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Masters Degrees (Studentship)

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Studying for a PhD with UEL’s School of Social Sciences will push you to the limit - and you’ll be supported all the way by our world-class academic staff. Read more

Studying for a PhD with UEL’s School of Social Sciences will push you to the limit - and you’ll be supported all the way by our world-class academic staff.

Our research consistently delivers improved outcomes for the delivery of social for adolescent self-harm, suicide prevention and child abuse.

Active social work and social policy research strands range from international human rights to the practical – such as applying practice-near research to social work, and using new media to help people with learning disabilities. We also use geo-information and numerical simulations to develop crime, health and social policies.

Our Sociology strand includes active research on anthropology, political economy, social psychology and psychoanalysis, international development, politics, refugee, urban and gender studies. 

Internationally, the School has partnerships with the University of New Mexico and the American University of Cairo; as well as exchange programmes with several European colleges.



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The M.Phil. in Theology and Religious Studies is a nine-month Masters course. The M.Phil. offers the opportunity for advanced study in Theology and Religious Studies across the full range of disciplines and with a strong focus on research. Read more
The M.Phil. in Theology and Religious Studies is a nine-month Masters course. The M.Phil. offers the opportunity for advanced study in Theology and Religious Studies across the full range of disciplines and with a strong focus on research. Students can draw on the expertise of leading scholars from a wide range of subjects, which allows both for specialisation and for interdisciplinary approaches. The M.Phil. is designed for students who wish to study their subject interest at an advanced level for nine-months, but also to enable those who wish to undertake further research at doctoral level to acquire the necessary skills and understanding.

Candidates submit a thesis of between 15,000 and 20,000 words and two pieces of submitted work of not more than 5,000 words which will be an essay or an equivalent exercise. Candidates then chose to do one of the following: a three-hour language examination; an exercise; or an alternative exercise within the candidates's chosen subject area if one has not already been offered.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmpmtr

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the M.Phil. students should have acquired:

- an introduction to research methods and skills appropriate to a chosen sub-discipline of the subject, such as will serve both: as a preparation for more advanced research or as offering skills of value to potential employers;
- more advanced and specialised knowledge of some fundamental issues and literatures at the forefront of research in that sub-discipline;
- the ability to construct a substantive, if preliminary, contribution to research on a particular issue within that sub-discipline, through the writing of a thesis.

Format

Teaching is by seminars, supervisions, and, as appropriate, classes and lectures. Each module shall normally be taught by four seminars of two hours duration in one term (though some subject areas may provide one-and-a-half hour seminars where there is no essay work being assessed during the seminar itself). Teaching for the exercises varies according to the nature of the exercise. Students may be required to submit preliminary written work for seminar presentations, or practice essays or exercises ahead of their submitted essays or exercises.

The seminars themselves constitute the teaching for the essays arising from the seminar course.

Other essays will be supervised individually. The norm is 2 hours of supervision (distributed between 2 or 3 meetings) per essay.

For theses, the norm is 4 hours of supervision, though that time may be distributed in various ways.

Feedback will be given on essays or exercises related to the seminar modules when the marks and comments are available. Feedback will be given regarding progress in the thesis during the supervisions given for it. There will also be termly reports on CGSRS.

Assessment

A thesis of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. The examiners may at their discretation request an oral examination in any aspect of the work submitted by the candidate.

Two pieces of written work, each of which shall be an essay of not more than 5,000 words, or an equivalent exercise related to a student's chosen seminar modules.
If a student does not choose to study a language, a further written exercise.

One three-hour language examination (if a student chooses to study a language).

Continuing

In order to be eligible to continue to the Ph.D., students must achieve at least a mark of 71 for the thesis and an overall average of at least 71% in the M.Phil. as a whole.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity & other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilisations)
- Philosophy of Religion Studentship
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies)
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Read more
The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Students will also be introduced to primary sources and bibliographical methods.

During the year, MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in subjects such as codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They must attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammparb

Course detail

The one year course MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) will have the following structure:

- (i) three modules each assessed by a written examination or a 5,000 word essay or by an Alternative Exercise.

The cumulative score of these three papers will be worth 50% of the final mark.

- (ii) a 15,000 word dissertation. The mark for the dissertation constitutes 50% of the overall mark for this course.

The following papers will be available for the MPhil pathway in Classical Arabic Studies in 2016 - 2017. You need to choose three of the following papers:

- Classical Arabic Literary Creativity
- Science and Religion in Medieval Islam
- Qur’an and Hadith
- Islamic Law
- The Arabic Grammatical Tradition
- Modes of Legitimation in the pre-modern Islamic world
- Alternative Exercise [to be arranged with specific instructors]

An individual student or a group of students sharing similar interests can arrange an 'Alternative Exercise'. Possible topics include:

- Al-Jahiz and the Ninth Century
- The Qira’at Tradition
- The Arabic Geographical Tradition
- Al-Ash’ari’s K. Maqalat al-Islamiyyin

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Classical Arabic;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Pre-Modern Middle Eastern culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may submit essays as part of their degree:
With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may take examinations as part of their degree:
Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- There is no practical assessment associated with this course.

- An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.

Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:
http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Arabic Studies) is a one-year research course, primarily for students who intend to go on to do a PhD in Arabic. Read more
The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Arabic Studies) is a one-year research course, primarily for students who intend to go on to do a PhD in Arabic. Students can take a modern or a classical option.

Applicants must already have good reading skills in Arabic, though a student can choose to enhance his or her skills in reading and interpreting texts specific to a particular topic. Some instruction in Arabic can be provided in the first term of study, but it will be consolidatory in aim.

Those applicants whose native language is Arabic must have an excellent command of the English language (evidenced by the appropriate English-language test scores). The aim of the course is to prepare graduate students for independent academic research. By the end of the year, students wishing to study for a PhD degree will be able to formulate a viable programme of doctoral research and will possess all the required skills to complete it within three years of study, the time allotted for PhD degrees at UK universities.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpabr

Course detail

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:

- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Modern and/or Classical Arabic;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Modern and/or Pre-Modern Middle Eastern culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Format

During the year, MPhil students can attend various training courses offered by the Department in subjects such as codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They must attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

Assessment

For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Arabic Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 25,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words. Students are expected to work closely with their supervisor throughout the year.

Those students who take the MPhil by research will be required to take a viva examination.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.
Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:

http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Read more
All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants for this course are expected to have a university qualification in either Hebrew or Arabic (Muslim-Jewish Relations stream) or Persian (Persian Cultural History stream).

Once admitted onto the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies), applicants will have the option of studying one of two streams:

- Muslim-Jewish Relations;
or
- Persian Cultural History

For each of these streams, students are required to choose three papers - courses usually run over two terms - in addition to doing a 15,000-word MPhil dissertation under the supervision of a supervisor. The dissertations are submitted no later than mid-August following the start of the course.

MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They may attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei

Course detail

* Muslim-Jewish Relations*

Students taking the Muslim-Jewish Relations stream will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying Muslim-Jewish relations, primary sources in translation and original language, bibliographical method, objectivity in the study of interfaith relations and controversial themes. Topics may include the Jewish languages of the Islamic world; key historical documents in the study of Muslim-Jewish Relations; Muslim and Jewish thought; Law and Society and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

* Persian Cultural History*

Students taking the Persian Cultural History stream will be offered readings in Persian cultural history, identifying persisting trends in Persian literature and cultural production from the medieval period down to modern times. These themes revolve around kingship and the image of the ideal prince, theories of justice and good government, and competing sources of secular and religious authority. Similarly, the motif of love, both earthly and divine, is a common thread running through Persian literature and entails also the extensive use of imagery of the natural world. In the modern world, the course examines a number of issues by studying Iranian cinema and focusing on gender, historical adaptation, nation and approaches to narration and resistance to dominant discourses, reflecting also on how the stories and legends of the classical tradition are adapted for contemporary literature and media. In discussing these topics, attention is paid to their visual as well as written representation.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Hebrew, Arabic or Persian;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Muslim and Jewish or Persian culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

The one-year MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies) will have the following structure for the (1) Muslim-Jewish Relations option and (2) Persian Cultural History option:

1. Three modules each assessed by an examination or a 5,000 word course exercise
2. A 15,000 word dissertation.

With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.
Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:

http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei/apply

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Our MPhil programme in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies is offered as a one-year programme which aims to give graduate students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or entry to professions requiring such skills. Read more
Our MPhil programme in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies is offered as a one-year programme which aims to give graduate students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or entry to professions requiring such skills.

This MPhil programme is taken by dissertation only. This entails working closely with one supervisor throughout the year on a 25,000 word dissertation to be submitted in mid-August.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmir

Course detail

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:

- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Modern and/or Pre Modern Arabic or Persian;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Arabic and/or Persian culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Format

During the year, MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They may attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

Assessment

For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 25,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

Those students who take the MPhil by research will be required to take a viva examination.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.
Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:

http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Read more
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

The Divinity Faculty at Cambridge has distinguished international reputation for research, teaching and for the formation of graduate students in Theology and Religious Studies. Consistently rated as one of the top research units in the country in our subjects, it offers postgraduate training at an acknowledged world-class standard.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmlltr

Specialisms

The teaching officers of the Faculty include leading experts in a wide range of fields:

- Biblical Studies;
- Ancient, Medieval and Modern Judaism;
- Patristics;
- History of Christianity;
- Christian Systematic Theology;
- Philosophy of Religion and Ethics;
- Religion and the Natural Sciences;
- Religion and the Social Sciences;
- Study of World Religions (with special reference to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism).

Each major research area is centred on a senior seminar meeting fortnightly during term. In practice these seminars are often interdisciplinary in character (such as the D Society in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics and the Hebrew, Jewish and Early Christian Studies Seminar); and a variety of other informal graduate seminars and reading groups also helps to expand the repertoire of exchange. A number of named lectureships (the Stantons, the Hulseans etc) regularly bring international figures from outside Cambridge to contribute to the research culture.

First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Learning Outcomes

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Format

Supervisions are given on the dissertation, twelve hours per year full-time (reduced pro rata for part-time).

Feedback will be given by the supervisor in the course of supervisions and in termly reports. In addition, there will be a report from the assessors following the first-year examination.

Assessment

Dissertation of not more than 80,000 words with a compulsory viva.

A first-year examination for which students must submit the following:
- a summary of the scope, purpose, methodology and value of research project;
- a provisional outline of dissertation with a timetable for the conduct and completion of the research and writing;
- a bibliography of topic and its immediate intellectual context set out in accordance with the conventions current field of study;
- a sample of written-up research of no more than 10,000 words, with appropriate footnotes and bibliographical references (included in word-count).

Students will have a meeting with two assessors to discuss the submitted work.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Faculty Studentships:

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity &other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilizations)
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies0
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme trains you in the fundamental aspects of quantitative and qualitative research, including research design, data collection and data analysis, and provides practical, ‘hands-on’ experience. Read more

This programme trains you in the fundamental aspects of quantitative and qualitative research, including research design, data collection and data analysis, and provides practical, ‘hands-on’ experience.

The programme will appeal to you if you would like to develop your career in experimental research, or to enhance your ability to apply research skills in either the public or the private sector.

The programme will enable you to:

  • gain a thorough knowledge of a range of behavioural and social science methodologies
  • understand the principles of quantitative and qualitative research
  • correctly apply advanced statistical and computing techniques
  • enhance your skills in critical analysis and evaluation of research findings
  • consider philosophical and ethical issues in relation to science in general and to psychological research in particular
  • develop expertise in data collection, handling large data sets and data analysis
  • appropriately plan and design, present and evaluate, effective psychological research studies

You also complete a research project leading to a dissertation, and you participate in general research skills training modules with students from other departments at Goldsmiths.

For more than ten years now, the programme has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council(ESRC) as providing the generic and specific research training required by students in receipt of ESRC studentship awards.

Since 2011, the programme has been the research methods training masters for the psychology pathway within the Goldsmiths and Queen Mary ESRC-funded Doctoral Training Centre (2011-2015).

Students in receipt of an ESRC 1+3 PhD studentship in the psychology pathway have to take this course as the first year of a 4-year PhD programme; students who have completed the Masters self-funded, are eligible to bid for an ESRC funded +3 PhD studentship in the psychology pathway at Goldsmiths or Queen Mary. 

Structure

The MRes runs for one academic year full-time or two years part-time. Most of the lectures, seminars and workshops on the programme run in the first two terms, but you are expected to pursue your studies beyond formal term times, particularly in respect of your research project.

Lectures, seminars and workshops for the programme are timetabled mainly for Mondays and Tuesdays, but you may occasionally be required to attend other seminars and workshops held by the Department and College. You must take all the modules listed in the syllabus.

The list below provides an overview of the topics covered in each module. All modules include a strong practical component.

In addition to these modules, you will also complete:

Research Project (60 credits)

You will produce an empirical piece of research leading to a research project, supervised by at least one member of the lecturing staff in the Department. The project provides invaluable, practical ‘hands on’ experience of evaluating a particular research question. You have the opportunity to set your research question, determine and apply the methods to obtain the answers, and present, discuss and interpret the results. You normally start your project in the second term, together with necessary literature reviews and research design. Work on your project will continue full-time following the formal examinations in May up until project submission in mid-September. 

Additional workshops and seminars

You are also required to attend some of the Department’s programme of Invited Speakers’ talks given by distinguished academics in psychology, and to produce a written critique on one of these. You are welcome to attend the Department’s other seminar series, which are hosted by eminent academics and practitioners.

Assessment

Written examinations; coursework; dissertation. 

Skills

The programme aims to equip you with a sound understanding of methods and skills necessary to conduct high-level research in psychology, using a wide range of approaches and techniques.

Careers

The programme provides the ideal preparation for a research career. Many students go on to do a PhD, or to conduct experimental research in a wide variety of settings.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Introduction. Applications are invited for an MSc by Research fees funded studentship post commencing 19th March 2018. The Studentship is open to home/EU students. Read more

Introduction

Applications are invited for an MSc by Research fees funded studentship post commencing 19th March 2018. The Studentship is open to home/EU students. It will run for 1 year and the fees of the MSc by Research programme will be paid by the Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research (ISPAR) at the University of Bedfordshire. 

ISPAR delivers research spanning across sport science, physical activity, health, psychology, behaviour change, pedagogy and social sciences of sport. In the latest Research Excellent Framework assessment 95% of our research was rated as internationally recognised or better. 

About the project

The Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research (ISPAR) and the Institute for Research in Applicable Computing (IRAC) at the University of Bedfordshire have partnered to deliver this exciting interdisciplinary research project. The project will undertake an evaluation of a mobile phone app and online platform developed by these two research institutes to promote the health and wellbeing of breast cancer patients. The app and online platform are designed to empower patients in their healthcare by encouraging them to self-manage their condition. The tools help to monitor health, medication reminders, medical appointments, physical activity, sedentary behaviour, pain, and fatigue, which are common problems in cancer patients. The app also delivers the patient tips and reminders for healthy behaviours and provides interactive visualisation of the patient’s data, which can be shared with medical professionals to inform clinical decisions. 

The successful candidate will undertake a research project to evaluate the effects of these tools on quality of life, pain, fatigue, physical activity, and sedentary behaviour in breast cancer patients. The candidate will gain research experience in a clinical setting and will work within an interdisciplinary team on this exciting project. It is expected that the student will contribute to the study design, NHS ethical approval process, delivery and evaluation of the intervention, and author a journal publication to disseminate the findings. 

Candidate requirements

The applicant will gain experience in the design, conduct and presentation of research relating to the project. Applicants will have a good first degree (minimum of 2:1) in a relevant discipline (e.g. physical activity, sport and exercise science, applied computing, biomedical science). 

Supervisor:

The student will be under the supervision of: 

- Dr Daniel Bailey Senior Lecturer in Health, Nutrition and Exercise; Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research 

- Feng Dong Professor in Visual Computing; Institute for Research in Applicable Computing 

Funding: ISPAR will pay the fees of £4,107; there are no bench fees associated with this project. The post will not include a bursary. 

How to apply

For an application pack or any application queries please email  quoting the appropriate reference number. In addition to a CV all applicants will need to send a cover letter with supporting information on their experience and skills and how these relate to the advertised studentship. 

It is expected that interviews will take place the week beginning 26th February 2018. 

For informal discussions or non-application related queries, please contact Dr Daniel Bailey by email at 

Closing date: 19th February 2018 



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A Masters’ studentship is available in the group of Dr. Martin Schröder in the School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Durham University to study stress signaling mechanisms originating from the endoplasmic reticulum. Read more
A Masters’ studentship is available in the group of Dr. Martin Schröder in the School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Durham University to study stress signaling mechanisms originating from the endoplasmic reticulum. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to the development and progression of many diverse diseases affecting secretory tissues, such as diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The successful candidate will employ modern genetic and molecular techniques to understand the underlying cell biological mechanisms in endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling that maintain the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum.

The MRes student will investigate control of ER stress signaling specificity by the dosage of ER stress. You will use a range of molecular biology and biochemical techniques to study (a) how the severity of ER stress alters the signaling outputs of the ER stress sensing protein kinase-endoribonuclease IRE1 or (b) how ER stress regulates transcriptional responses through the Rpd3-Sin3 histone/lysine deacetylase (see for example Schröder et al., 2000; Schröder et al., 2004). These techniques include protein expression and purification, immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, cloning, transfection, and RNA analysis by real-time PCR or Northern blotting.

Overall, the studentship will provide interdisciplinary training in molecular biology, genetics, and cell biology.

References

M. Schröder, Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 65 (2008) 862-894: Endoplasmic reticulum stress responses.
M. Schröder, C. Y. Liu, R. Clark, and R. J. Kaufman, EMBO J. 23 (2004) 2281-2292: The unfolded protein response represses differentiation through the RPD3-SIN3 histone deacetylase.
M. Schröder, J. S. Chang, and R. J. Kaufman, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 2962-2975: The unfolded protein response represses nitrogen-starvation induced developmental differentiation in yeast.

To apply

To apply: send a CV including the names of two references and a one page personal statement describing clearly your background, interest and experience in scientific research to . In your cover letter you should clearly identify the funding source to cover living expenses, tuition fees and bench fees. Further information can be found at https://www.dur.ac.uk/martin.schroeder or by contacting Dr. Martin Schroeder.

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The Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering is seeking to appoint an MPhil/MRes student to conduct research for Eco-Innovation Cheshire and Warrington Industry Collaboration programme. Read more

The Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering is seeking to appoint an MPhil/MRes student to conduct research for Eco-Innovation Cheshire and Warrington Industry Collaboration programme. Post Graduate fees are paid by the industrial sponsor for UK/EU students.

This studentship is part funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

Background

The company design and manufacture of energy efficient control and monitoring systems for the refrigeration industry. With 30 years industry experience and a focus on energy efficiency and energy reduction the company delivers direct and indirect energy savings, improved control and greater operational efficiency worldwide.

The proposed innovation adds an exciting new element/component to the refrigeration process. It will improve accuracy, optimise and significantly improve the efficiency of the process. It could be applied in a number of formats worldwide to deliver lower energy consumption, reduce equipment operation, reduce equipment maintenance and lower costs for retailers.  The technology has the potential to save mega-tonnes of carbon and significantly contribute to the UK’s climate change targets by 2030.

In this project, you will apply electronics and electrical engineering skills to develop a suitable and commercially viable hardware product for sensing, verify sensor placement and the analysis of digital signals. 

Summary of research tasks and work programme

1.   Establish/verify a low cost, robust and reliable sensor.

2.   Verify the sensors ability to detect key signals for use with digital signal processing analysis.

3.   Verify the best position and mount for optimised/accurate data and digital signal analysis.

4.   Verify the sensor can operate in the varying conditions created by the refrigeration process.

5.   Provide a report and evidence of the research and conclusions to the University of Chester and the company.

Skills and knowledge

1.   Knowledge of DSP tool such as MATLAB, Audacity or similar.

2.   Skilled in electronics design for sensor interfaces.

3.   Capability to use DSP tool, build interface circuits to micro processor.

Qualifications:

First degree (2:1 or above) in Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Control Engineering, Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering or Mathematics (essential).

You will be a motivated and dynamic person, with a demonstrable capability to conduct independent research.

Applicants whose first language is not English must provide evidence of proficiency to IELTS 6.5 with no less than 5.5 in each band or equivalent.

Funding

This studentship attracts a tax exempt stipend of £15,000 per annum. Post graduate fees are funded for UK/EU based students. International students will be required to make an additional contribution to their post graduate fees.

Application process

A completed University of Chester Postgraduate Research Degree (MPhil/MRes) application form including contact details of two referees (at least one must be familiar with your most recent academic work).

Candidates should apply online via the University of Chester website page https://www.chester.ac.uk/research/degrees/studentships and specify their reference number when applying. The reference number is: RA001801

Availability for interview

Please be available for interview during the last 2 weeks of November 2017. Exact time and date are to be agreed.

Further information

Prospective applicants are encouraged to initially contact Gerard Edwards Tel. 01244 512314 to discuss the project further. For general enquiries contact Postgraduate Research Admissions, University of Chester at

Closing date: 19th November 2017



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This Masters in Translational Medicine is the first year of a British Heart Foundation 4-Year PhD studentship. it is not offered as an individual programme of study. Read more
This Masters in Translational Medicine is the first year of a British Heart Foundation 4-Year PhD studentship: it is not offered as an individual programme of study.

Why this programme

◾The programme will provide you with the skills needed to assess critically recent advances in biology relevant to human disease.
◾It covers the areas of cardiovascular medicine, inflammation and immunology, neuroscience, mathematics, bioinformatics and cell biology, and advances in fundamental biomedical science relevant to integrative mammalian biology.
◾You will be taught the administrative procedures and ethical and project planning requirements for applying for statutory licenses (personal and project) for animal work as well as ethical aspects of gene and cell therapy.
◾The University is one of the few centres in the UK offering BHF 4-Year PhD studentships. Successful applicants accepted into the programme will be fully funded. For more information, see: BHF 4 year PhD programme.

Programme structure

The programme is part of a 4-year PhD with the first year being an MRes. The MRes is made up of three individual 12-week research placements after an intense two-week induction. Each project will be based on different themes with three different supervisors. Years 2-4 make up the PhD portion of the programme.

Induction

You will be required to attend an in-depth introductory programme, which will provide training in research ethics, statistics, project design, literature review and laboratory safety techniques.

Placements

The induction is followed by three individual research placements. These are at the core of this programme, providing three separate projects to allow you to define your areas of interest for your PhD studies. Each placement is a 12-week project and this will be with three different principal supervisors. You will be encouraged to choose placements beyond your undergraduate subject experience to maximise your exposure to new techniques and science. Supervisors are drawn from a wide range of academic disciplines, such as medicine, biomedical and life sciences, mathematics, electronics and electrical engineering, and veterinary medicine.

Career prospects

You will be taught the practical laboratory skills needed to pursue a career in basic translational medicine and applied science through research projects. After successfully completing year 1, you will be awarded an MRes, and progress to a PhD. The programme produces fully trained scientists ready for progression to academic or industrial careers.

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Area of research. Recent figures highlight that officers from 27 UK police forces took more than a million sick days over the last three years because of psychological distress (ITV news, 2016). Read more

Area of research

Recent figures highlight that officers from 27 UK police forces took more than a million sick days over the last three years because of psychological distress (ITV news, 2016). This report suggests that not only are these sickness days due to the stress and psychological distress caused by the critical incidents that they deal with, such as death, trauma, violence and abuse; but also by the behaviours they engage in to cope; such as alcohol use. What is known is that job stress and negative affect (such as depression) are significantly linked with maladaptive behaviours such as alcohol abuse in police officers (Kohan & O'Connor, 2002). It is also noteworthy that there is a 10-fold increase of suicidal ideation in police officers who have elevated levels of stress and alcohol use (Violanti, 2004). 

Conversely, there is a protective nature of physical activity behaviour on psychological wellbeing, with more active individuals showing lower levels of stress and depression and a greater satisfaction with life (Penedo & Dahn, 2005). It has long been discussed that poor mental health (depression, anxiety, stress) is significantly linked to illness and disease, particularly in front line staff (Hegg-Deloye et al., 2014). In contrast, evidence confirms that those who hold a positive outlook on life will have a significantly longer life expectancy than those who focus on the negative (Danner et al., 2001) and are less likely to be immunosuppressed (Cohen et al., 2003), making them less susceptible to viral infections such as colds and flu. 

Aim

Using a mixed methods approach (qualitative, quantitative and experimental design), this programme of research aims to identify health-related risk factors and those of a protective nature in the local police force. Using an online data collection tool, it will identify the level of subjective wellbeing (affect, stress, satisfaction with life), self-efficacy beliefs, and their link with health preventive behaviours, namely physical activity, diet, alcohol use, smoking behaviour and sleep patterns and physical health risk factors (such as obesity) across the Bedfordshire Police force. As a feasibility assessment for a future intervention, it will further test two brief Positive Psychology Interventions (PPIs), with the intention to enhance subjective wellbeing, and thus reduce levels of stress and negative health behaviours. Qualitative interviews will be used to support these findings. 

Funding

This studentship will cover fees for a full year-long MSc by Research alongside costs towards the dissemination of the findings (i.e. conference attendance, publication fees). 

Start date

Applicants should be available for a 19th March 2018 start date. 

Interviews will be held week commencing 19th February 2018 and/or week commencing 26th February 2018. 

The successful candidate and the experienced supervisory team of Dr Angel Chater (), Dr Julia Fruer () and Dr Daniel Bailey () will be responsible for developing the final project outline. 

*Subject to satisfactory progress on PP1 and PP2. 



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An opportunity to take a Masters of Research specialising in public health history; two bursaries exist to cover one studentship looking at the history of Newcaste-under-Lyme and Stoke-on-Trent, respectively (see http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/hi/research/postgrads.htm).. Read more
An opportunity to take a Masters of Research specialising in public health history; two bursaries exist to cover one studentship looking at the history of Newcaste-under-Lyme and Stoke-on-Trent, respectively (see http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/hi/research/postgrads.htm).

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This programme delivers high-quality research methods training, including practical experience with qualitative and quantitative data analysis software packages and detailed analysis related to research epistemology and the philosophy of social science. Read more

This programme delivers high-quality research methods training, including practical experience with qualitative and quantitative data analysis software packages and detailed analysis related to research epistemology and the philosophy of social science. It can provide opportunities to gain 'hands on' experience and contribute to current research projects, working, for example, with the Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM).

The programme is suited to those hoping to later pursue a research degree (usually PhD) but who do not meet the research methods training entry requirements, as well as those who wish to apply for an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) studentship, as the programme is recognised by the ESRC for 1+3 funding.

The programme is a Faculty-wide course and modules are taught within the School of Education, the School of Applied Social Sciences (Sociology) and the Department of Psychology. This provides you with the opportunity to come into contact with other students studying research methods in different disciplines across the Social Sciences.

Core Modules

  • Research Design and Process (15 credits)
  • Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
  • Experiments in Education (15 credits)
  • Research Methods in Education (30 credits)
  • Dissertation (45 credits)

Either:

  • Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

Or:

  • Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits)

Either:

  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)

And:

  • Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

Or:

  • Applied Statistics (30 credits).

Optional Modules

15 credits from:

  • Philosophy of Social Research (15 credits)
  • Categorical Data Analysis with SPSS and R (15 credits).

Course Learning and Teaching

Teaching is offered through lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will take part in a range of learning activities, including reading, discussion, presentations, criticising existing research, analysing and interpreting data, designing experiments, search literature and synthesising the results of multiple studies. Each module is assessed with an assignment (3,000) words for a 15-credit module and a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities in education are wide and include classroom teaching, educational leadership and management, administration and policy development.



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