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Masters Degrees (Speciation)

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Population genetics studies the genetic variation that exists in wild populations, and the forces, such as selection, mutation and genetic drift, that shape this variation. Read more
Population genetics studies the genetic variation that exists in wild populations, and the forces, such as selection, mutation and genetic drift, that shape this variation. Particular interests in the School involve the molecular genetic variation of humans, and variation in wild populations of molluscs, foraminiferans and Drosophila. Projects may include studies on molecular evolution and phylogenetics using computer analysis of DNA and protein sequences; the genetic changes that are associated with speciation; evolution of transposable elements; and the population genetics of genome structure.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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Genetics is the scientific study of inheritance and as such is a very broad research area. Within the School of Life Sciences, research in Genetics is focussed on the Institute of Genetics, most groups of which are located within the Queen's Medical Centre. Read more
Genetics is the scientific study of inheritance and as such is a very broad research area. Within the School of Life Sciences, research in Genetics is focussed on the Institute of Genetics, most groups of which are located within the Queen's Medical Centre. Projects in genetics cover a wide spectrum from population and evolutionary genetics through to molecular and biochemical genetics. They have the common aim of understanding how the genetic material achieves its functions and how it is passed down through generations. Some of the research involves classic genetic approaches including the isolation of mutants with specific phenotypes and the study of their behaviour in genetic crosses. These studies involve model organisms that include bacteria, yeasts and other fungi, Xenopus, zebrafish and mice. Other research in Genetics at Nottingham employs molecular techniques and bioinformatics to address fundamental evolutionary problems such as the evolution of AIDS viruses, the genetic changes that are associated with speciation and the evolution of transposable elements and genome structure. There also projects available in Genetics research groups who are focussing on the systems responsible for maintaining gene and genome integrity and securing accurate chromosome transmission in bacteria, archaea, yeast and vertebrates.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

After identifying which Masters you wish to pursue please complete an on-line application form
https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk/
Mark clearly on this form your choice of course title, give a brief outline of your proposed research and follow the automated prompts to provide documentation. Once the School has your application and accompanying documents (eg referees reports, transcripts/certificates) your application will be matched to an appropriate academic supervisor and considered for an offer of admission.

COURSE STRUCTURE
The MRes degree course consists of two elements:
160 credits of assessed work. The assessed work will normally be based entirely on a research project and will be the equivalent of around 10 ½ months full-time research work. AND
20 credits of non-assessed generic training. Credits can be accumulated from any of the courses offered by the Graduate School. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gradschool/research-training/index.phtml The generic courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor(s).

ASSESSMENT
The research project will normally be assessed by a dissertation of a maximum of 30,000 to 35,000 words, or equivalent as appropriate*. The examiners may if they so wish require the student to attend a viva.
*In consultation with the supervisor it maybe possible for students to elect to do a shorter research project and take a maximum of 40 credits of assessed modules.

The School of Life Sciences will provide each postgraduate research student with a laptop for their exclusive use for the duration of their studies in the School.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/international-applicants/scholarships-fees-and-finance/scholarships/masters-scholarships.aspx

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visit course pages for more information about the next Open Day at NHM on Wednesday 29 March 2017. Taxonomy and systematics provide the foundation for studying the great diversity of the living world. Read more

Open Day

visit course pages for more information about the next Open Day at NHM on Wednesday 29 March 2017.

Course Overview

Taxonomy and systematics provide the foundation for studying the great diversity of the living world. These fields are rapidly changing through new digital and molecular technologies. There is ever greater urgency for species identification and monitoring in virtually all the environmental sciences, and evolutionary ‘tree thinking’ is now applied widely in most areas of the life sciences.

This course provides in-depth training in the study of biodiversity based on the principles of phylogenetics, evolutionary biology, palaeobiology and taxonomy. The emphasis is on quantitative approaches and current methods in DNA-based phylogenetics, bioinformatics, and the use of digital collections.

Location

This course is a collaboration of Imperial College London (Silwood Park) with the Natural History Museum. This provides an exciting scientific environment of two institutions at the forefront of taxonomic and evolutionary research.

The MSc in Taxonomy and Biodiversity comprises two terms of taught modules, mostly based at the Natural History Museum, and covers core areas in biodiversity, palaeobiology, phylogenetics, molecular systematics, phylogenomics and taxonomic principles. This is followed by a 16-week laboratory or field-based research project at the NHM or Imperial College’s Silwood Park or South Kensington campuses.

Modules

• Taxonomy of major groups and the Tree-of-Life: An introduction of major branches of the Tree, including identification exercises, presented by NHM experts
• Statistics and Computing: A two-week intensive course at Silwood Park
• Field course: trapping and collecting techniques for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems
• Phylogenetic Reconstruction: the principles of building phylogenetic trees
• Molecular Systematics: generating and analysing molecular data; model-based phylogenetics
• Phylogenomics: Genomic techniques for studying evolutionary processes and biodiversity
• Biodiversity (Concepts): speciation, radiation, macroevolution
•Biodiversity (Applied): Measuring biodiversity, geospatial analysis, collection management and biodiversity informatics
• Palaeobiology: Studying the fossil record and what we can learn for biodiversity

Post Study

Students on the course will become the new generation of taxonomists in the broadest sense. They will be familiar with these new tools, as well as the wider concepts of biodiversity science, evolutionary biology and genomics. Most importantly, students gain the abilities to work as an independent scientist and researcher, to be able to solve questions about the future of biodiversity and to communicate them to peers and the public.
Students have many options for future employment in evolutionary and ecological research labs in industry, government and non-governmental organisations, conservation, and scientific publishing and the media. The courses are an excellent starting point for PhD level careers, feeding into various Doctoral Training Programmes available at NHM and Imperial, or elsewhere.

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The MRes in Molecular Evolution involves the study of the evolutionary relationships among organisms and gene families using molecular methods, with evolutionary trees (phylogenies) generated from the analysis of DNA and protein sequences. Read more
The MRes in Molecular Evolution involves the study of the evolutionary relationships among organisms and gene families using molecular methods, with evolutionary trees (phylogenies) generated from the analysis of DNA and protein sequences.

The programme involves both laboratory work (DNA extraction, PCR and sequencing) and bioinformatics (DNA sequence alignment and phylogeny reconstruction).

Research projects are available in: the evolutionary relationships in the molluscs (in particular, the land snails) and the link between molluscan phylogenies and biogeography; the molecular taxonomy of spiders and the link between rates of molecular and morphological diversification; studies on the evolution of spider silk gene families and the relationship between silk diversification and speciation; studies on the phylogeny of the foraminifera and the distribution of different genetic types across the oceans.

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Our MRes in Evolution and Behaviour provides a unique opportunity to learn from leaders in the field about evolutionary, genetic and functional bases of behaviour, adaptation and speciation, applied to a range of study systems from birds to fish, insects to snails. Read more

About the course

Our MRes in Evolution and Behaviour provides a unique opportunity to learn from leaders in the field about evolutionary, genetic and functional bases of behaviour, adaptation and speciation, applied to a range of study systems from birds to fish, insects to snails.

Our MRes degrees are excellent preparation for a career in research or industry. These courses enable you to develop your own research skills and contribute new knowledge to your chosen field.

Where your masters can take you

Our MRes programme will provide you with an excellent foundation for a career in research or industry. It is ideal preparation for a PhD degree, whilst also providing advanced level skills in research methods, data analysis, and clear communication of research findings, all of which are in high demand from employers.

Tailor your masters to your own research interests

Our MRes programme is uniquely research-focused. You will be assigned to a research supervisor on the basis of your particular research interests. You’ll be embedded within a research group, working alongside PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, and academic staff who are at the forefront of their research field. You will conduct an extended research project over several months, with the aim of producing original work of publishable quality.
Course structure

Each programme has a common element where you will learn about the most recent developments in your research area and discuss them with research leaders from the UK and around the world. You will gain advanced skills in experimental design, data analysis and presentation, as you learn how to become a research leader yourself.

Core modules

Advanced Trends in Biology
Advanced Biological Analysis
Research and Study Skills in Biology
Tutorials
Literature Review
Research Project (accounts for half of your final grade)

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is via working in a research laboratory or on a field-based research project, tutorials, discussion groups, attendance at seminars, and statistics and other workshops.

Assessment includes, but is not limited to, project report, literature review, critiques, short reports and essays, oral presentations including a viva.

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The Master of Science by Research degree in Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews. Read more
The Master of Science by Research degree in Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews.

The candidate will be based in the interdisciplinary Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD), based in the centre of St Andrews. The CBD links researchers in evolution, behaviour, ecology, molecular biology and biodiversity, plus researchers in other Schools across St Andrews. Research themes include: the mechanistic causes and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of animal behaviour, with strengths in behavioural ecology, animal cognition, social evolution and social learning; evolutionary and population genetics, including the genetic basis of population divergence and speciation; animal-plant interactions, including pollinator biology; conservation biology, focusing in particular on the measurement of broad-scale patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity change. These themes are underpinned and guided by theoretical evolutionary ecologists and geneticists, asking fundamental questions about the causes and consequences of organismal interaction. Our final objective is to advance this scientific understanding of the diversity of life to contribute pro-actively to policy that helps protect and nurture biological diversity.

Candidates may approach potential supervisors in the CBD directly (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/phd-study/phd-study-supervisors/phd-study-cbd-supervisors/) or via advertised projects listed here (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/mscres/). We strongly recommend that potential candidates make contact with a potential supervisor before applying.

The School of Biology provides a unique and supportive environment for scholarship, amid a beautiful setting for university life. We are a highly research active School, with a diverse and vigorous post-graduate community. The School comprises a large number of research groups organised into three interdisciplinary Research Centres: the Scottish Oceans Institute (SOI), the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) and the Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD). Together these centres encompass the full spectrum of research in biological sciences, spanning investigations on the properties and behaviour of individual molecules through to planetary environmental dynamics. Our postgraduate students enjoy a supportive and welcoming environment, including the student-led ‘Bionet’ society that provides a wide range of networking and social opportunities.

Progression and Assessment

Students in the MSc(Res) program will be assigned an Internal Examiner (IE) and Post-Graduate Tutor by the School. There will be a progress review meeting at three months to monitor and evaluate student progression, convened by the IE, with the student and Tutor in attendance.

In addition to the project-specific training that you will receive during your degree, Msc(Res) students will also have access to a wide range of training in transferable skills through the award-winning University of St Andrews GradSkills program, run by our Professional Development Unit CAPOD. Specific post-graduate programs run within the School of Biology may also offer additional training, for instance in statistical, bioinformatics or molecular techniques.

The degree requires submission and examination of a dissertation at the end of the one-year program. This thesis will consist of up to 30,000 words. The thesis will be evaluated by the IE and an External Examiner appointed at time of submission. Evaluation will be based on the written submission and there is no requirement for a viva voce examination.

Fees

For details of post-graduate tuition fees relevant to our research degrees including the MSc(Res), please visit:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/research-fees/

Application

Please apply via the University’s Post-Graduate Application portal: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgr/home.htm

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Expand your knowledge of chemistry and develop your research skills in Acadia's highly engaged, research-focused program of study. Read more
Expand your knowledge of chemistry and develop your research skills in Acadia's highly engaged, research-focused program of study.

Acadia's graduate program in chemistry provides advanced courses in chemistry to enhance your breadth of knowledge in the subject while complementing your study on your chosen research project. You will work closely with your supervisor to develop your analytical and critical thinking skills, while studying a problem of real-world consequence.

Be Inspired

Acadia’s chemistry department has faculty members who are active in many research areas, including environmental chemistry, chemical biology, health and wellness, materials science, photochemistry, and photophysics, among others. You will benefit from small class sizes, engaging researchers, and friendly faculty and staff. You also have access to incredible research tools and facilities within the department and through connected research centres such as the Acadia Centre for Microstructural Analysis.

Research Interests

-Application of chemical kinetics to atmospheric chemistry and fuel science
-Bioavailability of metals in nature
-Chemical speciation
-Cavity enhanced fibre-optic sensors
-Chromatographic separations
-Design and evaluation of DNA photocleaving agents
-Design and synthesis of molecular compounds for hydrogen storage
-Design and synthesis of photocages
-Design and synthesis of photodynamic multinuclear metal complexes
-Drug delivery
-Drug design
-Effectiveness of barrier films in preventing corrosion
-Environmental analytical chemistry
-Enzyme Inhibition
-Medicinal chemistry
-Novel thin films on metal surfaces
-Photodynamic therapy
-Role of proteins in fouling and corrosion of metal surfaces
-Role of proteins in medical implants

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