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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3S3 (minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the LLM Computer and Communications Law studied by presence in London and the LLM studied by Distance Learning.

Programme

Structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

You will need to gain 180 credits for the LLM, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Distance learning
Increasingly we all face more pressures in our business lives and finding the time to attend courses can be very difficult. Distance learning is the solution to your training needs; it allows you the full benefits of studying for a recognised UK university qualification whilst still in full-time employment using this freedom and flexibility to your advantage.

You can set the pace at which you learn and decide when, where and how long you want to study for.

This programme is delivered via our web-based virtual learning environment (VLE). All written assignments are submitted through the e-learning system. You are encouraged to interact with teaching staff and other students in online discussion forums, join group activities and be part of the student community.

Modules and Dissertations
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.
◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the LLM in Computer and Communications Law programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3CC (minimum - one year, part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Flexible Learning

Completion of the Certificate takes one to two years, part-time and is tailored for the needs of busy practitioners or other lawyers who would like to obtain knowledge in the computer and communications law field. Students may switch to the Diploma (120 credits) or the LLM (180 credits) after completing the Certificate.

Programme structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

The programme is tailored for you if you wish to obtain a specialist Certificate in Digital Media Law, Certificate in IT or IP Law, Certificate in E-commerce Law or a Certificate in Communications Law. The certificate requires the successful completion of 60 credits over a minimum of one year, which can be completed as follows:
◦four taught modules, or
◦three taught modules and the optional research seminar paper/presentation

On successful completion of the certificate you may switch to the diploma. The diploma must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation

If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)
Modules:
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5,000-word essay during the May – August term.

◦Dissertations (for the diploma and LLM only) – on a topic of your own choice
◦10,000-word dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

Modules

Certificate in Digital Media Law Module options
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling


Certificate in IP and IT Law Module options
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in E-commerce Law Module options
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the IT Sector
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in Communications Law Modules
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were uploaded when making an online application.

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3DL - (Minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on the established strengths of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) in computer, e-commerce, internet, communications law, media law and associated topics.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most materials for Computer and Communications Law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a virtual learning environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the courses to allow for as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the module. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not be required to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the programme.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the Postgraduate Diploma studied by presence in London and the Postgraduate Diploma studied by distance learning.

Programme

The programme must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits which can be completed as follows:

◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation
If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Modules and Dissertation

The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice.
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms.
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms.

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

Read less
During the first year emphasis is placed on set projects which explore different design approaches, contexts and roles in relation to emerging technologies. Read more

First Year

During the first year emphasis is placed on set projects which explore different design approaches, contexts and roles in relation to emerging technologies. The first project of the year is for both first and second years. The first project is designed to open up a space for discussion, experimentation and debate about the relationship between design and technology. It is also an opportunity for everyone to get to know each other, and to make clear how the programme and College work.

The next few projects are designed to expose students to different design roles, contexts and approaches in relation to new technology. Most of these projects will be led by either a member of the core teaching team or a visiting tutor. They will last between one to five weeks.

Guests with specialist knowledge and skills will plug-in to each project, giving tutorials, talks, or crits. Guest lecturers and course staff will also give talks about their work and ideas as part of the weekly evening talk series.

There will be short workshops throughout the first year exploring different technical skills such as software and electronics prototyping, model-making and film production. Students also undertake the mandatory Critical & Historical Studies programme in their first year (see below), in which a series of lectures, seminars and tutorials culminates in the submission of a dissertation at the start of the second year.

Besides gaining experience as an Intern, the summer is an ideal time for students to reflect on what they have learnt during the first year and to think about their design focus for the second year.

Second Year

During the second year students are expected to initiate their own projects and build up a body of work that reflects the professional context they wish to practice in.

At the start of the second year, students participate in a three to four-week project set for the whole programme. After that they are assigned a personal tutor and will begin to negotiate their areas of interest and final projects.

Throughout the second year, students are expected to become progressively independent. The emphasis is on developing a body of work that reflects the intellectual and creative requirements of the context they wish to work within on graduation. Students will meet with their tutor on a weekly basis either individually or in small groups and will present their work to the whole programme and visiting critics at least twice a term. They will also be able to discuss their work with other staff and visiting tutors.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

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The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Sport is offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy. Read more
The MA Program in Cultural Diplomacy and International Sport is offered by the University of the West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy.
.

Credits - 90 ECTS Credits

Length - 2 Trimesters (plus Dissertation)

Location - Paisley, Scotland and Berlin, Germany

Tuition - €9,000

Sport has come to occupy a central role in the economic, physical, psychological and socio-cultural fabric of nation states. Historical and cultural identity cannot be reflected, understood or critiqued without recourse to the place and influence of sport. Importantly, and despite the rhetoric of politicians and governing bodies, sport is a powerful political vehicle. As a driver of economic wealth, tourist attraction, business development and urban regeneration sport is a major plinth in the policy process. Moreover, in a techno-cultural age of digital and social immediacy, sport has become a key media and experiential spectacular, constantly deployed across the geo-political stage. Modern sport is now a global power player intrinsic to the perpetuation of the spectacle of consumer capitalism, which solidifies its status as a primary vehicle of cultural diplomacy.
Sport, sport events and the media are, more than ever, intrinsically linked. The trajectory of such a union is traced through the rise of the hallmark, major and mega events (e.g. Olympics and World Cup), which see the mediatisation of experience subtly mixed with the pride and prestige with identity politics and ideological power (Getz, 2014). Whether the propaganda of Nazi Germany, race relations of Mexico Olympics, terrorism of Munich Olympics, 1980s Cold War boycotts, favela clearances of 2016 Rio World Cup to human rights and FIFA allegations of 2022 Qatar World Cup sport is embedded in the arena of political contestation. The role of sport as a vehicle for peace and development are increasingly promoted by governing bodies of sport and ambassadors for developing nations. Again cultural diplomacy comes to the forefront with sport as we see governing bodies of sporting events, policy institutions and transnational corporations assert counter-discourses that see sport claimed as a supranational values vehicle for peace, human rights and equality. Whether in the bidding phase, lead up, mediatised event or post-event legacy and leverage claims sporting events bring geopolitical differences to the fore. This MA blends expertise in sport with that of cultural diplomacy to ensure the sporting leaders or diplomats of the future are prepared to deal with the global sporting arena and its potential political, social and cultural outcomes.
The program provides students with expertise in the field of International Sport and Cultural Diplomacy, a new and attractive field of studies, which is currently offered as an academic field only through the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies of the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy. This particular emphasis on Cultural Diplomacy and its historical and contemporary application in the public sector, private sector and civil society, provides students with expertise in three distinct academic fields, thus with an academic and practical advantage in the European and Global Arena.

The program addresses contemporary international issues, with classroom seminars and lectures, as well as online resources including vodcasts, recorded lecturers and presentations. Additionally, educational & cultural events, conferences, professional trainings, tours, visits and meetings with foreign officials, are further incorporated into the curriculum. Students will meet with leading experts working in international organizations, embassies, and academic institutions, and will engage with specialists in the areas of International Events, Sport, Sport Media, Sport Policy, Culture, Communication, Politics, Human Rights, Culture, Peace Building, Multilateral Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Development.

The program provides students with practical experience for both academic and professional development, preparing students for careers in diverse fields, such as international sport events, sports policy, sport governing bodies, international relations, conferences and events, the humanities, politics, and culture, foreign policy and international policy. On a practical level, the international environment of the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies offers students a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts and academics at a wide variety of international organizations and research centers. This exceptional learning environment leads to original research and independent study opportunities. It allows students to create a solid professional network and form a concrete base for future academic and professional career choices, preparing students for engagement in the international arena, civil society, politics, governmental organizations and international economic organizations, as well as the private sector.

Program Structure
The program consists of 90 ECTS credits in total and has duration of two trimesters, and a Thesis to be submitted towards the completion of the program. The first trimester of the program is hosted by the University of the West of Scotland in Paisley and the second trimester is hosted by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin.

The program follows the conventional university structure of a one year academic program divided into two trimesters, where Students are offered elective courses to accompany mandatory courses, a professional development experience and the final thesis.

Enrolments to the Program are possible towards the Fall, Winter and Spring semesters’ start each year.

For start Winter 2017 (February 8th, 2017)

Deadline for late admissions: December 31st, 2016

Next start:

Spring Semester 2017- April 11th, 2017 , Deadline for admissions: January 15th, 2017

For more information please visit: http://www.ccds-berlin.de and .http://www.ccds-berlin.de/index.php?en_uws_macd-is

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Overview. The MA Program in International Events and Cultural Diplomacy is a one-year program offered by the University of West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy. Read more
Overview
The MA Program in International Events and Cultural Diplomacy is a one-year program offered by the University of West of Scotland in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy.

Credits - 90 ECTS Credits

Length - 2 Trimesters (plus Dissertation)

Location - Paisley, Scotland and Berlin, Germany

Tuition - €9,000

The programme recognises that International events are increasingly important within a globalizing world, reflecting the increasing levels of interconnectedness and levels of social consciousness of the world as a single place Mega sporting and cultural events also have an increased political saliency to a wide variety of governmental and non-governmental actors across the world. In this sense, contemporary sporting and cultural events are significant elements of a globalised politic, ‘influencing and being influenced by politics and foreign policy’. International events are therefore inseparable from politics, international relations and diplomacy (public or cultural). They are also now accepted as an important element in nations’ soft power offensives, to the point that securing a positive impact on the nation’s image (or brand) or international prestige has moved from being a welcome consequence to a significant justification for investing in hosting sports mega-events. This particular emphasis on Cultural Diplomacy and its historical and contemporary application in the public sector, private sector and civil society, provides students with expertise in three distinct academic fields, thus with an academic and practical advantage in the European and Global Arena.

In addition to required coursework, the program includes educational & cultural events, conferences, professional trainings, tours, visits and meetings with foreign officials, which are further incorporated into the curriculum. Students will meet with leading experts working in international organizations, embassies, and academic institutions, and will engage with specialists in the areas of International Relations & Economics, Business, Communication, Politics, Human Rights, Culture, Peace Building, Multilateral Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Development.

The program provides students with practical experience for both academic and professional development, preparing students for careers in diverse fields, such as international relations, the humanities, politics, and culture, foreign policy and international economics. On a practical level, the international environment of the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies offers students a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts and academics at a wide variety of international organizations and research centers. This exceptional learning environment leads to original research and independent study opportunities. It allows students to create a solid professional network and form a concrete base for future academic and professional career choices, preparing students for engagement in the international arena, civil society, politics, governmental organizations and international economic organizations, as well as the private sector.

Program Curriculum
The program consists of 90 ECTS credits in total and has duration of two trimesters, and a Thesis to be submitted towards the completion of the program. The first trimester of the program is hosted by the University of the West of Scotland in Paisley and the second trimester is hosted by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin. This unique structure of the program provides the students with the advantage of learning in 2 different major European cities and thus the opportunity to gain academic, professional and personal experience from living in different cultures. Furthermore, the program’s structure provides a unique opportunity to benefit from the study environment in both an international non-governmental organization and a traditional public University.

The program follows the conventional university structure of a one year academic program divided into two trimesters, where Students are offered elective courses to accompany mandatory courses, a professional development experience and the final thesis.

Financials
The tuition cost is 9,000 Euros for the full program. The fees cover only the tuition fees, and do not include housing or any other living costs and related expenses.

Enrollments to the Program are possible towards the Fall, Winter and Spring semesters’ start each year.

For start Winter 2017 (February 8th, 2017)

Deadline for late admissions: December 31st, 2016

Next start:

Spring Semester 2017 - April 11th, 2017 , Deadline for admissions: January 15th, 2017


For further information please visit: http://www.ccds-berlin.de .

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Explore astronomy and astrophysics at an advanced level, with an emphasis on theoretical astronomy. This course is for you if you have graduated from an applied mathematics- or physics-based degree and wish to learn how to apply your knowledge to astronomy. Read more
Explore astronomy and astrophysics at an advanced level, with an emphasis on theoretical astronomy. This course is for you if you have graduated from an applied mathematics- or physics-based degree and wish to learn how to apply your knowledge to astronomy. It’s one of only three full-time, broad-based astronomy MSc courses in the UK.

How will I study?
Teaching is by:
-Lectures
-Exercise classes
-Seminars
-Personal supervision

You’ll contribute to our weekly informal seminars, and are encouraged to attend research seminars.

Assessment for the taught modules is by coursework and unseen examination. Assessment for the project is by oral presentation and a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. A distinction is awarded on the basis of excellence in both the lecture modules and the project.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options. Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships
Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty
Our research focuses on extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology.

Careers
The course has an excellent reputation, both nationally and internationally, and graduates from this MSc work and study all over the world.

Many of our graduates go on to take a research degree and often find a permanent job in astronomy. Others have become science journalists and writers.

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This MSc is for you if you’re a graduate from an applied mathematics- or physics-based degree and wish to learn how to apply your knowledge to cosmology. Read more
This MSc is for you if you’re a graduate from an applied mathematics- or physics-based degree and wish to learn how to apply your knowledge to cosmology.

It is one of only two MScs in this subject area in the UK. Our emphasis is on observational and theoretical cosmology in the pre- and post-recombination universe.

How will I study?

Teaching is through:
-Lectures
-Exercise classes
-Seminars
-Personal supervision

You’re assessed by coursework and unseen examination. Assessment for the project is an oral presentation and a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. You’ll contribute to our weekly informal seminars and are encouraged to attend research seminars.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options.

Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Our research focuses on extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology.

Careers

Most of our graduates have gone on to study for a research degree in a closely related field.

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This course is for you if you’re interested in exploring the fields of atomic, molecular and optical physics as well as experimental particle physics. Read more
This course is for you if you’re interested in exploring the fields of atomic, molecular and optical physics as well as experimental particle physics.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through lectures, workshops and personal supervision. Your time is split equally between the project and modules. Your project culminates in a dissertation (with a contribution from a research talk).

The modules are assessed by problem sets, with either open-notes tests or unseen examinations. You’ll attend research seminars and contribute to your group’s discussions of the latest journal papers.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options.

Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates go on to take research degrees, or take up employment in a range of industries in roles such as:
-Business/data analysis
-Computer programming
-Software development
-Teaching
-Research and teaching technical support

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There are four separate areas of design specialisation that may be studied. knitwear, footwear, accessory design and millinery. Specialism students follow the Fashion Menswear curriculum and have teaching and technical courses in their specialist area. Read more
There are four separate areas of design specialisation that may be studied: knitwear, footwear, accessory design and millinery. Specialism students follow the Fashion Menswear curriculum and have teaching and technical courses in their specialist area.

Technical courses relevant to the discipline and specialisms are integral elements to this process. Professional presentation and portfolio development focus on communication skills and the ability to present work coherently. Profile analysis and marketing clarify the students’ aspirations through product, positioning and use of the media. Our aim for students is that they fulfill their potential and exert a creative influence on the future of menswear.

In the first year, students undertake a series of workshops, lectures and projects including fabric and fibre technology, fitting and tailoring, drawing and illustration. Students also undertake the Critical & Historical Studies lecture and seminar programme, culminating in the submission of a dissertation at the start of their second year.

External, industry-set projects provide students with the experience of working professionally, and are timetabled in both first and second years. Recent projects included IFF, Brioni, Manolo Blahnik, Bill Amberg. These professional contacts frequently lead to sponsorship, international placements and freelance design work for our students.

In their second year, students are expected to work more independently, developing a pre-collection and a final collection. Every student will have the opportunity to show their work at the end of their final year. In addition, selected students will have the opportunity to show their final collection in the catwalk shows.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

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The Womenswear programme encourages the development of students’ individual design identity through the translation of their personal research into design. Read more
The Womenswear programme encourages the development of students’ individual design identity through the translation of their personal research into design. Within the discipline there are four areas of separate design specialisation, including: knitwear, footwear, accessory design and millinery.

During the programme, students are given the opportunity to develop their individuality and creativity through concentrating on the following subjects: research and development of design ideas, colour, fabric and yarn sourcing, dedicated technical workshops relevant to the specialism selected, drawing and portfolio presentation.

Professional presentations and portfolio development focus on communication skills and the ability of students to present their work coherently and intelligently. External, industry-set projects are selected primarily to provide students with the experience of working professionally, and are timetabled in both first and second years. These professional contacts frequently lead to sponsorship, international placements and freelance design work for our students.

Students also undertake the Critical & Historical Studies lecture and seminar programme, culminating in the submission of a dissertation at the start of their second year.

In their second year, students are expected to work more independently, developing a precollection and a final collection. Every student will have the opportunity to show their work at the end of their final year. In addition, selected students will have the opportunity to show their final collection in the catwalk shows.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

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Explore modern experimental and theoretical particle physics. This course – delivered by our expert faculty – gives you a sound footing for further studies in this field. Read more
Explore modern experimental and theoretical particle physics.

This course – delivered by our expert faculty – gives you a sound footing for further studies in this field. You can take this MSc in an experimental or theoretical mode.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through lectures, seminars and personal supervision. Assessment is split equally between the project and modules. Your project culminates in a dissertation (with a contribution from a research talk).

The modules are assessed by problem sets, with either open-notes tests or unseen examinations. You’ll attend research seminars and contribute to your group’s discussions of the latest journal papers.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options.

Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates go on to doctoral study (theoretical or experimental), or take up employment in a range of industries in fields such as:
-Business/data analysis
-Computer programming
-Software development
-Teaching
-Research and teaching technical support

Read less
Exploration of quantum phenomena has recently led to extraordinary applications of quantum entanglement. The degree of control exerted over these systems is reflected in the term ‘quantum technology’, describing both experimental and theoretical developments in this area. Read more
Exploration of quantum phenomena has recently led to extraordinary applications of quantum entanglement. The degree of control exerted over these systems is reflected in the term ‘quantum technology’, describing both experimental and theoretical developments in this area.

This course is for you if you’re interested in the wonders of quantum physics and have a desire to exploit its full power. We cover:
-Ion-trap quantum processors
-Ion-photon interfaces for the projected quantum internet
-Quantum simulators
-Superconducting quantum circuits
-Devices for quantum-enhanced metrology

How will I study?

Assessment is split equally between the project and modules.

Your project culminates in a dissertation (with a contribution from a research talk). The modules are assessed by problem sets, with either open-notes tests or unseen examinations. You’ll attend research seminars and contribute to your group’s discussions of the latest journal papers.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options.

Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

This course may be attractive to you if you aim to:
-Go on to doctoral study (theory or experiment)
-Work in a high-technology company exploiting cutting-edge technologies related to our research (this could involve development of quantum information technology, high-precision measurements and quantum metrology, and photonics/optical communications)
-Work in business/data analysis, research, computer programming, software development, or teaching

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The Master of Arts in International Economics, Business & Cultural Diplomacy is a two-year program offered by Furtwangen University (HFU) in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy. Read more
The Master of Arts in International Economics, Business & Cultural Diplomacy is a two-year program offered by Furtwangen University (HFU) in partnership with the Academy for Cultural Diplomacy.

The degree provides a comprehensive base of studies in several academic disciplines related to International Economics, Business and Global Politics, with a particular emphasis on cultural diplomacy and its historical and contemporary application in the public sector, private sector and civil society. The degree prepares students for careers in diverse fields, such as the field of international relations, the humanities, business, the financial sector, politics and culture, with a special focus on Cultural Diplomacy institutions and the application of Cultural Diplomacy in the framework of foreign policy and international economics. The program addresses contemporary international issues, with classroom seminars and lectures, as well as educational & cultural events, conferences, professional trainings, tours, visits and meetings with foreign officials, which are further incorporated into the curriculum. Students will meet with leading experts working in international organizations, embassies, and academic institutions, and will engage with specialists in the areas of International Relations & Economics, Business, Communication, Politics, Human Rights, Culture, Peace Building, Multilateral Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Development.
The program provides students with practical experience for both academic and professional development, preparing students for careers in diverse fields, such as international relations, the humanities, business, the financial sector, politics and culture, with a special focus on Cultural Diplomacy institutions and the application of Cultural Diplomacy in the framework of foreign policy and international economics.

On a practical level, the international environment of the Center for Cultural Diplomacy Studies offers students a unique opportunity to interact with leading experts and academics at a wide variety of international organizations and research centers. This exceptional learning environment leads to original research and independent study opportunities. It allows students to create a solid professional network and form a concrete base for future academic and professional career choices, preparing students for engagement in the international arena, civil society, politics, governmental organizations and international economic organizations, as well as the private sector.

The program consists of 120 ECTS credits in total and has duration of four semesters, which take place in both Berlin, and Furtwangen (Germany). The first two semesters of the program are hosted by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin and the third and the fourth semesters are hosted by the Furtwangen University (HFU) in Berlin Campus.

The tuition cost is 12,000 Euros for the full program (6,000 Euros/Academic Year). The fees cover only the tuition fees, and do not include housing or any other living costs and related expenses.


Applications are being processed on a regular base, as enrollment to the program is possible towards Fall, Winter and Spring semesters' start, each year.

For start Winter 2017 (February 8th, 2017)

Deadline for late admissions: December 31st, 2016

Next start:

Spring Semester 2017- April 11th, 2017 , Deadline for admissions: January 15th, 2017


For further information, please visit: http://www.ccds-berlin.de

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This is an interdisciplinary programme in the field of contemporary culture. It is a unique collaboration between the University of Kent and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in London. Read more
This is an interdisciplinary programme in the field of contemporary culture. It is a unique collaboration between the University of Kent and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in London.

The MA allows you to choose from a range of modules, each focusing on different aspects of contemporary culture. You will be taught jointly by academics and practitioners in the School of English, the School of Arts, The School of Music and Fine Art, and curators at the ICA. In addition, you will have the opportunity to enrich your academic knowledge and professional development with research trips, and a public presentation opportunity at the ICA.

The programme provides you with a deep understanding of the relationship between disciplines in the arts and an appreciation of the way in which interdisciplinary thinking makes it possible to grasp and respond to key issues in contemporary culture. The MA equips you with the skills, knowledge and professional experience to progress into areas such as artistic practice, related higher postgraduate research, arts management and policy, and a variety of other careers within the arts.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus, while participating in the collaborative module taught partly at the ICA in London, before relocating to our Paris Centre in the historic corner of Montparnasse for the spring term. Students will be able to choose from a wide variety of modules in the areas of Contemporary Literature, Creative Writing, Film, Drama and History and Philosophy of Art. At the Paris Centre students are offered a range of modules inspired by Paris and its unique cultural history. The ICA will coordinate a study visit to Paris which, in partnership with key galleries and artists, will seek to contextualise contemporary culture in an international setting.

The MA in the Contemporary provides students with a deep understanding of the relationship between disciplines in the arts and an appreciation of the way in which interdisciplinary thinking makes it possible to grasp and respond to key issues in contemporary culture. This pioneering educational opportunity will equip students with the skills, knowledge and professional experience to progress into areas such as artistic practice, related higher postgraduate research, arts management and policy and a variety of other careers within the arts.

Course structure

In addition to the core module (Reading the Contemporary, taught jointly by academics and practitioners in the School of English, the School of Arts, The School of Music and Fine Art, and curators at the ICA), you will be able to choose from a wide variety of modules in the areas of contemporary literature, creative writing, film, drama, and history and philosophy of art. You are invited to attend an induction at the ICA at the start of your studies to introduce you to the facilities and are encouraged to make use of the ICA’s programme of seminars and events. In addition, the MA will also involve research trips and a public presentation opportunity at the ICA.

- Professional Development

Besides engaging with ICA curators through the core module in Reading the Contemporary, students will also participate in three research trips in the Autumn, Spring and Summer semesters, led by ICA curators and responding to contemporary artistic developments, media and platforms. Students will be encouraged to apply to vocational placements within the ICA's Creative Team for two days a week over 3 months, working directly with the curators of Talks, Exhibitions, Artists' Film Club, Cinema or Learning and Touring programmes. Students will enjoy unique access to the knowledge of the ICA's Creative Team while working on they final project, and will have the opportunity to present their projects publicly at the ICA at the end of the year.

Modules

You take one compulsory module (EN842 - Reading the Contemporary) plus one additional module offered by the School of English, the School of Arts or the School of Music and Fine Arts in the autumn term and then two from the broad range of Paris modules in the spring term. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes. You then write the dissertation between the start of the summer term and the end of August.

Modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. They are based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/index.html?tab=taught-masters

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