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Masters Degrees (Specific Learning Difficulties)

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The Postgraduate Diploma in SEN Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) is one of a range of special educational needs courses that are offered by the University of South Wales at postgraduate level. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in SEN Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) is one of a range of special educational needs courses that are offered by the University of South Wales at postgraduate level.

This course is for you if you have at least two years experience of working with students with SpLD and are looking to gain a qualification to enable you to apply to the British Dyslexia Association (BDA) for either Approved Teacher Status (ATS or ATS HE/FE) or an Associate Membership of the BDA (AMBDA or AMBDA FE/HE).

The course may also be of interest to other approved professionals, such as speech and language or occupational therapists and educational psychologists.

The Postgraduate Diploma in SEN Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) is recognised by the British Dyslexia Association for the award of Associate Member of the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA). It is also recognised by the Joint Council for Qualifications as the appropriate training for completing Access Arrangements in Secondary Schools.

Those who have obtained the PG Diploma in Spld (AMBDA) are eligible to assess and diagnose dyslexia.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1280-postgraduate-diploma-sen-specific-learning-difficulties

What you study

To gain a Postgraduate Diploma SEN in SpLD you must pass four taught modules:

• Understanding Learning Difficulties and Disabilities which is taught on the campus or can be accessed via e-learning
• Specific Learning Difficulties
• Managing and Supporting Children and Young People with Specific Learning Difficulties
• Research Methodology

Both SpLD modules focus not only upon specific difficulties in literacy and numeracy, but address the wider spectrum of potentially associated conditions eg. Dyspraxia, Attention Deficit Disorder and Asperger’s Syndrome.

The course enables participants to gain knowledge of:

• The vast range of differences within the SpLD continuum
• Current research on the identification of learners experiencing problems with literacy and numeracy
• Assessing individual learning needs, using both standardised and non-standardised methods
• Planning programmes of work for individual pupils based on initial and on-going assessment
• The effects on learning, self esteem and behaviour of SpLD
• Monitoring the progress of learners who may show uneven or intermittent standards of achievement
• A variety of strategies and resources, including ICT and technical aids, for assisting pupil organisation, drafting and presentation of work
• The monitoring, evaluation and auditing responsibilities within school or service, in respect of the quality of provision for pupils with SpLD.

Learning and teaching methods

Students undertake two modules in year one, and two modules in year two. Both SpLD modules are taught on Monday evenings for three hours on campus over a period of 12 consecutive weeks.

Assessment methods

The first module is assessed on the basis of a written assignment of 5,000 words (or equivalent).

The second module is assessed in two ways:
- For students seeking a professional award, the successful completion of 30 hours of teaching experience and assessment of relevant files (equivalent to 5,000 words)

- For other participants, one 5,000 word assignment, or the equivalent

Employment Prospects

Most students proceed to the MA dissertation, in order to achieve the award of MA SEN.

Following successful completion of the course, some students have gained posts as school and college SENCOs, specialist tutors in SPLD services, set up their own SpLD consultancies, or become LEA Advisors. Others have published books and papers on the subject and gained doctorate awards.

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We are a key provider in this field with over 20 years experience. These are nationally recognised qualifications designed for teachers of children and young adults who are experiencing specific learning difficulties in literacy. Read more
We are a key provider in this field with over 20 years experience.

These are nationally recognised qualifications designed for teachers of children and young adults who are experiencing specific learning difficulties in literacy. They are accredited by the British Dyslexia Association* at Approved Teacher Status (ATS) level or Approved Practitioner Status (APS) in year 1 and Associate Member of the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA) in year 2. Exit awards are available at the end of year 1 (PG Cert SpLD) and year 2 (PG Dip SpLD) for those not wishing to take the full master’s degree.

Courses are principally designed to enable classroom practitioners gain a high level of knowledge and skill so that they can expertly meet the needs of learners with specific learning difficulties (SpLDs).

There is a supervised teaching practice consisting of 20 hours one-to-one teaching in year 1 and a further 10 hours in year 2 in order to meet BDA requirements. There is an additional, mandatory fee of £325 per study year for this which covers the observation and assessment of two one hour lessons, two individual tutorials with AMBDA tutors, and support with report writing and lesson planning via feedback on drafts.

Features and benefits of the course

-The Postgraduate Certificate leads to Approved Teacher Status (ATS) or Approved Practitioner Status (APS) for those without QTS of the British Dyslexia Association and the Postgraduate Diploma leads to AMBDA (Associate Membership of the British Dyslexia Association).
-Those who successfully complete the Postgraduate Diploma are eligible to apply for a Patoss Assessment Practising Certificate or BDA Assessment Practising Certificate.
http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/quality-mark-and-accreditation/professional-membership-accreditation.html
-Our Programme is led by highly qualified tutors with specialist experience who have close links to our Centre for Inclusive Education and Disability Studies. The Programme Leader has co-authored the two core texts on dyslexia which have been adopted by several universities and dyslexia providers, both nationally and internationally.

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This leading programme in the field of dyslexia prepares teachers to critically evaluate and develop evidence-based practice to become specialist teachers and assessors of learners with literacy difficulties. Read more

This leading programme in the field of dyslexia prepares teachers to critically evaluate and develop evidence-based practice to become specialist teachers and assessors of learners with literacy difficulties. This programme is recognised by the British Dyslexia Association for Approved Teacher Status (ATS) and Associate Member of the BDA (AMBDA).

About this degree

Students will gain an understanding of how learners typically develop literacy skills and how it might go wrong; how literacy difficulties can be identified and how to develop an individualised support programme. As part of this programme students will administer standardised tests (in their own educational setting) and teach (in similar settings) learners with literacy difficulties.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (150 credits) and a research report (30 credits).

Core modules

All modules are core to this qualification

  • Assessment of SpLD (dyslexia)
  • Evidence-based Practice SpLD (dyslexia)
  • Research Design and Methodology
  • Understanding SpLD (dyslexia)
  • Research report

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Research project/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a research report of 6,000 to 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning

This programme is delivered via face-to-face daytime and some evening sessions at UCL Institute of Education. It is assessed by coursework assignments and recordings of administering assessments and teaching pupils with literacy difficulties, plus a research report of 6,000 to 7,000 words. Modules 1-3 are taken in the first year on Wednesdays day time. RDM and report in Year 2. RDM module is on Tuesday evenings in the autumn term.

Fieldwork

Students will be required to work with children and young people up to the age of 18 years to demonstrate the core competencies of the programme.

Placement

Students must find have access to pupils - we do not find placements for students.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia) MA

Funding

Part-time students may apply for the UK Government Postgraduate Loan.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as specialist teachers of children with SpLD (dyslexia), while others have jobs as specialist teacher assessors; many combine both. Graduates can also be found working as headteachers, special educational needs co-ordinators, local authority advisors and in research roles.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Literacy Consultant, London Borough of Camden
  • Manager of Language and Learning Team, London Borough of Merton Council
  • Primary School Special Educational Needs (SEN) Teacher, Primary School & Children's Centre, Edmonton
  • Special Educational Needs School Teacher, Milton Keynes
  • Specialist Teacher, Special Education Needs (SEN), London Borough of Tower Hamlets

Employability

Successful completion of the programme will allow students awarded the ATS to support learners with dyslexia (up to the age of 18 years), and with the AMBDA to undertake diagnostic assessments and support learners with dyslexia.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is taught by a range of leading researchers and professionals in the field of dyslexia. It uniquely offers a rigorous academic programme combined with professional practice qualifications fully recognised by the British Dyslexia Association and UCL Institute of Education, an internationally recognised university.

Critical engagement with current research and evidence-informed practice, supported by professionals and researchers, will enable the participant to reflect on their learning and enhance workplace practice.

Professional practice is supported by a team of AMBDA specialists. It will provide the understanding, knowledge and skills required to teach children and young people with literacy difficulties.



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The inclusion and achievement of students with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) within mainstream education is an important current focus. Read more

The inclusion and achievement of students with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) within mainstream education is an important current focus. By acquiring specialist teaching and assessment skills, you’ll broaden your career opportunities within and beyond the school and college context.

The modules combine theory and practice. You’ll study through workshops, case studies and assignments, justifying your professional practice through research. Modules comprise taught sessions and assessed projects, and can be completed full-time in one year or part-time in up to five years.

COURSE STRUCTURE

You’ll develop your theoretical and practical knowledge of SpLD/dyslexia, and will learn specialist approaches to the identification, assessment and teaching of learners with specific learning difficulties.

MODULE STRUCTURE

The first module of the course enables you to assess a learner, compiling an individual profile based on your findings, and design/deliver an individualised programme of support. You’ll also explore methods and strategies to develop the inclusive practices which can support learners across the curriculum.

The second module will develop your ability to undertake full diagnostic assessments for dyslexia to inform programmes and appropriate support, such as Examination Access Arrangements.

A further module will allow you to develop an understanding of the difficulties faced by primary or secondary students with SpLD/dyslexia or dyscalculia when learning mathematics, and provide you with knowledge about how to support them.

If you already have specialist SpLD/dyslexia qualifications and wish to gain a PATOSS Assessment Practising Certificate, a further module can facilitate this.

For more information on careers, please view the Course Handbook: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/media/bathspaacuk/course-handbooks/ife/PG-Specific-Learning-Difficulties-and-Dyslexia-handbook-2016-2017.pdf

TEACHING METHODS

Modules are taught through twilight lectures and workshops, usually a three hour session each week from 5-8pm.

Many sessions are led by the Course Leader, who is a specialist in the academic and practical aspects of SpLD/dyslexia. Others are delivered by visiting tutors with particular areas of expertise such as an educational psychologist or dyscalculia specialist

ASSESSMENT

Each module is coursework-assessed (7000-10,000 words per 30 credit module). The dissertation is 15,000–20,000 words and worth 60 credits.

CAREERS

The programme can serve as a stepping stone to becoming a Specialist SpLD/Dyslexia teacher and assessor working either in a school setting or independently. This is also helpful pathway for those working within SEN leadership and management roles such as SENCO in schools. It can also lead onto further PhD studies in SpLD/Dyslexia, education or similar fields.

Areas of career direction include: Specialist learning support and teaching possibilities, Advisory Teacher roles for Local Authorities, educational leadership and management, curriculum design and development, higher education research and teacher training.

For more information on careers, please go to your Course Handbook: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/media/bathspaacuk/course-handbooks/ife/PG-Specific-Learning-Difficulties-and-Dyslexia-handbook-2016-2017.pdf



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The Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia) course is designed for mainstream teachers or those working in an educational setting (including practitioners with a particular responsibility for supporting children, young people and adults with dyslexia) who wish to deepen their understanding of dyslexia and link this learning to the School Improvement Plan. Read more
The Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia) course is designed for mainstream teachers or those working in an educational setting (including practitioners with a particular responsibility for supporting children, young people and adults with dyslexia) who wish to deepen their understanding of dyslexia and link this learning to the School Improvement Plan.

A flexible framework combines academic study with work-based action learning and action research, where your day-to-day professional activity informs your development through reflection and peer discussion.

The PGCert is a stand-alone qualification and counts as one-third of a masters degree.

The course is accredited by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA) and qualifies students to apply for Approved Teacher Status (ATS) or Approved Professional Status (APS) as long as they have completed two years (or equivalent) as a teacher or educational professional by the end of the course.

The programme is arranged to fit in with your working patterns and usually include twilight and Saturday sessions.

Areas of study

This course will focus on the following areas of study:

• developing knowledge of the theoretical basis of contemporary approaches to dyslexia
• the identification, assessment and practical support for leaners with dyslexia
• creating and delivering specialist intervention programmes and developing dyslexia friendly environments.
• the application of learning to practice and evaluation of impact on yourself, your learners or others affected by your study.

This will enable you, as a practitioner, to:

• extend and enhance your current practice
• gain knowledge of current thinking in the understanding of dyslexia
• develop frameworks for understanding the range of issues surrounding working with learners with dyslexia
• increase your confidence and effectiveness in supporting learners with dyslexia
• learn how to implement change in a range of policy contexts.

Careers and employability

Our PGCerts are designed to support your career progression, increase your subject knowledge and help you to make a direct difference to your school and students.

Graduates of the course are well placed to take on subject development and leadership positions.

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We are a key provider in the field of specific learning difficulties with over 20 years’ experience. Read more

We are a key provider in the field of specific learning difficulties with over 20 years’ experience.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Dyscalculia, which is new this year, is a nationally recognised qualification designed for teachers of children and adolescents who are experiencing specific learning difficulties in mathematics. It can be taken with or without BDA accreditation and gives 60 credits towards a PG Diploma in SpLD: Literacy and Numeracy or an MA SpLD. 

This course consists of two 30 credit units, one on nature, identification and assessment and the other on supporting learners with dyscalculia and other specific learning difficulties in mathematics. An additional (optional) 10 practice credits leads to a 'PG Certificate in Dyscalculia with Practice Credits' which is accredited by the British Dyslexia Association at Approved Teacher Status (ATS) Dyscalculia level or Approved Practitioner Status (APS) Dyscalculia.

The course is principally designed to enable classroom practitioners to gain a high level of knowledge and skill so that they can expertly meet the needs of learners with specific learning difficulties (SpLDs) in mathematics. 

There is a supervised teaching practice consisting of 20 hours one-to-one teaching for those wanting BDA accreditation, which forms part of a portfolio of practical tasks including an assessment report, an Individual Learning Plan and 20 lesson plans and evaluations. There is an additional fee of £325 for the practice credits which covers the observation and assessment of two one-hour lessons, two individual tutorials with AMBDA tutors, and support with report writing and lesson planning via feedback on drafts.



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Why study at Roehampton. All modules are taught in the evening. Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • All modules are taught in the evening
  • Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives
  • Tailor the programme to your own needs and interests
  • Gain the Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing accredited by the British Psychological Society (optional) as part of the programme or as a stand-alone module

Course summary

The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Our programme is founded upon a commitment to forms of education which enable the participation, learning and development of all.

Students studying on the programme engage with aspects of theory, policy and practice relevant to international and local contexts. With its international profile, this programme brings together teachers and other professionals working directly with children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages, as well as policy-makers and managers in areas of SEN and Inclusive Education.

On the MA Special Educational Needs, students choose between two distinct pathways, Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives, which reflect different theoretical traditions and approaches to practice, provision and policy within the field of special educational needs, disability and inclusion. Both pathways are relevant to mainstream and special education contexts.

The Inclusive Perspectives pathway emphasises the application of inclusive and person-centred values and critical educational analysis. Concepts and theories such as person-centred education; participation and ‘voice’; the social model of disability and difference; and human rights and equalities are used to consider educational practice, provision, policy and systems relating to pupils experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

The Psychological Perspectives pathway emphasises the use and application of psychological theories. Concepts and theories of cognition, educational testing, and social and emotional development are central in developing psychologically informed understandings of children and young people experiencing difficulties in educational settings. 

Students greatly benefit from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of other course members, from a diverse range of contexts and backgrounds. The combination of their own experiences, insights gained from others on the course and the theoretical resources offered by learning within the modules, enables students to deepen their understanding of, and to be able to challenge, the barriers that hinder the learning, development and participation of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages.

The teaching provided on modules is informed by active research and scholarship in the field of Inclusive Education and SEN practice and policy. All lecturers leading modules on the programme have high level specialist qualifications, teaching and leadership experience in the field of Education, SEN and Inclusive Education.

Content

All students complete a common module which takes a broad view of key perspectives and issues in SEN, it also introduces the psychological and inclusive perspectives. From here, students undertake specialist modules within the programme, depending on their chosen pathway.

Inclusive Perspectives Pathway content: Students critically explore the issues involved in children’s behaviour using sociological approaches. You will reflect on your own and society's beliefs about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ behaviour, which often relate to medical and psychological foundations of schools’ policies and practices. The social pedagogical approach is also explored as a basis for inclusive teaching and learning. A critical analysis of instrumentalist/functionalist approaches to teaching is developed with a view to enhancing holistic development and the participation of pupils as a means of addressing barriers to the inclusivity of the classroom. 

Psychological Perspectives Pathway content: On this route students engage with the idea that socially and emotionally well-adjusted students perform better at school, whilst social and emotional aspects of learning have become marginalised in a highly competitive education system. The use of psychometric testing is covered, with an exploration of its appropriate uses (students can gain a Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing, accredited by the British Psychological Society, from successfully undertaking this module). 

Optional modules are available to students on both pathways which focus on Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty and on Autism in Education. Students also have an option, instead of taking a taught optional module, to take a (non-taught) Independent Study module to learn about a specific issue relevant to their pathway and interests, which is not taught about in the programme.

The final module is an independent research-based enquiry (either a Dissertation or Practice-Based Research Project), which is founded upon the pathway perspective chosen, but is also subject to the student’s choice of topic.

Modules

Required modules for both routes

  • Perspectives in SEN and Inclusion
  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research
  • Dissertation OR 
  • Practice-based Research Project

Inclusive Perspectives

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality

Psychological Perspectives

  • Assessment and Intervention in Education
  • Social and Emotional Dimensions of Learning

Optional modules 

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality
  • Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty
  • Autism: Principles, Practices and Perspectives
  • Assessment and Intervention in Education

Career options

The Programme supports and enables:

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership: teaching, advisory work, SEN coordination, inclusion management, support assistance.
  • Careers in policy-making, implementation and development of inclusion and SEN provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the inclusion and SEN workforce in further and higher education.

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This new programme will interest graduates who want to make a difference to the lives of a wide range of children in education. You will compare inclusive educational practices in Scotland, the UK and across the world. Read more

This new programme will interest graduates who want to make a difference to the lives of a wide range of children in education. You will compare inclusive educational practices in Scotland, the UK and across the world. You will study particular approaches to removing barriers to learning and including all children.

The programme has specific pathways for Postgraduate Diploma (visually impaired learners), Postgraduate Diploma (deaf learners) and Postgraduate Diploma (bilingual learners).

Programme structure

Compulsory courses

  • Inclusive Pedagogy
  • Sources of knowledge
  • Conceptualising research

Option courses

You will choose three option courses from this range:

  • Comparative approaches to inclusive and special education
  • Collaborative working in children’s services
  • Education for all
  • Teachers as agents of change
  • Foundations of international child protection
  • Issues and strategies for teaching and learning (VI)
  • Inclusion of pupils with visual impairment
  • Cerebral VI and profound and multiple learning difficulties
  • Audiology and audiometry
  • Language and communication (deaf children)
  • The developing bilingual learner
  • Specific learning difficulties: dyslexia
  • Assessing pupils with visual impairment
  • Bilingualism and other additional support needs
  • Promoting achievement and curriculum access to deaf / bilingual learners
  • Specific learning difficulties: co-occurring difficulties
  • Deaf Studies
  • an option course worth up to 40 credits from within the School or from elsewhere in the University (at SCQF level 11), subject to approval by the programme director

Dissertation (MSc)

  • Planning research
  • Research dissertation

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

  • develop and appropriately apply knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to inclusive education and the contexts in which it takes place
  • reflect critically on the relationships between theory and practice and explore issues in the implementation of educational and social principles and ideals
  • engage with and where appropriate influence policy issues and the practice of professionals in relation to the delivery of inclusive education
  • develop extended skills in research and enquiry, including the use of literature, reviewing evidence, gathering, organising and evaluating data, responding to evidence and providing critical comment

Career opportunities

Suiting newly qualified teachers and experienced practitioners alike, this programme provides a qualification that can open doors to a new career in inclusive and special education, or an advanced role in the field.

It can also provide the foundations for a career in policy formation and development, as well as a broad range of highly transferable skills, such as communication and project management, which can be applied to roles in any field.



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Course outline. We currently offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at the level of MSc, MPhil or DPhil (PhD). Read more

Course outline

We currently offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at the level of MSc, MPhil or DPhil (PhD). Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. The minimum periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

  • MSc – 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
  • MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
  • DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time (this is our equivalent term for a PhD)

The Psychology Department fosters a culture of collaborative, multidisciplinary research, and you will join a vibrant community that includes regular work-in-progress seminars to foster an active research environment. You will join one of our four research hubs described below, all of which are engaged in inter-institutional collaborations, including some with non-academic partners such as health-care providers and music conservatoires.

We are happy to consider research proposals on a wide range of topics relevant to our hubs, but may also be looking to fill specific research roles in some areas. Contact us below for more details.

Our Research Hubs

‘CREATE’ (Centre for Research into Expertise Acquisition, Training and Excellence)

The main focus of the centre is the exploration of the drivers of excellence in performance (whether cognitive, creative or practice-based). We welcome applications from potential MSc and DPhil candidates across a wide range of related topic areas, including:

  • Insight and creativity
  • The drivers of performance excellence and expertise development (e.g. in music, theatre, puzzle-solving, board-games and medicine)
  • Hobbies, motivations and characteristics of niche populations
  • Music psychology
  • Time perception and those with ‘natural’ time-keeping abilities

We have a number of external collaborative projects in the areas of creativity and performance, and also work with internal colleagues in Applied Computing and the University of Buckingham Medical School.

Centre for Health and Relationship Research (CHR)

The main aim of the hub is to study the impact of the interpersonal world and support structures on health and well-being in clinical and non-clinical settings. This overarching focus has led to the study of topic areas such as:

  • Prevalence, impact of and psychosocial challenges facing people following spinal cord injury
  • Biopsychosocial understanding of pain and developing interventions for successful pain management
  • Social norms as a predictor of health behaviours in young people
  • Social factors affecting uptake of health behaviours
  • The role of social support in living well with chronic conditions

Together, these projects represent a body of work which seeks to fight patient isolation and to understand health experiences in the context of a social world. The hub aims to identify methods for supporting patients as they live with long-term conditions, including through developing interventions, assessment techniques and knowledge dissemination. With connections and active research work taking part at four local NHS hospitals, we can offer excellent opportunities for research studies with tangible impact.

Cyber and Interpersonal Behaviour Research (CIBR)

The CIBR research hub in the Department of Psychology offers diverse research opportunities in the following areas:

  • Cyberpsychology, including cyberbullying and other online risks
  • Motivations and social effects of gaming
  • Cyber versus real world behaviour
  • Social inference and emotion regulation
  • Interpersonal relationships, including dating, rejection, relationship maintenance and break down
  • Mental resilience and its relationship to social support

The aim of the research in this area is to explore human behaviour, social experiences and group dynamics in both online and offline contexts.

Psychology of Educational Development (PED)

In this hub, we study the cognitive processes, behavioural issues and developmental factors that affect learning, and how learning environments and individual differences influence educational outcomes. With a focus on the resilience, creativity and happiness of learners, as well as on Specific Learning Difficulties which might impact upon academic performance, we welcome applicants to study a wide range of topics with us, including:

  • Children with Specific Learning Difficulties
  • Bullying and Cyberbullying in schools
  • Educating for Creativity
  • Children's understanding of Science
  • Excellence in Performance and Academic achievement
  • Resilience, Wellbeing and Positive education

For more information, and to apply online, visit us here: http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/psychology

Or contact us by email below.

Visit the MSc / MPhil / DPhil Psychology page on the University of Buckingham website for more details!



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The Language, Literacies and Dyslexia programme, is aimed at teachers, speech and language therapists and other professionals working with children, young people and students in further and higher education at pre-16 and FE/HE education levels who have difficulties with learning literacy skills. Read more
The Language, Literacies and Dyslexia programme, is aimed at teachers, speech and language therapists and other professionals working with children, young people and students in further and higher education at pre-16 and FE/HE education levels who have difficulties with learning literacy skills.

This distance learning masters level programme is essential for practitioners seeking to become specialist practitioners, employable to assess and teach learners with dyslexia and literacy difficulties of school age or in further/higher education. Successful completion of modules 1-3 which meet the British Dyslexia Association (BDA) criteria in practical assessments, allows students to apply for the BDA professional qualification.

The University of Birmingham offers three awards at masters level.

Postgraduate Certificate (3 modules, 12 months of part-time study, Sept – end of August)
Postgraduate Diploma (6 modules, 24 months part-time study, Sept – August)
MEd (6 modules+ dissertation, 36 months part-time study, Sept – August)
You can register for the first year’s study and half way through the year you will be invited to consider if you to wish extend your registration to a further award.

The programme provides a broad and critical perspective of language literacies and literacy difficulties/dyslexia through sociocultural and cognitive research, as well as education policies. It embraces school and further educational demands of literacy skills, the demands of family and social literacy practices, and peer demands of new literacies, such as digital literacies. The programme establishes the fundamental relationship between language and literacy in typical and atypical development. Students study literacy difficulties/dyslexia in contexts of monolingual, multilingual and multimodal (eg digital literacies).

Studying at a distance means you can work from anywhere, such as in your home or workplace in the UK or overseas. All your studies will be in English and it is a requirement that you practice in an educational context of monolingual or additional English (EAL/ESL/EFL). Reference would be made to contexts that are multilingual and multimodal.

Specialist professional practice in dyslexia/specific learning difficulties

All students follow the same programme and module requirements for study and assessment that develop knowledge and practice in specialist assessment and teaching for learners with literacy needs and difficulties.

Successful completion of the Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) award, meets the specialist professional practice competencies required by the Joint Qualifications Council UK, and the British Dyslexia Association’s AMBDA accreditation, in diagnostic assessment, and intervention/ specialist teaching with learners with literacy difficulties/ specific learning difficulties at school and FE/HE levels of provision.

The PGCert award allows practitioners, who wish, to apply for the BDA’s accreditation (ATS/APS, AMBDA, AMBDA FE/HE) depending on their professional qualification – please visit the BDA website http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk for further information.

The Department of Disability Inclusion and Special Needs (DISN) in the School of Education, has a very strong profile in professional development, regionally, nationally and internationally. The tutors who run this programme have strong national and international profiles in the field of research and practice in language and literacy difficulties and dyslexia. The department also runs a number of other courses in special education which may interest you.

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course. The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. Read more

Why this course?

The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course.

The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. The course is based on the Standards in Social Work Education (SiSWE) and is to be validated by social work's professional body in Scotland, the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

The course provides a stimulating blend of university-based teaching and agency-based learning opportunities across both years.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/socialwork/

You’ll study

You'll undertake a range of taught modules, a dissertation and assessed placements in a range of social work service settings.

Work towards the Masters dissertation is mostly scheduled for the period beyond Year 2 of the programme. You’ll be told of the arrangements during year 1.

Teaching staff

The School of Social Policy and Social Work has a long and rich tradition of education, research and consultancy in social work. It brings together a staff group with extensive experience in the varied areas of social work practice i.e. children and families, criminal justice social work and community care.

Facilities

The Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (a multi-million pound development funded by the Scottish Government to support research and training in residential child care), the Centre for the Child and Society, and Community Care Works are all based within the School and contribute to teaching in the course as well as to research and consultancy.

Relevant work experience

We normally expect you to have had at least six months full-time work experience, or its equivalent in part-time work, at the point of the application.

We’re more concerned with the quality of experience than whether or not it’s paid. It’s useful to think about experience in three dimensions - duration, range and depth. While longer and more diverse experience is of great value, depth (or quality) is perhaps more important since this is what allows learning and professional development. Often experience is "deeper" in contexts where supervision is offered regularly, allowing for in-depth discussion in practice issues and dilemmas. Undertaking relevant reading and training while working often helps people to "deepen" the quality of their work experience.

- Criteria for work experience
The following indicate the kinds of criteria we look at in considering the relevance and suitability of your work experience:
- does it involve direct contact with people either as service users e.g. individuals, families or groups where the focus is on helping them live with or manage major difficulties in their lives, or in stimulating collaborative ventures to seek social change?

- does it develop critical awareness of the range, depth and complexity of social and personal problems and the variety of individual and agency responses which can address these?

- does it develop basic knowledge of the functions of social work, social care and/or community development agencies?

- does it develop skills in helping other people in difficulty e.g. skills in identifying and assessing problems, jointly planning and supporting a response to them or coping with stress?

- does it provide opportunities to reflect on, and take action to combat, discrimination and oppression in people's lives?

- does it generate an awareness, and an ability to act in the light of the value dilemmas involved in both helping activities and social change activities e.g. reflecting on the tensions between individual rights and freedoms and collective social obligations?

- Relevant work settings:
- work may be undertaken in a wide variety of settings e.g. community-based offices, residential provision, day care services, community organisations.
- work may be carried out with a range of client groups. These will commonly be people who experience various forms of disadvantage.
- it should be supervised by a member of staff of the status and experience to provide a reference indicating suitability for entry to social work education.

Personal qualities

The kinds of personal qualities which we look for in an applicant include:
- the ability to convey genuine warmth and interest in people
- an ability to see strengths and potential in even the most difficult circumstances and people
- a genuine interest in difference and diversity and an obvious ability to adapt and change
- a willingness to question conformity and risk discomfort in challenging attitudes which encourage discrimination and complacency
- the ability to support people who live with difficult, sometimes worsening circumstances
- an ability to help people set and follow their own agendas while being capable of asserting your authority where their welfare requires it
- being level-headed and helpful in the face of people's distress, pain and anger, even when it's turned on you
- a quiet confidence in your own ability and the capacity to argue and defend your views in a constructive way
- satisfaction in helping manage and, where possible, resolve conflict, but never at the expense of sacrificing the interests of vulnerable people
- taking enjoyment from both using your own initiatives as well as working accountably as part of team
- the ability to accept constructive criticism and learn from your mistakes
- a passion to fight for the rights of disadvantaged people

Communication skills

The communication skills which we would expect all applicants to demonstrate would include the capacity to:
- engage appropriately with a wide range of people
- communicate expressively, fluently and convincingly in verbal and written form
- understand, calculate and present accurately, basic numerical and financial information
- possess at least a basic understanding of information and communication technology and be able to acquire sufficient competence by the end of year 1/level 1 of the course

Age

There are no specific age restrictions for undertaking the course although funding bodies may impose an upper limit. Employability on course completion is a factor in selection.

Professional suitability

All entrants must register with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and meet suitability criteria regarding offending history, employment record etc.

Overseas students

As with home students, overseas applicants should be able to demonstrate their motivation, aptitude and preparedness for social work training. You must have substantial relevant paid or voluntary work experience. In addition, you must have a recognised degree or an equivalent qualification.

Application for entry to the course must be made through UCAS. The subsequent selection process is broadly the same as for UK and EC applicants. However, in order to ensure that applications from out-with the UK are given full consideration it is advisable that in addition to applying to UCAS you should send additional information directly to us. This should include:
- detailed information about degrees held and the awarding institution(s)
- where English is a second language please provide information about your levels of proficiency in English
- details of work experience, with particular reference to the aspects referred to in the guidelines on work experience
- a statement about reasons for wanting to study in the UK
- financial arrangements for meeting the cost of tuition fees and living expenses during the two year course
- an indication that you would be available to come to the UK for interview. Applicants who are not able to come for interview may be asked to supply additional written material and/or references.

Learning & teaching

The teaching and learning approach is student-centred and aims to promote reflective learning. Our key approach is problem-based learning which is universally recognised as an effective way of developing the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed by busy professionals.

The course is taught through lectures, seminar groups, simulations and individual skills rehearsal with a commitment to use interactive e-learning wherever relevant. At the heart of the course is practice learning in social work service agencies with formally assessed placements being undertaken in both years.

Assessment

Our assessment methods consist of regular feedback on specific tasks related to teaching and learning as you work through a module.

Modules are formally assessed in a range of different ways, including essay, report, presentations and peer group assessments.

Careers

Qualified social workers are increasingly valued. Promotion and career development opportunities are excellent. Social workers can be found in:
- Local authorities - from main-grade workers to directorate level. Social workers will be providing, managing, purchasing and organising services to people with very diverse needs across the life span in different settings

- Voluntary organisations - at all levels, usually working in relatively specialist ways with children and young people with particularly challenging needs, as well as vulnerable adults, especially those with learning disabilities and those affected by mental health issues. Settings and contexts vary as widely as in local authorities.

- Private sector - often at senior practitioner and management level with services focusing on home-based support to vulnerable adults and residential services to older people as well as foster care support and services to people with offending histories.

- Central government - experienced social work managers advise and support ministers in monitoring and developing social work services.

- Social work regulation - a range of independent bodies, like the Care Inspectorate and Scottish Social Services Council employ social workers at a senior level to lead and manage registration and inspection of social work services to ensure they meet appropriate standards.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. Read more

The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The Global Mental Health programmes offered by the University of Glasgow are unique to Scotland and are the only online Global Mental Health Postgraduate courses offered anywhere in the world. These online programmes are intended for people who are unable to come to Glasgow to complete on-campus delivery of the programmes.

Why this programme

  • You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
  • The MSc Global Mental Health programme will help you develop the knowledge to integrate your initiatives into the wider aims of international development, and address the global inequities in the provision of mental health services.
  • The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
  • We have collaborative partnerships with organisations working in low and middle income countries. You will have opportunities to complete placements and projects with them.
  • The Global Mental Health academic programmes at the University of Glasgow place specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
  • Contributors to the Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
  • The Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides. 

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents.

Global Mental Health courses offered at the University of Glasgow:

Year 1 (exit with PgCert Global Mental Health)

  • Introduction to Mental Health and Disability
  • The Global Burden of Mental Health Difficulties
  • Cultural, Social and Biological Determinants of Mental Health
  • Improving Access to Mental Health Care in the Global Context

Year 2 (exit with PgDip Global Mental Health)

  • Research Methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
  • Mental Health Promotion Across the Life-span
  • Mental Health and Disability: International Law and Policy

Year 3 (exit with MSc Global Mental Health)

  • Dissertation

Please note: the order of the courses above will vary dependent on your start date.

Career prospects

Graduate of the Global Mental Health academic programmes establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.



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Prepare for a career in social work with a course that is well connected with social work and social care service providers in the region. Read more

Prepare for a career in social work with a course that is well connected with social work and social care service providers in the region. As a result of these connections, you get the benefit of supervised practical work in a range of social work settings.

Placements and work experience

Practical work experience is at the heart of this course. We have a 100% record of placing students in quality-audited placements. You spend 170 days putting what you’ve learned into practice in real working situations, such as • social work teams • family centres • primary care practices • hospitals • mental health settings • women's refuges and a range of family support services for vulnerable people.

These placements take place with our partners in local authority, private and voluntary agencies across South Yorkshire and the North East Midlands. Previous students have worked in statutory local authority social work teams, NHS mental health units, youth offending teams working with the police, and charities including the NSPCC, Age UK, Barnados, Mind and Women's Aid.

Your placements are supported by 30 specialist skills days. You work with experts, professionals and service users on specific topics such as how to assess risky behaviour, or interventions for safeguarding children. In your final year, we run a workshop with employers on how to apply for jobs in social work.

There are also opportunities to spend time studying abroad. Previous students have attended a summer school in Berlin, gaining new, international perspectives on social work and discovering how it is practised around the world.

Facilities

During the time you spend at university, you are based at our Collegiate Crescent Campus which includes our £13 million purpose-built Robert Winston Building, a newly built Heart of the Campus complex and a learning centre which is open 24 hours and seven days a week. You use specialist facilities including our courtroom, where you learn how to give evidence, and our virtual reality training environment which is used to practise different cases.

Expertise

We are one of the most experienced providers of social work, education in the country, and we have a wide range of expertise. Social work is part of the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, which enables us to apply specialist knowledge and resources from across a range of health and social care professions.

All our teaching staff are qualified and experienced social workers, or have experience in related professions. You experience a range of different ways of learning, including role play with actors, real-life case studies and virtual reality experiences alongside lectures and seminars,

Many of our lecturers are involved in research in social work and have a well-established reputation in various international projects, including

  • international practice learning opportunities for students
  • EU-funded projects to develop an international curriculum
  • projects developing social work practice and social work education.

Professional recognition

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). After successfully completing the course you are eligible to apply to register with them to practise as a social worker.

We are in a transitional period where the work of the College of Social Work has come to an end and some functions are temporarily hosted by the British Association of Social Work.

Course structure

This is a full time course that can lead to professional registration as a social worker and therefore requires extensive study.

Taught modules take place on average three days a week. but you will be required to engage in study outside of these times. A large proportion of the course is spent on placement within social care organisations – during these times you are required to attend for five days a week. 

Social work programmes provide a combination of practice learning and academic modules, that build together in order to equip you with the range of knowledge and skills you need in order to meet the requirements of this challenging profession. The strategies of teaching, learning and assessment across the 24 months are progressive, so that you gradually develop the abilities to be a self-directed learner. At the beginning of each year there will be an induction period to help you orient yourself to the shape of your studies for that year, and the increasing levels of academic and professional standards expected of you.

Additionally, some of the academic modules contain skills days, which further reinforce that there are strong links between the intellectual abilities you need in order to be a social worker, and the practice skills that are also needed. The programme structure comprises five interrelated elements

  • pre-enrolment and induction
  • the inter professional learning module
  • core professional modules
  • mandatory practice education modules
  • independent learning

Year one modules

  • Introduction to social work
  • Law and policy for social work
  • Psycho-social theories and methods for social work practice
  • Readiness for social work practice
  • Research knowledge, methods and skills for social work
  • Practice learning 1 and 2
  • Social work skills development days

Year two modules

  • Theories and knowledge for social work, applied across the life course
  • The organisational context of social work
  • The enhanced social work practitioner
  • Dissertation

Assessment

  • essays
  • examinations
  • practice-learning portfolios
  • group and individual presentations
  • report writing.

Employability

You will be able to take advantage of a high demand for qualified social workers in the South Yorkshire and East Midlands regions and nationally in areas such as • social services departments • education and other local authority departments • residential care • housing associations • national and local voluntary organisations • private sector care providers.

You can work in careers alongside other professionals including • nurses • police officers • lawyers • teachers • occupational therapists • doctors • housing officers • a range of care and support staff.

You work with a range of people who require professional support such as • children and young people • parents and carers • people with mental health problems, learning difficulties or physical disabilities • older adults • refugees and asylum seekers.



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The School of Education provides an online portfolio of Career-long Professional Learning (CPL) programmes for the education workforce, to meet both current and emerging needs associated with the profession and to reflect the increasing importance attached nationally to professional learning, update and practice. Read more
The School of Education provides an online portfolio of Career-long Professional Learning (CPL) programmes for the education workforce, to meet both current and emerging needs associated with the profession and to reflect the increasing importance attached nationally to professional learning, update and practice.

The programme is aimed at teachers and other professionals teaching and/or supporting learning in mainstream schools or other inclusive educational settings.

About the programme

The programme takes inclusive education to operate within the equality and human rights legislative context, aiming to remove barriers to learning and participation, and to eliminate discrimination and disadvantage for whatever reason.

Your learning

The programme equips you with knowledge, understanding and skills that make you well-suited to pursue positions of responsibility in the areas of inclusion and support for learning.

You will start with the compulsory module ‘Inclusion and Equality’. Upon successful completion of this module you can undertake two of the following modules to complete the Certificate; and five of the following modules or four of the following modules plus a Research Methods module to complete the Diploma:

• Autism Spectrum Disorders
• Dyslexia
• Gifted and Talented
• Inclusive Enquiry
• Inclusive Leadership
• Inclusive Practice
• Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

Upon successful completion of the Diploma, participants who have studied the Research Methods module can progress to the MEd stage where you will undertake a dissertation on a relevant topic of your choice.

There is no requirement to attend ‘face-to-face’ sessions on this programme as it is offered by distance learning, using the UWS virtual learning environment.

Our Careers Adviser says

Professional and personal development abilities are greatly enhanced, and graduates will be perfectly poised to undertake positions of leadership as well as seeking new opportunities in this exciting field.

First-class facilities

You’ll have access to a wide range of technology to facilitate your learning. Our libraries are stocked with a vast range of specialist resources to help you in your studies, and you’ll also have access to our extensive electronic library collection (including e-books and academic journals) and the virtual learning environment, Moodle.

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A flexible, professionally orientated programme for speech and language therapists and other graduates seeking new knowledge and expertise about communication disorders and swallowing. Read more
A flexible, professionally orientated programme for speech and language therapists and other graduates seeking new knowledge and expertise about communication disorders and swallowing.

Who is it for?

The course is for qualified speech and language therapists seeking to gain specialist knowledge and high level research skills in their field. It is also suitable for other graduates with a background and special interest in children and adults with speech, language, communication and associated difficulties, including Deafness.

Objectives

The MSc programme is designed to:
-Stimulate you to think in new ways about disorders of language, communication and swallowing.
-Introduce you to new theoretical ideas and new approaches to clinical practice.
-Strengthen your knowledge of the evidence base for clinical work.
-Enhance your skills in critically appraising research evidence.
-Provide you with the skills and knowledge that you need to begin independent research.
-Students are taught in a dynamic and supportive atmosphere, which encourages participation and the exchange of ideas. The knowledge and skills that you will develop can be applied across different language and cultural contexts, making the programme highly suitable for home, EU or overseas students.

Academic facilities

Students on the MSc course have access to specialist labs, e.g. providing speech and hearing instrumentation, computing resources and the excellent Institution library facilities, including our subject specific librarian. The School of Health hosts a speech and language therapy clinic (The Roberta Williams Centre) which provides project opportunities for MSc students.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching and learning takes place in small groups, combining direct input from experts with student-led discussion and workshop activities. Large-group teaching in research methods is combined with small-group laboratory sessions. Our virtual learning environment, Moodle, provides a platform for sharing module information and interactive learning. These methods support and are supported by self-directed study.

Assignments include essays, portfolios, literature reviews, poster presentations, oral presentations, and data analyses. Some focus entirely on critical evaluation of research; others require you to apply a selected body of research to a given case, client group, or clinical setting.

Modules

To gain the MSc or a PG Dip you will study two core modules, three discipline-specific modules (or related to communication or swallowing), and two elective modules which may be discipline-specific or generic.

Most modules run in the Autumn and Spring terms. A typical 15 credit module involves between 25 and 30 hours of teaching, supplemented by extensive private study (at least 8 hours a week).

The research dissertation involves up to one year of independent data collection and study, supported by a supervisor.

To gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Speech Language and Communication you will be required to complete 3 or 4 modules totalling 60 credits. These must include at least two discipline specific modules in the area of Speech Language and Communication.

Core modules
-Introduction to research methods and applied data analysis (30 credits)
-Critical issues in advanced practice (15 credits)

Discipline Specific and Elective modules
-Acquired language impairments (15 credits)
-Case-based clinical management (15 credits)
-Cognitive communication impairments (15 credits)
-Developmental language impairment (15 credits)
-Dysphagia and disorders of eating and drinking (15 credits)
-Habilitative audiology (15 credits)
-Identity, Inclusion and Living with Disability
-Language learning and development (15 credits)
-Instrumental Techniques in Speech Sciences
-Developing Complex Interventions (15 credits)

Students can also choose modules from the School of Health Sciences' broader Continuing Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) portfolio.

Following successful completion of the taught component, students have up to one year to complete the dissertation.

Career prospects

Successful completion of the MSc fulfils the requirements for many higher-grade senior speech and language therapy posts, and for many EU and overseas clinical posts that require a masters level qualification. Students will also be eligible to apply for a research degree (MPhil/PhD) and for some research posts.

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