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Masters Degrees (Speculative)

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Our. MA Photography course. approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making. Read more

Our MA Photography course approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making.

We offer a dynamic and exciting environment for studying the critical theory of photography, and this course engages with practices of reading and writing about the image. MA Photography also pays close attention to the dissemination, exhibition and publication of photographic work.

We provide specialist digital and analogue facilities for large-format colour and black-and-white exhibition prints.

Our course offers a considered balance of support that develops practical skills and fosters a high standard of diverse critical approaches. You'll take risks, explore and develop your interest, and exchange, debate and discuss ideas. You'll respond to the diverse field of contemporary photography and explore practices of representation that engage with the still and the moving image, as well as performance and installation.

Your studies will be supported by a number of internationally renowned staff in a department that encourages experimentation. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework whilst also being able to communicate to others, both visually and verbally.

We place a strong emphasis on publication, enabling you to find creative ways to disseminate your work beyond the academic context and into the public arena.

Facilities

Our range of equipment and technical support at UCA Rochester enables specialist and professional-grade work, whilst also encouraging experimental and speculative approaches to making.

Industry Partners

Our MA Photography course enjoys extensive links with a number of photographic, media and fine art professionals, curators, publishers, specialist printers and book designers. These connections enrich your experience through visiting lecturer and seminar programmes.

In the last three years, speakers on the course have included photographers and other creative practitioners such as:

-Ori Gersht

-Esther Teichmann

-Margaret Salmon

-Sarah Jones

-Matthew Stone

-Criodhna Costello

-Chris Coekin

-Carey Young

-Lisa Castagner

-Rod Dickinson

-Jo Longhurst

-Jason Evans

-Joseph Walsh

-Eva Bensasson

Additionally, creative professionals and industry links for our course include:

-Benedict Burbridge, editor of Photoworks

-Stuart Smith, book designer at Smith-Design

-Sarah James, writer at Art Monthly and Frieze

-Lucy Soutter, writer at Source

-Clare Grafik, curator of The Photographer's Gallery

-Jennifer Thatcher, Folkestone Triennial

-Jean Wainwright, writer at Art Newspaper

-Terry King, specialist printer

-Emily Pethick, directs The Showroom

-Robert Shore, editor of Elephant Magazine

-Edward Dorrian, organiser of Five Years

-Joyce Cronin, manages the Cubitt Gallery.

Careers

Our postgraduate degree prepares you for your career through professional practice units, talks by visiting artists and portfolio reviews with figures from across the photographic industry. Career opportunities include:

-Freelance photography

-Fine art

-Fashion

-Advertising and editorial

-Post production/digital imaging

-Picture editing and research

-Curating

-Image, arts and community arts management

-Gallery administration

Graduates of MA Photography have gone on to win the Jerwood Photography prize; to exhibit their work in The Photographers' Gallery, Photofusion, ArtSway and the Geffyre Museum as well as publishing their outputs in different venues ranging from The Sunday Times Magazine to monographs with Dewi Lewis Publishing.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas. Read more

Introduction

MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas: interaction design, design prototyping, physical computing, user centered design, open source digital platforms, design research, foresight and insight, experience design, communication design, speculative and critical design, interactive design and digital arts.

Content

MA Interaction Design Communication provides an opportunity for experimental practice in an area of design that increasingly explores the intersection of the physical and digital domains. With a focus on synthesising thought through rigorous design prototyping (making), digital processes and user perspectives, the course is highly reflective of interdisciplinary practice within the contemporary design, media and communications industries.

The integrated approach of the course to critical thinking provides you with the opportunity to work with critical ideas in an applied design context – for example psycho-geographic practice as empirical research or engaging with other critical theories of space to generate user perspectives. This ensures that ideation processes take on both the macro as well as micro opportunities for innovation and speculation crucial to building a portfolio of highly engaged work.

As well as placing you in a position to work across the board spectrum of interaction, design and communication the course is just as interested in design questions as design answers. This means that the course also prepares you for progression to further design research at MPhil/PhD level as well as to advanced self-directed experimental practice.

LCC has an outstanding team of practitioners and published researchers and enjoys a powerful programme of visiting speakers. The course also benefits from a cross-European collaboration with design industry professionals and higher education institutions and there is an opportunity to visit at least one other centre in Europe during the course.

Structure

Phase 1

1.1 Theories and Technologies of Interaction Design (40 credits)
1.2 Research Practice and Human Centered Design (20 credits)

Phase 2

2.1 Interaction Futures and Speculative Design (40 credits)
2.2 Physical Computing and Design Prototyping (20 credits)

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Final Major Research Project

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This course promotes a dynamic and speculative approach to the design of interior spatial environments and values research that seeks to challenge traditional methodologies. Read more
This course promotes a dynamic and speculative approach to the design of interior spatial environments and values research that seeks to challenge traditional methodologies. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your particular issues of interest in interior design or specialist areas of three dimensional design, through concise and focused study.

You will cover a range of issues, both theoretical and practical. Design modules deal with contemporary issues in a variety of interior design typologies, including retail, exhibition, gallery, performance and speculative efforts broadly described as installation. Careful studies are made in the pursuit of a fresh approach to their design resolution, through analogous and figurative studies, as well as comparison using suitable contemporary exemplars. The thesis can be undertaken as a design project, a dissertation or a piece of research – effectively a hybrid, both a project and a written summary or theoretical proposition.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.
-DECODING THE INTERIOR
-INTERIOR DESIGN CASE STUDY
-INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN COMPUTING
-MAJOR THESIS PROJECT
-RETAIL DESIGN
-THESIS DEVELOPMENT

Careers

Our dedicated Career Development Centre is actively working with an ever-expanding network of over 3,000 employers to provide you with exceptional employability support and guidance. As a result we were nominated as finalists for a significant industry award – the NUE Awards Most Improved Commitment to Employability 2016.

We provide our students with work placements and international opportunities to support them in becoming highly employable, globally engaged graduates, and with one million businesses operating within 20 miles of the University of Westminster, over 84% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduation. Our graduates work in a variety of sectors and organisations, from small/medium-sized companies and start-ups to large not-for-profit organisations and corporates.

During your time at Westminster you will be able to use our comprehensive online vacancy service and meet with our experienced careers consultants, providing you with thorough training and support on CV writing, application forms, interview preparation and assessment centres.

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This course looks beyond fashion design as we currently know it. Mixing design practices, innovative thinking and conceptual speculations, along with technology and science, the course finds strategies for the future state of fashion in ecological, cultural and social contexts. Read more

Introduction

This course looks beyond fashion design as we currently know it. Mixing design practices, innovative thinking and conceptual speculations, along with technology and science, the course finds strategies for the future state of fashion in ecological, cultural and social contexts.

Content

In this ground breaking course, you are encouraged to explore and develop speculative fashion practice and theoretical perspectives in parallel. You will identify new territories for fashion and work in new spaces to communicate ideas in relation to design for sustainability where digital design applications, the interplay of hard and soft sciences, design futuring, fashion design theory, fashion thinking, meta design, ethics, politics, psychology and anthropology are considered.

You will examine a diverse range of methodologies and technologies, including film, audio, digital and online platforms, garment prototyping, publishing, events and performance. Critical fashion practice and reflexive thinking to test, reframe and make responses to existing paradigms, is key to MA Fashion Futures. This will enable you to develop a very personal response to, and a critique of, the current paradigm and the role and activities of fashion.

This course is aligned to and supported by the Centre for Sustainable Fashion and the Fashion Digital Studio.

Structure

15 months level 7 180 credits

September to February

Critical Fashion Practice (40 credits)
Research Methodologies (20 credits)

February to June

Fashion Fictions: Speculative Prototyping (40 credits)
Collaborative Unit (20 credits)

June to December

Masters Project (60 credits)

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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Open to graduates holding degrees in any subject, this course assumes no prior knowledge of public relations (PR) and is suitable for UK, EU and international students wishing to progress their academic knowledge of PR. Read more

Open to graduates holding degrees in any subject, this course assumes no prior knowledge of public relations (PR) and is suitable for UK, EU and international students wishing to progress their academic knowledge of PR. It is also suitable for those who do not have a degree but who possess relevant experience.

Combining a unique blend of academic and practical public relations skills, the course will enable you to develop a successful career in an incredibly dynamic sector. With a strong emphasis on application of knowledge to practice industry skills such as PR writing, media relations, digital communications and client management are underpinned by academic rigour focusing on PR strategy, campaign planning and PR specialisms.

You will have the opportunity to work with real clients, including individually creating a press pack for use by a client, in addition to working as part of an account team on a live PR project.

You will be able to network with professional PR practitioners and guest speakers, and have the option to undertake an internship to gain additional work experience. Completing the programme will enhance your career prospects, equipping you with the skills required by PR consultancies as well as private and public sector organisations.

Features and benefits of the course

  • This course is approved and accredited by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and we are a partner university of the Public Relations Communications Association (PRCA). As a PR student at Manchester Met, you can gain FREE student membership of the PRCA whilst on the programme, with a range of benefits including access to professional conferences and training.
  • You will be taught in the internationally recognised multi award-winning Business School on our Manchester Campus. 
  • This programme will position you as a 'plus-two' candidate capable of rapid promotion through a strong portfolio of professional skills as well as academic theory.
  • Read our Man Met PR blog to find out about current activities on the course and students' views and experiences. 
  • Access to a strong network of PR practitioners who contribute to the programme as guest speakers.
  • Access to our PR network of practitioners and alumni on LinkedIn offering contacts, work experience and employment opportunities.
  • Access to our international alumni network of graduates working in public relations.
  • Please follow us on twitter: @MMUPR
  • Watch a student story video: Diana Boch, MSc Public Relations
  • Read a student story: Rebecca Ireland, MSc Public Relations

Adding value to your employability skills

Throughout your studies there is strong provision for employability and gaining graduate employment through our Careers and Employability Hub and a range of additional activites that include:

Work with external clients on live projects 

Employers require graduates who possess a range of skills and knowledge, including experience in the workplace. To ensure you develop into a work-ready graduate for the PR or communications industry, you will have the opportunity to work on two live projects: (i) you will work on Live Client Brief as part of an account team on a live PR project under the guidance of an academic tutor who is also an experienced PR manager; and (ii) within Media Relations, you will work with an external client to prepare a media pack containing original material for the media, including a press release, social media press release, Q&A, social media content and photography for distribution to target media, as well as devise a media relations strategy for your client. These live projects will enable you to develop practical PR skills to enhance your employability, as well as develop client management skills. You will be supported by an academic tutor who is also an experienced PR consultancy manager.

Behind-the-scenes business visits

As a Masters student of the Business School, you have the opportunity to participate in a number of free business visits that allow you to see behind the scenes of real companies and learn about how these businesses are structured and operate. The business visit programme varies each year, the following are indicative of the type of business visits that are available:

  • Manchester United Football Club – museum and stadium tour plus guest speaker on business operations
  • Robinson’s Brewery – tour of 175 year old family run brewery and guest speaker
  • BBC at MediaCityUK - tour of BBC studios at MediaCityUK with an insight into how TV broadcasting works.
  • Jaguar LandRover - tour of the LandRover factory including every stage of the assembly process to the finished product.

Professional development weeks

The Faculty of Business and Law hosts two Professional Development Weeks annually. Free and open to all students, this includes a festival of skills-development activities, practical support in developing your CV and employability skills, and the opportunity to network with actively recruiting graduate employers. 

Consultancy dissertation 

The dissertation unit is your chance to undertake a consultancy dissertation, which could be based on a current or potential employer and aligned to your career goals in a specific sector, organisation or industry.

Expert guest lectures

A number of guest lectures take place each year with leading speakers from industry. The Business School shares extensive links with over 25 professional bodies including the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) and the Public Relations Communications Association (PRCA). We invite speakers from various organisations onto campus as guest lecturers to share their knowledge with current Masters students, including practitioners from leading PR consultancies, senior in-house experts, digital specialists, journalists from local media including the BBC, and alumni now working in the PR or communications field.

Postgraduate internship programme

All Masters students at the Business School are encouraged to undertake an optional, short-term internship with a real business in order to develop relevant experience relating to their studies.

A dedicated Placement and Project Coordinator will guide you through this process, by sourcing and advertising suitable roles throughout the year, offering 1-2-1 application advice, and supporting you to make speculative applications to source your own Internships.

Internships can be part-time or full-time but must fit around your scheduled classes.



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Modern business practices rely on accurate logistics and reliable, dependable supply chains. The smooth operation of these crucial aspects of company operations affects the profitability and reputation of any organisation that supplies business-to-business or business-to-consumer. Read more

Modern business practices rely on accurate logistics and reliable, dependable supply chains. The smooth operation of these crucial aspects of company operations affects the profitability and reputation of any organisation that supplies business-to-business or business-to-consumer.

Accredited by The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) and The Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (CIPS), this course is designed to equip you with the skills and knowledge needed by this fast-paced industry. Alongside topics such as strategic sourcing, contract and stakeholder management, and risk management, you also study information technology and information systems. This reflects the revolutionary impact the internet and e-commerce have had on logistics and supply chain management and how they continue to drive innovation.

You also engage in contemporary issues that influence industry practices such as ethical sourcing, reducing CO2 emissions and government policies that affect transport and infrastructure investments (road, rail, aviation and maritime).

During your studies, you may have the opportunity to participate in:

-Industry visits to real companies

-Short term internships with local employers

-Live business projects for real clients

-A live consultancy project for your final dissertation

Open to graduates holding degrees in any subject, this course assumes no prior knowledge of business or management and is suitable for both UK, EU and international students wishing to progress their academic knowledge of logistics and supply chain management.

Features and benefits of the course

-You will be taught in the internationally recognised multii-award-winning Business School on All Saints Campus.

-This programme is accredited by the Chartered Institute for Logistics and Transport and the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply.

-You will benefit from practitioner-led teaching by a team with substantial industy experience.

-SAP is the leading enterprise system in the world and this programme provides the advantage of 12 hours worth of hands on workshops on the SAP package.

Postgraduate internship programme

Employers look favourably on candidates who can demonstrate relevant and practical work experience. All Masters students at the Business School are encouraged to undertake an optional, short-term internship with a real business in order to develop relevant experience relating to their studies.

The Postgraduate Internship Programme is an optional unit which allows you to gain up to fourteen weeks of work experience in a business environment; putting your studies into practical application, at the same time as gaining practice credits, which are recorded on your degree qualification transcript.

A dedicated Placement and Project Coordinator will guide you through this process, by sourcing and advertising suitable roles throughout the year, offering 1-2-1 application advice, and supporting you to make speculative applications to source your own Internships.

Internships can be part-time or full-time but must fit around your scheduled classes.

About the Course

Our postgraduate programmes aim to combine academic knowledge from leading research in the area with the professional skills that employers are seeking.



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Our. MA Animation course. builds on our long history of providing highly regarded animation education at UCA Farnham, and will provide you with a strong interdisciplinary approach to the animated form. Read more

Our MA Animation course builds on our long history of providing highly regarded animation education at UCA Farnham, and will provide you with a strong interdisciplinary approach to the animated form. We offer a dynamic environment in which you'll be able to engage with the animated form in traditional 2D and 3D stop motion, as well as the theoretical aspects of the discipline.

This course attracts students from around the world and has a rich cultural mix. You'll approach animation as a broad discipline and be encouraged to engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making through a range of projects, which will culminate in the production of a high quality animated film.

MA Animation at our Farnham campus has a long history of nurturing creative, innovative and challenging animators and has an incomparable alumni. This course will support you in developing practical skills while fostering a high standard of diverse critical approaches.

On this course you'll be encouraged to take risks, explore and develop your interests, and exchange, debate and discuss your ideas. You'll be expected to produce original and exciting films during your time with us, and explore the wide range of creative possibilities of frame-by -frame filmmaking. We'll encourage you to be open to these possibilities and to develop new skills, as well as building on your existing ones.

Your studies will be supported by internationally renowned staff on a course that is proud to have no house style. We'll encourage you to explore your own natural inclinations - whether narrative, experimental, documentary or fiction. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework.

Our course uses a wide range of technical resources that cover the whole spectrum of contemporary animation practice, from traditional drawn and stop motion animation to the latest digitally generated imagery.

Part-time students are normally taught on a Wednesday but sometimes field trips, study visits or other events take place on other days of the week. You should check before enrolling if you have concerns about the days your course will be taught on.

Industry Partners

Our course actively encourages you to gain industry experience through a wide variety of approaches. These include work experience, internships, studio visits, commissions and competitions and entry into major film festivals.

We've built an extensive network of industry connections, giving us access to high-profile visiting lecturers, and to commissions, competitions and exciting work placement opportunities.

Our industry links include:

-Aardman Animations

-STUDIO AKA

-Passion Pictures

-Mackinnon & Saunders

-Nexus

-Framestore

-Cinesite

-The Mill

-ustwo

-Stylorouge

-Blink Productions

-ITV.

Careers

Animation is one of the most significant and rapidly expanding media fields. An enormous range of career opportunities exist in animation. These range from the traditional techniques of animation storytelling, drawn to model and CGI animation.

Typical careers in the industry include:

-Directors

-Producers

-Animators (in commercials, films, broadcast, online media and games)

-Editors

-Character designers

-Production designers

-Pre-vis artists

-Compositors

-Storyboard artists

-Post-production.

As one of the pre-eminent animation courses in the world, our sought after alumni have landed many exciting, high-profile roles across the industry - including positions as:

-Animators

-Directors

-Producers

-Designers

-Model makers

-Storyboard artists

-CG animators

-CG riggers.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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The MA Fine Arts degree programme will enable you to develop and locate your practice in relation to current bodies of knowledge and practice in the fine arts. Read more
The MA Fine Arts degree programme will enable you to develop and locate your practice in relation to current bodies of knowledge and practice in the fine arts. You will build a strong and increasingly confident practice through awareness and interaction with current contexts of professional practice and research.

Course detail

The curriculum, which also supports awards at Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma levels, is uniquely designed and focused on developing artists’ abilities and capacities for professional, vocational and academic innovation. We emphasise relationships between composition, reflection, practice and dissemination across a dynamic breadth of fine arts disciplines and discourses. Teaching, learning and research on the programme will enable discovery of the variety of ways in which composition, creation and dissemination in fine arts practice has evolved into its present media and forms.

This degree enables students who already have some experience of fine arts practice to expand their artistic horizons, develop their reflective abilities and expand their portfolio as thinking practitioners.

Format

You will follow two strands, consisting of two 40 credit modules is designed to enhance your abilities as a self-reflective practitioner. It recognises the deep interrelationship between reflection, documentation, dissemination and production, in terms of the development of an artist’s work and practice in terms of its function and operation within critical and public domains. You will be introduced to the variety of ways in which composition, creation and dissemination in the production of fine arts practice has evolved into its present media and forms. This will be accompanied by investigation into the potential of strategies concerning documentation as useful modes of reflection and realisation. This module strand will be primarily focused around your own practice, contextualised by examination of various key practitioners, modes or epistemologies.

Modules

- Questions of Practice -

This is a practice-based module that encourages you to think and reflect through development of studio practice and discovery of related questions of practice. It recognises critical and creative reflection on studio practice as an active and essential aspect of working processes. It aims also to guide you in the development and enhancement of your conceptual, intellectual, practical and technical range of abilities, skills and knowledge in relation to models and strategies of making and reflecting upon current fine arts practice.

- Practice in Context -

This module encourages you to develop a nascent body of practice-based work in response to issues of context. Where work in ‘Questions of Practice’ encourages speculative approaches to studio practice, this module asks you to identify and respond to any of a range of historical, social and cultural contexts. This could range from re-examining approaches to site-specific practice, the ‘white cube’ gallery space, or networked, online spaces. The module allows time and opportunity for you to develop and enhance your conceptual, intellectual, practical and technical range of abilities, skills and knowledge in relation to issues and opportunities of making/disseminating practice-based research in fine arts practice.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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Open to graduates holding degrees in any subject, this course assumes no prior knowledge of project management. The course also includes two units accredited by the Association for Project Management (APM). Read more

Open to graduates holding degrees in any subject, this course assumes no prior knowledge of project management. The course also includes two units accredited by the Association for Project Management (APM).

Project management skills are in demand in almost every sector and increasingly they are an essential requirement for many different job roles. The programme is suitable for professionals and graduates who are looking to develop their project management skills as well as project management specialists who want a recognised qualification that supports the experience they have gained in employment.

This exceptionally practical course addresses the key factors that underpin the successful delivery of projects. Your studies will cover how to manage the technical, cultural, political and financial aspects of a project and the tools and techniques available to you. People are a crucial part of any project’s success and you will consider how to adeptly manage challenges such as power disputes between colleagues, skills development issues and maintaining motivational levels for long-term projects.

Through case studies and scenario-based exercises, you also look at how professionals in different sectors manage multiple projects and multi-task across teams. The programme incorporates a virtual, computer-based experience for project management learning and an innovative syllabus on the challenging issue of sustainability in project management.

During your studies, you will have the opportunity to participate in:

  • Industry visits to real companies
  • Short term internships with local employers
  • Live business projects for real clients
  • A live consultancy project for your final dissertation.

Features and Benefits

  • You will be taught in the internationally recognised multi-award-winning Business School on our Manchester Campus.
  • Two units on this course carry accreditation by the Association for Project Management 
  • There will be extensive use of the University's virtual learning environment (Moodle) to provide additional learning materials, communication and also as an aid to discussions.

Postgraduate internship programme

Employers look favourably on candidates who can demonstrate relevant and practical work experience. All Masters students at the Business School are encouraged to undertake an optional, short-term internship with a real business in order to develop relevant experience relating to their studies.

The Postgraduate Internship Programme is an optional unit which allows you to gain up to fourteen weeks of work experience in a business environment; putting your studies into practical application, at the same time as gaining practice credits, which are recorded on your degree qualification transcript.

A dedicated Placement and Project Coordinator will guide you through this process, by sourcing and advertising suitable roles throughout the year, offering 1-2-1 application advice, and supporting you to make speculative applications to source your own Internships.

Internships can be part-time or full-time but must fit around your scheduled classes.

About the Course

Our postgraduate programmes aim to combine academic knowledge from leading research in the area with the professional skills that employers are seeking.



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The MSc in Construction Economics and Management equips graduates with the skills to become senior managers, policy advisers and decision-makers in any branch of the construction industry. Read more

The MSc in Construction Economics and Management equips graduates with the skills to become senior managers, policy advisers and decision-makers in any branch of the construction industry. It can also provide teachers and researchers in these subject areas with professional academic development.

About this degree

This RICS accredited programme aims to develop students' knowledge and skills under two mutually supporting themes, for which the School of Construction & Project Management has an international reputation:

  • the economics and finance of construction at project, firm and industry levels
  • the management of construction projects and enterprises.

Construction is taken in its widest sense to include design, infrastructure and the supply chain.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional/elective modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules, four optional modules (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

Core modules

  • The Economics of Construction: Economics, Sectors and Industries
  • The Economic Institutions of the Construction Industry
  • The Management of Construction Projects
  • The Management of Construction Enterprises

Optional modules

Optional module choices will include:

  • Construction Booms and Slumps**
  • Construction Clients and the Market for Contracts**
  • Economics of Appraisal of Construction Projects: Leading Issues**
  • Economics of Speculative Construction Development**
  • Construction Industry Development**
  • Managing Professional Practice*
  • Relationships between Firms*
  • Capturing and Delivering Value*
  • The Construction Firm: Contractors and Subcontractors*
  • Marketing and Project Business Development*
  • Managing Change in Organisations*
  • Environmental Sustainability in the Construction Sector
  • Integrating Project Information Systems with Building Information Modelling
  • Managing Construction
  • Managing the Enterprise-Project Relationship
  • Organisations and People in Projects
  • Social Networks in Project and Enterprise Organisations

*Students choose at least one

**Students choose at least two

The fourth optional module is selected from the remaining choices displayed above.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation related to the main themes of the programme, under the guidance of an individual supervisor.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and group work on case studies, exercises and problems. Lectures include industry guest speakers. Assessment is through written examination, term papers and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Fieldwork contributes to primary research for the dissertation

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Construction Economics and Management MSc

Careers

The career options for graduates are varied, and many students go on to work for construction, engineering and design enterprises, professional consultants and commercial research organisations, and client enterprises with significant project portfolios such as retailers or banks. Graduates are keenly recruited by many of the UK's very best construction-sector firms. The MSc can be used as a foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Graduate Construction Manager, Balfour Beatty
  • Project Planner, Laing O'Rourke
  • Business Analyst, Lloyds Banking Group
  • Project Engineer, CMT Design & Construction
  • Structural Design Engineer, Urban Construction Architectural Design and Research Group

Employability

The programme offers an understanding of financial and other kinds of management within the context of the project, the project-based firm and the construction industry in its widest sense. There are some elements which can be put to use straight away while other elements of a strategic nature will prove useful as graduates move into more senior management roles. It is an attractive graduate qualification either for those trained in a technical discipline without previous economic training or those trained in economics or finance without previous exposure to construction.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Our school is part of The Bartlett, which is the UK's largest multidisciplinary faculty of the built environment. It brings together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, finance, design, procure, construct/refurbish and operate the buildings, infrastructure and urban environments of the future.

Outside the faculty we have links within UCL with those involved in engineering, computing and other areas of management.

Located in central London, UCL is at the heart of a large cluster of architectural, engineering, surveying, real estate and management consultancies, major construction/infrastructure clients, contractors and financial institutions. The UK's centre of government and all the resources of a world city are also to hand.

Accreditation

RICS Project Management pathway

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Construction & Project Management

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MSc Marketing (Communications) is designed to ensure you will study the latest thinking and techniques within the discipline of marketing communications , as well as specialist areas, such as digital and social media. Read more

The MSc Marketing (Communications) is designed to ensure you will study the latest thinking and techniques within the discipline of marketing communications , as well as specialist areas, such as digital and social media. The course will equip you to be a well-rounded marketing professional, capable of working in a varity of sectors.

This course will develop your skills in marketing processes and procedures, including market research, market planning and strategy and marketing communications and brand portfolio building.

You will be taught by industry professionals and highly experienced tutors, who are able to draw upon their substantial industry experience, bringing lectures to life and offering practical support on student projects.

This course is also approved and accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing and has been developed to meet the demand for skilled marketing communications professionals to work within the ever-changing marketing communications industry.

The programme has excellent professional links nationally and internationally, with Manchester also being recognised as a world leader in digital marketing activity.

During your studies, you will have the opportunity to participate in:

-Industry visits to real companies

-Short term internships with local employers

-Live business projects for real clients

-A live consultancy project for your final dissertation

Open to graduates holding degrees in any subject, this course assumes no prior knowledge of marketing or business and is suitable for UK, EU and international students wishing to progress their academic knowledge of marketing communications. It is also suitable for those who do not have a degree but possess relevant experience.

Postgraduate internship programme

Employers look favourably on candidates who can demonstrate relevant and practical work experience. All Masters students at the Business School are encouraged to undertake an optional, short-term internship with a real business in order to develop relevant experience relating to their studies.

The Postgraduate Internship Programme is an optional unit which allows you to gain up to fourteen weeks of work experience in a business environment; putting your studies into practical application, at the same time as gaining practice credits, which are recorded on your degree qualification transcript.

A dedicated Placement and Project Coordinator will guide you through this process, by sourcing and advertising suitable roles throughout the year, offering 1-2-1 application advice, and supporting you to make speculative applications to source your own Internships.

Internships can be part-time or full-time but must fit around your scheduled classes.



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This course will equip you with the latest knowledge and skill set needed for a successful career within the accounting and finance sector. We have had graduates go on to work at companies including KPMG, Deloitte and RBS to name a few. Read more

This course will equip you with the latest knowledge and skill set needed for a successful career within the accounting and finance sector. We have had graduates go on to work at companies including KPMG, Deloitte and RBS to name a few.

This programme has been designed to enhance the specialist knowledge and skills of graduates who have already undertaken substantial accounting and finance studies at undergraduate degree level. Alternatively, if you have successfully achieved all of the ACCA Fundamental level papers you are eligible to apply.

The programme covers a number of core themes including International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), corporate reporting, corporate governance and risk management. Professional ethics, alongside the application of tools and models of finance theory, to complex strategic corporate finance transactions are central to the programme. In addition, you will develop knowledge in implementing strategy in the context of both the external environment and internal business capabilities, and be able to evaluate performance implications of a given strategy. 

You will have the opportunity to engage with current business issues through specialist input and the completion of independent study. Your dissertation will normally take the form of an empirical piece of research.

Top-Up Your Existing Postgraduate Qualifications to a Masters

If your qualifications are relevant to the MSc you would like to study, you may be eligible for ‘entry with advanced standing’. For more information please visit our website.

Features and benefits of the course

-You will be taught in the internationally recognised multi-award-winning Business School on All Saints Campus.

-Teaching staff on this programme are highly experienced practitioners and active researchers in their fields.

-You will have complementary access to Bloomberg, the leading global platform used by the world’s leading banks, corporations and government agencies for news, data, analytics and research.

-The Business School is the only public sector ACCA platinum approved learning partner in the North of England.

-There are opportunities to focus your assignments on your employment goals.

-You will have extensive access to real world data and academic journals.

-This programme has an advanced standing route for mature students who have relevant professional qualifications or who have previously studied for a postgraduate certificate or diploma. Through advanced standing, we can give you academic credit for your current qualifications. Typically, this would be membership of the ACCA. Consequently, you only need to study selected units and can achieve an MSc in a shorter time frame. The tuition fees for this route are also lower because you only pay for the units you need to take rather than having to study all the units for the MSc.

-All graduates from the MSc Accounting and Finance course will be eligible to sit the CIMA Gateway paper, which will fast track them to the CIMA Strategic Level. The route requires you to sit a single three hour exam in either May or November each year. It assesses your knowledge of the material covered in the management level of the CIMA Professional Qualification. Once you have passed, you will be awarded the CIMA Advanced Diploma in Management Accounting and be granted exemptions from all certificate, operational and management level exams in the CIMA Professional Qualification. Then by sitting three strategic level papers and TOPCIMA (and relevant work experience) it will lead to students becoming CIMA qualified accountants.

Postgraduate internship programme

Employers look favourably on candidates who can demonstrate relevant and practical work experience. All Masters students at the Business School are encouraged to undertake an optional, short-term internship with a real business in order to develop relevant experience relating to their studies.

The Postgraduate Internship Programme is an optional unit which allows you to gain up to fourteen weeks of work experience in a business environment; putting your studies into practical application, at the same time as gaining practice credits, which are recorded on your degree qualification transcript.

A dedicated Placement and Project Coordinator will guide you through this process, by sourcing and advertising suitable roles throughout the year, offering 1-2-1 application advice, and supporting you to make speculative applications to source your own Internships.

Internships can be part-time or full-time but must fit around your scheduled classes.

About the Course

Our postgraduate programmes aim to combine academic knowledge from leading research in the area with the professional skills that employers are seeking.

Our research in business and law brings together a number of synergistic research centres and knowledge clusters and our doctoral school of PhD researchers, who work with teaching staff on the design of the programme.

During your studies, you may have the opportunity to participate in:

-Industry visits to real companies

-Short term internships with local employers

-Client projects for real clients



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