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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Designed for those already working in student-facing services, or graduates who are interested in this career path, our innovative Masters degree will develop your expertise, knowledge, skills and experience in this rapidly emerging area of higher education. Read more
Designed for those already working in student-facing services, or graduates who are interested in this career path, our innovative Masters degree will develop your expertise, knowledge, skills and experience in this rapidly emerging area of higher education. It includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the USA.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/student-affairs

We’ve designed our unique Masters course with you in mind. If you're already working in student-facing services, in the UK or overseas, it will expand your professional skills. If you're a graduate it will equip you with the knowledge and insight you need to start a career in this field. You can choose to study with us full-time, or part-time while you continue to work.

This course gives you an exciting opportunity to participate in the emerging field of student affairs. You’ll make an important contribution to the development of literature and research relating to student affairs in the UK. Whether you work in student services, libraries, residence services, student unions or sport centres, you’ll be able to tailor your research project to your own area of interest.

Alongside improving your understanding of key issues in higher education student affairs, you’ll have the chance to gain first-hand experience of student affairs in the USA through an optional internship with a US university. Here you'll undertake a project under supervision and present your findings to colleagues in the USA. This opportunity is subject to an application process and includes some, but not all, costs. There will also be opportunities for placements here at Anglia Ruskin University.

Our MA will not only increase your career opportunities, but let you transform the way you, your colleagues and your institution provide student-facing services.

Careers

Our MA programme will help your personal and continuing professional development. You’ll advance your knowledge and application of leadership and management in the different areas covered by student-facing services, such as student engagement, advising, student development and support.

This course will benefit you if you want to work in a student affairs-related area, or if you're already a professional in a student-facing service and want to progress to higher levels of management. It's intended for professionals from areas such as:

• student services
• careers and employability
• the Students' Union
• sports and activities
• student engagement
• library
• registry or academic office
• accommodation or residential service
• registration
• finance.

With a strong focus on the skills and knowledge needed for a successful career in student affairs – where there's a skills gap at present – our course will boost your prospects.

Modules & Assessment

Educational and Social Research Methods
Key Issues and Themes in Student Affairs - Higher Education
National and International Perspectives in Higher Education Student Affairs
Professional Enquiry in Education
Specialist Studies in Student Affairs in Higher Education (part-time students only)
Postgraduate Major Project

Please note that you will need to complete all of the above core modules. This course does not have any optional modules. Modules are subject to change.

Assessment

We'll assess you in a number of ways, from literature reviews to reflective commentaries on your professional practice, to make sure you're learning effectively.

Other forms of assessment include visual presentations, comparative studies, critical analyses of existing research, research pilots and a research project.

Where you'll study

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - Our striking, modern campus sits by the riverside in Chelmsford's University and Innovation Quarter. http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

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The Master of Information Technology is aimed at IT professionals and recent graduates (domestic and international) wishing to undertake an advanced programme of study in order to prepare for further study or to assist with obtaining a more senior position. Read more

Course Outline

The Master of Information Technology is aimed at IT professionals and recent graduates (domestic and international) wishing to undertake an advanced programme of study in order to prepare for further study or to assist with obtaining a more senior position.

Course Content

Master of Information Technology students will undertake a coherent programme of 180 credits approved by the programme manager and will follow one of two pathways.

Pathway 1

The first pathway is designed for students who want to undertake more course work and consists of four compulsory components:

- IT801 Managing ICT Projects and Systems
The student will develop knowledge and skills in managing ICT projects and systems. The student will also research into established frameworks that are relevant to current industry trends.
- IT802 Researching ICT Issues and Trends
The student will develop knowledge and skills in critiquing and undertaking research, assessing social impacts of ICT and analysing ethical issues in ICT practice.
- IT803 Research Proposal
The student will develop expertise in preparing research proposals, including reviewing relevant literature, selecting a methodology and exploring ethical issues.
-IT901 Research Project
The student will develop expertise in conducting applied research that informs professional ICT practice.

and an approved selection of level 8 papers worth at least 90 credits from the following list:

- IT811 Business Analysis
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the structure and function of organisations in order to improve efficiency and productivity using ICT.
- IT812 Business Intelligence
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the strategic use of data warehousing, data mining and data analysis in order to obtain business intelligence.
- IT813 ICT Infrastructure
The student will develop knowledge about various aspects of ICT infrastructure, including emerging digital technologies.
- IT814 ICT Quality
The student will develop knowledge and skills in the application of methods and techniques used in ICT quality assurance and testing.
- IT815 ICT Security
The student will develop knowledge of the impact of security on an ICT infrastructure, research into the ethical and legal implications of ICT security and cybercrime, and identify appropriate investigation strategies in the light of emerging digital technologies.
- IT816 Mobile Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to create, market and deploy a mobile application.
- IT817 Web Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to develop web services and applications.
- IT818 Special Topic
The student will critically examine current developments and emerging issues in a specified topic area.
- IT819 Applied Project
The student will be able to identify and apply appropriate ICT techniques and technologies to solve a non-trivial problem in a business, educational, industrial or similar setting.

Pathway 2

The second pathway is designed for students who want to undertake a more substantial research project and consists of four compulsory components:

- IT801 Managing ICT Projects and Systems
- The student will develop knowledge and skills in managing ICT projects and systems. The student will also research into established frameworks that are relevant to current industry trends.
- IT802 Researching ICT Issues and Trends
The student will develop knowledge and skills in critiquing and undertaking research, assessing social impacts of ICT and analysing ethical issues in ICT practice.
- IT803 Research Proposal
The student will develop expertise in preparing research proposals, including reviewing relevant literature, selecting a methodology and exploring ethical issues.
- IT902 Thesis
The student will develop expertise in conducting publishable research about applied ICT.

and an approved selection of level 8 papers worth at least 45 credits from the following list (each worth 15 credits, except for 819):

- IT811 Business Analysis
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the structure and function of organisations in order to improve efficiency and productivity using ICT.
- IT812 Business Intelligence
The student will develop knowledge and skills in analysing the strategic use of data warehousing, data mining and data analysis in order to obtain business intelligence.
- IT813 ICT Infrastructure
The student will develop knowledge about various aspects of ICT infrastructure, including emerging digital technologies.
- IT814 ICT Quality
The student will develop knowledge and skills in the application of methods and techniques used in ICT quality assurance and testing.
- IT815 ICT Security
The student will develop knowledge of the impact of security on an ICT infrastructure, research into the ethical and legal implications of ICT security and cybercrime, and identify appropriate investigation strategies in the light of emerging digital technologies.
- IT816 Mobile Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to create, market and deploy a mobile application.
- IT817 Web Application Development
The student will develop knowledge and skills required to develop web services and applications.
- IT818 Special Topic
The student will critically examine current developments and emerging issues in a specified topic area.
- IT819 Applied Project
The student will be able to identify and apply appropriate ICT techniques and technologies to solve a non-trivial problem in a business, educational, industrial or similar setting.

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The Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) degree program is ideally suited for those who wish to pursue careers in higher education. Read more

Program Overview

The Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) degree program is ideally suited for those who wish to pursue careers in higher education. Potential higher education roles include academic advising, admissions and enrollment management, career development and placement, financial aid, health services, judicial affairs, leadership development, multicultural affairs, non-traditional and commuter student services, residential life, services for students with disabilities, student activities, and student development and involvement.

Explore Student Affairs Administration: https://www.binghamton.edu/student-affairs-administration/index.html

Coupled with sufficient professional experience, the MSAA may also serve as the foundation for students wishing to become deans of students or vice presidents for student affairs.

The MSAA degree program is grounded in both student development theory and the concept of theory-to-practice-to-theory. Thus, an underlying goal of the program is to prepare professionals who have working knowledge of how student development theory is used in practice, and how practice serves to inform future theory development. A secondary goal of the proposed program is to prepare administrative leaders and personnel who are comfortable working with people of diverse backgrounds in positions that require decision-makers to respond to department/unit situations while taking into consideration how their decisions impact other systems (i.e. departments and/or divisions) within the institution.

Curriculum

The curriculum for the MSAA degree program was designed to meet the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Professional Preparation Commission Standards.

Required Core Courses Include:
Introduction to Student Personnel Services
College Student Development: Theory, Research and Practice
Culture of the American College Student
Organization and Administration of Higher Education
Law in Higher Education

Explore the complete curriculum online: https://www.binghamton.edu/student-affairs-administration/curriculum/index.html

Admissions Materials:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee

- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended

- Two letters of recommendation, which should come from instructors or professors who can attest to the applicant's academic ability for graduate study
Applicants who have been out of college for at least three (3) years may submit current letters of reference from employment supervisors or others affiliated with their employment who can attest to their ability to perform successfully and professionally and to the likelihood of success in a graduate program

- Personal statement (2-3 pages), which should specifically address the applicant's interest in the program, career goals, and current skills and experiences relative to their current or intended career in student affairs

- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)

- Official GRE scores. GMAT scores can be submitted in lieu of GRE scores.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Contract
* By signing the document, you agree, if admitted to the program, to abide by the professional standards of student affairs administration as set forth by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards that govern our profession.
* Review the Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards before signing the contract.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Certification of Information

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings. Read more
The MPA + MS Student Affairs Administration Dual-Degree Program prepares students for administrative positions in college and university settings.

To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. Leaders in higher education need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings, and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, students are often able to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study without compromising the professional standards of either program.

Successful completion of the dual-degree programs results in two degrees: a Master's in Public Administration (MPA) and a Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration.

The MPA-MSAA Dual Degree Program

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) and Master of Science in Student Affairs Administration (MSAA) programs both are housed within the College of Community and Public Affairs and are considered professional terminal degrees. By carefully structuring the sequence of courses, recognizing comparable course offerings and using courses in one program to count as electives in the other, the MPA-MSAA dual degree program allows students to complete both degrees in three years of full-time study, without compromising the professional standards of either program. The 42-credit hour MPA program and the 45-credit hour MS in Student Affairs Administration program can be completed as part of a 66-credit hour program (rather than 87 credit hours required to complete the two programs without the benefit of the dual degree structure).
The MPA-MSAA dual degree will prepare students for administrative positions in college and university settings. The MSAA program provides specialized training for students desiring to work in student affairs offices, while the MPA provides the knowledge and skills necessary for management. To be an effective leader in student affairs, professionals must first be knowledgeable of how students grow and develop during the college years and how institutions can be intentional in facilitating the growth process. This requires the study of organizational and student development theory as well as gaining hands-on experience in at least one student services office. Leaders in higher education also need to employ proven managerial strategies in order to be successful and must pay careful attention to the management of human resources, finances, information technology, and physical infrastructure. In addition to this, leaders should know how to adjust their administrative style if problems are encountered and be able to ground both successes and shortcomings in administrative theory.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Letters of recommendation (see details below)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores. GMAT scores can be submitted in lieu of GRE scores.

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

You must also meet the following program-specific requirements:
MPA:
- Two letters of recommendation
Letters of recommendation should be from individuals who know the applicant in a professional capacity, such as professors, work supervisors, and professionals from organizations where the applicant has served as a volunteer or in another capacity. When evaluating the letters of recommendation, the admissions committee looks for evidence of academic achievement, community involvement, and personal characteristics that suggests the applicant has the capacity to foster an institutional culture that advances democratic administration and governance.

- Personal statement
The personal statement should be no more than 500 words or two (2) double-spaced, typed pages and should answer the question,"Why do I want an MPA?" You may wish to describe your reasons for pursuing graduate studies in public administration, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee. In the personal statement, the committee assesses the student's commitment to public and/or nonprofit administration as well as his/her ability to communicate in writing.

- Significant work experience (5 or more years in the public and/or nonprofit sectors) can earn applicants a positive adjustment to their admissions scores. However, the lack of work experience does not result in a penalty.

MS:
- Personal statements should specifically address the applicant's interest in the program, career goals, and current skills and experiences relative to their current or intended career in student affairs

- Three letters of recommendation, which should come from instructors or professors who can attest to the applicant's academic ability for graduate study
Applicants who have been out of college for at least three (3) years may submit current letters of reference from employment supervisors or others affiliated with their employment who can attest to their ability to perform successfully and professionally and to the likelihood of success in a graduate program

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Contract
*By signing the above document, you agree, if admitted to the program, to abide by the professional standards of student affairs administration as set forth by the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards that govern our profession.
*Review the Statement of Ethical Principles and Standards before signing the contract.

- A signed copy of the Student Affairs Administration Certification of Information

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The focus of the program is on preparing graduate students to work as educators, practitioners and policy-makers in student affairs, student services and higher education. Read more
The focus of the program is on preparing graduate students to work as educators, practitioners and policy-makers in student affairs, student services and higher education. The program will help students comprehend, analyze and meet the changing needs and wants of the current college student. Students will learn how to use interpersonal skills and strategic interventions, especially as they relate to issues of equity and access, which lead to success for ALL students. Employing an Action Research Methodology, graduates of this program will be prepared to analyze current higher education practices and policies and create programs, services and interventions that generate positive impact and student success. Students will have an opportunity to complete two internships in the field.

The program is aligned with the CAS (Council on the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education) Standards and the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competencies.

Course Structure and Content

The program is a 42-credit program that can be completed in 2 years. Students have the option of earning a certificate in either Sustainability or Educational Technology as part of the HEPSA Program.

Students will have two internship classes and opportunities totaling 500 hours in the field. Internship 1 will focus on developing the interpersonal, listening and referral skills necessary for work in the field of higher education and student affairs. Internship 2 will focus on developing an understanding of strategic planning and institutional structure as well as planning for and creating policy changes.

All students in their first semester will take a course on Critical Action Research where they will have an opportunity to pose a question about student affairs/higher education that they would like to understand. Throughout their program they will answer that question through their course work. The capstone project will result in a publishable thesis answering that question. This process will help to position students as experts on their topic of interest as they move in to a professional or new role.

Modules include:

• The Sustainable Campus
• Issues of Power and Privilege in Higher Education Policy and Student Affairs
• Applications and Implications of Technology in Student Affairs
• Program Evaluation and Assessment
• Theories of College Student Identity Development
• Law, Policy and Equity in Higher Education and Student Affairs
• Resource Management in Student Affairs and Higher Education
• Transformative Leadership in Higher Education and Student Affairs

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An 11 month (October - August) full-time course of research, culminating in the submission of a thesis and viva voce examination. Read more
An 11 month (October - August) full-time course of research, culminating in the submission of a thesis and viva voce examination. There are no taught components to this course but students do attend appropriate lectures and courses such as those involving transferable skills training.

The course introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are:

- to give students with relevant experience at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in the discipline under close supervision; and

- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blzompbsc

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical
- understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The Principal Supervisor’s role is to give advice, encouragement and constructive criticism to research students. Principal Supervisors and students should meet every 1-2 weeks, when the student is working in Cambridge.

Supervisors will:

- Assist the student in drawing up a research topic and a viable written research timetable, preferably in the initial meetings with the student.
- Ensure that the student is aware of relevant lectures and seminars in the field.
- Ensure that the student is aware of relevant training programmes and opportunities (including the Department's Graduate Training Programme) and discuss transferable and teaching skills the student may benefit from and make provision for appropriate training in these areas.
- Ensure that the student is aware of the range of facilities available for research and learning at the University of Cambridge.
- Introduce the student to other senior and graduate members working in a similar area.
- Assist the student in preparing research trips and archival visits within the UK and/or abroad.
- Encourage the student to keep systematic records of the research, including back-up copies of electronically-stored material.
- Discuss the research in person and offer constructive written comments and criticism.
- Consistently monitor progress and time management.
- Provide the student with adequate indication of his or her progress and challenges still to be met.
- Make termly and annual reports on the student’s progress using the Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System (CGSRS).
- Encourage the student to present his or her work at appropriate internal and external conferences, seminars and workshops.
- Advise on ethical issues, such as plagiarism.
- Advise on the writing up and presentation of the dissertation.
- Assist the student's applications for funding by the writing of letters of reference.
- Give the student guidance on the publication of their work.

Students receive formal feedback from two academic advisors following submission of a Feasibility Report (after 1 month), and a Progress Report (after 5 months). Feedback is also provided by the supervisor via termly supervision reports.

Assessment

You will be expected to submit a thesis (20,000 words excluding tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices) after 11 months, followed by a viva voce examination.

Continuing

Students completing the MPhil cannot automatically continue to PhD - it is a separate course that must be applied for in the normal way.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. Read more
The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. The Department’s senior staff support several research groups, covering various aspects of mental health and disorder throughout the life course.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvpcmpmsc

Course detail

The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Psychiatry is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by an Advisor, to increase access to staff members and accommodate a diversity of viewpoints.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a group leader whose area of research most appeals to them.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. We also require our students to attend their research group’s research-in-progress/laboratory meetings, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. The supervisor and details of the proposed research project are determined during the application process.

Most research training is provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. The student should expect to receive one to one supervision at least weekly in term time.

The structure of the MPhil course enables the students to significantly develop their analytical and research skills, and is intended as preparation for further research.

The MPhil programme provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of research in psychiatry;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil in Medical Science (Psychiatry) degree is a one-year degree, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree.

However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Psychiatry course via the following options:

1. Complete the MPhil then continue to the three year PhD course:

If the student would like to continue with their research and has secured funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

2. Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil.

If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Pinsent Darwin Fund (managed by the Graduate School of Life Sciences)

Sims Fund (administered by Fees & Graduate Funding, Student Registry)

Other funding opportunities (e.g. through research grants) might become available depending on funds

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015). All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015).

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

School and Local Authorities are increasingly seeking to employ teachers with not only high levels of competence and skill in classroom practice, but practitioners who have advanced subject knowledge for teaching and enhanced knowledge of systems and theories relevant to education. Therefore, the aims of this program are:

-to enable student teachers to develop a critical understanding of issues and theories that impact upon classroom practice in teaching, learning and assessment in secondary schools;
-to support student teachers in their exploration and critical reflection on their own and others practice in relation to national and regional priorities and policies and current research relevant to the Key Stages for this programme;
-to promote student teachers' practical teaching skills and subject knowledge for teaching across the relevant Key Stages for this programme, making links with relevant theory to inform practice.

The programme aims to further develop students' existing transferable skills in communication, literacy, numeracy and critical reasoning. It is suitable for those who wish to gain employment as teachers and who aspire to progress to leadership and management roles in schools or in the wider world of education. It will provide an excellent foundation for progression to either higher academic or advanced professional qualifications.

Course Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Secondary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 11-16. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Secondary courses are structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based. The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.
You will also focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

2. Education Studies II

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.
You will also continue to focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

3. Education Studies III

This module focuses specifically on supporting student teachers to make an effective transition into their first post and examines the following themes in GPE:
Preparing for induction and the professional learning action plan for your first post;
Pathways into leadership in education;
Learning outside the classroom;
Contributing to the wider aspects of the formal and informal curriculum and your wider professional role as a teacher.

Subject Specific Course Content

The aim of Physical Education is to develop physical competence so that all children are able to move efficiently, effectively and safely and understand what they are doing. The outcome, physical literacy, is as essential as literacy and numeracy to ensure the holistic educational development of young people in our society.

The PGCE Secondary Physical Education course at Brunel University London has a long standing national reputation for high quality teacher education in our subject area. The course is very popular, drawing on outstanding expertise and experience in this field from both academic and school staff. Many of our alumni have gone on to become school leaders, not only within Physical Education, but also as members of senior management teams in school at an early stage in their career because of the high standards and expectations we have for our student teachers. We retain very close links with our community of Physical Education alumni and many of them go on to be mentors for our student teachers, are involved in selection and recruitment of the next generation of PE teachers from Brunel or contribute to aspects of teaching on the programme where they have specific expertise.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go on to work as teachers.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list.

The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006. We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.
We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), young offenders institutions. This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Secondary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Secondary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of QTS. In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:

Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
(Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the Secondary PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning expe