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Masters Degrees (Speech Writing)

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The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Read more

ABOUT THE MA/MFA WRITING FOR STAGE AND BROADCAST MEDIA

The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Although the primary focus is on writing for television, film, theatre and radio, Central also runs
optional units in writing for new music theatre and, in collaboration with MA Applied Theatre, writing with and for communities. The course provides the opportunity for students to develop the core competencies and skills of the dramatist to explore their own ‘voice’ and develop their confidence as dramatists, and to appreciate the specific media contexts within which professional writers work.

Key features are: practice-based enquiry into techniques and processes for writing for stage and screen; a series of writing projects to engage with different styles and formats of production; associated study of writing techniques and issues of
performance in relation to theatre, cinema, television and other relevant contexts.The MA and MFA are taught in group sessions and through individual tutorials. During these sessions participants will consider the fundamentals of dramatic writing. Indicatively, these will include structure, narrative, dramatic action, genre, character, dialogue and rhetorical effect.

Students will study different approaches to writing including individual authorship, group writing and writing to specific briefs. Students will attend masterclasses, seminars and workshops that focus on particular modes of writing for different production contexts, and will be part of a writers’ group, providing peer support in developing their writing. Their vocational work is complemented by individual research and appropriate theoretical discussion and enquiry. Students will address historical, theoretical and critical contexts within which traditions of dramatic writing have evolved.

Students will engage in a range of projects that test and develop their skills as a writer of drama. Indicatively, these will include forming a team of writers to evolve a television series, writing a short play script for a staged reading, writing a short
film script, writing a radio play and developing and writing a complete dramatic script for production in a particular medium (stage, radio, television, music theatre, or film).

ASSESSMENT

This is through peer assessment, practical assignments, essays, scheme of research, presentations, and the submission of a practitioner portfolio, including personal insights, research, the student’s own scripted material and a plan for professional
development.

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This MSc is an accredited professional programme leading to qualification as a speech and language therapist (SLT). The programme integrates theory with work-based clinical placements with adults and children with a range of communication and swallowing difficulties. Read more
This MSc is an accredited professional programme leading to qualification as a speech and language therapist (SLT). The programme integrates theory with work-based clinical placements with adults and children with a range of communication and swallowing difficulties. The programme has an excellent reputation, and over 90% of graduates are working in SLT-related posts within six months of qualifying.

Degree information

Students learn to apply knowedge from a range of academic subjects to speech and language therapy practice. Innovative and authentic learning methods develop necessary skills such as team-working, assessment and therapy, self-evaluation. The research-based curriculm promotes strong research skills, enabling students to evaluate and add to the evidence-base for the profession. The programme prepares students well for future leadership roles.

Students undertake modules to the value of 360 credits.

The programme comprises twelve core modules. Students register for six modules in year one (totalling 165 credits) and six modules in year two (195 credits, including a 60-credit research project). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Year One core modules
-Management of Communication Disorders 1: Language and Cognition (developmental)
-Management of Communication Disorders 2: Speech and Hearing
-Phonetics and Phonology
-Linguistic and Psychological Perspectives
-Research Methods 1

Year Two core modules
-Professional and Clinical Studies II
-Management of Communication Disorders 3: Language and Cognition (acquired)
-Management of Communication Disorders 4: Speech, Swallowing and Voice
-Brain, Mind and Health
-Research Methods II
-Research Project

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 8,000–10,000 words. Students also present their project orally to a group of peers.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small group tutorials, workshops, supervised clinical placements, practical classes and self-directed learning. Collaborative peer-working features strongly throughout. A variety of assessment methods are used, including coursework, presentations, clinical vivas, written examinations and practice-based assessment on placement.

Placement
Students attend both weekly and block placements, from the start of course working alongside qualified SLTs in a wide range of settings including hospitals, community, schools and charities. Placements are organised such that each student gains a breadth of experience. Students undertake over 700 hours of supervised clinical practice over the two year course, well above RCSLT recommendations.

Careers

Most graduates work as speech and language therapists with adults and children with a range of communication and swallowing difficulties, such as people with autism spectrum disorder, specific language or learning difficulties, people who have had strokes or head injuries. They work in the NHS, for example in hospitals, community health centres, specialist centres or domicilairy services. Many graduates work in education settings, such as mainstream or specialist schools and children's centres. Emerging areas of work are youth justice and dementia services. Graduates are well placed to take up further research and to develop into specialist SLTs.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Speech and Language Therapist, King's College Hospital (NHS)
-Speech and Language Therapist, North Middlesex University Hospital (NHS)
-Speech and Language Therapist, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust
-Speech and Language Therapist, Whittington Health NHS
-Speech and Language Therapy Assistant, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust

Employability
The programme is highly regarded by employers. As a professional training programme, this MSc develops a range of transferable skills relevant to employability, such as: interpersonal and communication skills, oral and written presentation skills, collaboration and teamworking, critical evaluation, integration and sythesis of information, report writing, behaviour management and change. Workplace learning in clinical placements enables students to apply their knowledge from a range of disciplines - including linguistics, phonetics, psychology and neurology - to assessing and managing communication difficulties in real life speech and language therapy contexts.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Students will benefit directly from UCL's world-leading research and teaching in language, mind and behaviour, supported by facilities such as cutting-edge laboratories, the on-site national SLT library and our in-house clinic.

You will be taught by experts in the field including specialist speech and language therapists, psychologists, linguists, neurologists. Our strong partnership with SLT services across London ensures the high-quality and currency of the curriculum.

This programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT). This qualification allows you to practise as a SLT in the UK.

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This MSc is a joint programme of City, University of London and UCL Institute of Education (IOE). It brings together speech and language therapists, teachers and other graduate school-based practitioners for collaborative study. Read more
This MSc is a joint programme of City, University of London and UCL Institute of Education (IOE). It brings together speech and language therapists, teachers and other graduate school-based practitioners for collaborative study.

Degree information

Taught modules address current research and debates on educational contexts and children's language; social, emotional and behavioural development; and needs. They also enhance students' understanding of research methods and skills in critical analysis, preparing them to undertake a research project in their chosen area.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (90 credits), either one IOE or two City electives (30 credits in total) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - there are four taught core modules - two at the IOE and two at City University, and the MSc Speech, Language and Communication Needs in Schools: Advanced Practice dissertation. For the dissertation module students can choose to be supervised at either institution.
-Concepts and Contexts of Special and Inclusive Education
-Foundations of Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis (City University)
-Language, Learning and Development (City University)
-Social, Emotional and Behavioural Development

Optional modules - students choose either one IOE optional module or two City optional modules to the total value of 30 credits.
-Autism: Research and Practice
-Child and Adolescent Mental Health: Early Identification and Assessment
-Cognitive Communication Impairments
-Developmental Language Impairments
-Inclusive Pedagogy
-Literacy Development
-Literacy Practice in Writing and Comprehension
-Promoting Child and Adolescent Psychological Development
-Psychology for Special Needs
-Reading and Spelling Difficulties
-Understanding Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia)

Dissertation/research project
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Modules are taught in different ways: a conventional lecture-based approach predominates, supplemented by a variety of activities, for example, group/pair discussions, case study analysis, role play, the use of simulations. Assessment is by written assignments and a dissertation. Some assignments may require data analysis, or written work and a presentation.

Careers

This MSc qualification raises graduates' profiles as specialists and leaders in speech, language and communication needs in the school setting. It is an advantage for teachers and clinicians seeking higher grade specialist and managerial posts. Graduates are also eligible ro apply for a research degree (MPhil/PhD) and some research posts.

Please note: this MSc does not lead to professional qualification as a speech and language therapist or teacher.

Employability
Depending on their prior experience, graduates of this programme might expect:
-Entry into employment relevant to SCLN.
-Promotion, e.g. to a management position for students with several years' prior experience.
-Progression to higher degrees, e.g. MPhil/PhD for students with a consistently high academic profile.
-To deliver training to other practitioners at their host institution.
-Publication in professional journals in the fields of language and communication for exceptional students.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The MSc Speech, Language and Communication Needs in Schools: Advanced Practice will enhance your knowledge and provide you with a detailed understanding of children's speech, language and communication needs (SCLN). It will broaden your awareness of how children develop speech, language, literacy and numeracy.

This programme provides a springboard for fresh stimulation and reflection on support for children with speech, language and communication needs in a community of fellow students, practitioners and research experts.

There are opportunities within all modules to share theory and professional practice across the disciplinary boudaries of health and education. Participants explore the needs of children with speech, language and communication difficulties from a range of perspectives. The programme seeks to promote effective collaboration between educational practitioners and speech and language therapists.

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Research profile. Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines. Read more

Research profile

Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines.

As technology focuses increasingly on language-based communication tools, research into the automation of language processing has become vital. ILCC offers you the broadest research scope in the UK, and a strong computational focus.

Our primary areas of research are:

  • natural language processing and computational linguistics
  • spoken language processing
  • dialogue and multimodal interaction
  • information extraction, retrieval, and presentation
  • computational theories of human cognition
  • educational and assistive technology
  • visualisation

Much of our research is applied to software development, in areas as diverse as social media, assisted living, gaming and education.

You may find yourself working closely with other departments of the University, particularly the School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences.

Many of our researchers are involved in two cross-disciplinary research centres:

Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR)

The Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR) is an interdisciplinary research centre linking Informatics and Linguistics. Founded in 1984, it is now one of the world's largest concentrations of researchers working in the field of language and speech processing.

CSTR is concerned with research in all areas of speech technology including speech recognition, synthesis, signal processing, acoustic phonetics, information access, multi-modal interaction and dialogue systems.

The Centre is home to state-of-the-art research facilities including specialised speech and language-orientated computer labs, a digital recording studio, perception labs and a meeting room instrumented with multiple synchronised video cameras and microphones. There is also access to high-performance computer clusters, the University storage area network, a specialist library, and many speech and language databases.

Human Communication Research Centre

The Human Communication Research Centre (HCRC) is an interdisciplinary research centre at the Universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow that brings together theories and methods from several formal and experimental disciplines to understand better how this happens.

We focus on spoken and written language; we also study communication in other visual, graphical and computer-based media.

Training and support

You carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

While many of our graduates pursue an academic career, others find their skills are highly sought after in the technology industry. A number of our students serve internships with large UK and international software developers, while others take up positions with major social media companies.



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The University of Alabama Master of Science degree program in speech-language pathology is designed to prepare speech-language pathologists to contribute to the prevention, assessment, and treatment of communicative disorders. Read more
The University of Alabama Master of Science degree program in speech-language pathology is designed to prepare speech-language pathologists to contribute to the prevention, assessment, and treatment of communicative disorders. Through formal academic coursework, clinical experience, and exposure to research, students enrolled in the program acquire knowledge of the literature in human communication sciences and disorders, skill in the administration and interpretation of speech, language and hearing measures, the ability to apply therapy techniques, an appreciation of related behavior, physical and biological sciences, an awareness of, and an appreciation for, the multicultural nature of our society, and insight into their own professional strengths and limitations.

Students completing the requirements for the Master of Science degree at The University of Alabama meet the academic and clinical practicum requirements for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Certificate of Clinical Competence in speech-language pathology and for state licensure in Alabama.

The Master of Science degree program in Speech-Language Pathology provides the following:

1. A prescribed sequence of courses in human communication sciences and disorders and related disciplines.

2. Opportunities to observe, discuss, and participate in the assessment and treatment of individuals of all ages with a wide range of communication disabilities at The University of Alabama Speech and Hearing Center and various off-campus facilities.

3. Experience in the assessment and treatment of individuals with speech, language and hearing disorders.

4. Opportunities for research experiences which may include the writing of a thesis.

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The Master of Speech Language Pathology (MSLP) prepares graduates for professional practice as speech pathologists. Speech pathologists work with children and adults with communication difficulties, including problems with speaking, comprehension, reading, writing, voice problems and stuttering. Read more
The Master of Speech Language Pathology (MSLP) prepares graduates for professional practice as speech pathologists.

Speech pathologists work with children and adults with communication difficulties, including problems with speaking, comprehension, reading, writing, voice problems and stuttering. Speech pathologists also work with children and adults who have swallowing difficulties or need alternative ways to communicate.

The curriculum for the MSLP has been designed to enable students to learn in a way that resembles the clinical practice of speech pathology. Case-based learning and clinical placements help students acquire the skills necessary to qualify and practise as speech pathologists in Australia.

The course is a graduate-entry program (students are required to have completed an undergraduate degree prior to entry), however the MSLP is designed to accommodate all suitably qualified candidates regardless of their previous discipline.

As the course leads to eligibility to practise, students will be assisted in achieving prescribed professional competencies through practical and theoretical skill acquisition and clinical fieldwork placements. Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

The pace of work in the MSLP is commensurate with the expectations of postgraduate study, as is the level and complexity of the issues dealt with in the degree, including research project design.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics. Read more
The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in neuroscience and communication such as neurobioliogy, speech processing, developmental and acquired language disorders and linguistics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), a research report (105 credits) and plan (15 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Introduction to Syntax
-Students select two specialisation modules from those below:
-Introduction to Speech Sciences
-Neurobiology of Speech Processing
-Neuroscience of Language
-Seminar in Neurolinguistics

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:
-Conversation Analysis
-Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech
-Deafness - Cognition and Language
-Designing and Analysing an fMRI Experiment
-Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition
-Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
-Introduction to Event-Related Potential Techniques
-Language Acquisition

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on an aspect of speech, language and cognition which culminates in a research plan of 3,000-6,000 words and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Employability
This MSc is full of opportunities for the students to improve reading, writing and communication skills generally. These opportunities include writing essays, oral presentations, critical reading of scientific articles, and group discussion. These skills are critical for success in a wide range of jobs. Likewise, the programme will help to improve critical thinking skills through the critical evaluation of scientific research. This skill is applicable to those careers requiring problem solving. Lastly, the programme provides practical experience in conducting research, which is highly valuable to those interested in pursuing a research career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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The Communications - Professional Writing program prepares you to work as a versatile communications professional. Read more
The Communications - Professional Writing program prepares you to work as a versatile communications professional. With a focus on assessing audience needs and delivering thoughtful and relevant content, combined with effective project management techniques, you develop the skills you need to write and produce copy for a variety of professional settings and styles.

The innovative Communications - Professional Writing courses encompass a wide range of communications disciplines and vocational skills, including:
-Web copywriting
-Technical writing
-Proposal writing
-Writing for social media
-Content marketing
-Presentations and speech writing
-Content management
-Information design and data visualization
-Digital storytelling

As a student of the Communications – Professional Writing program, you have the advantage of creating a diverse and professional portfolio that includes training modules, complex visual aids (such as infographics), and compelling layouts for many different print and virtual platforms (brochures, newsletters, websites and more). Thanks to your well-rounded training, you will be able to launch a writing career that can go the distance, taking on a variety of roles in both the profit and non-profit sectors.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-The Content Bootcamp, an intensive two-week workshop at the beginning of the first semester, builds on your academic writing skills, polishing your writing for a professional audience.
-A vocational program at its core, Communications – Professional Writing prepares you for a writing career with longevity. As such, every course has you producing professional quality work so that you graduate with a polished and diverse portfolio.
-Unique second-semester course components include creating training modules, implementing training programs, and leading virtual or live training sessions to complement the content and documentation created in first semester courses.
-The Digital Storytelling course, a standout feature, encourages you to think critically about the future of communications, and its role in business, technology and society in general. You have the opportunity to collaborate on a creative communications project, exploring what it means to be a communicator in a digital world.
-A field placement opportunity in the final semester provides you with valuable experiences in a variety of industries. Program faculty works with you to place you in an organization relevant to your long-term career goals.

​​Career Outlook
-Technical writer
-Communications coordinator
-Social media officer
-Editor
-Web copywriter
-Proposal writer
-Instructional designer
-Report writer/business analyst

Areas of Employment
-Arts and culture
-Retail and e-commerce
-Government and non-profit
-Finance
-Marketing
-Software development and IT
-Medicine
-Science
-Web design

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The Master of Professional Writing (MPW) involves taking a core paper, designed specifically to enhance your workplace readiness, as well as elective papers which range across a variety of fields from creative writing to writing for promotional purposes and advertising, for digital media and for scholarly and professional publication. Read more

The Master of Professional Writing (MPW) involves taking a core paper, designed specifically to enhance your workplace readiness, as well as elective papers which range across a variety of fields from creative writing to writing for promotional purposes and advertising, for digital media and for scholarly and professional publication.

If creative writing is your passion, then you will have the opportunity to specialise in this. The Creative Writing Thesis gives selected students the option of producing a manuscript of publishable quality – whether poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction – in a stimulating and supportive workshop environment of fellow writers, and supervised by award-winning authors. The selection of students for the Creative Writing Thesis is by assessment of a portfolio of poetry and prose, and a manuscript proposal outlining the creative project.

When studying towards the MPW you will be able to include a professional writing internship and be offered an on-campus writing mentor, who will provide professional advice and direct you towards writing opportunities.

Industry Connections

The staff contributing to the Professional Writing programme have long-standing relationships with the broader writing community at a number of levels:

  • They have established senior profiles as publishers of creative and scholarly writing, as editors of literary and scholarly materials, and as peer reviewers for local and international journals.
  • The creative writing staff have won significant local and international prizes for short fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.
  • They publish across a wide range of academic and popular media, including reviews, opinion columns, feature articles, works of scholarly reference, book chapters, scholarly articles, researched scholarly editions, and researched books.
  • They are called on to judge local and international literary prizes, and to assess applications for substantial public and private funding for literary grants, including the annual University of Waikato Writers’ Residency (co-funded by Creative New Zealand) and the Sargeson Grimshaw Writing Fellowship.
  • Contributing staff in Screen and Media maintain international networks in scriptwriting and script development.
  • Staff maintain professional links with local and international organisations who co-ordinate, sponsor and enhance the interests of professional writing in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Career Opportunities

MPW graduates will have excellent transferrable skills in devising, producing and editing text. If you include a formal internship in your programme of study, or take up the option of informal professional mentoring, you will make connections in the professional writing community, and enhance your CV with relevant workplace experience.

Potential careers include editing, long-form researched journalism, policy analysis and policy writing, report writing, script writing, speech writing, teaching, website content editing, writing for digital and broadcast media, writing for stage and screen, writing for travel and tourism and writing for public relations and marketing.

Potential employers include biotechnology industries; cultural sector/arts organisations; energy provision sector; higher education sector; libraries and archives; local and district councils; manufacturing and technology; national government, NGOs; non-profit and philanthropic sector; primary industries; print and digital news media; publishing industry; telecommunications; theatre, film and broadcast media production houses; transport, tourism and travel.



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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• A writing sample, preferably a recent essay written showing evidence of scholarly research and writing. For applicants who have significant work experience, a substantial piece of workplace writing may be substituted.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Arts program in English and Communication challenges students to develop integrated competencies in the highly sought skills of reading, writing, and speaking. The program focuses attention on the many uses of language and on the nature of language itself. It requires students to become familiar with the connections between the written and the spoken word, and with the varied ways that language is shaped to serve aesthetic, social, and practical ends. By fostering research and analytic skills, the program prepares students for a variety of career opportunities. Program Start Dates: Fall.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 36 credit hours

GECD 601, Introduction to Research Methods .......................3 credits
GECD 606, Thesis Workshop .............................................3 credits
Electives .....................................................................21 credits (Students will select, with prior advisor approval, seven grad- uate English and Communication courses; at least 12 credit hours must be completed at the 600 level. Nine credit hours may be taken at the 500 level in any courses with LITR, COMP, or COMM designators.)
GECD 690, Thesis .........................................................9 credits

Uniqueness of Program

The MA English and Communication program is home to scholars of literature, rhetoric, speech communication, composition, and linguistics, making it unique within the SUNY system. It best serves students who wish to study in more than one of these disciplines. Students’ thesis projects can be rooted in one of these disciplines, or they may cross or blur disciplinary boundaries. A comprehensive approach to these distinct, yet related, fields defines the core graduate experience at Potsdam, making our program ideal for a variety of purposes. We also take a lot of pride in providing personalized attention, professional/academic achievement, unique program design, and flexible course scheduling. Graduates of our program have obtained positions as faculty at community colleges; editors and publishers of speeches, documents, and multimedia; and employees for business, governmental agencies, and/or the corporate world in a multitude of capacities.

Testimonials

“The program helped me grow as a writer, critical reader/thinker, and oral presenter. It prepared me to work as a professional and taught me a lot about how to interact with students and provide meaningful feedback.” —Becca Jewell

“The program nurtures a longer-term project focus, as compared to semester-based projects. I thoroughly enjoyed the freedom to design my own projects and the unpredictable, yet focused, discussions during class.” —Josh Clark

“I gained a better understanding of the world and an enhanced ability to analyze, synthesize, and critically think. In my view, studies like these prepare us to understand, analyze, dissect, and influence the academic and non-academic conversations that define our politics, work environments, and society at large.” —Adam Bulizak

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The only course of its kind offered by a Russell Group University, our MA in Screenwriting is an intensive one-year training programme designed to professionalise writers and present a genuine gateway into the film and television industries. Read more
The only course of its kind offered by a Russell Group University, our MA in Screenwriting is an intensive one-year training programme designed to professionalise writers and present a genuine gateway into the film and television industries. Over the course of the year, students will work with leading industry practitioners to develop their screenwriting, pitching and story-breaking skills. By the end of the programme, each student will have developed a full length feature film screenplay, a pilot TV episode and two short films. Like all courses at the Centre for New Writing, this programme is taught by practitioners and as such it is vocationally-oriented and industry-focused. Students will have access to individual career guidance and training in how to navigate entry-level work in both the television and film industries.

The course includes regular speakers from the industry which last year included Beth Pattinson BBC Films ( Brooklyn, We Need to Talk About Kevin, Philomena ), Chris Chibnall (writer and creator of Broadchurch) and Pete Czernin, producer of In Bruges and Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (1 and 2).

The course runs across two twelve week long semesters, during which students will attend weekly writing workshops in which they will study the very best of contemporary screenwriting, including shows such as Breaking Bad, True Detective, The Killing, Broadchurch, This is England, Rev, Transparency and The Sopranos. They will also cover British and American examples of charismatic film screenwriting from Goodfellas to The King's Speech via Alien.

In the second semester there will be a London industry day based at BAFTA with talks from agents, producers, and writers as well as a meeting with the BFI.

Students will study story design, visual story-telling and character arcs in both long-running television series and feature films. They will develop the tools to be able to analyse and critique screenwriting craft, and learn how to disseminate their own work. There will be weekly film screenings, and students will have access to an excellent lending library of films to watch at home. Through the duration of the course students will develop a broad and eclectic knowledge of cinema and television.

We intend to keep learning as specific to individual study as possible and study groups will be intentionally small in scale. The course capacity is limited to twelve students each year and you will be taught through a mixture of screenings, lectures and group discussion. Our `writers' room' ethos ensures an environment that encourages collaboration, sharing and creative risk-taking.

Importantly, each summer, we offer students a two week `hands-on' industry placement at a renowned film or TV production company either in London or the North West. Current partners include Film4 ( Room. Ex_Machina, The Lobster) , Wildgaze (Brooklyn) , Number 9 Films (Carol) , Left Bank (The Crown), Warp (This is England) , Red Productions ( Happy Valley, Scott and Bailey ), and Hammer Films ( The Woman in Black , Let Me In ). These placements are an excellent opportunity for students to make useful contacts, and to develop a practical and direct understanding of the professional context within which screenwriters ply their trade.

Coursework and assessment

To complete the MA, students are required to take 180 credits in total. They will take two semesters of courses consisting of workshops/tutorials and seminars. There are 60 credits in the first semester and 30 in the second with 90 for the dissertation.

-All writing workshops meet for three hours per week.
-Workshops will help students add to their portfolio by including adaptations, scenes, draft scripts, script reports, and genre presentations.
-Each workshop is assessed by a portfolio which will include pitches, treatments, scenes, draft scripts, script reports and notes on how to progress a draft.
-Seminars also meet for three hours per week.
-Students will also be offered two individual half- to one-hour tutorials per semester in order to discuss the progress of their writing.

Over the summer students complete a 'dissertation' which consists of a final revised version of a full-length screenplay. This is worth 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to train its graduates to work in the UK film and television industries. Some will work as professional screenwriters, others may take up other, related, positions.

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The Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture MLitt offers an all-round introduction to the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth-centuries. Read more

MLitt in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture

The Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture MLitt offers an all-round introduction to the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth-centuries. It covers both elite and popular writing, the influence of other continental vernaculars, and the importance of print and manuscript media. Students who choose to study at St Andrews will be taught by expert scholars in small groups. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary.
Our aim is that students should leave the programme more fluent and accomplished writers than they entered it, better informed about the literature of the English Renaissance, and capable of producing interpretative prose of the highest quality.

• Fully explore the literature and culture of the English Renaissance (c. 1500-1700).
• A particular focus on the work of William Shakespeare.
• A range of critical and interpretative perspectives, selecting from a range of available module options.
• Manuscript, print, speech, and the editing of Renaissance texts.
• All foreign language texts will be taught in translation.

Teaching methods: Seminar.
Assessment: Coursework essays, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Weekly seminars for core modules, each lasting 90 minutes; for Special Topics, six hour-long meetings over the course of one semester.

Features

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* St Andrews is one of only three universities outside the USA in the Folger Institute consortium.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

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Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. Read more
Applied Linguistics is for teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice.

The programme covers the areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to your peer group and international students from other programmes. There is also the opportunity to visit a local language college and observe classes.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/357/applied-linguistics-and-teaching-english-to-speakers-of-other-languages-tesol

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with three linguistics modules (Sounds, Structure and Meaning) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching and how to apply them to the classroom.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (The Practice of TESOL), plan for your students’ needs (Course and Syllabus Design) and provide them with materials which will be interesting, effective and motivating (Materials Evaluation and Development).

The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Master of Translation and Interpreting Studies is designed to meet the needs of proficient bilinguals who aim to work as professional translators and interpreters. Read more

Overview

The Master of Translation and Interpreting Studies is designed to meet the needs of proficient bilinguals who aim to work as professional translators and interpreters. Students will acquire the skills and knowledge required to perform translating and interpreting in a range of institutional settings common to community and commercial translating and interpreting practice in Australia and overseas.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-translation-and-interpreting-studies

Key benefits

- Focuses on the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and practical skills relevant to translating and interpreting practice.
- Students are guided to independent research and to execute practicum projects with our industry partners in a variety of settings.
- There is a strong emphasis on technological skills to prepare students for a fast-changing marketplace.

Suitable for

Suitable if you are interested in becoming a professional translator or interpreter, or wish to further develop translating and interpreting skills whilst acquiring a masters degree.

Please note our working languages for practical units are Chinese (Mandarin), Korean, Japanese, Spanish, and other languages depending on demand.

Recognition of prior learning

Course Duration
- 1.5 year program
Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline and proficiency in one of the available languages;
Bachelor degree in any discipline, completion of internal admission assessment and proficiency in one of the available languages;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and NAATI Para-Professional accreditation in translation or interpreting.

- 1 year program
Bachelor degree in any discipline and Honours, Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in translating and/or interpreting;
Bachelor degree in any discipline and NAATI Professional accreditation in translation or interpreting.

- Relevant disciplines
Translation studies, translating and interpreting, linguistics, speech and hearing sciences, speech-language pathology, language or literary studies, comparative literature, creative writing, education, journalism, media or communication studies, law, or a related discipline.

- Relevant areas
Accredited Translating and/or Interpreting domain;
Proof of proficiency in one of the available languages (other than English) refer to one of following:
----Tertiary study either through the medium of the language in question or with the language as major up to the final undergraduate year.
----In-country residence (where language is spoken) of more than 2 years;
----Score on internationally recognized proficiency test including:
Chinese: HSK-level 5 (Mainland China);
TOCFL (original name TOP)-level C (Taiwan)
Korean: TOPIK-level 6
Japanese: JLPT-level N1
Professional accreditation as translator or interpreter in this language (e.g. NAATI).

Work experience requirements

No work experience required, but it would be an advantage.

English language requirements

IELTS of 7.0 overall with minimum 6.5 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Careers

- Accreditation
The program is a NAATI (National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters) approved course for accreditation at professional translator and interpreter level. For detailed information on languages that are approved for accreditation, please contact the program at

- Career Opportunities
Graduates will be well prepared to pursue a career as professional translators and interpreters in a range of settings including: community translation and interpreting (e.g. governments, courts, tribunals, police, clinics and hospitals), International Conferences (primarily conference interpreting), business (e.g. business meetings, internal and external documents and contracts), industry products (e.g. manuals, localization), regional and international events (e.g. Olympics and Paralympics), broadcasting and publishing.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/master/master-of-translation-and-interpreting-studies

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This course provides a fast-track route to an audiology qualification for individuals who hold a degree (or equivalent) in a related discipline (linguistics, psychology, physics, behavioural science, biomedical science, speech and language therapy or some combination of these). Read more

This course provides a fast-track route to an audiology qualification for individuals who hold a degree (or equivalent) in a related discipline (linguistics, psychology, physics, behavioural science, biomedical science, speech and language therapy or some combination of these).

Audiologists work with patients to identify and assess hearing and/or balance disorders, recommending and providing appropriate rehabilitation and management. An audiologist will assist in the promotion of normal communication as well as the prevention, identification, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and management of the following: hearing and/or balance disorders that arise in the peripheral and/or central auditory and/or vestibular systems; functional hearing disorders; and central auditory processing disorders.

An audiologist should also be able to identify developmental or acquired disorders of speech, language and language processing caused by a hearing loss, and make referrals to an appropriate professional.

The course is organised in three broad strands. You will study supporting subjects such as linguistics, anatomy, physiology, psychology, neurology and research methods. You will learn theoretical audiology knowledge relating to hearing and balance, and you will carry out an element of professional practice through placement-based and university-based learning of practical clinical skills, clinical decision-making, reflection and professional issues. Knowledge, understanding and skills acquired in the theoretical modules are integrated and applied to clinical practice throughout the course.

Teaching, learning and assessment

The course is taught using a variety of interactive learning methods including lectures, tutorials, seminars, workshops, laboratories, group work, role-play and interactive computer sessions. The development of interpersonal skills and professional skills and attitudes is also a major focus of the learning and teaching programme. Learning activities are guided using web-based programmes. A variety of assessments are used for example essays, individual presentations, electronic portfolios, group discussions, case studies, practical skills as well as a final dissertation. Class sizes are normally 10 - 15 students.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Your attendance at QMU will depend on which module you are studying. In most instances, the taught elements of this course occur over three consecutive days. It is suggested that students use the other days for independent study.

Links with industry/professional bodies

The course provides graduates with eligibility to register with the Registration Council for Clinical Physiologists (RCCP) in the United Kingdom/ Academy of Health Care Scientists.

Modules

15 credits: Neurology for Speech Therapy and Audiology/ Linguistics and Culture in Signed and Spoken Languages/ Advanced Audiological Assessment/ Multidisciplinary Working

30 credits: Audiological Assessment/ Aural Habilitation and Rehabilitation/ Technology for Hearing Impairment/ Vestibular Assessment and Rehabilitation/ Research Methods

Level 10 credits

20 credits: Audiological Clinical Skills/ Professional Practice for Audiology 40 credits: Clinical Audiology 1,2 & 3 (placement modules) If studying for the MSc you will also complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Careers

Graduates may work within the National Health Service and private sector. A further assessment is required in order to work as a registered Hearing Aid Dispenser. There are also career opportunities for research in universities and research institutes.

Quick Facts

  • This course includes 34 weeks of structured placements throughout Scotland, Northern Ireland and the North of England.  
  • It draws on scientific principles to inform clinical practice.  
  • Practical skills are taught on campus and students have access to a wide range of equipment.


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