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Masters Degrees (St Andrews)

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The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. Read more

Introduction

The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are now fully merged for all postgraduate degrees and together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy institutions in the United Kingdom.
The programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers that is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects. It offers graduate teaching at a level that matches the best graduate programmes elsewhere in the world, in a wide range of areas, including the history of philosophy.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MLitt
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: MLitt St Andrews Programme Director: Patrick Greenough | MLitt Stirling Co-ordinator: Dr Philip Ebert

Course objectives

The taught MLitt provides the foundation year of the programme. Modules are offered in three fundamental areas of philosophy: logic and metaphysics, moral and political philosophy, and history of philosophy. The degree is primarily designed as a preparatory year for entry to postgraduate work in philosophy. It provides a firm foundation of general understanding and skills in philosophy which will serve as a basis for sound philosophical research. Graduate students are taught in dedicated graduate classes.

English language requirements

All SASP courses are taught in English. Applicants who are NOT native speakers AND whose undergraduate degree was NOT taught in English must submit a recognised English Language test. We normally require a TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based). 250 (computer-based), or 100 (internet-based). A copy of your TOEFL certificate will be sufficient. Alternatively an IELTS score of 7.00 is also acceptable/sufficient. (Ideally we prefer the IELTS exam.)
The University of St Andrews offers pre-sessional English courses - you can find out more about them on the website of the St Andrews University English Language Teaching Centre http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/ .

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 7.0 with minimum 6.0 in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade A
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 67 with a minimum of 55 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 100 with no sub test lower than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

The programme is taught by seminars (normally one two-hour seminar each week for each module) and individual supervision. Assessment is normally by coursework: each full module is assessed by two essays.
To gain the Diploma, you must satisfactorily complete all the taught modules. To gain the MLitt, you must satisfactorily complete the taught modules and write a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Rating
Both Departments did well in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). Average ranking: St Andrews 3.15, Stirling 2.95.

Career opportunities

Students on the MLitt have proceeded to the further study of Philosophy at PhD level. Some have remained within the SASP Graduate Programme, either at Stirling or at St Andrews, and others have gone on to leading institutions in the UK and abroad.
A large number of former MLitt students have secured permanent university teaching positions. The general training in research and analytical thinking it offers also prepares you for a wide range of careers in various areas of public policy, public administration and governance.

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MLitt in Film Studies. The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level. An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas. Read more

MLitt in Film Studies

• The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level.

• An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas.

• Both core and specialist modules are assessed by essay.

• Two specialist modules provide you with the opportunity to transfer and apply the theoretical knowledge and research skills acquired in the core module to a more concrete level of intellectual investigation, focusing on the creation of meaning and aesthetic value in the context of global dynamics of cultural production and distribution.

• The specialist modules vary annually and reflect current staff research interests. Emphasis throughout the year is placed on individual research.

Features

* Film Studies was ranked first in Scotland for world leading and internationally excellent research in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.

* Senior expertise of high profile scholars, such as Professor Robert Burgoyne, Professor Richard Dyer, Mr Jean Michel Frodon and Professor Dina Iordanova, all internationally known and respected leaders in the field .

* Regular visits from high-profile film critics, film. The most recent have been celebrated Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán, who in April 2015 visited the Department and attended a screening of two of his films, followed by a Q&A session.

* The new programme in Global Cinema: Managing and Cultural Curation, is offered out of the Institute for Global Cinema and Creative Cultures (IGCCC: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/globalcinema ) which capitalise on achievements, global connections and on our reputational advantages as leaders in the study of global culture, film circulation and film festivals.

In learning and teaching, St Andrews sets the highest of standards and attracts students from all over the world with understandably high expectations. In its first five-yearly review in 2009, the Department’s teaching provision achieved the highest possible commendation. Teaching and research are closely co-related, and postgraduate teaching is informed by the staff’s research activity.

At St Andrews, we investigate cinema as a key form of cultural output and as the dominant type of creative expression. Focusing on the global dimension, our programmes cover key aspects of Film Studies through the lens of transnational cultural studies.

Film Studies at St Andrews is committed to questioning the traditional view of what is ‘normal’ cinema. We attempt to uncover the agendas (be they national, ‘western’, cultural, commercial, industrial, and so on) that define how we think about cinema, both in terms of the kinds of films we watch for pleasure, and those we study at university. There is much to be learned by studying what is produced at the margins of dominant societies, in addition to the canonical films of Hollywood and the European art house. We are interested in exploring the ways in which racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual subcultures conceptualise their identities. Similarly, we are keen to look at films produced at the periphery of established nations, co-productions between smaller players struggling to survive in the global marketplace and popular genre films often deemed unworthy of high-brow critical attention. Similarly, we

look at films that focus on transnational communities or appeal to international markets that deal with lesser-known histories and are made in foreign languages but are nonetheless worthy of critical examination and intellectual engagement.

Studying film at St Andrews will help you master a range of advanced research skills and acquire knowledge related to the construction and analysis of the moving image, the past and present day realities of various national and regional film traditions, the dynamics of the global film industry, and the theoretical approaches related to film.

Facilities and collections

The Department is housed in its own buildings, in North Street. They are within easy walking distance of the University Library, local cinema and town centre. The Department is well resourced with a dedicated teaching room. Recently the Department has started to use the wonderful facilities at the nearby Byre Theatre for most of our seminars, and for other film-related activities. MLitt classes are usually held at the Byre. A Film Studies Postgraduate Study Centre houses a DVD collection, postgraduate workspaces, viewing stations and off-air recording facilities.

At St Andrews you will be exposed to a rich and diverse film programme. Regular course-related film showings take place in a custom-built theatre. In addition, a range of screenings takes place across the University during term time, featuring films related to anthropology, international relations, and history.

St Andrews has excellent library provision, with book, journal and other information resources in Film Studies at a level consistent with an international centre of excellence. The Main Library hosts one of the best collections of international cinema on DVD and video (over 9,000 titles). The Library also holds over 1,000,000 print monographs, over 32,000 electronic books, and substantial journal title holdings in print and over 33,900 full-text electronic titles. Well over 2,000 monographs are classified under Film Studies and related subjects. There are holdings of approximately 100 film, television and media-related journals, of which about 65 are available electronically; there is also networked access to various databases, including Box of Broadcasts, Film Indexes Online and Film & Television Literature Index Full-Text.

Careers

In our media saturated culture, the opportunities for Film Studies graduates are remarkably diverse. Directly related are careers in academia, creative industries, development, distribution, film festival/cinema programming, and arts administration.

A Film Studies degree opens doors to many other spheres, including media management, film and TV research, journalism, publishing, advertising, cultural entrepreneurship, nongovernmental organisations, marketing, public relations and education. Recent destinations include: Junior Assistant Producer, European Tour Productions (IMG Media); Adjunct Instructor, SUNY (State University of New York) at Oswego; Consultant for Propel London Media.



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The MPhil in Philosophy is a two-year research degree that is awarded after successful completion of the taught element of the MLitt programme (see above) plus a supervised research thesis of 40,000 words. Read more

MPhil in Philosophy

The MPhil in Philosophy is a two-year research degree that is awarded after successful completion of the taught element of the MLitt programme (see above) plus a supervised research thesis of 40,000 words. The MPhil is primarily designed for those wishing to undertake an extra year of research study in preparation for PhD studies, although the MPhil remains a desirable independent qualification in its own right.

A distinctive feature of the SASP MPhil programme is that you have two academic supervisors to provide regular academic guidance and advice throughout the research project.

A further distinctive feature is that students in the second year of the MPhil programme are actively encouraged to participate and make presentations at the regular dedicated MPhil seminar hosted by senior members of staff.

The number of MPhil students is typically between five and ten, drawn from the UK and around the world. Many MPhil students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US.

- Entry to the MPhil
Entry to the programme is in the first instance via progression from the SASP MLitt programme. You must complete 120 credits of 5000-level modules, as in the MLitt regulations. If you meet the standard progression-to-dissertation requirements on the MLitt, you will have the option to write an MLitt dissertation of 15,000 words and either graduate with an MLitt degree or convert your MLitt dissertation into a 40,000-word MPhil thesis and graduate with an MPhil degree (subject to meeting all the requirements for the award of both qualifications).

Note that you can apply for admission to the MPhil programme as well as to the MLitt programme. You will still be required to complete the MLitt programme as detailed above in year 1 before progressing to the MPhil dissertation in year 2.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

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The MLitt in Epistemology, Mind and Language is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The MLitt in Epistemology, Mind and Language is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. It focuses on topics within epistemology, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language; with classes covering normativity, intentionality, representation, consciousness, rules, thought, and reason and rationality available.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • A range of modules are available with a specific focus on epistemology, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.

Teaching format

The MLitt degree requires two semesters of full-time (or four semesters part-time) coursework, normally equivalent to four modules. Each module has a minimum contact time of 12 hours. The modules are taught as small group discussion seminars, with an average size of four to eight students in each group. Additionally, there may be class trips where relevant to the taught modules.

The assessment for the taught modules is based on coursework including:

  • book reviews
  • annotated bibliographies
  • visual analysis and object analysis essays
  • reading journals
  • research papers.

Part-time studies

The MLitt in Epistemology, Mind and Language can also be taken as a part-time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The History of Philosophy MLitt is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The History of Philosophy MLitt is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. It offers the ability to study a range of different philosophical periods, from the classical period, via mediaeval philosophy, modern philosophy, including the Scottish Enlightenment and Kant, to early analytic philosophy. If you are interested in focusing on the inter-connected questions, themes and topics which span these periods, the History of Philosophy MLitt is a good choice.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest
  • Students can choose modules which best suit their interests, with topics ranging from the classical philosophy of Plato through to the work of contemporary philosophers.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.

Teaching format

Students have the opportunity to study a range of philosophical periods through lectures, tutorials and reading groups. Modules are taught in small groups, normally consisting of four to ten students. All postgraduate taught students in the Department participating in the compulsory Current Issues modules. In 2017-2018, there were approximately 40 postgraduate taught students in the Department.

The programme consists of six taught modules taken over two semesters (each assessed by coursework) a 15,000-word dissertation in an area of your choice.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. Your adviser will provide you with individual guidance on essay planning and writing, academic conduct, and advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

Part-time studies

The History of Philosophy MLitt can also be taken as a part-time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The Master of Science by Research degree in Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews. Read more

The Master of Science by Research degree in Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews.

The candidate will be based in the interdisciplinary Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD), based in the centre of St Andrews. The CBD links researchers in evolution, behaviour, ecology, molecular biology and biodiversity, plus researchers in other Schools across St Andrews. Research themes include: the mechanistic causes and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of animal behaviour, with strengths in behavioural ecology, animal cognition, social evolution and social learning; evolutionary and population genetics, including the genetic basis of population divergence and speciation; animal-plant interactions, including pollinator biology; conservation biology, focusing in particular on the measurement of broad-scale patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity change. These themes are underpinned and guided by theoretical evolutionary ecologists and geneticists, asking fundamental questions about the causes and consequences of organismal interaction. Our final objective is to advance this scientific understanding of the diversity of life to contribute pro-actively to policy that helps protect and nurture biological diversity.

Candidates may approach potential supervisors in the CBD directly (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/phd-study/phd-study-supervisors/phd-study-cbd-supervisors/) or via advertised projects listed here (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/mscres/). We strongly recommend that potential candidates make contact with a potential supervisor before applying.

The School of Biology provides a unique and supportive environment for scholarship, amid a beautiful setting for university life. We are a highly research active School, with a diverse and vigorous post-graduate community. The School comprises a large number of research groups organised into three interdisciplinary Research Centres: the Scottish Oceans Institute (SOI), the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) and the Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD). Together these centres encompass the full spectrum of research in biological sciences, spanning investigations on the properties and behaviour of individual molecules through to planetary environmental dynamics. Our postgraduate students enjoy a supportive and welcoming environment, including the student-led ‘Bionet’ society that provides a wide range of networking and social opportunities.

Progression and Assessment

Students in the MSc(Res) program will be assigned an Internal Examiner (IE) and Post-Graduate Tutor by the School. There will be a progress review meeting at three months to monitor and evaluate student progression, convened by the IE, with the student and Tutor in attendance.

In addition to the project-specific training that you will receive during your degree, Msc(Res) students will also have access to a wide range of training in transferable skills through the award-winning University of St Andrews GradSkills program, run by our Professional Development Unit CAPOD. Specific post-graduate programs run within the School of Biology may also offer additional training, for instance in statistical, bioinformatics or molecular techniques.

The degree requires submission and examination of a dissertation at the end of the one-year program. This thesis will consist of up to 30,000 words. The thesis will be evaluated by the IE and an External Examiner appointed at time of submission. Evaluation will be based on the written submission and there is no requirement for a viva voce examination.

Fees

For details of post-graduate tuition fees relevant to our research degrees including the MSc(Res), please visit:

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/research-fees/

Application

Please apply via the University’s Post-Graduate Application portal: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgr/home.htm



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The Master of Science by Research degree in Biomedical Sciences is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Biomedical Sciences, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews. Read more

The Master of Science by Research degree in Biomedical Sciences is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Biomedical Sciences, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews.

The candidate will be based in the interdisciplinary Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC), based at the North Haugh Science Campus, St Andrews. The BSRC comprises research groups undertaking highly innovative, multi-disciplinary research in eleven broad areas of biomedical research, employing state-of-the-art techniques to address key questions at the leading edge of the biomedical and biological sciences.

There are eleven research themes running through the BSRC: Biophysics; Chemical Biology; Chemistry; Enzymology; Microbiology; Molecular Biology; Molecular Medicine; Parasitology; Structural Biology; Translational Biology; Virology. These interdisciplinary approaches bring together molecular biologists, chemists, computer scientists, geneticists, bioinformaticians and clinicians to challenge and further our understanding of disease, in terms of basic biological function through to medical intervention. Further details about the BSRC can be found here: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/bsrc/.

Candidates may approach potential supervisors in the BSRC directly (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/phd-study/phd-study-supervisors/phd-study-bsrc-supervisors/) or via advertised projects listed here (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/mscres/). We strongly recommend that potential candidates make contact with a potential supervisor before applying.

The School of Biology provides a unique and supportive environment for scholarship, amid a beautiful setting for university life. We are a highly research active School, with a diverse and vigorous post-graduate community. The School comprises a large number of research groups organised into three interdisciplinary Research Centres: the Scottish Oceans Institute (SOI), the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) and the Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD). Together these centres encompass the full spectrum of research in biological sciences, spanning investigations on the properties and behaviour of individual molecules through to planetary environmental dynamics. Our postgraduate students enjoy a supportive and welcoming environment, including the student-led ‘Bionet’ society that provides a wide range of networking and social opportunities.

Progression and Assessment

Students in the MSc(Res) program will be assigned an Internal Examiner (IE) and Post-Graduate Tutor by the School. There will be a progress review meeting at three months to monitor and evaluate student progression, convened by the IE, with the student and Tutor in attendance.

In addition to the project-specific training that you will receive during your degree, Msc(Res) students will also have access to a wide range of training in transferable skills through the award-winning University of St Andrews GradSkills program, run by our Professional Development Unit CAPOD. Specific post-graduate programs run within the School of Biology may also offer additional training, for instance in statistical, bioinformatics or molecular techniques.

The degree requires submission and examination of a dissertation at the end of the one-year program. This thesis will consist of up to 30,000 words. The thesis will be evaluated by the IE and an External Examiner appointed at time of submission. Evaluation will be based on the written submission and there is no requirement for a viva voce examination.

Fees

For details of post-graduate tuition fees relevant to our research degrees including the MSc(Res), please visit:

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/research-fees/

Application

Please apply via the University’s Post-Graduate Application portal: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgr/home.htm



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The Master of Science by Research degree in Marine Biology is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the area of Marine Biology, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews. Read more

The Master of Science by Research degree in Marine Biology is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the area of Marine Biology, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews.

The candidate will be based in the interdisciplinary Scottish Oceans Institute (SOI), based at East Sands, St Andrews. The SOI is home to the world famous Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU), and hosts a wide-range of researchers with interests ranging from the deep oceans to the coasts, and from the people who use and interact with the sea, to the biological and physical processes that make the oceans function.

There are four research themes running through the SOI: Global Change and Planetary Evolution; Ecology, Fisheries and Resource management; Developmental and Evolutionary Genomics; the Sea Mammal Research Unit. As such, the SOI brings together behavioural and population ecologists, evolutionary biologists, geneticists, conservationists, mathematicians and environmental scientists to contribute towards understanding and managing the future of our oceans and the organisms, big and small, that live within them. Further details about the SOI can be found here: http://soi.st-andrews.ac.uk/.

Candidates may approach potential supervisors in the SOI directly (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/phd-study/phd-study-supervisors/phd-study-soi-supervisors/) or via advertised projects listed here (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/mscres/). We strongly recommend that potential candidates make contact with a potential supervisor before applying.

The School of Biology provides a unique and supportive environment for scholarship, amid a beautiful setting for university life. We are a highly research active School, with a diverse and vigorous post-graduate community. The School comprises a large number of research groups organised into three interdisciplinary Research Centres: the Scottish Oceans Institute (SOI), the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) and the Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD). Together these centres encompass the full spectrum of research in biological sciences, spanning investigations on the properties and behaviour of individual molecules through to planetary environmental dynamics. Our postgraduate students enjoy a supportive and welcoming environment, including the student-led ‘Bionet’ society that provides a wide range of networking and social opportunities.

Progression and Assessment

Students in the MSc(Res) program will be assigned an Internal Examiner (IE) and Post-Graduate Tutor by the School. There will be a progress review meeting at three months to monitor and evaluate student progression, convened by the IE, with the student and Tutor in attendance.

In addition to the project-specific training that you will receive during your degree, Msc(Res) students will also have access to a wide range of training in transferable skills through the award-winning University of St Andrews GradSkills program, run by our Professional Development Unit CAPOD. Specific post-graduate programs run within the School of Biology may also offer additional training, for instance in statistical, bioinformatics or molecular techniques.

The degree requires submission and examination of a dissertation at the end of the one-year program. This thesis will consist of up to 30,000 words. The thesis will be evaluated by the IE and an External Examiner appointed at time of submission. Evaluation will be based on the written submission and there is no requirement for a viva voce examination.

Fees

For details of post-graduate tuition fees relevant to our research degrees including the MSc(Res), please visit:

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/research-fees/

Application

Please apply via the University’s Post-Graduate Application portal: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgr/home.htm



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The MLitt in German and Comparative Literature is a two-year taught programme run jointly by the . School of Modern Languages at St Andrews. Read more

The MLitt in German and Comparative Literature is a two-year taught programme run jointly by the School of Modern Languages at St Andrews and the University of Bonn. The programme will deepen your knowledge of the latest thinking in literary and comparative studies and give you the research, communication and writing skills needed to embark on a PhD or top-level graduate career.

Highlights

  • Students become truly bilingual and intercultural by studying at two world-renowned and historic universities.
  • The programme is taught by a group of internationally renowned experts in all major areas of German and comparative studies from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century.
  • Students spend their first year in Germany and the second year in Scotland.

Teaching format

Students spend their first year at the University of Bonn in Germany where they will take two compulsory modules on comparative literature and have a choice of optional modules covering a wide range of topics from medieval texts to current trends in German literature.

Students will spend their second year at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, where one semester will be devoted to studying two compulsory and one optional module, and the second semester will be spent focused on writing an 18,000-word dissertation.

Modules

These are the modules offered by the University of St Andrews during the second year of the MLitt/MA programme. Find out more about the modules taught by the University of Bonn.

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The Conversion in Philosophy Graduate Diploma is a one year taught programme aimed at students who are interested in undertaking research in philosophy but have studied little or no philosophy at undergraduate level. Read more

The Conversion in Philosophy Graduate Diploma is a one year taught programme aimed at students who are interested in undertaking research in philosophy but have studied little or no philosophy at undergraduate level. Satisfactory performance on the Diploma may lead to entry to the SASP MLitt Philosophy programme.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The Stirling and St Andrews Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • Students have a number of optional modules with a focus on philosophy to choose from.

Teaching format

Conversion Diploma students take undergraduate-level modules, but remain members of the large and vibrant postgraduate community at the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. You are invited to all postgraduate events, such as the various postgraduate reading parties, and are strongly encouraged to get fully involved with the many and various seminars, workshops, talks, and reading groups.

You will be able to choose from a range of undergraduate modules in philosophy according to your own interests. At least one module must be selected from two compulsory modules designed to introduce students to key philosophical ideas and techniques. Students on the Conversion course do not write a dissertation.

Modules

The modules in this programme are delivered through lectures combined with tutorials, discussions and independent study; they are assessed through coursework, examinations, and in some cases, in-class presentations.

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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120 credits’ worth of modules, taken over eight months exactly the same as the MRes, and a written examination, plus a further twelve months preparing a 40,000-word thesis. Read more

MPhil programmes

120 credits’ worth of modules, taken over eight months exactly the same as the MRes, and a written examination, plus a further twelve months preparing a 40,000-word thesis.
If you have an advanced background in Social Anthropology you may be permitted to enrol directly into the second year of the MPhil and receive the degree solely from the 40,000-word thesis.

Features

* Social Anthropology was established in 1979, and is now a constituent department in the University’s School of Philosophical, Anthropological & Film Studies with a staff of 14.
* Teaching at all levels is informed by the research interests and accomplishments of lecturing staff.

Postgraduate community

Many students are from abroad and are undertaking a varied range of taught courses and research programmes. Those returning from, or preparing to go into, the field form an active community with a wide range of diverse geographical and substantive interests.

You will participate in annual workshops organised by the Department, jointly with the Anthropology departments of the universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow under the Scottish Training in Anthropological Research (STAR) programme. These workshops provide opportunities for informal presentations of research proposals, discussions relevant to your fieldwork preparations (e.g. ethics, data collection, writing field notes). The exploration of creative ways of learning is held in a relaxed yet focused environment, together with members of staff and PhD students from each of the universities. The training workshops last for
four days and take place in a beautiful countryside location. They act as complementary elements of the postgraduate training programme, and are organised in consultation with postgraduate students themselves, according to their perceived needs and wishes. In addition, there are shorter workshops which take place throughout the year and are designed to develop theoretical perspectives in anthropological research.

Facilities

The Department of Social Anthropology occupies an extensive suite of offices on North Street and in St Salvator’s Quad. It is well situated in the centre of town and at the geographical heart of the University. The Centre for Amerindian Studies has its own set of rooms within the Department, including a reading room that holds a library for Latin American and Amerindian studies. Within Social Anthropology there is also a museum collection of ethnographic objects, and a common room that includes a general anthropological class library, providing a space that is shared by both staff and postgraduates. The Departmental libraries, along with the main library, which holds a fine anthropology collection, include materials from all ethnographic regions of the world.

Weekly research seminars are organised by both the Department and sometimes by the Centres, and include speakers from outside St Andrews and abroad, thus enriching the intellectual environment. Social anthropologists from other UK departments, and beyond, visit and contribute to our series of seminars, and to workshops and conferences arranged by staff members and by research students. We endeavour to create a warm and friendly atmosphere and this also contributes towards maintaining a high quality of teaching and intellectual exchange.

Teaching methods

Taught postgraduate programmes in Social Anthropology are small class format modules, in which formal lectures are combined with seminar style teaching and student-led group work. Every taught postgraduate student is assigned an individual supervisor from among the anthropology staff, who works with them closely to develop a topic and direction for the end of degree dissertation.

International conferences

An important element in fostering the Department’s reputation has been a series of international conferences, each of which has considered an important contemporary theoretical issue within the discipline. These have dealt with, for example, the Anthropology of Violence; Power and Knowledge; Localising Strategies; the Concept of the Market; the Problem of Context; Kingship; the Anthropology of Love and Anger; Ways of Knowing; an Epistemology of Anthropology. The Ladislav Holy Memorial Trust plays an important supportive role for many of these conferences. From time to time distinguished scholars are appointed to the St Andrews Visiting Professorship in Social Anthropology, and each year members of the international academic community join the Department to follow postdoctoral work and other research endeavours. Such visiting scholars greatly enhance the thriving research environment.

Careers

Social Anthropology graduates have characteristics many employers seek and a Social Anthropology degree provides openings to a wide range of careers.
• Private organisations: can use the skills of social anthropologists doing research for urban planning, working with health organisations, doing market research for advertising companies, training employees who will be working in international divisions, or working within human resource departments.

• Government agencies: can employ social anthropologists as policy researchers, research analysts, evaluators, managers, planners and policy makers.

• International organisations: can employ anthropologists in projects in various countries around the world as researchers and cultural brokers.

• Non-profit agencies: can employ social anthropologists as advocates, administrators, evaluators and researchers.

• Graduate employers: 70% of graduate jobs are for students from any discipline. Social anthropologists successfully move into teaching, law, finance, HR, marketing, PR etc.

Well known St Andrews Social Anthropology graduates:
• Saba Douglas-Hamilton – wildlife conservationist & BBC presenter
• Nicolas Argenti – anthropologist
• Alexander Schulenburg – historian, independent scholar and activist for the British overseas territory of St Helena
• Nicholas Barker – journalist: winner of The Independent Young Journalist of the Year.

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Overview. ScotGEM is a unique and innovative four-year graduate entry medical programme focused on enthusing graduates to become generalist practitioners (not necessarily GPs), with experience in rural health care and healthcare improvement. Read more

Overview

ScotGEM is a unique and innovative four-year graduate entry medical programme focused on enthusing graduates to become generalist practitioners (not necessarily GPs), with experience in rural health care and healthcare improvement. The programme will prepare students for any branch of medicine with appropriate further training.

ScotGEM uses the existing strengths of medical teaching in the Universities of St Andrews and Dundee and our local health boards in Fife and Tayside, in collaboration with NHS Highland, NHS Dumfries and Galloway and the University of Highlands and Islands. The first year will be based at the University of St Andrews and within Fife, components of the course in the second, third and potentially fourth years will include periods of living and studying in other regions of Scotland.

A bursary of £4,000 each year will be available to all students, those who accept the bursary will complete a return of service to NHS Scotland of one year for each year of bursary accepted. Return of service, sometimes known as bonding, will commence at the start of Foundation training.

First year

From week one, your learning will be focused around real patient scenarios using an approach known as Case Based Learning. Semester one will use cases to focus on foundational medical sciences to underpin subsequent more challenging scenarios. Consultation skills will be introduced early alongside topics such as biochemistry, pharmacology and anatomy and weekly clinical experience in the community. The course is designed as a spiral in which the complexity and challenge of the cases builds as you and your peers become more effective learners.

Semester two focuses on body systems so that related regional anatomy and examination skills can be learnt in parallel. You will be engaged in small group workplace-based learning for one day per week, supported in the community by dedicated Generalist Clinical Mentors (GCM) who are trained GP tutors.

Second year

Second year is largely structured around the lifecycle but will be delivered in different regions. You will be expected to spend some weeks away from Fife with opportunity to study in Tayside, the Highlands and Dumfries and Galloway. NHS Boards will provide accommodation when required. You will continue to work for a day each week with a GCM in their practice but also spend an additional half day in a specialist clinical environment. Second year closes by providing experience of unscheduled care (GP, Emergency department, ambulance etc.) and two periods of project work related to five underpinning Vertical Themes (Informatics, Quality Improvement, Prescribing and therapeutics, Public health and community engagement).

Throughout the course these five Vertical Themes will also develop expertise as ‘agents of change’ within the health service. For example, students might work with a group of general practices to research and analyse prescribing patterns before implementing an agreed improvement.

Third year

Third year is designed as a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship with students being immersed into a community for the duration of the year. You will be based in a general practice, seeing many patients each week and following a selection through their illness journey. This approach works especially well for graduates and has been shown to develop more patient-centred doctors with improved decision-making skills.

Fourth year

Fourth year offers you, as a now competent generalist student, the opportunity to be immersed in the hospital environment and prepare yourself for work as a junior doctor through two one-month Foundation Apprenticeships and other hospital based clinical attachments. You may choose areas of particular interest, perhaps a potential career choice, which you can experience in greater depth. You will also arrange an eight-week elective of your choice.

Upon successful completion of the ScotGEM programme, graduates will receive a primary medical qualification (PMQ), which allows them to apply for subsequent postgraduate training in any specialty through normal routes. It also entitles graduates to provisional registration with the General Medical Council.

Teaching

The ScotGEM course will be based on clinical cases from the outset. These will be supported by a set of learning objectives, lectures, practical classes, tutorials, simulated and ‘real’ clinical and consultation skills plus extensive supported independent and peer-peer learning.

Your learning will be underpinned by a sophisticated online Curriculum Management System (GEMonline), which will give access to a wide range of resources and enable progress to be monitored for all including the geographically dispersed class from second year.

Increasingly, especially in second year, learning will become more self-directed and you will be reliant upon yourself and your peers to explore, investigate and learn from the cases (guided by clear learning objectives with synchronised centrally organised teaching). This approach will set you up well for learning based on real patients in the clinical environment.

The Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship in third year will allow you to join a team and learn whilst becoming increasingly involved in patient care. You will select patients to follow through and study them, their conditions and their care in more detail. Where relevant you will attend specialist clinics, operations etc. as you follow these individuals’ journey through the healthcare system.

Finally, in fourth year, you will experience intensive hospital attachments that involve shadowing Foundation Doctors and other secondary care attachments.

Assessment

Each year will require you to pass assessments of knowledge, clinical skills and a portfolio demonstrating professional development.

  • In first and second year you will be assessed on your knowledge using a mix of online multiple choice questions and short answer written assessments. Third year will use online multiple choice questions aligned with the planned General Medical Council common exam (Medical Licencing Assessment).
  • In every year, there will be a portfolio assessment based on a mixture of engagement with learning, workplace-based performance and project work related to the Vertical Themes.
  • In every year, there will be an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.
  • The assessments will be selected specifically for the ScotGEM course but drawing heavily upon those available within both medical schools. Thus, your progress will be benchmarked against existing UK standards throughout.

Contact us

T: +44 (0)1334 463619

E:

W: http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/graduate-entry-medicine/



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The MLitt in Philosophy is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The MLitt in Philosophy is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. 

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.
  • Students can choose any of the optional modules offered by the Department, allowing you to choose any combination of philosophical topics. 

Teaching format

Students on the MLitt in Philosophy have the opportunity to study a broad range of philosophical topics through lectures, tutorials and reading groups. Modules are taught in small groups, normally consisting of four to ten students. All postgraduate taught students in the Department participating in the compulsory Current Issues modules. In 2017-2018, there were approximately 40 postgraduate taught students in the Department.

Those on the MLitt in Philosophy may sign up for any of the postgraduate taught modules offered by the department, building a timetable which best suits individual interests. The course offers flexibility for those students who are not yet sure of their research interests, or who wish to gain a broader understanding of issues and debates across the discipline. This flexibility allows students to combine the modules which are of most interest; combining logic and ethics for example, or metaphysics and political philosophy.

The programme consists of six taught modules taken over two semesters (each assessed by coursework) and a 15,000 word dissertation in an area of your choice.

Every MLitt student is assigned an advisor at the beginning of the year. Your advisor will provide you with individual guidance on essay planning and writing, academic conduct, and advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

Part time studies

The Philosophy MLitt can also be taken as a part time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MSc in Human Computer Interaction is a one-year taught programme run by the School of Computer Science. Much of the core content is delivered by members of the . Read more

The MSc in Human Computer Interaction is a one-year taught programme run by the School of Computer Science. Much of the core content is delivered by members of the St Andrews Human Computer Interaction (SACHI) research group.

The course consists of two semesters of taught components followed by an 11-week project leading to the submission of a 15,000-word dissertation in August.

Highlights

  • The MSc in Human Computer Interaction is a specialist course but retains some flexibility, allowing students to pursue other areas of computer science alongside the compulsory specialist modules.
  • The course develops students' practical skills in the process and practice of prototyping and implementing interactive computing systems.
  • Students undertake a significant project, including a wide-ranging investigation, leading to their dissertation which enables them to consolidate and extend their specialist knowledge and critical thinking.
  • The School has a dedicated HCI laboratory with specialist equipment, including an 84-inch Microsoft Hub, a 3D printer, Google Soli sensors, and a diverse range of eye-tracking and motion-capture equipment.
  • Students have 24-hour access to modern computing laboratories, provisioned with dual-screen PC workstations and group-working facilities.

Students may switch to an MSc in Advanced Computer Science or in Information Technology after the first semester.

Teaching format

The taught portion of the MSc programme includes eight modules: five compulsory and three optional from a wide range available. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical classes. Most modules are assessed through practical coursework exercises and examinations. Class sizes typically range from 10 to 50 students.

All students are assigned an advisor who meets with them at the start of the year to discuss module choices and is available to assist with any academic difficulties during the year. A designated member of staff provides close supervision for the MSc project and dissertation.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MLitt in Logic and Metaphysics is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The MLitt in Logic and Metaphysics is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. It focuses on topics within metaphysics and logic; with classes covering logic and advanced logic, formal approaches to natural languages and contemporary and historical debates in metaphysics.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The Stirling and St Andrews Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • Students have a number of optional modules with a focus on metaphysics or logic to choose from.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.

Teaching format

Students have the opportunity to study topics through lectures, tutorials and reading groups. Modules are taught in small groups, normally consisting of four to ten students. All postgraduate taught students in the Department participating in the compulsory Current Issues modules. In 2017-2018, there were approximately 40 postgraduate taught students in the Department.

The programme consists of six taught modules taken over two semesters (each assessed by coursework) and a 15,000-word dissertation in an area of your choice.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. Your adviser will provide you with individual guidance on essay planning and writing, academic conduct, and advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

Part time studies

The MLitt in Logic and Metaphysics can also be taken as a part-time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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