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Masters Degrees (Sri Lanka)

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About. This part-time PGDip/ MSC course is offered by the School of Geography and Environmental Sciences at Ulster University. The School was originally established in 1969 and it has a long and successful record of teaching and research in an interrelated group of geographical and environmental science subjects. Read more

About

This part-time PGDip/ MSC course is offered by the School of Geography and Environmental Sciences at Ulster University. The School was originally established in 1969 and it has a long and successful record of teaching and research in an interrelated group of geographical and environmental science subjects. The School is among the largest providers of part-time postgraduate course in the Physical Sciences in the United Kingdom. We have been offering this innovative, fully online distance learning Masters’ programme for over 15 years. The geographical spread of our students is global, with students from many areas of the European Union and also further afield such as Australia, Canada, China, Japan, Malaysia, Nigeria, Sri Lanka and the United States. The various modules on this course will encourage you to develop an evidence-based approach to understanding the impact of chemicals on the environment and will give you the opportunity to enhance your knowledge and skills for testing, monitoring and controlling these toxins.

The specific objectives of the course are for you to develop:

  • a clear and detailed understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity for both organic and inorganic substances 
  • an advanced awareness of the behaviour of contaminants in a variety of environmental systems
  • a clear insight into the main toxicological problems of contaminants in the environment and the impacts on organisms
  • the ability to identify and articulate how environmental quality standards are created and monitored
  • a detailed understanding of the legislative controls on contaminants.

Why study with us?

  • We have a proven record of delivering this course by distance learning (read our student testimonials).
  • You will get support and advice from experienced lecturers, tutors, librarians and e-learning IT staff.
  • There is total flexibility of location – you can study from almost anywhere and there is no need to travel to classes.
  • You can choose the times you study to suit yourself, so that you can combine study and work.
  • You will be able to access a wide range of online resources such as e-books and journals, digital lectures and module discussion boards within the sector leading e-learning platform, Blackboard.
  • There is flexibility in the level of the course – you can study for a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) or a Master’s degree (MSc) or enrol for individual modules that interest you.

Our students come from a variety of backgrounds and have included employees from areas such as: The Pharmaceutical Industry; Oil, Gas and Nuclear Industries; Government Environmental Protection Agencies; Engineering and Mining Companies; Environmental Consultants; Laboratory Technicians as well as people from unrelated areas who wanted a career change.

Attendance

This course is offered fully online and is completed part-time by distance learning. You do not need to visit Ulster at any stage to successfully complete this course.

The Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) is made up of four taught modules (30 credits per module). One module is taught in each semester (late September to early January and late January to early May). It takes 2 academic years to complete the award of PgDip (120 credits). At this stage you can take the PgDip award or continue studying for the MSc. This entails completing a research project module (60 credits) over a further two semesters. This leads to the award of Master of Science (MSc) worth in total 180 credits. The full PgDip/ MSc programme normally takes three years part-time (6 semesters).

Career options

Our students enrol for this course to develop their professional knowledge and to acquire new skills. They do this to improve their career and promotion prospects, change their career, or, if they are recently graduated, to specialise in a new subject area to enhance their job prospects.

Experience has shown that the majority of students who register on this course are already working in the environmental field. We therefore aim to be as flexible as possible in terms of the topics studied and will give you the opportunity to focus on areas of particular interest to you and/or the organisation for which you work where possible.

Strong links to consultancies and environmental agencies both private and governmental ensure that the course remains current and relevant to the needs of potential employers.



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This course focuses on the analysis of management, planning and policymaking aspects of the development process. Read more
This course focuses on the analysis of management, planning and policymaking aspects of the development process. It is designed for social science graduates, or for those working in institutions such as central and local government, parastatal organisations, nongovernmental organisations and multilateral or bilateral aid agencies involved in the management of development activities in developing countries.

It aims to blend theory and practice and seeks to explain policy behaviour through an integrated approach, drawing on a range of disciplinary perspectives.

Aims

-Provide an opportunity for you to deepen your understanding of management, planning and policy-making in economic, social and political spheres of development.
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between development management and development processes.
-Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different forms of development management.
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to development and management.
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication.
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within development management, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute (GDI) has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. Read more
The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. The challenge of understanding and tackling the problems of poverty and inequality is therefore an urgent one. This course is designed to help you engage with this challenge in a critical and constructive way, by offering high-level academic training in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Aims

-Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. Read more
This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. It looks at policies and practices, by which individuals, communities and organisations seek to reduce poverty, understand conflict and initiate humanitarian interventions.

Aims

-Provide you with an opportunity to deepen your critical understanding of key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty analysis and reduction, conflict analysis and reconstruction
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, conflict and reconstruction and make judgements about related policies and their implementation
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development and poverty reduction
-Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different practical approaches to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, conflict and reconstruction, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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Over the past two decades, environmental considerations have become central to development policy and management. As a result, there is a growing need for policymakers, planners and managers to be fully conversant with the environmental dimension of development. Read more
Over the past two decades, environmental considerations have become central to development policy and management. As a result, there is a growing need for policymakers, planners and managers to be fully conversant with the environmental dimension of development.

This course aims to meet this need by linking environmental understanding grounded in the physical sciences with study of the social and economic bases of planning and managing development.

Aims

-Provide an interdisciplinary training to equip you with an understanding of the environmental and climate change dimensions of development trends and interventions.
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between environmental issues, climate change and development processes, and make judgements about policies and their implementation.
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote climate change adaptation, mitigation and sustainable development.
-Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different approaches to promoting climate change adaptation, mitigation and sustainable development.
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to environment, climate change, and development.
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication.
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of environment, climate change, and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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This coherent, interdisciplinary and applied course examines the rapidly transforming global economy. The changing dynamics of cross-border, trade, finance and labour are fundamentally affecting how developed and developing countries relate to each other. Read more
This coherent, interdisciplinary and applied course examines the rapidly transforming global economy. The changing dynamics of cross-border, trade, finance and labour are fundamentally affecting how developed and developing countries relate to each other. This course will convey to you a variety of analytic perspectives on contemporary issues relating to globalisation, international trade policy, industrial development, and their development consequences.

Aims

-Provide critical insights into different theoretical and inter-disciplinary perspectives on the political economy of globalisation, trade policy dynamics, and industrial development within the wider context of global development strategies.
-Develop the analytical skills of students in critically evaluating and engaging with distinct and cutting edge theoretical frameworks that help shape understanding of global value chains and global production networks and their implications for trade dynamics, industrial and trade policies, firm strategies and labour, social and environmental outcomes.
-Provide an understanding of the relationship of globalisation to economic, political and social asymmetries of development at global, regional, national and local scales.
-Provide an appreciation of the policy issues associated with globalisation, trade and industry and their impacts including insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed by leading public and private policy actors in the global South, prominent international agencies as well as private sector and civil society actors.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Bulgaria, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. Read more
A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. The second term includes a residential Spring School in Dublin. For the remainder of the programme, including the summer dissertation period, April-September students may be based in either Belfast or Dublin depending on their research interests. A one term (twelve week) programme is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study.
Course Description:
This innovative cross-border programme allows M.Phil. students to take a broader joint course Master in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation, or a specialist option for either a Master in Conflict Resolution or a Master in Reconciliation Studies. The Conflict Resolution specialism develops skills in conflict analysis and conflict intervention for both established practitioners and those seeking to develop new expertise in conflict management, conflict resolution and conflict transformation. The Reconciliation specialism offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of political conflict, drawing on social research, politics, theology and ethics. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts, and the role of religion in such conflicts and in peacebuilding and reconciliation. Case studies typically include: Northern Ireland; South Africa; Zimbabwe; Rwanda; El Salvador; Guatemala; Israel/Palestine; and Sri Lanka. The programme equips graduates for work with local and international organisations, and provides transferable skills for a wide variety of careers, including mediation, diplomacy, policy, advocacy, journalism, teaching and Ph.D. research.

Students are required to take a 10 ECTS core module in Research Skills, a further 50 ECTS of taught modules, and a 30 ECTS research dissertation. In the Conflict Resolution specialism, students are required to take the core module, Conflict Analysis and Models of Intervention. In the Reconciliation specialism, students are required to take the core module, Dynamics of Reconciliation. Optional modules worth 10 ECTS include: Conflict Resolution Skills, Conflict Transformation, Conflict Resolution Lessons from Comparative Peace Processes, Social Research for Transformation, Reconciliation in Northern Ireland, Theology of Reconciliation, Community Learning and Reflective Practice in Northern Ireland, and Post-Conflict Justice and Truth Commissions. Optional modules worth 5 ECTS include: Guided Research Project and South Africa: The Ethics of Truth and Reconciliation. Modules are generally assessed on written work of 3,000-5,000 words, to be submitted according to the internal deadlines distributed at the beginning of each academic year, with final submission date by 1 May. Subject to satisfactory performance in the written work, students may proceed to the submission of the dissertation. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment. The 30 ECTS dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words, and to be submitted by 1 August. The dissertation is required for all M.Phil. students.

Further details on the specialist tracks are available on the School website http://www.tcd.ie/ise/resolution/

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If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. Read more
If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. We are lucky in the West Country to have prehistoric Dartmoor on our doorstep, where the recent Whitehorse Hill burial was uncovered. Exeter itself is a city built on Roman foundations and the nearby Ipplepen dig is shedding further light on Romano-British history. The Anglo-Saxons too were active in our part of the world and we have excellent interdisciplinary ties with the History Department and Centre for Medieval Studies. In the past there have been opportunities for Exeter students to participate in fieldwork and outreach activities in as diverse locations as Argentina, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan, South Dakota and Texas. In some cases, fieldwork may consist of archaeological work in a museum rather than excavation.

The MA Archaeology programme is flexible, so you can choose the modules that interest you – including those on Experimental Archaeology, Human Osteoarchaeology and Zooarchaeology. If you’re interested in going on to doctoral study then our MA will give you the right training and our academic staff will be happy to support you through the process of funding applications.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study called 'modules' .

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Material Culture and Dissertation

Optional modules

You can choose from a variety of modules on offer within our other Masters, some examples of these are; Advanced Project; Experimental Archaeology in Practice; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology; Funerary Osteoarchaeology and Musculo-skeletal Anatomy

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Learning and teaching

Most of our teaching is done collaboratively in small groups because we feel this is the best way to help you develop. Your classes will be a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops where you will learn the methodology and practical skills you need. We have a range of specialist equipment and excellent facilities including laboratories, kiln room, and spaces for experimental archaeology.

Research areas

Our research at Exeter is world-leading and all our academic staff are actively engaged in both Britain and further afield. We are particularly unique for our expertise in the fields of Bioarchaeology and Experimental Archaeology. Our interests run from early prehistory through to the post-medieval period. Our geographic specialisations include the Americas, the British Isles, Europe, South Asia and North Africa.

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The development of the global trading system has created an increasingly sophisticated system of trade and related rights. It not only governs relations between states but impacts on relationship between states and individuals. Read more

Why this course?

The development of the global trading system has created an increasingly sophisticated system of trade and related rights. It not only governs relations between states but impacts on relationship between states and individuals.

At both policy and practical level, there's tension surrounding the function and role of international institutions such as the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

These debates are not confined to the realm of academia. The highest 'court' of WTO has opined that decisions must take into account "[h]uman societies as they actually exist, in other words... in the real world where people live and work and die." (WTO Appellate Body Report, EC-Hormones, paragraph 187)

This LLM in International Economic Law offers you the opportunity to explore how international economic law deals with real world challenges. You’ll gain an understanding of the fundamental rules and principles supporting international economic law.

You can tailor your degree to suit your intended career path by choosing elective modules from outside of our Law School.

The course is for those wanting to develop careers with international law firms and other organisations with an international focus. It’s also useful if you want to work in the international development sector in management, planning, or policy related areas.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internationaleconomiclaw/

You’ll study

This programme is available full-time and part-time with three potential exit points. You can choose to study for a:
- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert)
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip)
- Masters degree (LLM)

Core classes:
- Legal Research
- World Trading Systems: Law & Policy

In addition to the core classes, you'll have the opportunity to pursue elective classes from other Masters programmes in Law as well as related programmes across the university.

- Elective classes
Choices may include:
- Comparative Law of Obligations
- International Environmental Law
- E-Commerce
- Comparative Company Law and Regulation
- Competition Law and Policy in the EU
- Legal Process and the Law of Contract and Other Obligations (For non-lawyers)
- UK and EU Environmental Law
- Intellectual Property
- Digital Copyright Law and Policy-Making
- International Trade Theory, Policy and Institutions
- Telecommunications Law

Please note that the classes offered may change from year to year.

Field dissertation

A unique aspect of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.

This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis. It lasts for up to 12 weeks between July and September. Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law and will form the subject of your dissertation.

Previous students have undertaken placements in countries including Sri Lanka, Tanzania, South Africa, India and Kenya. Examples of projects which our students have undertaken include:
- assessing the extent to which Indian environmental and energy laws promote the development of micro-renewables
- an analysis of whether Tanzanian land law discriminates against women and what reforms would be needed to address the discrimination
- an exploration of the low take-up of Clean Development Mechanism [CDM] in Sub-Saharan Africa and how the situation could be improved
- an assessment of environmental justice in Nigeria and South Africa

The project/field work is organised and supported by Challenges Worldwide. Challenges Worldwide is an innovative, award-winning, social enterprise working in international development.

The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources, which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

Additional Entry requirements

If your first language is not English, you must provide documentary evidence of an appropriate level of competency of written and spoken English. The minimum standards are an IELTS minimum overall band score of 6.5 (with no individual test score below 6.0).

The University's English Language Teaching department offers pre-entry and pre-sessional courses for new international students from April each year. Full fee paying students are entitled to one month of the pre-sessional English course free of charge.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As a general rule, classes taught within the Law School will normally be taught over a ten-week teaching period with one two-hour seminar per week.
However in some cases, classes will be offered intensively over a shorter time period because of the availability of staff teaching them.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods and weightings are used on Law School Masters programmes. The classes developed specifically for this programme generally follow this format:
- two x 4,000-word essays or one final exam together with a 4,000-word essay
Each component of assessment is generally worth 50% of the final mark of a class. To pass each class, you need an average overall score of 50% across all assessments as well as a minimum score of 40% in each individual component of assessment.

Careers

Increasingly, lawyers and other related professionals are operating in environments that demand an understanding of international economic law.

Studying on this programme will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and analytical skills relevant to working or planning a career with an international focus.

Students on this programme and the LLM in International Law and Sustainable Development have gone on to take up varied positions including:
- Analyst in the Private Wealth division of a multinational bank
- Policy Officer with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency
- Logistical Co-ordinator with Oxfam America
- Legal counsel for an energy utility company based in Switzerland
- Responsible Investment Analyst for a leading global provider of research into corporate environmental, social and governance performance
- Project Associate for an international non-profit organization working to advance global public health
- Senior manager at Ofgem
- Lecturer at a technical college in Bahrain

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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In a world facing unique economic, environmental and social challenges of a scale not seen before, promoting sustainable development has become a pressing priority. Read more

Why this course?

In a world facing unique economic, environmental and social challenges of a scale not seen before, promoting sustainable development has become a pressing priority.

The course will give you a solid grounding in the structures, rules and principles of aspects of public international law that impact on sustainable development.

This programme is designed specifically for graduates who want to work in the international development sector in management, planning or policy-related areas.

The course has a flexible structure. You’ll have the opportunity to pursue your own interests and tailor your degree to your chosen career path. You can select elective classes from other Masters Programmes in Law as well as related programmes across the University.

It is not necessary that you hold a law degree before embarking on this course of study however law content in your previous course may be useful.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internationallawsustainabledevelopment/

You’ll study

This programme is available full-time and part-time with three potential exit points. You can choose to study for a:
- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert)
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip)
- Master’s degree (LLM)

Core classes:
- Research Methods (compulsory for LLM)
- The World Trading System: Law & Policy
- International Environmental Law

Elective classes
Choices may include:
- Comparative Law of Obligations
- Business & Human Rights
- Comparative Company Law & Regulation
- Competition Law & Policy in the EU
- Legal Process & the Law of Contract & Other Obligations (for non-lawyers)
- UK & EU Environmental Law
- Intellectual Property
- Global Water Policy
- International Trade Theory, Policy and Institutions
- Fundamentals of Environmental Forensics
- Energy Resources and Policy

Please note that the classes offered may change from year to year.

A limited number of students will be given the opportunity to choose elective classes from the optional modules offered in the LLM in Climate Change Law and Policy. This allows those students to combines sustainable development law and policy with climate change. The programme is delivered off campus on an intensive three-day basis in January. For further information, please contact the Law School.

- Field dissertation
A unique aspect of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.
This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis. It lasts for up to 12 weeks between July and September. Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law and will form the subject of your dissertation.
Previous students have undertaken placements in countries including Sri Lanka, Tanzania, South Africa, India and Kenya. Examples of projects which our students have undertaken include:
- assessing the extent to which Indian environmental and energy laws promote the development of micro-renewables
- an analysis of whether Tanzanian land law discriminates against women and what reforms would be needed to address the discrimination
- an exploration of the low take-up of Clean Development Mechanism [CDM] in Sub-Saharan Africa and how the situation could be improved
- an assessment of environmental justice in Nigeria and South Africa

The project/field work is organised and supported by Challenges Worldwide. Challenges Worldwide is an innovative, award-winning, social enterprise working in international development.

The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You will have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

The Law School is home to Scotland’s first Law Clinic. It provides a ‘real life’ learning experience for students and an invaluable service to members of the public who do not qualify for legal aid, and cannot otherwise afford legal advice.

Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance

You're encouraged to engage with the activities of the centre. These include guest lectures and international conferences. The Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law and Governance is a centre of excellence in environmental law and governance and boasts a vibrant research community.

You'll also have the opportunity to participate in the organisation of the annual postgraduate Colloquium on Environmental Law and Governance. This has a session devoted to the presentations of highly qualified LLM students.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, documentary evidence of an appropriate level of competency of written and spoken English must be provided. The minimum standards [at the date of writing] are an IELTS minimum overall band score of 6.5 (with no individual test score below 6.0). Tests are valid for two years.

The University's English Language Teaching department offers pre-entry and pre-sessional courses for new international students from April each year. Full fee paying students are entitled to one month of the pre-sessional English course free of charge.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As a general rule, classes taught within the Law School will normally be taught over a ten-week teaching period with one two-hour seminar per week.
However in some cases, classes will be offered intensively over a shorter time period because of the availability of staff teaching them.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods and weightings are used on Law School Masters programmes. The classes developed specifically for this programme generally follow this format:
- two 4,000-word essays or one final examination together with a 4,000-word essay
Each component of assessment is generally worth 50% of the final mark of a module. To pass each module, you need an average overall score of 50% across all assessments as well as a minimum score of 40% in each individual component of assessment.

Careers

Increasingly, lawyers and other related professionals are operating in environments that demand an understanding of sustainable development, and its relationship with other rights and norms.

Studying on this programme will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and analytical skills relevant to working or planning a career with an international focus.

Students on this programme and the LLM in International Economic Law have gone on to take up varied positions including:
- Analyst in the Private Wealth division of a multinational bank
- Policy Officer with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency
- Logistical Coordinator with Oxfam America
- Legal counsel for an energy utility company based in Switzerland
- Responsible Investment Analyst for a leading global provider of research into corporate environmental, social and governance performance
- Project Associate for an international non-profit organization working to advance global public health
- Senior manager at Ofgem
- Lecturer at a technical college in Bahrain

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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MSc International Finance is for those working or hoping to work in finance or accounting. You'll gain an academic qualification in domestic and international financial operations and you'll address current challenges and issues facing the world's international financial institutions and markets. Read more
MSc International Finance is for those working or hoping to work in finance or accounting. You'll gain an academic qualification in domestic and international financial operations and you'll address current challenges and issues facing the world's international financial institutions and markets.

The course links theory and practice in international financial matters through intensive, selective and expert orientated modules with a clearly defined business outlook. One of the main attractions of this course is that it provides a wide range of modules to suit your specific interests. The content focuses on financial markets, the analysis and management of financial intermediaries and their interaction with financial instruments, investment and risk management. This will see you studying a broad range of related topics such as asset fund management, portfolio theory and investment analysis, credit risk, and financial institutions main operations and performance within an international context.

On this course you'll also take part in a residential weekend focused on personal development and in-depth learning. You'll exchange experiences and discuss current events and specific problems affecting the financial markets and institutions, with academics and a visitor practitioner.

7 reasons to study here

1. Research & Enterprise: Delivering outstanding economic, social and cultural benefits from our intellectual capital, by connecting our teaching and research to the real world.
2. Award winning: LSBU Business School picked up the award for Accountancy College of the Year- Public Sector at the PQ Magazine 2017 awards.
3. Employability: Providing students with an individualised learning experience to develop the skills and aspirations that enable them to enter employment, further study, or start their own businesses. Students will get Bloomberg market certificate (BMC) as the end of their course.
4. Student Experience: Ensuring that students are seen as participants in their learning and that the student voice is encouraged and listened to. Students will also have the chance to visit financial institutions such as Bloomberg.
5. Internationalisation: Developing a multicultural community of students and staff, which through international alliances and partnerships will further build our capacity and capabilities in education, research and enterprise
6. Research & Enterprise: Delivering outstanding economic, social and cultural benefits from our intellectual capital, by connecting our teaching and research to the real world through commercial activities and social enterprise
7. Practicability and digital skills: The course is highly practical with a large part of it associated with the learning of Bloomberg software. You will learnt practical skills in a real-world environment.

Modules

Core modules:

Corporate financial management
International financial markets
Empirical finance
Research design and methods
Placement (for MSc with placement only)
Dissertation

Plus two elective modules from:

Bank Financial Risk Management
International Banking
Derivatives and Risk Management
Institutional Fund Management
Business Analysis
Governance, Risk & Ethics
Corporate Law
International Strategy

Teaching and learning

This course will develop your key skills in:

• Understanding the core of international finance in the modern global marketplace
• Understanding the theoretical basis for understanding the nature of international financial operations and their complexity.
• Understanding of the employment of theoretical principles to deal with practical situations faced by investors, business and financial institutions
• Developing research problems/questions in the area of investment, banking and finance.

You will also benefit from the Department's experienced lecturers, excellent learning materials, and small class sizes. Workshops, seminars, case studies and student led discussion facilitate more active modes of learning. You'll receive training in the use of Bloomberg and Thomson-One Banker, and specialist software (SPSS and N-Vivo)during seminar sessions and in the development of assignments, and dissertation/Business Project.

All modules are assessed by a mix of coursework, individual and group presentations and written examinations. A typical taught module involves a total of 200 study hours (52 contact hours and 148 group and private study hours).The use of specialist resources such as Bloomberg and Thomson-One Banker are embedded within modules.

Facilities

Specialist industry software prepares our students with the digital skills that employers value. Students on our programmes have access to Bloomberg, Thomson One Banker, SAGE, Blueprint, FAME, NVivo, and SPSS.

Read more about the Division of Accounting and Finance's specialist facilities and software.

Placements

In addition to academic rigour, the Masters is highly oriented to support your career development.

There is an optional placement in a relevant business area to enhance your employability skills and apply accounting and finance theory to contemporary business practices.

If you take part in a placement, the dissertation may be linked to your placement experience.

A placement is not currently offered on the part-time mode.

Facilities

Specialist industry software prepares our students with the digital skills that employers value. Students on our programmes have access to Bloomberg, Thomson One Banker, SAGE, Blueprint, FAME, NVivo, and SPSS.

Read more about the Division of Accounting and Finance's specialist facilities and software:

http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/schools/business/subjects/accounting-and-finance

Professional links

According to the electives chosen, the programme will part prepare students for some of the professional examinations of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), CIMA, ICAEW and CISI.

Collaboration agreements with:

• Auston Institute of Management (Singapore and Sri Lanka)
• Pole Universitaire Leonard de Vinci (Paris)

Employability

Graduates who possess an LSBU Masters degree in international finance are likely to be highly employable in trading and analyst positions, not only in the UK but throughout the world. Excellent career opportunities exist in finance, banking and investment. Graduates from this course have gone on to obtain positions in major international companies, financial institutions, regulatory agencies, credit rating agencies and financial consultant firms in the UK and overseas.

Past employability skills events held by the Department include:

"My Employability event"

• My dream job
• Preparing CVs and cover letters
• Using databases to research the company
• IT qualifications for your CV
• Preparing for interviews
• Managing expectations
• Internships

The optional placement in arelevant business area enhances your employability skills and enables you to apply accounting and finance theory to contemporary business practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The Anthropology of Childhood, Youth and Education MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thoroughgoing anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young. Read more

About the course

The Anthropology of Childhood, Youth and Education MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thoroughgoing anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young.

Its key organising principle is that understanding children requires the study of how their relations with others - peers, older and younger children, parents, teachers and other adults - inform their practices, identities and world views.

This course addresses the following issues from an anthropological perspective:
Do children of ‘different cultures’ live ‘different worlds’?
How does education impact upon children’s worlds and upon social and cultural practices more broadly?
How do everyday processes of learning – both formal and informal - help to shape children’s ideas of and engagement with society at large?
What is the role of schools in the transmission and acquisition of cultural values to children and youth?
And why are adults’ ideas about childhood and youth so important for what children learn and aspire to become?

The distinctiveness of this degree derives from an anthropological approach that focuses on the importance of children’s and youth’s perspectives, and on the role that education (formal and informal) plays in children’s learning processes and in the transmission and acquisition of cultural knowledge.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

Through an examination of ethnographic cases from around the world (including the UK), you will learn about the different ways in which childhood and youth are understood and conceptualised.

You will explore the different educational forms and processes through which cultural knowledge is transmitted and acquired, and how culture impacts upon these processes.

Course Content

The course is designed to show postgraduate students how anthropological approaches can be used to gain access to and understand children and young people's lived experience, their ideas about the world and themselves, and their relations with peers and adults. In so doing, it aims to provide a rigorous grounding in key anthropological ideas and research methods and to show how a comparative social analysis illuminates our understanding of ourselves and other people.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Childhood, Youth and Education
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation*
Foundation Disciplines of Education*
Literature Policy and Analysis*
International Development, Children and Youth

Part-time

Year 1 compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning

Year 2 compulsory modules:

Dissertation in Childhood, Youth and Education
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Special Features

Our course team has worked in countries across the globe including South, West and East Africa, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

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The MA in South Asian Studies provides exceptional opportunities for advanced study of one of the world’s most diverse and important regions. Read more
The MA in South Asian Studies provides exceptional opportunities for advanced study of one of the world’s most diverse and important regions.

Students can choose to concentrate on pre-modern or modern South Asia and can acquire a basic knowledge of one of the area’s languages.

The degree provides a wide-ranging interdisciplinary analysis of the South Asian countries – India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka. Disciplines available include Politics, Economics,Anthropology, Law and History.

The programme attracts students from a variety of backgrounds. While some wish to broaden their previous studies or experience of South Asia, others approach the course without having a South Asian element to their first degree, but with a desire to focus their previous training on the region.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/masastud/

Structure

Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

Some disciplines, such as Politics, Economics or Social Anthropology, require an appropriate qualification (such as part of a first degree) if any of their courses are to be taken as the major subject.

Programme Specification

MA South Asian Area Studies - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 34kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/masastud/file80818.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

For most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in South Asian studies from SOAS provides its students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law.

Postgraduate students are equipped with linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research, along with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in business, public or charity sectors. These include written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

An MA in South Asian Area Studies can open many doors. Those remaining in London will be able to take advantage of the numerous international bodies here, and those with specialist areas of knowledge (finance, law, art) will find relevant opportunities. Many students may choose to pursue a career in South Asia to put their skills into practice. Research degrees are also possibilities for graduates with high grades.

Among a variety of professions, career paths may include: Academia; Commerce; Community; Finance; Government; NGOs; Media; Politics; and UN Agencies.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?. Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?. Read more

About the course

Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?
Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?
Is there a ‘human nature’ underneath all the cultural differences?

Anyone interested in psychological processes, feeling and expression, memory and trauma, culture and personality, will have asked themselves questions of this kind. However, they are less likely to have asked themselves how (or if) we can recognise and analyse different emotions in other cultural settings.

In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience.

By engaging with debates on these important topics and through the examination of world ethnography (including the UK), participants will learn about selfhood, emotion, madness and identity in cultural context.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

This MSc gives candidates a solid grounding in key topics in psychological and psychiatric anthropology.

Through detailed consideration of cases from Britain and around the world, we explore the ways in which person, emotion, and subjectivity are shaped through cultural practices.

Candidates from backgrounds in health, therapy, social work and psychology will be able to challenge the categories and assumptions inherent in standard approaches to psychological and behavioural issues.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Year 2

Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and dissertation. There are no examinations.

Special Features

This degree looks at psychological and psychiatric topics from an anthropological perspective. There is an overlap with psychology and psychiatry in the things we look at (identity, consciousness, cognition, mental health, etc), but the approach is quite different; indeed, the findings can be startlingly different.

In all cases, we explore the point of view and experience of the insider, the ‘native’, in a range of cultures, we analyse this inside view in relation to the social and cultural environment. What we seek is a dynamic conception of human nature that is true to experience as well as illuminating broader social processes of which the individual may be only partly aware.
 
This degree challenges standard assumptions about normality and deviance, social and personal identity, the boundaries of the self, and the constituents of experience.

For those employed in the health, social and educational sectors, it will enhance professional practice and broaden understanding. But for every student it will open up new avenues.

The programme is run by experts in their field, who have worked in countries across the globe including Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to an up to 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

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The Social Anthropology MRes is a taught postgraduate degree that provides high quality training in anthropology and anthropological research. Read more

About the course

The Social Anthropology MRes is a taught postgraduate degree that provides high quality training in anthropology and anthropological research.

The course is of particular relevance for those who wish to use such training as a foundation for PhD study or who are keen to enhance their careers through the acquisition of advanced knowledge and research skills. Accordingly, the MRes can be completed as a qualification in itself, or as the first stage in a four-year PhD programme.

For students with no previous anthropological training, it can also act as a conversion course to anthropology.

A unique feature of this programme is that students can design, in collaboration with academic staff, Guided Study Modules to focus on their particular areas of research interest.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The MRes/MPhil/PhD programme marries the best aspects of the traditional apprenticeship system of anthropology - students work with a leading anthropologist in their geographical area of interest and undertake a formal training programme concerned with developing broader anthropological skills in the context of social science as a whole.

Our students have been or are being funded by the British Council, the Economic and Social Research Council, the Commonwealth Scholarship Scheme, the World Health Organization, national and local governments as well as NGOs.

Course Content

The MRes consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Social Anthropology Research

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Anthropology of International Development
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology
The Anthropology of Childhood
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Guided Study Module
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Option modules

Year 2

Compulsory modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essays, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based on fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

Our course team has worked in countries across the globe including South, West and East Africa, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a final dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

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