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Masters Degrees (Spring)

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Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance. Read more
Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance.

A place on the conversion year is normally offered together with a conditional offer for the MSc in Mathematical Finance in the following year, subject to successfully completing the conversion year. The normal progression requirement for progression from the conversion year to the MSc in Mathematical Finance is a final weighted average at 2:1 level (60% or above) for the modules taken in the conversion year.

Programme structure

The conversion year consists of a selection of modules to the value of 120 credits being part of the undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Finance at the University of York, with emphasis on the mathematical aspects of the course. Module choice is subject to prerequisites, timetabling constraints, availability of modules, and is subject to approval by the programme director.

The available modules may vary from year to year but are likely to include:

Term 1 (Autumn)
-Calculus (30 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Algebra (20 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Introduction to Probability and Statistics (20 credits)
-Statistics I (10 credits)
-Applied Probability (10 credits)
-Differential Equations (10 credits)
-Mathematical Finance I MAT00015H (10 credits)

Terms 2 and 3 (Spring and Summer Terms)
-Calculus (30 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Introduction to Applied Mathematics (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Real Analysis (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Linear Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Vector Calculus (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Statistics II (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Numerical Analysis (10 credits) (Spring Term only)
-Mathematical Finance II (10 credits) (Spring Term only)

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IT Tralee is currently seeking to recruit ahigh calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master by Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Read more

IT Tralee is currently seeking to recruit ahigh calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master by Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Graduates holding a relevant Level 8 Honours Degree (second class honours or higher) are invited to submit an application. The successful applicants will be awarded a stipend of €700 per month for a maximum period of 18 months and the Institute will waive full fees for this funding period. Postgraduate students are expected to complete their studies full-time at the Institute.

Biography of Principle Supervisor

Mr Quille received his Degree in Chemistry of Pharmaceutical Compounds from University College Cork in 2007. He has since completed an M.Sc in Biotechnology in the Shannon ABC laboratories at IT Tralee on a project entitled: The preparation of an alginate with a hydrophobic moiety that retains its biocompatibility and immunosuppressive properties while remaining suitable for cellular encapsulation. He has previously worked in Astellas as a Process Technician and in Shannon ABC as a Biochemical Technician. He currently holds the role of Research Scientist with Shannon ABC. Previous projects include developing a commercial focus to the use of bioassays in the assessment of different components of seaweed and the impact of seasonality. He has worked on the FP7 funded project NatuCrop where he oversaw extensive tomato growth room, glasshouse and field trials. Results of his work have been presented at a number of conferences all over Europe and in Brazil. He is currently working on a Horizon 2020 project. 

Research Project Abstract

Crop productivity relies heavily on nitrogen fertilisation which in itself requires huge amounts of energy to produce. Also excess applications of nitrogen to the land is detrimental to the environment therefore increasing plant nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is essential in the promotion of sustainable agriculture. The use of seaweed and seaweed extracts in agriculture is well documented. The most popular and well researched type of seaweed extract commercially available is an Ascophyllum Nodosum extract (ANE). Ascophyllum is a brown seaweed that is native to the waters of Ireland as it grows best in the North Atlantic basin. Seaweed extracts have been described to enhance seed germination and establishment, improve plant growth, yield, flower set and fruit production, increase resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and improve postharvest shelf life. Previously a seaweed extract when combined with a fertiliser regime increased the productivity and oil content and accelerated maturation (colour and firmness) of the olive fruits from olive trees. Oil-Seed Rape (OSR; Brassica napus) is a member of the Brassicaceae family that is grown for its oil content. It requires extensive nitrogen fertilisation, however it has a poor N-harvest index meaning a lot of nitrogen is lost in the straw rather than transported to the pod. The aim or our study is to apply 4 commercially available ANE’s to winter and spring crops of OSR (different varieties) in a controlled growth room and glasshouse and finally in a field setting under different fertiliser regimes. Treatments will be assessed by comparing fresh weight, dry weight, and seed/oil yield and oil quality. Plant tissue will also be saved in order to assess other parameters such as flavonol accumulation, nitrate reductase, gene expression (NRT2) and photosynthetic parameters.

Research Context (Technical Merit & Impact)

600,000 Ha of OSR is planted in the UK and Ireland alone every year, recommended input of nitrogen is 200 kg (0.2 tonnes) per Ha meaning 120,000 tonnes of nitrogen every year. As OSR only has an N-harvest index of 0.6, representing 48,000 tonnes lost, which is a massive financial loss as well as potentially environmentally detrimental. In determining the effect of ANE’s on NUE current research focuses on the outcome, i.e. is yield increased, rather than investigate the method by which the yield has increased. This research is aimed a filling some void of knowledge here by linking phenotypic differences to biochemical and genetic data of treated plants in order to assign a potential mode of action.

Research Methodology

While ANE’s have been shown to increase nitrogen assimilation, extensive growth trials, especially in economically important crops (such as OSR) which investigate their role in affecting NUE are scarce and are only seemingly becoming popular in recent years. However considering the increased price of nitrogen, the additional interest in biostimulants (ANE’s in particular), the need to feed a growing population and coupled to the environmental damage of excess nitrogen this can be considered a ‘hot topic’. Plant (glasshouse and field setting) trials will be conducted and analysed for phenotypic data (photosynthetic measurements, yield). Materials from these plant trials must then be harvested, extracted and saved for biochemical and genetic determination. Lab-based techniques employed include protein extraction, western blotting and spectrophotometry, RT-PCR and HPLC. This 3 pronged approach from assessing phenotype to the biochemical level and finally to the gene level will provide evidence on mode of action of the ANE’s potential impact on NUE in OSR.



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The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest. Read more
The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest.

Overview

The MA in Linguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in linguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in linguistic analysis
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in linguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in linguistics

Course structure

The Autumn term comprises four modules in core areas of linguistics. In the Spring term you will choose two modules from a range of options, and begin a further core module on key ideas in linguistics which you will complete in the Summer term. The programme is completed with a research dissertation.

The modules in the Autumn term assume no prior knowledge and provide introductions to the core areas. The modules in the Spring term provide preparation for the research area in which you will complete your dissertation.

Autumn Term
Students take modules worth 40 credits in Autumn Term. The typical Autumn Term modules are:
-Language variation and change (10 credits)
-Semantics (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits)
-Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term you will take two 20-credit modules of your choice. Your options may include:
-Articulatory and impressionistic phonetics (20 credits)
-Bilingualism (20 credits)
-Phonological variation and change (20 credits)
-Second Language phonology (20 credits)
-Second language syntax (20 credits)
-Semantic theory (20 credits)
-Syntactic theory (20 credits)
-The phonetics of talk-in-interaction (20 credits)
-Topics in language variation and change (20 credits)

Note that module offerings may vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.

If you have covered substantial parts of the taught MA programme in your undergraduate degree, please talk to us about whether one of our specialist degree programmes may be more appropriate.

Spring and Summer Terms
In the second half of the Spring term and first half of the Summer term you will take a further core module:
-Key ideas in linguistics (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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York's taught MA in the History of Art provides a stimulating transition from undergraduate study to postgraduate work. It will train you in advanced methods of art-historical research, raise your level of intellectual engagement, instill an awareness of your own scholarly procedures, and improve your writing skills. Read more
York's taught MA in the History of Art provides a stimulating transition from undergraduate study to postgraduate work. It will train you in advanced methods of art-historical research, raise your level of intellectual engagement, instill an awareness of your own scholarly procedures, and improve your writing skills. The MA exposes you to the latest scholarship in your areas of interest and equips you to pursue independent research at the highest level.

Degree structure

Full-time
Taken full-time, the one-year taught MA consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Part-time
-Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Teaching and assessment
Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

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This unique MA will enhance your critical understanding of the musical theatre as a popular entertainment genre- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-musical-theatre/. Read more
This unique MA will enhance your critical understanding of the musical theatre as a popular entertainment genre- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-musical-theatre/

It will help you to sharpen your practical skills as a creative artist. On a practical level, it will assist you in working as a freelance writer, composer or producer of musical theatre.

The MA focuses on the dramaturgy of the musical as a key factor in the future development of the genre.

Expert professionals are regularly employed as visiting tutors, to maintain direct links with the industry.

You follow one of the two pathways as either:

-producer
-writer or composer

You undertake an analytic case study of a musical or production, a placement project and dissertation (producers), and a creative project involving either book and lyrics or music for a short original musical (writers and composers). Producers share some classes with students on the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Secretary.

Modules & Structure

You undertake an analytic case study of a musical or production, a placement project and dissertation (producers), and a creative project involving either book and lyrics or music for a short original musical (writers and composers). Producers share some classes with the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy.

You elect to follow one of two pathways on the programme – Producers, or Writers and Composers. In each case, the programme involves five separate modules:

1. Genre study – autumn and spring terms, both pathways.
This module runs for 20 weeks. It begins in autumn with an historical survey of the development of the American musical, from ‘Showboat’ (1927) to ‘Sweeney Todd’ (1979). It continues in the spring term with a look at new forms of musical theatre that have resulted from the fragmentation of the classic tradition of ‘book’ musicals, with the innovation of the ‘concept’ musical, the impact of rock musicals, the ‘invasion’ of Broadway by the British ‘megamusical’ and the subsequent globalisation of the market by Cameron Macintosh and Disney.

2. Case study – autumn and spring terms, both pathways.
This module involves a 15-week introduction to the different structural components (book, music, lyrics, choreography, scenography) and industrial factors (producers, marketing, technology, conomics)
determining the production of musicals today. The module is taught by a range of professional and academic experts with a variety of different perspectives on the subject.

3. Shared complementary/contextual module 1 – autumn term.

Students choose one of these modules:

4. Shared complementary/contextual module 2, - ‘Musical Theatre and Society’
5. Creative project/dissertation – spring and summer terms, both pathways.

Assessment

Genre study is assessed by two 3,000-word essays; the case study is assessed by means of a 4,000-word essay. The nature and form of creative projects, dissertations and research/placement projects are agreed with the Module Convenor during the programme.

Skills

You will develop a critical understanding of the collaborative processes involved in the creation of musical theatre in the UK and USA.

Composers and librettists/lyricists will achieve an enhanced ability to engage with the integration of dramaturgical and musical components of musical theatre writing, and a comprehension of the various factors involved in working within the industry.

Producers will acquire an overall perspective on the industrial and organisational factors involved in musical theatre production, including methods of theatre marketing, systems of arts funding and policy, and a working knowledge of the strategies involved in producing a small-scale musical.

Producers will also develop skills of leadership and teamwork and the ability to develop and critique their own approaches to working in musical theatre production.

Careers

Typical careers for graduates of this MA include:

musical theatre composer
librettist
lyricis
tproduce
marketing manager
production assistant

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This full-time PGCE (Secondary) programme is available in conjunction with any of the following teaching subjects. Art and Design; Biology; Chemistry; Design and Technology; Drama; English; Media with English; Mathematics; Modern Languages and Physics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pgce/secondary/. Read more
This full-time PGCE (Secondary) programme is available in conjunction with any of the following teaching subjects: Art and Design; Biology; Chemistry; Design and Technology; Drama; English; Media with English; Mathematics; Modern Languages and Physics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pgce/secondary/

This programme aims to develop all the skills, knowledge and understanding you’ll need to become a responsible and effective secondary school teacher in your chosen subject. Find out about the programmes:

PGCE (Secondary): Art & Design
PGCE (Secondary): Design & Technology
PGCE (Secondary): Drama
PGCE (Secondary): English
PGCE (Secondary): Mathematics
PGCE (Secondary): Media Studies with English
PGCE (Secondary): Modern Languages
PGCE (Secondary): Science Education: Biology, Chemistry or Physics
Why train with Goldsmiths?
We have a strong and longstanding partnership with a range of schools in London and south-east England and work closely with them to plan and implement our PGCE (Secondary) programmes.

In 2015, 98% of students who were recommended for QTS with Goldsmiths were employed in schools. This figure is higher than the national average.

Our recent Ofsted inspection found that:

Schools and NQTs testify that the course provides trainees with a solid pedagogical understanding of teaching in their subject area. They rightly believe this is due to an effective balance between practice and pedagogy. School Direct trainees are able to attend the same academic sessions at the university as trainees on the traditional PGCE courses.

All trainees feel these sessions equip them with a range of teaching strategies. They comment that they are encouraged to develop their reflective skills and this further enhances the quality of their teaching over time.

School Direct

It is also possible to study this course via our School Direct programme. Please visit our School Direct page to see which schools offer this subject.

Additional costs

As well as your your PGCE fees, you will have to cover your travel costs to your school placements.

We produce reading packs electronically and in hard copy format. There’s a small charge for the hard copy reading packs. You may also be asked to contribute towards trips and some materials for your modules.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Department of Educational Studies.

Structure

Autumn Term

The first four weeks of the Autumn Term are usually College-based, although you may begin regular visits to your first teaching experience school from the fourth week onwards.

In College, you spend most of your time in a subject group with your subject tutor, who has overall responsibility for your professional development. These sessions introduce you to the basic principles and approaches to teaching and learning in your subject.

There is also a block lecture programme, General Professional Studies (GPS), which explores issues common to all teachers. Within GPS you have an opportunity to study an option in more depth.

From around the fifth or sixth week until the end of the term, you are based for four days a week in a school, working largely within your specialist subject department.

Your school-based tutor is responsible for a programme in school that enables you to relate what you have learned in College to the context of the particular school, and to gradually build up your confidence and expertise in teaching.

Throughout the term, you continue to come into College on Fridays to work with your subject tutor and group to reflect on your experience in school and develop particular areas of expertise.

Spring and Summer terms

The first two weeks of the Spring Term are usually based in College, where you build on the experiences of the Autumn Term to develop your expertise further so that you will be ready to undertake an extended block of teaching.

From around the third week of term until the spring half-term holiday, you spend four days a week in your second school, coming into College on Fridays to reflect on your experiences and develop your expertise with your subject tutor and fellow students. Between the spring and summer half-term holidays you are based full-time in the school.

In effect you work as a full member of a school team, with responsibility for all aspects of planning, teaching and assessing the learning of a number of classes. During this period, you have the opportunity to investigate in greater depth one of the areas introduced in the Autumn Term lecture programme, and to relate it to the specific context of the school in which you are based.

The three or four weeks at the end of the Summer Term are used flexibly for both school and College activities to ensure that all aspects of your professional development have been addressed.

Department

We have been training teachers since 1904, and have established a reputation for excellence in this field

Educational Studies

We see education as a window through which to view the world, and as something with the power to define who we are and how we live

As a department we’re interested in seeing what education can tell us about the social, political and economic forces of our times. And what these forces mean for the everyday lives of individuals and groups.

We place a strong emphasis on active and collaborative learning, and we'll train you to become a reflective and socially conscious teacher.

Teaching placements

We have partnerships with many London schools, offering you the chance to gain teaching practice in socially mixed, multi-ethnic urban classrooms.

Support

We offer a high level of support through a system of school and personal tutoring.

Research

Staff in the department carry out world-leading research – we're ranked 8th in the UK for the quality of this research.**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

It delves into areas including culture and identity, gender, multilingualism, and youth cultures, and why we maintain a commitment to social justice and inclusion.

Learning & Teaching

A range of teaching methods are employed across the PGCE programmes, including:

• Taught subject sessions
• Taught General Professional Study sessions
• Practical workshops
• Core lectures
• Group tutorials/seminars
• Individual tutorials
• Individual and group presentations
• Supported self-study

As with the other PGCE courses, you’ll be given the opportunity to work with children in a wide range of contexts. These might include focused interventions with individuals or groups, or larger scale events for the community.

How to apply

You apply for this PGCE through the UCAS Teacher Training website. Our institution code is G56 GOLD.

Please take a look at the information on applying, including the specific qualifications or experience you need for this course.

There's no closing date for primary or secondary applications, but we advise you to apply early to avoid disappointment.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The programme consists of research training, two compulsory 30-credit modules and two 30-credit subject options, plus a dissertation. Read more
The programme consists of research training, two compulsory 30-credit modules and two 30-credit subject options, plus a dissertation.

You spend the autumn and spring terms viewing and discussing films in modules that are designed to address a range of practical and theoretical issues, including authorship, genre, stardom, style, modernity, nationalism and internationalism. Seminars will also cover debates in philosophy and film theory on the nature of filmic representation and its relationship to language, art, emotion, and consciousness.

The spring term in Paris will allow you to focus more on French cinema and its context, and to consider the impact of French critics and filmmakers on the wider discipline of Film Studies. In the summer term you will complete your one-year MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic agreed with tutors.

Modules

During the first term, you take two 30-credit taught-course modules from your chosen MA pathway. You then spend the second term in Paris, studying two modules from a choice which varies from year to year.

This means that during the spring term you are free to construct your own programme from across the range of modules available (see Paris Module Collection), making it as focussed or as inter-disciplinary as you like. You have plenty of time during the autumn term to make informed decisions about your programme of studies in Paris.

All the spring-term modules have been designed to be specifically relevant to your experience of living and studying in Paris.You are encouraged to make full use of the city’s cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies which means you will be able to explore and discover connections between history, literature, the visual arts and other media.

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Modules available on this programme may include:

FI812 - Advanced Film Theory (30 credits)
FI813 - Film History: Research Methods (30 credits)
FI821 - Film and Modernity Paris (30 credits)
FI998 - Dissertation:GPMS (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/arts/study/postgraduate.html

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The MA in Medieval History offers an unparalleled opportunity to study at one of the world's leading centres of expertise in medieval history. Read more
The MA in Medieval History offers an unparalleled opportunity to study at one of the world's leading centres of expertise in medieval history. The degree is equally suitable for students who wish to pursue doctoral research or careers in teaching, public history, or archives, or for those with enthusiasm for the subject but not yet a clear career direction.

Since few students will have had the opportunity to study medieval history in depth at Undergraduate level, the programme offers both wide-ranging training in sources and methods and Option Modules in specialised areas. The University of York’s Medieval MA programmes (in History, Literature, Archaeology, Stained Glass) are some of the most popular and sought after, making York the largest centre in the UK for medieval masters level study across the Humanities disciplines.

This degree offers both thorough research training and the opportunity to explore new approaches to the history of medieval Britain and Europe with seminars led by experts in the area. You will be introduced to a wide range of sources and approaches from across the period. Team teaching on the core and training modules brings the chance to get acquainted with most staff not on leave.

You will be able to participate in the lively scholarly community surrounding the active graduate school, and also have full access to the Centre for Medieval Studies and its active programme of seminars, conferences and reading groups involving both staff and graduate students.

Programme of study

The MA programme consists of five taught courses (80 credits in total), a 20,000-word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits). Note that the most effective means of teaching the specific medieval study skills result in the course being split slightly unevenly in terms of credit-weighting, with students taking 50 credits in Autumn and 30 in Spring. This will, nevertheless, give students the space to begin thinking about their dissertation earlier in the Spring Term.

For students registered for full-time study, the programmme runs as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Perspectives on Medieval History
-Option Module 1
-Skills Module 1: Latin
-Skills Module 2: Palaeography
-Research Training (taught content)

All students take the core module, Perspectives on Medieval History. This module introduces students to a diverse range of themes and areas of debate within Medieval History. Students also take an option module chosen from a list approved by the Course Convenor. (When enrolment numbers permit, students may also select options from the Centre for Medieval Studies and its other parent departments as well as from the MA in Public History.)

All students also take the two skills modules, in Latin and Palaeography, and follow a research training programme. The research training includes specific sessions for Medieval History MA students, which will explore some of the resources available in York and may involve opportunities to handle original source materials.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Option Module 2
-Skills Module 1: Latin
-Skills Module 2: Palaeography
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)

During the Spring Term students take a second Option module and continue the two skills modules in Latin and Palaeography, as well as writing their dissertation proposal.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, students write a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their choice and under the supervision of a member of staff, submitted at the end of the academic year. Dissertations should be focused on a well considered research question and should based on primary source material. Students receive generic advice about selecting research topics, setting up the research questions and assembling bibliographies, followed be specialist advice and guidance from an advisor with relevant expertise. The range of expertise of staff members and the wealth of source material available at York enables a wide range of topics, both chronologically and geographically.

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This new and innovative Masters programme caters for the current global need for toxicologists and ecotoxicologists who are competent in conducting hazard and risk evaluation of chemical substances. Read more
This new and innovative Masters programme caters for the current global need for toxicologists and ecotoxicologists who are competent in conducting hazard and risk evaluation of chemical substances.


Aims
The programme aims at providing students with an advanced and up-to-date understanding of the effects of chemicals on human and environmental health and the resulting impact on chemical risk assessment and regulation. The programme covers both human and ecotoxicological risk assessment and includes modules on topical areas, such as mixtures toxicology, endocrine disruption and computational toxicology. Some modules have been designed specifically to be offered as short-term training programmes for professionals


The course is suitable for graduates interested in obtaining a qualification in human and environmental health, as well as students already in full time employment who require either formal qualifications or intend to revalidate their qualifications in toxicology. This will contribute to their continuing professional development (CPD) and towards the requirements for the UK Register of Toxicologists.


Course contents
The MSc in Toxicology and Risk Assessment comprises a total of 8 taught modules, including 6 compulsory modules and 2 (out of 3) optional modules.

Compulsory modules:
• Priority Pollutants and Human Health Effects (Autumn term, 12 weeks)
• Essentials in Ecotoxicology (Autumn term, 12 weeks).
• Designing, Analysing and Interpreting Toxicological Studies (Autumn term, 5 consecutive days)
• Current Practice in Chemical Risk Assessment (Spring term, 5 consecutive days)
• Chemical Regulation and Legislation in the EU (Autumn term, 5 consecutive days)
• Carcinogens and Mutagens (Autumn term, 12 weeks).

Optional Modules: (students will have to complete 2 out of 3 optional modules):
• Mixtures Toxicology and Cumulative Risk Assessment (Spring term, 5 consecutive days)
• Reproductive Toxicology and Endocrine Disruption (Spring term, 12 weeks)
• Computational Toxicology: Modelling and Predicting Toxicity (Spring term, 5 consecutive days)

Dissertation
Depending on student’s interests and their progress through the course, they will have the opportunity to carry out their dissertation with collaborators from Industry and regulatory bodies.

Throughout the course, students will be required to develop a personal development plan, agreed upon with tutors, which will structure and enhance their professional and personal development.


Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
A number of our specialised modules are run as intensive short-courses, which can be taken individually by participants without having to enroll for the full course. The aim is to support professionals already in employment in advancing their knowledge in specific areas, as well as developing their careers.

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Studying Modern History at York is a lively and stimulating experience. The programme combines an advanced level introduction to the historiographical debates, methodologies and techniques of modern history together with a choice of thematic taught modules, culminating in a research dissertation. Read more
Studying Modern History at York is a lively and stimulating experience. The programme combines an advanced level introduction to the historiographical debates, methodologies and techniques of modern history together with a choice of thematic taught modules, culminating in a research dissertation. Students are introduced to a wide range of sources and approaches drawn from the entire span of the modern period and from across different localities, and thereby gain an unusual breadth of vision which transcends more conventional boundaries.

The MA is run by the Department of History and students are encouraged to participate in the lively scholarly community of the department's active graduate school through attendance at relevant MA seminars and masterclasses, research training sessions and the weekly departmental research seminar. Students also have full access to the Centre for Modern Studies which provides an active programme of academic seminars, small conferences and reading groups involving both academic staff and graduate students.

Programme of study

The programme consists of four taught modules (20 credits each), a 20,000 word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits), which make up the 180 credits required for an MA in the UK higher education system. For students registered for full-time study, the programme is as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Approaches to Modern History
-Option Module 1
-Research Training (taught content)
All students take the core module Approaches to Modern History. Taught by weekly seminars, this module introduces students to the key concepts, debates, methods and practices which inform the work of historians of "modern times". Additionally, all students take an Option Module chosen from a list approved by the Course Convenor. All students follow a research training module across both the Autumn and Spring terms.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Option Module 2
-Option Module 3
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)
Students choose two Optional Modules which should include at least one related to their pathway. With the approval of the convenor they may also choose a module from other MA programmes in and outside of the department, e.g. the MA in Public History, including its very popular placement module, or the MA in Culture and Thought after 1945.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, all students will write a research dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing and under the supervision of a member of staff, and submitted at the end of the academic year.

Students receive advice about research topics and instruction in bibliographical research, plus additional specialist advice and guidance from a supervisor. Because of the range of expertise of staff members and the wealth of source material available in York and electronically, it is possible to provide supervision on a wide range of topics, both chronologically and geographically. Past dissertations have covered such diverse topics as The West Indies Federation, British abolitionism after emancipation, and violence in the American South in the interwar years.

Part-time students
Students registered for part-time study over two years take in Year One the MA Core module in the Autumn Term (20 credits), an Option in the Spring Term (20 credits), plus the 10-credit Research Training module: a total of 50 credits in the first year. In Year Two, they take two more Option modules (40 credits in total), normally scheduled in second Autumn and Spring Terms respectively, and a research dissertation (90 credits): a total of 130 credits.

Although this gives Year Two disproportionate formal credit-weighting, the work flow spreads slightly more evenly because planning and preliminary research of the dissertation is undertaken in the Year One, and significant research and writing is undertaken the Year Two; the Research Training module taken in Year One also provides support in dissertation planning.

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This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location. Read more
This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location.

After a term at our Canterbury campus, you move to Kent’s Paris centre to study modules with a specific focus on this city, allowing you to benefit from the experience of living and studying in another European culture. All classes in Paris are taught in English. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Comparative Literature involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing students to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices. The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian, as well as from colleagues in the School of English.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

This programme is for those wanting to pursue detailed literary and cultural studies and also wishing to benefit from the experience of living and studying overseas.

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The autumn term modules are the same as those for the standard MA in Comparative Literature. The spring term modules are taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. These modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in Paris. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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The first year consists of three main projects, one per term that will explore different intellectual themes and contexts in which you might work. Read more

First Year

The first year consists of three main projects, one per term that will explore different intellectual themes and contexts in which you might work.

During the autumn term, students work from the collections at the Victoria & Albert Museum to explore the notion of the role that an object might fulfil. It lays the foundations of the research skills associated with developing material and process understanding and the cultural and social history imbedded in an object.

The spring term presents students with the opportunity to explore the theme of ‘Food’: its cultural significance, presentation and consumption.

The summer term is concerned wit the terrain of Wall, Floor, Window.

During the first two terms alongside the projects, a series of short course/workshops/masterclasses will be offered to widen students skill base and material/process understanding. These cover such topics as:

- Plaster making
- Print
- Glass – hot working
- Glass – cold working
- Glass – casting
- Jigger/jolley
- Decorative processes – ceramics
- Hand forming processes
- Basic glaze technology
- Rubber moulds
- Digital Design
- Digital Manufacture
- 3D Print
- Laser Cutting

Second Year

Through the second year, individual programmes of study will be negotiated with Personal Tutors exploring the context and working methods that will inform an individual’s future practice. There are opportunities to engage with a range of staff and visiting lecturers, and student led discussions and seminars are encouraged to promote independent thinking.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Architectural History and Theory pathway

If you select the Architectural History and Theory pathway you can take options that are both historical and theoretical, choosing from different periods spanning from the Medieval to the contemporary. In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Architectural History and Theory. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Architectural History and Theory, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Architectural History and Theory) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The British Art pathway

If you select the British Art pathway you could choose options from different periods spanning from the Anglo Saxon to the contemporary. In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in British Art. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in British Art, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (British Art) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Background

We welcome students who have previously studied history of art, but also those from other backgrounds.

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Medieval Art and Medievalisms pathway

If you select the Medieval Art and Medievalisms pathway you can work on a wide range of media, from stained glass to manuscripts and architecture. In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Medieval Art and Medievalisms. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Medieval Art and Medievalisms, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Medieval Art and Medievalisms) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

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