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The MA degree in studio art requires completion of a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work, including at least 6 hours in art history, 15 hours in a major studio field, 3 hours of graduate seminar, 3 hours of graduate critiques, and 3 hours of art studio electives. Read more

Master of Arts in Studio Art (MA)

The MA degree in studio art requires completion of a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work, including at least 6 hours in art history, 15 hours in a major studio field, 3 hours of graduate seminar, 3 hours of graduate critiques, and 3 hours of art studio electives. Candidacy for the degree is determined by a review upon the completion of 18-24 semester hours. A thesis exhibition and an oral review are required for successful completion of the program. The degree program must be completed within six years.

Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art (MFA)

All new graduate studio art students enter the MA program; admission to the MFA program is by recommendation of a faculty review committee, which meets at the time of the candidate’s MA thesis exhibition. This committee reviews the student’s progress upon the completion of a minimum of 30 graduate hours taken within the MA studio program. Hours must conform to the requirements of the MA program, representing completed coursework in studio and art history. The committee will recommend that the candidate continue within the MFA program or finalize studies at the University with a completed MA degree.

COURSEWORK

The MFA degree requires the completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours of graduate work, including at least 9 hours of art history, 30 hours in a major studio area, 6 hours of graduate seminar, 6 hours of graduate critiques, and 9 hours of studio art or art history electives. The degree must be completed within six years of enrollment in the MA studio program. A graduate student may select a minor studio concentration of study or choose a variety of graduate level classes offered within the art department or approved graduate-level elective courses.

PUBLIC LECTURE

Admission to candidacy for the MFA degree is based on the delivery of a public lecture by the candidate addressing his or her research in the making and thinking of visual art. The lecture is followed by questions from the faculty to the candidate concerning all aspects of the research presented for candidacy to continue study toward the MFA degree. Successful candidacy is achieved when the candidate has proved able to coherently and clearly defend his or her research in dialogue with the faculty. The candidate must achieve and demonstrate proficiency in technique and accomplishment in addition to personal direction in the respective area of study.

THESIS EXHIBITION

A thesis exhibition is presented at the end of the candidate’s final term. During the exhibition, an oral examination is conducted by the student’s faculty committee. At that time the candidate defends the exhibition and his or her written artist’s statement.

REVIEW PROCEDURE

A graduate review committee is established by each graduate student. The committee must consist of no fewer than four faculty members and can have an unlimited number of approved graduate faculty. Required appointees to this committee include the department chairperson (director of graduate studies), the major area professor, an art historian, and another studio art or art history faculty member. The chairperson of the committee is the candidate’s major area professor.

Concentrations

Ceramics
Painting
Photography
Printmaking
Sculpture

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The Master of Architecture provides a vibrant, challenging and expansive programme aimed at equipping you with the professional and creative skills for a successful career as an architect and leads to Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 exemption. Read more

Why take this course?

The Master of Architecture provides a vibrant, challenging and expansive programme aimed at equipping you with the professional and creative skills for a successful career as an architect and leads to Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 exemption. Through the design studios you will be exposed to a range of related architectural interests, including urbanism, landscape, practice, sustainability and culture, providing a cross-disciplinary learning environment that is appropriate in today’s professionally complex architectural world. We can also provide all incoming, full-time MArch students with funding toward a Course field trip.

What will I experience?

On this course you will undertake studio-based design projects, with opportunities to:

Engage with current collaborative projects with academic institutions in other countries – in the past these have included Turkey, Spain, Denmark and Australia
Work on projects with 'live' clients through our RIBA registered Project Office practice
Opt to study at a choice of European universities through the ERASMUS exchange scheme

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is professionally accredited by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). It is structured to ensure the integration and synthesis of contextual, technical and professional complexities inherent within the design process, helping you to engage with the prescribed ARB/RIBA criteria, and attain RIBA Part 2 exemption.

Module Details

The design curriculum is delivered through studios, each having a distinct research topic relating to the research and practice of the studio tutors. The studio topics and pedagogy provide a framework and guidance for student projects in Year One and support in Year Two as you develop your particular thesis questions into design propositions. Studios topics change annually in response to current issues in practice and society, challenging the architectural profession, and offering variety in scale,content and context in the UK and abroad.

Please see our proposed 2016/17 MArch studios below. You can find more information on our course blog and see output in our MArch Gallery.

MArch Studios 2016-17*

Latent Culture- Exploring the Reading, Mapping and Making of Place: Mapping, reading and drawing out, Studio 1 will explore cartography, archaeology, memory, narrative and material of place. Through a series of thematic studies – text and making based – the studio will bring together an understanding of place using artefacts, films, maps and narratives.

Littoral Landscapes: Change Labs for Coastal Experimentation: This studio will experiment with the ‘seeds’ of transformation, focussing on littoral landscapes – coastal villages, towns and cities in the UK and abroad. The studio is the Lab, the seeds are about speculation, growth, invention and entrepreneurialism - small changes which can lead to revolutions.

Urban Futures. Cities constantly change in response to changes in society: Today, major environmental and economic challenges we are facing require new models for the built environment that are capable to be resource efficient, adaptable to environmental modifications and designed to facilitate placemaking.

The Emergent Studio: Architecture of, on and around the Edge: The Emergent Studio explores the idea of making architecture within cultural contexts that are not ‘our own’; always in a location that in some way exemplifies an edge condition. Our theoretical platform for exploring these conditions has been, and continues to be, rooted within phenomenology, drawing from the writings of the humane Nordic modernist tradition, in informing our methodologies of interrogation and design.

Portsmouth: The Anatomy of "The Island City”: This studio continues our reflections on Portsmouth's response to climate change induced rise in sea levels adding an analysis of infrastructures and their impact on developing Urban & Architectural visions for the city.

Tactical Urbanism: Tactical Urbanism will investigate, in a radical and provocative way, how a university environment will change in the future and create alternative and hypothetical social scenarios as starting point for your design project. The aim is not to create a futuristic environment but to challenge the current paradigms and try to address the real problems and issues that our society will face in a near 2050 future.

Coastal Latent Dynamics: Material Voids: This new studio will frame the architectural process, starting with a close up of the Micro (the detail, the material qualities of place, prototyping), continuing to a wide shot of the Macro (the notion of municipality in a coastal context) and then zooming into the Meso (dealing with the opportunities of voids, empty buildings and their environs).

*Please note: studio offers may change due to staff and student numbers.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a combination of individual and group tutorials in your selected studio, while year-wide units are lecture-based, complemented by seminars and workshops. Our studio-teaching method will mean that you will be working with tutors with professional and academic experience in their field and all unit programmes are complemented by contributions from external professionals.

Studio programmes will often entail shared sessions with European and, sometimes, other overseas institutions, in countries such as Denmark, Turkey, Morocco, Italy and Spain. Representatives of local public and private bodies and agencies frequently contribute to studio tutorials and crits. All this helps to ensure that your learning and studio research outputs can have regional impact and global reach.

Design assessment is through studio review (crit) as work progresses and portfolio assessment at the end of the academic year. ‘Taught’ units, in support of the design curriculum, are assessed through various forms of illustrated written coursework – both individual and group, such as reports and the Dissertation.

Student Destinations

Careers in architecture are demanding ever-increasing specialism and professional competence.

The unique learning experience we offer on this course will enable you to develop as an expansive, creative and professional individual capable of success in a range of creative and professional environments. The breadth of engagement with the discipline and range of studios ensures that you will become confident in responding to the demands of the profession. The regional, national and international destinations of the School’s alumni are testament to this, as are our graduate employment take-up statistics.

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The Studio is a part of three studio project series and it is the International Placemaking Studio, preceded by the Nordic Studio - Urban Public Places and Advanced Urban Space Studio. Read more
The Studio is a part of three studio project series and it is the International Placemaking Studio, preceded by the Nordic Studio - Urban Public Places and Advanced Urban Space Studio. The aim for all three studios is to foresee urban planning and design issues and problems that will be coming into the public focus in the near future. After completing this international studio the students will be able to fully grasp and understand the dynamic conditions acting on modern cities, specifically issues of regional urbanization, urbanistic genericism and informal globalization. Creating consciousness through concrete examples that place the social reality of a site at the forefront of political discussion will be a nunaced element that the students will acquire during the course of their work with the project. Students will be able to adopt a placemaking approach that is a humanistic process defined by reality. The studio adopts concrete strategies for physical appropriation and production through the students work which will envision a platform for public performance to serve as a catalyst for social reform. Finally the studio offers students a completely different approach to intervention in the public realm, one of kinetic accupuncture method based on inclusivity and transformative placemaking strategies - making a public space into a living place. [STUDIO WILL FEATURE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDY TRIP WITHIN THE PROJECT]

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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/art/graduate-fine-arts-studio. The MFA in fine arts studio is a rigorous two-year program comprised of major studio courses chosen from painting, sculpture, non-toxic printmaking, and expanded forms. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/art/graduate-fine-arts-studio

The MFA in fine arts studio is a rigorous two-year program comprised of major studio courses chosen from painting, sculpture, non-toxic printmaking, and expanded forms. The program also includes studio electives in areas such as film, ceramics, photography, industrial design, and glass in addition to theory, and contemporary art history, A thesis is required.

The program is committed to collaboration and interdisciplinary approaches both within the four major fine arts areas of study and the entire College of Imaging Arts and Sciences. The program's structure allows for personal growth, experimentation, collaboration, and unique, non-discipline specific results to occur in the thesis. Courses are meant to concentrate on creative visual work while also thinking about making and sustaining a dialogue.

Curriculum

- First Year

Fine Art Studio Major Courses
Thinking About Making
Fine Art Research
Art History (Contemporary) Course
Business Practices
CIAS Studio Elective
Free Elective

- Second Year

Fine Art Studio Major Courses
Research and Thesis
CIAS Studio Elective
Free Electives

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The course is designed to enable you to strengthen your position as an artist with a move from undergraduate study or re-entry at postgraduate level characterised by an increased depth of research and increasingly sophisticated, critically reflexive, material practice. Read more
The course is designed to enable you to strengthen your position as an artist with a move from undergraduate study or re-entry at postgraduate level characterised by an increased depth of research and increasingly sophisticated, critically reflexive, material practice.

The programme supports the development of your visual research process and enables a testing ground of methods, genres, concepts and contexts that challenge the boundaries and relationship between theory and practice.

Course content
The MA Fine Art is a broad, studio-based programme with an open and inclusive approach to fine art practice. The programme encourages both specialist and cross-disciplinary approaches enabling students to extend and deepen their knowledge and application of fine art practice.

The curriculum is structured on Practice as Research, through which specialist studio disciplines are developed within cultural, aesthetic and socio-political contexts supporting the creative exploration of ideas through practical skills, research methodologies, theoretical and analytical frameworks. This places individual practice at the centre of the programme. Studio-based modules run throughout the programme and maintain the dynamic interrelation between visual research, concepts and theory. Studio research can be developed within: painting, textiles, sculpture (including ceramics), printmaking and digital media.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time taught including dissertation £5670.00.

Part time - 30 credit module fee £945.00. Dissertation fee £1890.00

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees for 2017 are £12,360.00

Our facilities
Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

The Art department are situated in the dedicated artOne building comprising outstanding studio and workshop facilities. It is an exciting place to study, providing a dynamic and supportive learning environment for the production of original new art work.

The well-equipped workshops and studios provide environments for you to create experimental, inventive and ambitious work. The main studio space in the purpose built artOne building provides individual studio spaces for all students as well as bookable spaces for installation, performance and projection work. If you are doing studio practice modules, you will be allocated a personal studio base in which you can carry out your self-directed projects and art work.

All students also have access to workshop areas and technical support in the key disciplines of the Fine Art programmes. The workshops reflect the range of options across the various degree programmes. A distinctive aspect of the department is that of individualized working areas in the studio space.

Where this can take you
The course provides the opportunity to concentrate on a specific area of research.

Potential Careers

Professional artist
Art teacher, educator, or technician
Art administration and management in galleries and museums
Art therapy (with extra professional qualification) and art community work
Art journalism
Curator

Work placements
Recent students have worked on site-specific commissions, community arts projects, and work placements with local galleries and museums, residencies in schools, and even creating their own virtual gallery. The experience is invaluable in terms of working to time and budgetary constraints, and in dealing with the public.

Indicative modules
Distinctive features of the course:

Practice-based Fine Art research in Painting, Sculpture (including Ceramic), Textiles, Printmaking and/or New Media and technologies
Opportunities to work with nationally recognised arts researchers
Development of professional working practices
All students may leave with a fully functioning website for their own work (the emphasis being on the development of an existing site rather than building one from scratch)
Theory and Research Methodologies linked to practical studio work
Full time students offered studio space
Use of 'artOne' BA studio facilities for full and part time students in the summer period.
Optional modules:

The development of fully functioning websites for students' own work
Share in collaborative work through 'Practising Arts with New Technologies' module.

Teaching and Assessment
To gain an MA students need to complete four out of five modules plus the Independent Exhibition. This is an independent research project, and is largely practical, culminating in a professional context exhibition.

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. The two-year structure provides students with sustained periods of studio-based activity, with dissertation requirements coming early in the second year of study. The emphasis on practice is nonetheless informed and supported by theoretical and professional Study Units throughout the academic year. Whether specialising in a single discipline or working across media, MFA students will have time to develop and expand their studio work to the highest standards, bringing in relevant historical, theoretical and professional perspectives.

::MFA students can expect::

- Support in consolidating studio practice to a level appropriate for accomplished practitioners
- Access to facilities, workshops and expertise for the fabrication of artworks relating to the individual student's ambitions
- Opportunities to employ innovative approaches to studio practice through which conceptual ideas are tested and informed by use of selected media
- To gain a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research and scholarship
- To develop originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the Visual Arts
- To consolidate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of current debates in contemporary art practice
- To further develop aptitude for professional practice, independent research or employment, including opportunities for public exhibition
- To possess independence, self-reliance, as well as promotional enterprise skills, motivated toward professional practice or employment

::Learning Environment::

- Large individual studio spaces
- An excellent staff-to-student ratio with the possibility for weekly tutorial support
- A specialised programme of lectures, seminars and workshops
- Input from regular Visiting Lecturers and artists
- Expert support for a dedicated team of workshop technicians
- Professional development provision for gallery visits and other external events
- Contact with a regular series of professional Artists-in-Residence based in the Visual Arts studios throughout the academic year
- An immersive environment with rich connections to art history, particularly Surrealism, through the legacy of college founder Edward James

Programme Aims

The MFA programme Aims and Learning Outcomes are consistent with the descriptors for a
qualification at QAA Level 7, as defined in the QAA Quality Code for Higher Education (Part A,
Chapter 1).

The programme aims are to provide:

Practical:

1. Provide a stimulating and supportive learning environment for students to develop their
creative, intellectual and material practices

2. Provide facilities and support through which students can further develop their skills and fluency
to an advanced level as accomplished practitioners, gaining a comprehensive understanding of
techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

3. Enable students to achieve a comprehensive understanding and detailed knowledge of key
aspects of their field of study, as well as creative originality in their application

4. Encourage and support advanced experimental, creative approaches to studio work, much of
which is at, or informed by, the forefront of academic discipline, field of study or area of
professional practice (QAA Quality Code Part A, Chapter A1, p12)

Theoretical:

1. Provide a stimulating environment where advanced research methods and critical practices can
be articulated and where a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to personal
research and advanced scholarship can flourish

2. Increase student’s ability to deploy accurately advanced techniques of analysis and inquiry within
their chosen discipline

3. Enable students to articulate an advanced critical understanding of studio practice and its
contexts within contemporary visual art culture, much of which is informed by the forefront of
art practice and theory

Professional:

1. Provide support for personal and professional development, including development and
application of transferable skills such as self-management, decision-making, communication,
collaboration, problem solving, IT and research skills

2. Educate students to possess independence, self-understanding, self-reliance motivated toward
future learning, practice or employment

Facilities

All full-time Visual Arts students are provided with a large individual workspace in the Edward James Studios. In addition to specialist spaces dedicated to Painting and Drawing, Sculpture and Tapestry and Textile-based work, the studios also include Seminar Room, a materials and tool store, a small photographic darkroom, bookable exhibition and research spaces, plus an IT suite with digital editing software. A self-contained Print Room offers specialist facilities for etching, aquatint, monoprinting, woodblock and linocut. Students can work on a large-scale in the Sculpture Courtyard, which is also suitable for work in stone carving.

Students are encouraged to collaborate with other College departments - particularly the full-time programmes in the School of Conservation - making the most of the wide range of specialist knowledge, materials and equipment that is available. The Short Course programme also allows students to access a wide range of visiting tutors and specialist techniques that can further enhance their studies.

West Dean House and Estate offers students access to ambitious exhibition opportunities and unique research material. Students are able to submit site-specific proposals throughout the year and are encouraged to take part in the annual Open House event. The Edward James Collection is an outstanding resource for full-time students, given them access to a range of significant, even iconic, works of art as an ongoing source of inspiration and research.

The College's Arts and Conservation Library gives students access to thousands of specialist books, journals and databases to support their studies.

The Main House also contains West Dean Tapestry Studio, one of the world's leading producers of hand-woven tapestry. As well as having close contact with the expertise of Master Weavers and designers, students have access to the studio's Dye Rooms, a specialist facility for the dyeing of yarn. Find out more about the professional Tapestry Studio here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-creative-arts/tapestry-studio

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate

The MFA is a professional degree for practicing artists, craftspeople, or designers who desire to leave a lasting impression on their fields by devotion to their work and high standards of discipline and artistic ideals. The MFA is generally a two-year, full-time program that involves the presentation of a thesis, which includes written documentation and a formal exhibition of a body of work.

Plan of study

The MFA in metals and jewelry design provides students with broad exposure to metal working techniques, expands knowledge of applied design, strengthens perceptual and philosophical concepts, and develops an individual mode of expression. This sequence leads to a master’s thesis, inaugurated by the student and overseen by the faculty. The program is structured on the basis of individual needs, interests, and background preparation, as may be determined through faculty counseling.

Curriculum

- First Year

Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio l
Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio ll
Fine Art Research
Thinking About Making
Crafts Graduate Seminar
Free Elective

- Second Year
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Initiation
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Resolution
Thesis Implementation
Thesis Review
Free Elective
CIAS Studio Electives

Admission requirements

To be considered for the MFA program in metals and jewelry design, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of art, science, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. For those applicants applying from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass. The MFA in glass is a two-year program of study that develops students personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass

The MFA in glass is a two-year program of study that develops students personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. Students are provided full access to a complete glass facility and individual studio space to strengthen their technique and to practice designing pieces that flourish their personal expression of the medium. Graduate studio courses, seminar courses, and in-depth critiques are offered in conjunction with thesis planning and implementation to provide students with a deep understanding of this personal craft. Students are exposed to a broad range of critical issues related to the conception and production of art, to inspire and provoke critical reflection and facilitate the development of a thesis exhibition and supporting documentation.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in glass, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (the undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses),

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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This programme is for artists who want to develop their specialist studio practice to a higher level. The course will give you the opportunity to enhance your practical and creative skills as a practicing artist, underpinned by a contextual research-based programme of critical studies. Read more
This programme is for artists who want to develop their specialist studio practice to a higher level.

The course will give you the opportunity to enhance your practical and creative skills as a practicing artist, underpinned by a contextual research-based programme of critical studies. You will be given a personal supervisor at the start of the programme, and you will also work in the studio alongside your fellow MA Fine Art students.

It builds upon the distinctive approach to arts practice currently offered on the undergraduate fine art programme at the University. The course combines the use of established media and techniques with an ethos of open learning and experimentation using new and alternative media.
You will enhance your practice through a critical and contextual understanding of your creative methods, enabling you to develop and broaden your work in the formulation and articulation of your ideas.

Through contacts with external partners and arts-based agencies you will engage directly with the world of contemporary fine art, extending your knowledge of the commercial side of the art world. This aspect of your practice will also be supported by learning business management skills such as creating a business plan and writing proposal briefs for commission, exhibition and project work.

The course is taught by practitioners with extensive experience of creative media and the broader art world. In addition to studio work, (which will take up the bulk of your time here), you will learn through lectures, master classes, field trips, seminars, presentations, group work, tutorials and independent study.

The fine art department has excellent facilities for a variety of creative practices. These include a fully-equipped wood workshop; a fully-equipped metal workshop with facilities to work with a wide variety of metals, including a small aluminium foundry; a printmaking studio; a ceramics and casting studio with two large kilns; and a digital studio equipped with the latest AppleMac computers, a range of high end software and printing facilities up to A1 size.

Special features

The open nature of the fine art studio means you will have the opportunity to apply a multi-disciplinary approach to your work and make use of the high level facilities available within the studio set-up.

The fine art department has established strong links with a number of arts organisations and groups within the region, including Bolton Metropolitan Borough Council, Bolton At Home, Queens Park and Bolton Landscape Department, Bolton Schools Liaison Network, Bolton Museum and Art Gallery, Hospital Arts, and a large number of private organisations who regularly commission our students.

Students from the undergraduate programme have successfully set up three large studio groups in the region and studio spaces are available for students to rent in these studios at very reasonable rates. Two new contemporary art galleries have also been set up by our students in the past three years.

The department has also set up an undergraduate programme in fine art in Athens and students from the programme have an opportunity to spend some time at the art school in the centre of this historic city.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-ceramics-graduate. The MFA in ceramics focuses on intellectual and artistic development through an intensive teaching of the aesthetics and techniques of ceramic design. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-ceramics-graduate

The MFA in ceramics focuses on intellectual and artistic development through an intensive teaching of the aesthetics and techniques of ceramic design. Graduate studio courses, seminar courses, and in-depth critiques, in conjunction with thesis planning and implementation, provide students with a deep understanding of not only their own work, but the work of other students and their peers. Students examine the creativity, perceptions, aesthetics, and criticism of the work of contemporary artists and craftspeople in courses and discussions. Thesis reviews track students' progress towards the final thesis presentation, which is completed when a formal critique and evaluation is performed by the thesis committee. The MFA program in ceramics strengthens and deepens the understanding of the aesthetics, techniques, and theory of this fine art.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in ceramics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (the undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses),

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

- Studio residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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-Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production. -Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original arrangements, mixes, re-mixes and mastering work. Read more
-Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production
-Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original arrangements, mixes, re-mixes and mastering work
-Deliver comprehensive solutions and support for live sound in a variety of performance settings
-On this postgraduate degree you will create your own A/V interfaces, plug-ins, and programming codes

Why choose this course?

Music and Sound Technology in Audio Engineering is designed to provide industry-relevant post-graduate education aimed at forming creative professional for the audio, production, and post-production industry, who wish to pursue careers as creative Audio Engineers within recording, production or live sound settings. Students take hands-on sessions in the University's state-of-the-art facilities, including a top-class SSL studio, guided by dedicated tutors with significant industry experience. The postgraduate curriculum covers all the most relevant and current skills of the field, and sessions and assessment are designed to reproduce, as far as possible and appropriate, the realities of the commercial environment.

We are one of the largest music department in the UK, offering a rich portfolio of forward-looking music programmes uniquely designed to develop the most relevant skills in the current industry. The environment is friendly and supportive, and students benefit from being part of a large community of creatives in all fields: from film, to new media, performance, and fine arts.

Our top-class facilities include:
-2 labs, each with 36 workstations dual monitor Apple Intel
-Large recording studio with latest SSL AWS 900+ SE
-Studio with Yamaha 02R/963 monitoring spaces for surround sound
-Dubbing suite for audio-to-video work
-Foley studio for sound design work
-Sony Game studio
-Multimedia studios
-Anechoic chamber
-TV studio
-460-seat state-of-the-art performance venue with A/V recording facilities

Careers

When you graduate from these awards you will be ideally positioned to act as an interface between various music technologies and composers/producers. You may also consider a range of related positions such as lecturer, technical editor for music technology publications and other similar professions in the music industry or consider further study at doctoral level.

Teaching methods

Lecture, seminars and tutorials are typically scheduled over two consecutive days a week, plus some extra sessions for particular workshops, performance and recording. In addition to scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in continuous self-directed study and studio practice.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Creative Music Production (Discourse / Reflection)
-Major Study:Music Projects
-Practice 1: Studio Technology, Practices and Processes
-Practice 2: Audio Engineering
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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The MFA in Fine Art is a studio-based, research-centred programme with a critical studies component, supported by studio-led seminars arising from the creative and critical interests of students and staff. Read more
The MFA in Fine Art is a studio-based, research-centred programme with a critical studies component, supported by studio-led seminars arising from the creative and critical interests of students and staff. Students are admitted into painting, sculpture or fine art media (which includes electronic media, photography, print, film and video).

Degree information

The programme provides an intellectual and creative environment in which talented fine art graduates may develop their individual potential as professional artists and researchers in their chosen studio area; whilst developing a critical awareness of the broadening intellectual and cultural contexts of fine art.

The Fine Art MFA is an integrated degree programme and does not have a modular structure.

The programme consists of studio work (100%) in the student's chosen subject area, and critical studies which are assessed on a pass/fail basis. There are no core or optional modules for this programme.

Exhibition
Assessment is by submission of the critical study and final examination of studio work in the form of an exhibition.

Teaching and learning
A studio-based programme, students develop their work with tutorial/technical assistance according to individual need. The taught component is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops, but primarily demands individual investigation. Year two prioritises supervised individual research.

Careers

The programme aims to develop students' individual potential, and provide an excellent foundation for further doctoral research. The Graduate Degree Shows are attended by gallerists, curators and collectors providing a high-profile entrance to the professional art world. Recent graduates have established international careers as professional artists, receiving important commissions, gaining gallery representation, winning major prizes and residencies, as well as developing new artist-led initiatives. Others have taken on roles in related careers including curation, museum and gallery management and teaching worldwide. News and achievements of alumni including recent graduates are detailed on the news section of the Slade School website.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Gallery Assistant, Tate Modern
-Studio Technician, White Dark Ltd
-Art Technician, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts
-Artist, Self-Employed Filmmaker and Artist
-MA Neurosciences, King's College London

Employability
Professional development opportunities are actively encouraged with recent competitions including commissions to design a nine-storey mural and another to produce an artwork for the entrance to the UCL Grant Museum of Zoology.

Partnerships outside of UCL include one with Camden Arts Centre whilst the Slade is a founder member of the Junction: North London Cultural Consortium; all of which offers students the opportunity to experience working with galleries and other professional art bodies. In addition, there are several studio residency awards to help launch completing graduate students including the annual Red Mansion Art Prize of a residency in China.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Slade School of Fine Art is one of the UK's leading university departments for research in Fine Art, approaching the study and practice of art in an enquiring, investigative, experimental and research-minded way.

All academic staff are practising artists, actively involved in research as well as teaching, and have a broad and diverse range of interests and expertise. Students benefit from excellent studio space and facilities, including a large research centre in Woburn Square.

The UCL Slade School's central London location enables easy access to unparalleled learning resources including major galleries, museums, libraries, cultural institutions and theatres.

Read less
-Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production. -Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original arrangements, mixes, re-mixes and mastering work. Read more
-Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production
-Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original arrangements, mixes, re-mixes and mastering work
-Deliver comprehensive solutions and support for live sound in a variety of performance settings
-On this postgraduate degree you will create your own A/V interfaces, plug-ins, and programming codes

Why choose this course?

Music specialising in Audio Programming is designed to provide industry-relevant postgraduate education aimed at forming creative professional for the audio, production, and post-production industry, who wish to pursue careers as creative Audio Engineers or Producers within recording, production or as software developers, consultants or audio-media specialists. Students take hands-on sessions in the University's state-of-the-art facilities, including a top-class SSL studio, guided by dedicated tutors with significant industry experience. The postgraduate curriculum covers all the most relevant and current skills of the field, and sessions and assessment are designed to reproduce, as far as possible and appropriate, the realities of the commercial environment.

We are one of the largest music department in the UK, offering a rich portfolio of forward-looking music programmes uniquely designed to develop the most relevant skills in the current industry. The environment is friendly and supportive, and students benefit from being part of a large community of creatives in all fields: from film, to new media, performance, and fine arts.

Our top-class facilities include:
-2 labs, each with 36 workstations dual monitor Apple Intel
-Large recording studio with latest SSL AWS 900+ SE
-Studio with Yamaha 02R/96
-3 monitoring spaces for surround sound
-Dubbing suite for audio-to-video work
-Foley studio for sound design work
-Sony Game studio
-Multimedia studios
-Anechoic chamber
-TV studio
-460-seat state-of-the-art performance venue with A/V recording facilities

Careers

When you graduate from these awards you will be ideally positioned to act as an interface between various music technologies and composers/producers. You may also consider a range of related positions such as lecturer, technical editor for music technology publications and other similar professions in the music industry or consider further study at doctoral level.

Teaching methods

Lecture, seminars and tutorials are typically scheduled over two consecutive days a week, plus some extra sessions for particular workshops, performance and recording. In addition to scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in self-directed study and studio practice.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Creative Music Production (Discourse / Reflection)
-Major Study:Music Projects
-Practice 1: Studio Technology, Practices and Processes
-Practice 2: Audio Programming
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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Our groundbreaking MSc has been developed in response to a pressing need to offer a high quality postgraduate programme serving the industries of computer games and entertainment, with an emphasis on programming, maths and graphics, business, IP, entrepreneurship, team management, 3D animation, AI and physics in games- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-computer-games-entertainment/. Read more
Our groundbreaking MSc has been developed in response to a pressing need to offer a high quality postgraduate programme serving the industries of computer games and entertainment, with an emphasis on programming, maths and graphics, business, IP, entrepreneurship, team management, 3D animation, AI and physics in games- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-computer-games-entertainment/

The computer games and entertainment business is a fast growing multi-billion dollar worldwide business, with games platforms ranging from Playstation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Wii U, mobile and handhelds including iPhone, iPad and Android phones, PC-based, and massively multiplayer online games (MMOG) involving tens of thousands of people.

With ongoing strong demand for graduate computer games programmers from the UK and abroad, this MSc will produce graduates who are well positioned to get a job in this exciting worldwide industry. Potential employers include EA, Ubisoft, Sony, Activision, Microsoft, Cinesite, Framestore, and many more.

The programme is delivered by a mix of professionals from the industry and from the research world. We work closely with industry leaders to offer internships at studios including Sega and Sony.

In a wider sense, the influence of computer games programming is spreading to other digital media industries outside games, including gamification and the medical sector, games based learning, new forms of social networking and the interactive visualisation of scientific and live financial business data. Computer games are starting to fundamentally change the way people interact with computerised systems.

Partnership: Sony‌‌

‌Our MSc in Computer Games & Entertainment is part of the PlayStation®First Academic Partnership Programme offered by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe (SCEE) uk.playstation.com. Our course provides students with unique access to PlayStation® professional development hardware (dev kits) and software (SDK) to equip students with industry relevant game development skills across PlayStation®3 and PlayStation® Vita. http://www.worldwidestudios.net/london

Placement: Supermassive Games

"Following two years of successful placements at Supermassive Games, which resulted in full time jobs, we are looking forward to inviting Goldsmiths students to take part in our internship assessment day again this year."
Jonathan Amor, Director of Technology, Supermassive Games

Placement: Reflections - a Ubisoft studio

"We are delighted to announce that Reflections, a Ubisoft studio, will be taking on two Goldsmiths MSc Computer Games and Entertainment Programming students for Internship."
Dr Chris Jenner, Expert Programmer

Placement: Rebellion

"Having now placed four interns from Goldsmiths here at Rebellion, two of which have gone on to become permanent members of staff, we are very much looking forward to future applications from talented and creative Goldsmiths MSc Computer Games students”
Jason Kingsley OBE, CEO and Creative Director of Rebellion

Rebellion is one of Europe’s largest independent game developer-publishers, with their own state of the art cross-platform games engine and toolset. Rebellion’s latest number one hit was Sniper Elite 3, and they also publish the legendary 2000AD comic featuring Judge Dredd.

Placement: The Creative Assembly (SEGA)

Following two continuous years of The Creative Assembly (SEGA) successfully taking Goldsmiths MSc Games Programming Students on placements we are pleased to announce that we have reserved a minimum of three placements for Goldsmiths MSc students starting the course in September 2013, on site during the period May to September 2014. Subject to interview/ portfolio process”. Martin Servantes Director of Operations & Finance

Leading UK Developer Creative Assembly is the developer of the hit game series Total War. They are currently working on a new cross-platform title based on the Alien IP. Based in Horsham.

Placement: Jagex Games Studio

"Jagex Games Studio in Cambridge is looking forward to receiving applications from Goldsmiths’ talented MSc Games and Entertainment students for their summer internships in 2014”.
Sue Stather, Graduate Recruitment Specialist, Jagex Games Studio (RuneScape and Transformers Universe MMO Development Studio)

Placement: Roll 7

Roll7 is a New Cross-based indie video games developer and has been offering placements to Goldsmiths MSc Games students for three years. Roll7 is just about to release its first console title OlliOll, exclusively for PSVita, and we are looking for another 1 or 2 Goldsmiths programming interns for 2014 to work on a Sony backed PS4/Vita cross-play title.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Computing.

Structure

Final Project & Dissertation
During this final project, you will undertake a project towards your dissertation, typically over the Spring-Summer period (May to September). We offer three options to our students:

Individual research project:

This is based on a research theme selected by you and agreed upon by the lecturing team. Recent examples include:
Building a cheap kinect-like gesture tracking system
AI (rule-based) platform for game level design
Software development for our mobile technology projects (iPhone based)
Assessment
Mainly based on coursework (involving programming), essays, final project and dissertation; some lecturers may also conduct exams/quizzes.

Attendance

The taught programme is organised into three terms (full-time). The Autumn term runs from early October to mid-December, the Winter/Spring term from mid-January to the end of March, and the Summer term runs, typically, from late April to mid-September. Taught modules are given during the Autumn and Winter/Spring terms, while the Final Project takes place during a Summer term (in the second year for part-time students).

This programme is focused on providing you with the skills and experience needed to secure a job in the computer games industry.

Skills

You'll develop excellent games programming skills. These skills are highly transferrable, as games programming is viewed by other industries as being very demanding and requiring a high level of technical ability.

Careers

The global computer games industry is valued at 60 billion USD and is predicted to continuously grow in years to come. It's a mature industry with companies such as EA, Ubisoft, and Blizzard Activision giving long-term career prospects, shares, and benefits. There is a big skills shortage in this growing sector.

Placements provided by our industry partners

Asylum Entertainment
Climax Studios
The Creative Assembly
Geomerics
IdeaWorks Game Studio (Now Marmalade Game Studio)
Playmob
Rebellion
Reflections - a Ubisoft studio
Roll7
SEGA Sports Interactive
Sony Computer Entertainment Europe

Alumni

See what some of our graduates have gone on to do on our alumni news page.

100% employment

All of the graduates from the 2012/13 MSc in Computer Games & Entertainment course have secured placements at UK computer games companies.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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