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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Designed for those already working in student-facing services, or graduates who are interested in this career path, our innovative Masters degree will develop your expertise, knowledge, skills and experience in this rapidly emerging area of higher education. Read more
Designed for those already working in student-facing services, or graduates who are interested in this career path, our innovative Masters degree will develop your expertise, knowledge, skills and experience in this rapidly emerging area of higher education. It includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the USA.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/student-affairs

We’ve designed our unique Masters course with you in mind. If you're already working in student-facing services, in the UK or overseas, it will expand your professional skills. If you're a graduate it will equip you with the knowledge and insight you need to start a career in this field. You can choose to study with us full-time, or part-time while you continue to work.

This course gives you an exciting opportunity to participate in the emerging field of student affairs. You’ll make an important contribution to the development of literature and research relating to student affairs in the UK. Whether you work in student services, libraries, residence services, student unions or sport centres, you’ll be able to tailor your research project to your own area of interest.

Alongside improving your understanding of key issues in higher education student affairs, you’ll have the chance to gain first-hand experience of student affairs in the USA through an optional internship with a US university. Here you'll undertake a project under supervision and present your findings to colleagues in the USA. This opportunity is subject to an application process and includes some, but not all, costs. There will also be opportunities for placements here at Anglia Ruskin University.

Our MA will not only increase your career opportunities, but let you transform the way you, your colleagues and your institution provide student-facing services.

Careers

Our MA programme will help your personal and continuing professional development. You’ll advance your knowledge and application of leadership and management in the different areas covered by student-facing services, such as student engagement, advising, student development and support.

This course will benefit you if you want to work in a student affairs-related area, or if you're already a professional in a student-facing service and want to progress to higher levels of management. It's intended for professionals from areas such as:

• student services
• careers and employability
• the Students' Union
• sports and activities
• student engagement
• library
• registry or academic office
• accommodation or residential service
• registration
• finance.

With a strong focus on the skills and knowledge needed for a successful career in student affairs – where there's a skills gap at present – our course will boost your prospects.

Modules & Assessment

Educational and Social Research Methods
Key Issues and Themes in Student Affairs - Higher Education
National and International Perspectives in Higher Education Student Affairs
Professional Enquiry in Education
Specialist Studies in Student Affairs in Higher Education (part-time students only)
Postgraduate Major Project

Please note that you will need to complete all of the above core modules. This course does not have any optional modules. Modules are subject to change.

Assessment

We'll assess you in a number of ways, from literature reviews to reflective commentaries on your professional practice, to make sure you're learning effectively.

Other forms of assessment include visual presentations, comparative studies, critical analyses of existing research, research pilots and a research project.

Where you'll study

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - Our striking, modern campus sits by the riverside in Chelmsford's University and Innovation Quarter. http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

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The Master of Information Technology is aimed at IT professionals and recent graduates (domestic and international) wishing to undertake an advanced programme of study in order to prepare for further study or to assist with obtaining a more senior position. Read more

Course Outline

The Master of Information Technology is aimed at IT professionals and recent graduates (domestic and international) wishing to undertake an advanced programme of study in order to prepare for further study or to assist with obtaining a more senior position.

Course Content

Master of Information Technology students will undertake a coherent programme of 180 credits approved by the programme manager and will follow one of two pathways.

Pathway 1

The first pathway is designed for students who want to undertake more course work and consists of four compulsory components:

- IT801 Managing ICT Projects and Systems
The student will develop knowledge and skills in managing ICT projects and systems. The student will also research into established frameworks that are relevant to current industry trends.
- IT802 Researching ICT Issues and Trends
The student will develop knowledge and skills in critiquing and undertaking research, assessing social impacts of ICT and analysing ethical issues in ICT practice.
- IT803 Research Proposal
The student will develop expertise in preparing research proposals, including reviewing relevant literature, selecting a methodology and exploring ethical issues.
-IT901 Research Project
The student will develop expertise in conducting applied research that informs professional ICT practice.

and an approved selection of level 8 papers worth at least 90 credits from the following list:

- IT811 Business Analysis
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the structure and function of organisations in order to improve efficiency and productivity using ICT.
- IT812 Business Intelligence
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the strategic use of data warehousing, data mining and data analysis in order to obtain business intelligence.
- IT813 ICT Infrastructure
The student will develop knowledge about various aspects of ICT infrastructure, including emerging digital technologies.
- IT814 ICT Quality
The student will develop knowledge and skills in the application of methods and techniques used in ICT quality assurance and testing.
- IT815 ICT Security
The student will develop knowledge of the impact of security on an ICT infrastructure, research into the ethical and legal implications of ICT security and cybercrime, and identify appropriate investigation strategies in the light of emerging digital technologies.
- IT816 Mobile Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to create, market and deploy a mobile application.
- IT817 Web Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to develop web services and applications.
- IT818 Special Topic
The student will critically examine current developments and emerging issues in a specified topic area.
- IT819 Applied Project
The student will be able to identify and apply appropriate ICT techniques and technologies to solve a non-trivial problem in a business, educational, industrial or similar setting.

Pathway 2

The second pathway is designed for students who want to undertake a more substantial research project and consists of four compulsory components:

- IT801 Managing ICT Projects and Systems
- The student will develop knowledge and skills in managing ICT projects and systems. The student will also research into established frameworks that are relevant to current industry trends.
- IT802 Researching ICT Issues and Trends
The student will develop knowledge and skills in critiquing and undertaking research, assessing social impacts of ICT and analysing ethical issues in ICT practice.
- IT803 Research Proposal
The student will develop expertise in preparing research proposals, including reviewing relevant literature, selecting a methodology and exploring ethical issues.
- IT902 Thesis
The student will develop expertise in conducting publishable research about applied ICT.

and an approved selection of level 8 papers worth at least 45 credits from the following list (each worth 15 credits, except for 819):

- IT811 Business Analysis
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the structure and function of organisations in order to improve efficiency and productivity using ICT.
- IT812 Business Intelligence
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the strategic use of data warehousing, data mining and data analysis in order to obtain business intelligence.
- IT813 ICT Infrastructure
The student will develop knowledge about various aspects of ICT infrastructure, including emerging digital technologies.
- IT814 ICT Quality
The student will develop knowledge and skills in the application of methods and techniques used in ICT quality assurance and testing.
- IT815 ICT Security
The student will develop knowledge of the impact of security on an ICT infrastructure, research into the ethical and legal implications of ICT security and cybercrime, and identify appropriate investigation strategies in the light of emerging digital technologies.
- IT816 Mobile Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to create, market and deploy a mobile application.
- IT817 Web Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to develop web services and applications.
- IT818 Special Topic
The student will critically examine current developments and emerging issues in a specified topic area.
- IT819 Applied Project
The student will be able to identify and apply appropriate ICT techniques and technologies to solve a non-trivial problem in a business, educational, industrial or similar setting.

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The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings. Read more
The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings.

To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. Leaders in higher education need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings, and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, students are often able to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study without compromising the professional standards of either program.

Successful completion of the dual-degree programs results in two degrees: a Master's in Public Administration (MPA) and a Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration.

The MPA-MSAA Dual Degree Program

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) and Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) programs both are housed within the College of Community and Public Affairs and are considered professional terminal degrees. By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, the MPA-MSAA dual degree program allows students to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study, without compromising the professional standards of either program. The 42-credit hour MPA program and the 45-credit hour MS in Student Affairs Administration program can be completed as part of a 66-credit hour program (rather than 87 credit hours required to complete the two programs without the benefit of the dual degree structure).
The MPA-MSAA dual degree will prepare students for administrative positions in college and university settings. The MSAA program provides specialized training for students desiring to work in student affairs offices, while the MPA provides the knowledge and skills necessary for management. To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. This requires the study of organizational and student development theory as well as gaining hands-on experience in at least one student services office. Leaders in higher education also need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Letters of recommendation (see details below)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores. GMAT scores can be submitted in lieu of GRE scores.

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

You must also meet the following program-specific requirements:
MPA:
- Two letters of recommendation
Letters of recommendation should be from individuals who know the applicant in a professional capacity, such as professors, work supervisors, and professionals from organizations where the applicant has served as a volunteer or in another capacity. When evaluating the letters of recommendation, the admissions committee looks for evidence of academic achievement, community involvement, and personal characteristics that suggests the applicant has the capacity to foster an institutional culture that advances democratic administration and governance.

- Personal statement
The personal statement should be no more than 500 words or two (2) double-spaced, typed pages and should answer the question,"Why do I want an MPA?" You may wish to describe your reasons for pursuing graduate studies in public administration, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee. In the personal statement, the committee assesses the student's commitment to public and/or nonprofit administration as well as his/her ability to communicate in writing.

- Significant work experience (5 or more years in the public and/or nonprofit sectors) can earn applicants a positive adjustment to their admissions scores. However, the lack of work experience does not result in a penalty.

MS:
- Personal statements should specifically address the applicant's interest in the program, career goals, and current skills and experiences relative to their current or intended career in student affairs

- Three letters of recommendation, which should come from instructors or professors who can attest to the applicant's academic ability for graduate study
Applicants who have been out of college for at least three (3) years may submit current letters of reference from employment supervisors or others affiliated with their employment who can attest to their ability to perform successfully and professionally and to the likelihood of success in a graduate program

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Contract
*By signing the above document, you agree, if admitted to the program, to abide by the professional standards of student affairs administration as set forth by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards that govern our profession.
*Review the Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards before signing the contract.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Certification of Information

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course: