, and provides students with access to the UK film industry’s most valuable knowledge base – its staff.

Develop a range of production management skills

At DMU, these skills include scriptwriting, lighting and cinematography, image processing, directing and post production. At CMS you will focus on pitching, budgeting, production development, and fine skills. You will also gain core business expertise, such as an understanding of research and development, and wider careers planning.

Benefit from DMU’s expertise

At DMU, you will develop your filmmaking and camera based skills, learn about the UK film industry and shoot your major production. You will benefit from our outstanding studio spaces, and the skills and expertise of established research groups such as Cinema and Television History (CATH) Research Centre and Institute Of Creative Technologies (IOCT)

Learning off campus at CMS

The second semester of your learning will take place in the Creative Media Skills centre. While there, you will manage the development of a production and receive masterclasses on a range of fine skills from the CMS team and respected professionals actively working in the film industry.

Semesters

During the first semester, you will work at DMU. This semester involves developing core skills in storytelling, screenwriting, directing, producing, image processing, sound recording and other camera based skills. You will take four, 15 credit modules during semester one: 

  • Screenwriting
  • The Production Process
  • Key Roles in the Film Industry
  • Realisation

You will be taught by DMU’s team of production experts and filmmakers in our studio space, and you will begin the process of developing a major project, and specialising in a production role. 

During the second semester, you will work in the Creative Media Skills centre. Here you will finesse your skills in a more diverse range of areas, including Production management & Coordination, Pitching, Assistant Directing, Production Management, Script Supervision, Hair, Makeup, Costume, Art Department; Working with Actors and Working in Teams. You will also enter pre-production under the guidance of our expert staff. At Creative Media Skills, you will take two, 30 credit modules, which cover these various areas: 

  • Pre-Production and Development
  • Fine skills

During this semester you will be expected to pitch film ideas to a panel of industry experts. The best will be selected as the major projects, which will become your focus in the third semester. During the third semester you will work more independently at DMU to manage and deliver your final film project, with an accompanying reflective commentary. This project will demonstrate the skills and knowledge developed on the course, and will form the basis of your professional portfolio. You also have the option of taking an academic dissertation. 

In addition to the major project, assessments take the form of practical coursework, written reports and presentations. 

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:

Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx



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About the course. Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production. Read more

About the course

  • Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production.
  • Discover advanced compositional devices and strategy applicable to DAW-based realisation of original material.
  • Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original works that stand out from the crowd in their artistic and technical sophistication.
  • Survey the most exciting aesthetic trends in current music-making with technology, and their relation to the demands of the music industry.

Why choose this course?

The MA Creative Music Production is aimed at applicants specifically interested in applying studio technologies and production skills to the creation of their own original music (as opposed to “producing” other artists’ music). In addition to equipping students with solid bases in studio technology, processes and practices, the course addresses the purely formal, artistic and aesthetic aspects of music-making, and the specific compositional devices and strategy applicable to DAW-based realisations of original material.

By surveying the defining traits and aesthetic concerns of a number of popular genres centred on electronic composition-production, students develop a sophisticated awareness of current artistic and aesthetic trends, and an enhanced knowledge of the musicology of production. On this course, you will develop a portfolio of original works showcasing your talent as a composer-producer, opening up a wide range of possibilities for your professional career.

Course content

Taught sessions will typically cover the following topics:

  • Studio Technology, processes and practices
  • Audio production and design
  • Compositional strategies in DAW environments
  • Musical form, structure and discourse in Electronica
  • Rhythm and kinesis in EDM
  • Experimentation in IDM
  • Noise in Techno
  • Timbre and texture in Ambient music
  • Machine aesthetics in House music
  • Sampling and re-contextualisation in Hip-Hop
  • Lo-fi aesthetics and Glitch
  • Retro-revivalism - analogue sound in the digital age

Resources

  • A large recording studio featuring the high-end SSL AWS 900+ SE mixing desk / Protools HD system and Quested and JBL monitoring (2.0, 2.1 and 5.1).
  • A medium-size studio featuring an Avid C24 / Protools HD system with RedNET and Neumann 5.1 monitoring.
  • 4 x iMac control/edit spaces with Slate Raven Mti touchscreen control and RedNET.
  • 2 x live recording booth/spaces.
  • 3 monitoring spaces for surround sound mixing.
  • a dubbing suite for A/V work (foley, ADR, etc.)
  • 2 x 30 seat dual-monitor Apple iMac labs.
  • A 150-seats state-of-the-art performance venue with Soundcraft vi1 console and full RedNET integration.
  • Top class outboard including Digidesign Pro Tools, Lexicon TLAudio, TC Electronic, Focusrite, and more.
  • Vast selection of top-quality dynamic, condenser and ribbon microphones, including Soundfield, Neumann, AKG, Coles, Shure, Audio-Technica, Beyerdynamic.

Careers

Graduates from this award will be equipped with a wide range of specialist knowledge and skills in the field of music technology and music creation – from purely technical to creative and intellectual. As such, they will be ideally positioned to pursue a career in the music and media industries, creating their own musical content for production music library, film/TV synch, or commercial release. You may, in addition, consider positions in music publishing, music journalism and criticism, or teaching, or you may continue your higher education at doctoral level.

Teaching methods

Lecture, seminars and tutorials are typically scheduled over two consecutive days a week, plus some extra sessions for particular workshops, performance, recording, as necessary. In addition to scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in continuous self-directed study and studio practice.

Staff team

The MA Creative Music Production is led by Bruce Aisher.  Bruce is a music producer, songwriter, composer, remixer, sound designer and technology journalist whose work is to be found on over 100 commercially released tracks (including a US Billboard Club Chart No.1) on TV programmes such as ‘CSI’ ‘Numb3rs’ and 'Top Gear' and products by Apple, Clavia and Native Instruments.

Industry links

Our industry partners include:

  • BAFTA
  • Splash Damage Videogame Company
  • Videofeet Media Company
  • Focusrite
  • SampleMagic
  • Dynamic Music
  • Extreme Music (Sony)
  • Grand Chapel Studios
  • iZotope
  • SSL

Entry requirements

A good (1st, 2.1 or 2.2) BMus/BSc/BA in Music / Music Technology (or equivalent qualification), or 5 years professional industry experience at the discretion of the admissions or programme tutor. Evidence of solid compositional work with technology prior to undertaking the course is required (determined by the submission of a small portfolio of original compositions with the student’s application).

All international students are required to demonstrate suitable levels of English language competence. This can be through previous study in English, but we often require specific performance in English tests. All undergraduates must be able to prove a minimum of IELTS 6.5 with at least 5.5 in every component or equivalent.

Fees and Funding

Fees for 2018/19 are still to be confirmed for home students.

International Students

Full time: £12,500 for the 2018 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1040 per 15 credits for the 2018 academic year

*Tuition fees are charged annually. The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. Fees may be higher in future years, for both new and continuing students. Please see the University’s Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed “When tuition fees change”), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years.

How to apply

For more information about our new MA in Creative Music Production, please contact Bruce Aisher on



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Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGDip in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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Music Technology is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities. Read more

Aims

Music Technology is a rapidly evolving field of study with a diverse and expanding range of possibilities.

The MSc in Audio Technology is designed to go beyond the simple provision of training, and to instead enable you to engage with current debates and actively participate in some of the most vibrant areas of contemporary research.

Throughout the course you will be encouraged to demonstrate self-direction and autonomy as you critically explore and define your position within the wider field. One overarching aim is that you should leave the course as not only an adept user of various hardware and software technologies, but as someone able to actively shape and develop their own, responding as necessary to future developments.

Thus, in addition to developing your theoretical and methodological understanding, the MSc in Audio Technology features a strong emphasis on practical work in a number of different (but related) areas. For example, you will study modules in Advanced Studio Practice, Sound on Screen, Music Computing and Musical Human-Computer Interaction. These are supported by a technology-orientated Research and Development module that provides robust foundation for the final Audio Technology Project.

Acting as summary of all that you have learned and a portfolio going forward, the Audio Technology Project provides an opportunity to plan and execute a substantial project in an area of personal specialism or interest. Innovative projects are encouraged, and there exists the potential for interdisciplinary and/or collaboration with practitioners in other fields.

Fees and finance

2015/6 Home/EU International
Full time £5,750 £11,960
Part time £2,875

These fees are applicable for new entrants in 2015/6. Fees are for the academic year only, any subsequent years may be subject to an annual increase, usually in line with inflation.

The University also offers a postgraduate loyalty discount: If you have completed an undergraduate degree at the University of Wolverhampton, you may be eligible for a 20% discount on the first year of a taught postgraduate programme.

Employability

The course will actively equip both graduates and those already in industry with a diverse range of skills to enhance their career prospects. It will also develop a range of opportunities for experience and employment in areas such as studio recording, media production and content creation, video game and software development, education (FE/HE), research assistantships/studentships, and employment in HE institutions.

In addition to subject-specific practical skills, you will also acquire a range of transferable skills relevant for pursuing a research degree. These include critical, analytical, project management and research skills from the study of a broad spectrum of literature, research, and external projects.

Outcomes

- Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of a variety of issues in the expanded field of contemporary music technology, taking an independent and rounded perspective.
- Apply theoretical discourse relating to aspects such as technologised production and performance, reactive/interactive/non-linear media, and computational creativity (etc.) to practice through a systematic understanding of historical, contextual, philosophical, technical and scientific theory.
- Select, interpret, develop and apply a variety of research methodologies appropriate for their work.
- Critically evaluate and use a wide variety of hardware and software technologies, and, where appropriate, develop their own.
- Exercise personal autonomy in learning through effective self-organisation and management of workload in both individual and group scenarios.
- Understand the possibilities afforded by the contemporary, expanded field of music technology (including its gaps and trends), and be able to position their own work, interests and aspirations within this wider context.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course offers an explicit and concerted move away from the notion of “training” in how to use specific software and/or other music technologies in favour of a more balanced synthesis of theory and practice.

The proposal for the Audio Technology Project is developed in the Research and Development module, providing time and opportunity to consider the project’s direction thoroughly, and to explore possibilities for collaborative/interdisciplinary working.

Course staff specialise in both traditional/well-established areas of music technology (studio production, film sound, audio synthesis and processing) and flourishing areas of contemporary research (musical interaction, generative music).

A wide range of career routes are open to graduates of the course. These are largely dependent upon the nature of the work the student chooses to produce, but may include: studio production, sound for games and film/video/animation, interactive media, interaction design, creative software development, design for music technology, post-compulsory and higher education.

The University of Wolverhampton continues to develop state of the art facilities to greatly enhance your learning experience. The Performance Hub, opened in 2011, has a diverse range of fully equipped music teaching, performance and practice rooms (accommodating single person to large band / ensemble), two high-end professional recording studios, and two bespoke technology suites boasting sixty Apple iMacs running industry standard software including Pro Tools, Logic Pro, Max, Pure Data and SuperCollider.

Our two recording studios offer the perfect blend of digital and analogue technologies giving students the opportunity to combine classic analogue recording technique with the flexibility and reliability digital technology provides. As well as a dedicated live room each for recording, for increased flexibility and choice of room acoustic, any of the music rehearsal rooms surrounding each studio can also be patched into the studio's control room.

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The Broadcast Journalism MA at City is highly rated in the industry as evidenced by the range and number of alumni working in broadcasting, the awards won, and the industry placements offered. Read more
The Broadcast Journalism MA at City is highly rated in the industry as evidenced by the range and number of alumni working in broadcasting, the awards won, and the industry placements offered.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a first degree, looking to become well-rounded broadcast journalists. You will have a keen interest in TV and radio news and current affairs plus sport, lifestyle and national and international politics. Though this course is NOT about presenting on screen or on air, you must be prepared to present your material on camera or mic, and write and direct material for others to perform. The MA in Broadcast Journalism is essentially about visual and audio communication of topical information, and requires a desire to communicate through essential team working. City provides an alumni network second to none in the UK broadcast industry; and provides possibly the best employment opportunities of any postgraduate broadcasting course in the UK.

Objectives

The MA in Broadcast Journalism produces award winning young journalists and has a superb reputation. You will learn learn comprehensive TV and radio skills. The course benefits from a large cohort of 50 students with great networking and peer support. Teaching groups of 15 ensure daily personal contact with Professor Lis Howell; TV reporter Colette Cooney; Dr Abdullahi Tasiu; and key visiting staff like Talksport’s Sandy Warr and former Reuter’s producer Lloyd Watson.

New from autumn 2016 Broadcast Journalism aims to offer hour long TV news programmes on news-days produced by students gaining practical training. Newswriting, television and radio journalism are taught in groups of fifteen and larger groups through lectures, workshops and broadcast simulation.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of the Broadcast Journalism MA. MA Broadcasters arrange their own placements - with help from academics if necessary. You must have 15 days of work experience whilst on the course. This usual happens during the the Christmas break. The size of the City cohorts past and present means unique networking opportunities with present students and 4,000 alumni. But at the same time every student is given personal help in finding a placement and help ultimately to find a job in broadcasting. Every student counts.

Organisations who have hosted City students in the past include:
-ABC
-Al-Jazeera
-BBC
-BBC local radio stations across the UK
-Blakeway Productions
-Blink
-CTVC
-Flame
-Hardcash Productions
-ITN
-ITN Sport (Olympics)
-NorthOne
-October Films
-OR Media
-Plum Films
-politics.com
-Reuters
-Sky
-Talkback

Academic facilities

In 2014 we completed a £12m development project for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN and were praised by the BJTC. They include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media simulated broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

Some courses are taught in lecture theatres, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Activities include lectures, practical work in groups and individually, personal tutorials, and independent learning

This pathway is taught by professors, senior lecturers and lecturers, with industry practitioners as visiting lecturers, and a number of key industry visiting speakers.

Assessment

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for aspiring journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation.

Assessments vary from module to module but include coursework, practical work both in groups and individually, a Final Project, a written timed test, and essays.

Modules

All of our Broadcast Journalism MA students must undertake core modules in Ethics, Rules and Standards and a Final Project. As a Broadcast Journalism student you will take a module in Newsgathering for TV and Radio; a module in Newsdays and Longer From film-making; and a module in Studio Production. Teaching hours are between Mondays to Fridays during working hours, and occasionally outside those times.

Core modules
Ethics, Rules & Standards (30 credits)
Final Project (30 credits)
Newsgathering for TV and Radio (30 credits)
Newsdays Production (30 credits)
Studio Production for TV or Radio (15 credits)
UK Media Law (15 credits)
Political Headlines (15 credits)

Elective modules
Journalism Innovation (15 credits)
Social & Digital Journalism (15 credits)

Career prospects

96.8% of graduates from this course were in employment six months after completing the course (DLHE survey 2014-15).

Alumni include famous names such as:
-Sophie Raworth (BBC)
-Dermot Murnaghan (Sky News)
-Barbara Serra (Al Jazeera)
-Jo Whiley (BBC Radio).

Recent graduates of the MA Broadcasting include:
-Ramita Navai, Emmy Award-winning documentary maker
-Chris Mason (BBC Political Reporter)
-Isobel Webster (Sky News)
-Darren McGaffrey (Sky News)
-Minnie Stephenson (ITN)
-Cordelia Lynch (Sky News Washington)

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IN BRIEF. Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus. Enjoy excellent job prospects in a growing field. Tap into the expertise of world-class audio-engineering and acoustics researchers. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus
  • Enjoy excellent job prospects in a growing field
  • Tap into the expertise of world-class audio-engineering and acoustics researchers
  • Part-time study option
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

On this course, you’ll gain practical, theoretical and creative experience of sound engineering, music production and audio technology.

You’ll explore the design, manipulation and production of audio across many platforms, using our state-of-the-art audio-post recording, radio and TV studios to study a mix of sound engineering and theory modules.

The aim of the course is to develop the skills that you’ll need to create and deliver professional audio, whilst under pinning these skills with a sound theoretical background.

94% of our postgraduates go on to employment and/or further study within six months of graduating.DLHE 2009 and 2010

COURSE DETAILS

This course entails both practical based and theory modules. The modules are delivered in the recording studios, the audio technology suite, audio post production suite and lecture theatres.

DURATION

September start

MSc (one year full-time or up to three years part-time)

PgDip (nine months full-time or 18 months part-time)

January start

MSc (16 months full-time)

PgDip (one year full-time or up to two years part-time)

TEACHING

Teaching and learning involves a mix of lectures and practical sound engineering work, involving individual and group learning, There is an emphasis on motivated students' self-study.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment involves a mixture of practical work, report writing and project work. By the end of the course students will have built up a substantial portfolio of audio, video and new media work.

Assessment is approximately divided across the course as follows:

  • Practical work (30%)
  • Report/Assignment (35%)
  • Presentation (5%)
  • Dissertation - that may entail practical elements (30%)

FACILITIES

This degree is based in MediaCityUK,the new home for the BBC, ITV, Coronation Street and parts of the University of Salford. MediaCityUK is located at Salford Quays on the banks of Manchester's historic ship canal. The University has the first four floors of a new, purpose built facility that looks over the water to The Lowry theatre, Imperial War Museum North and the new Coronation Street set. ITV occupy the floors above us, with the three BBC buildings on one side of us and Peel Media Studios on the other.

A number of BBC departments are based at MediaCityUK, having moved from London, including BBC Breakfast, BBC Children's, BBC Radio 5 Live, BBC Future Media and Technology, BBC Learning, BBC Sport and BBC Academy. All of the BBC Manchester operations have also moved to MediaCityUK, including BBC Religion and Ethics, Current Affairs and the BBC Philharmonic.

For more information, check out the Salford MediaCityUK site and the main MediaCityUK site.

Here is a summary of our relevant facilities at MediaCityUK:

  • Audio Post Production and Audio Suite - Mac-based suites that run a range of audio software, including Pro Tools, Reason, Cubase and Reaktor. The Post Production suite has a Digidesign Icon D-command desk running Pro Tools.
  • TV Studios - full professional specification studios. Studio A has separate vision and audio control rooms. Studio B allows for a full 3D virtual studio.
  • Radio Studios - two radio studios, including a small studio space.
  • Computer Suites - a range of Mac and PC based computer rooms for general computer work.

On the main campus, we also have a Pro Tools equipped studio recording complex consisting of four control rooms and recording areas. Please see this brochure for more detailed information brochure.

EMPLOYABILITY

The wide range of skills provided on this course will enhance your employability. Possible career paths include: audio manufacturer research and design, broadcast engineer in audio for radio or TV, audio and visual design and installation, education, interactive media and sonic arts.

Possible career paths include:

  • Audio manufacturer research and design
  • Broadcast engineer in audio for radio or TV
  • Recording studio, live sound engineer, music production
  • Music technology retail
  • Theatre or film audio engineer
  • Musical instrument technology
  • Audio and visual design and installation
  • Education
  • Interactive Media
  • Sonic arts

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Staff have strong links with industry either through collaborative R&D projects with industry through the Acoustics Research Centre and our commercial test laboratories.  Our research department is a Centre of Excellence for BBC Research.

FURTHER STUDY

Some students could go on to study a PhD at our world-class Acoustics Research Centre. We have been carrying out acoustics and audio research for over 30 years. Our research is funded by research councils, government bodies, and industry. It has fed into audio products that companies make and sell worldwide, as well as regulations and standards used in the UK, Europe and beyond. We are also involved in public engagement - getting more people aware of and interested in acoustic science and engineering.



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