• Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Northampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Manchester Featured Masters Courses
"speaking"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Speaking)

We have 887 Masters Degrees (Speaking)

  • "speaking" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 887
Order by 
A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. Read more

A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. The course is taught by experienced TESOL Education staff within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Key information

-Degree type: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, MSc.

-Study methods: Part time, full time. Campus based.

-Duration: 1 year full time, 2 years part time.

-Start date: September.

-Course Director: Anne Lawrie.

-Location: Stirling Campus.

Course objectives

The TESOL Masters at the University of Stirling provides an advanced training and professional qualification for people presently engaged in any area of the teaching of English as a foreign or second language. It also offers professional development to people new to TESOL who are seeking a career change. On completion, you should possess the knowledge and practical classroom skills to be a confident, critically reflective and enterprising teacher.

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Social Sciences is a large interdisciplinary unit, combining teaching and research interests in: Dementia; Education; Housing Studies; Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology; and Social Work. We offer an established, research-led suite of taught postgraduate courses, including our world renowned Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) courses, ESRC-recognised courses in Social Research and diverse Doctoral opportunities.

Our externally accredited professional courses, such as Educational Leadership, Housing Studies and Social Work Studies, are designed to best equip our students with practical and transferable knowledge for the complex demands of professional practice. The Faculty is home to a vibrant and diverse community of academics and postgraduate students, where creative thinking and independent spirit is promoted and celebrated.

Other admission requirements

INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree.

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

-IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing.

-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B.

-Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B.

-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening.

-IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening.

For more information go to English language requirements: http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx



Read less
These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Read more

These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Most of the students are in-service health professionals working for example as doctors or laboratory staff, who take the courses in order to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases, or to update their current expertise.

The Infectious Diseases courses draw upon the School’s long tradition in the study of clinical and epidemiological aspects of infectious and tropical diseases. Providing a broad understanding of infectious diseases, together with developing strategies for their control and treatment, the courses will be of particular relevance to in-service health professionals, such as doctors or laboratory staff who either wish to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases or update their current expertise.

These courses are aimed both at recent graduates who wish to pursue an advanced degree, and at people who took their first training some time ago and wish to update their knowledge in this rapidly evolving field or who wish to change career direction.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (https://london.ac.uk/sites/default/files/programme-specifications/progspec-infectiousdiseases.pdf)

- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/infectious-diseases-online)

Visit the website https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/infectious-diseases-online

English Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved;

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking; or

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening

Course objectives

Students will develop:

- a comprehensive understanding of the role of biology of infective agents and hosts on the outcome of infection

- the use of this knowledge, in combination with epidemiological and public health approaches, to develop rational strategies for the control and treatment of infection

Method of assessment

All distance learning modules are assessed by means of a two-hour unseen written examination (with 15 minutes planning/reading time at the start of the examination).

Elective modules (i.e. modules other than the IDM1 modules) are assessed partly by the two-hour unseen written examination (70%) and partly by an assessed assignment (30%), submitted electronically to the School by a set deadline.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. Details of available examination centres (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/community-support-resources/current-students/examinations/examination-centres).

They are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking distance learning examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt, if you have failed the module overall.

Study materials

You receive your study materials after you register. Study materials may include Subject guides, Readers, Textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata), Past examination papers and Examiners’ reports, and Handbooks. You also have access to the School’s online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while two modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. Tutorial support is available throughout this time. Students carrying out projects are assigned personal supervisors to support their project work which is mostly carried out between June and the end of September in their final year.

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsid.html#seventh



Read less
Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education. Read more
Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education.

Our MA is designed for people who want to know more about how foreign or second languages (particularly English) are learned, and how different kinds of classroom practice might affect proficiency. You explore different approaches to understanding language and language acquisition, and the methods that can be used to investigate language learning and teaching. You select a mixture of modules on language learning and its application to classroom practices.

You can choose areas of special study from a wide range of options, including:
-Teaching speaking and listening skills to language learners
-Psychological factors in second language learning
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Age and bilingual development

You'll also be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA Applied Linguistics
-MA Dissertation
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Language Learning
-Research Methods I
-Research Methods II
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

Read less
These courses provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of randomised controlled trials of health interventions. Read more

These courses provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of randomised controlled trials of health interventions. They are suitable for students working in high-, middle- and low-income countries.

The need for rigorous evaluation of components of health care is increasingly recognised worldwide. An important type of evaluation is the randomised controlled clinical trial. These courses will give students an understanding of trials which will equip them to work in this increasingly important field.

They are suitable both for those wishing to gain an overall understanding of trials before moving into the field, and those who have general or specialist experience in clinical trials and aim to broaden their role in the design, management, analysis and reporting of clinical trials in high, middle and low income countries.

The aims and learning outcomes of the courses are detailed in the programme specification.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/request-prospectus)

- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/request-prospectus)

Visit the website https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/clinical-trials-online

English Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved;

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking; or

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening

Method of assessment

Assessment varies from module to module but will include a combination of unseen written examinations and written assignments. Details are given in the module specifications.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. We have examination centres in over 180 countries worldwide (for details please visit the assessment and examinations section).

Examinations are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt.

Credit awarded

Credits will be awarded to all modules (15 credits each) and (MSc only) the integrating module (30 credits) successfully completed. To successfully pass an award, the following credits must be gained:

- Postgraduate Certificate – 60 credits

- Postgraduate Diploma – 120 credits

- MSc – 180 credits

Study materials

The majority of the Clinical Trials module study materials are delivered online after course/module registration. You will receive details of how to use the online learning environment effectively. Study materials provided for non-Clinical Trials modules may include study guides, textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata). You will have access to past examination papers and Examiners' reports, Student Handbooks, and to the School's online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff. You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

Once registered, you will be sent the learning materials for the module(s) you have chosen to study. Clinical Trials module materials are mostly delivered online. These materials will take you through a programme of directed self-study, and indicate how and where you can obtain supplementary study materials and access tutorial support to enhance your studies.

The study year runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, during which time tutorial support is available. Those writing the Clinical Trials integrating report will also continue to have tutorial support over the summer. Deadlines for submission of coursework vary per course but are usually in March, May, August and September.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsct.html#seventh



Read less
These courses provide students with an in-depth understanding of the planning and delivery of policy responses to global health concerns and issues. Read more

These courses provide students with an in-depth understanding of the planning and delivery of policy responses to global health concerns and issues. They focus on approaches to effective policy-making which contributes to the protection and promotion of population health in a globalising world, at both national and transnational levels.

These are the world's first Master's level courses on global health policy by distance learning. They are aimed at students and professionals from both health and non-health backgrounds who seek to understand more about the policy environment associated with issues of global health. They will be of value especially to those seeking to assume positions related to issues of global health policy in national, regional or global health organisations, health-related research institutions, non-governmental organisations and private consultancies.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (https://london.ac.uk/sites/default/files/programme-specifications/progspec-globalhealthpolicy.pdf)

- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/global-health-policy-online)

Visit the website https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/global-health-policy-online

English Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved;

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking; or

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening

Course objectives

Students will develop:

- a solid grounding in various theories and practices concerned with global health policy

- an understanding of the emerging institutional structures and governance mechanisms to address global health issues

- a good appreciation of relevant health policy research methods, such as comparative analysis and cross country learning

- an ability to apply these analytical and methodological skills to address the multifaceted challenges posed by global health issues

Method of assessment

All distance learning modules are assessed by means of a two-hour unseen written examination (with 15 minutes planning/reading time at the start of the examination).

Modules EPM3, IDM2, IDM3, IDM5 and PHM2 modules - are assessed partly by the two-hour unseen written examination (70%) and partly by an assessed assignment (30%), submitted electronically to the School by a set deadline.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. Details of available examination centres.

They are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking distance learning examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt, if you have failed the module overall.

Study materials

You receive your study materials after you register. Study materials may include Subject guides, Readers, Textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata), Past examination papers and Examiners’ reports, and Handbooks. You also have access to the School’s online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while two modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. Tutorial support is available throughout this time. Students carrying out projects are assigned personal supervisors to support their project work which is mostly carried out between June and the end of September in their final year.

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/pg_ghp.html#seventh



Read less
Introduction. Available across six in-demand language pairings. English and one of French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian. Read more

Introduction

Available across six in-demand language pairings: English and one of French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian.

A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies with TESOL is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an entry-level teaching qualification with which you can embark on a career in English Language Teaching.

Here in the UK, recent research has shown that the fall in the number of language learners over the past decade has come at a big cost to the economy.

Accreditation

We are proud members of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI). The ITI is the UK's only dedicated association for practising translation and interpreting professionals. Our membership of the ITI allows us to help you to keep abreast of the full range of exciting developments and opportunities in the languages services industry.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, MSc

- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time

- Duration: Full-time MSc: 12 months Diploma: 9 months Certificate: 9 months Part-time MSc: 27 months Diploma: 21 months Certificate: 9 months

- Start date: September entry

- Course Director: Dr Anne Stokes

Course objectives

The objectives of the MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL are twofold. On the one hand, the course has a strong focus on practical translation and on specific situations in which people communicate with another across cultures. We offer the following language pairings: English and French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish andRussian. On the other hand, you will benefit from a sustained focus on contemporary theory and practice in the field of TESOL, with teaching provided by staff who have extensive personal experience of TESOL teaching.

In the Translation part of the course, you will undertake extensive practical translation work and you will have considerable flexibility in choosing what areas of translation you wish to specialise in, as you build up a portfolio of translations under the guidance of your tutor. Students on the course also examine some major debates surrounding the opportunities and problems that arise when people from different cultures communicate and translate, through seminars led by experts in the field of intercultural communication. And there will also be some opportunity for work-based study and exercises, including a work-based dissertation, as well as a chance to develop your skills using translation software packages. You may also choose to undertake extended translation as part of your final dissertation and will be given an opportunity to examine some of the key topics in contemporary Translation Studies throughout the course.

The TESOL segment of the course comprises a module in TESOL methodologies and another in Applied Linguistics, These, in turn, will underpin the development of your own teaching practice through the third TESOL module, which is devoted to classroom observation and peer assessment of your lesson planning and teaching.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening

- IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. Each semester will also include a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), and the portfolio of translation.

Career opportunities

Our MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL opens up a range of opportunities across diverse sectors where linguistic fluency and language teaching are key. It offers a fantastic gateway into a career in Translation, whether you want to work freelance or in-house, specialising in business or tourism or literary translation, and there’s much more that you could end up doing with a qualification in Translation.

In a world of globalisation, criss-crossing travel and trade routes, and multi-lingual, multi-platform media, your high-level Translation skills, your close attention to detail and your ability to work to client deadlines will set you apart from the crowd. Whether you’re interested in developing a career in Europe, or working for one of the many international companies with offices in Scotland and the UK, this is the course for you.

At the same time, the course prepares you for a dynamic career teaching English to speakers of other languages, in the UK or beyond. You will be fully-equipped with an in-depth understanding of the challenges of the language classroom, and will be able to build on your own combined experience as a student of languages and of language teaching to provide a supportive and productive language learning environment for your own students.

In short, our course will enable you to play an active role in the development of a global community, putting your language skills to excellent use in fostering international dialogue, exchange and cooperation.



Read less
University of St. Gallen Introduction. The University of St.Gallen is a leading European business school located in Switzerland. Founded in 1898, today it has the leading business school in the German-speaking area, with more than 7,000 enrolled full-time students. Read more

University of St. Gallen Introduction

The University of St.Gallen is a leading European business school located in Switzerland. Founded in 1898, today it has the leading business school in the German-speaking area, with more than 7,000 enrolled full-time students.

St.Gallen offers a full range of undergraduate, postgraduate, executive and doctoral Programmes, and is accredited by both EQUIS and AACSB. It benefits from a strong reputation for quality, particularly in the German-speaking countries of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. It is also recognized in major rankings, both at the MBA-level and the university as a whole. Students benefit from the University's close ties to leading international companies and 20,000 strong alumni network. The MBA programmes are part of the Executive School within the University of St.Gallen.

St.Gallen is located in Eastern Switzerland, one hour from Zurich city centre and 45 minutes from Zurich International Airport. It is at the heart of Europe, well-served by rail links to Paris, Geneva, Milan and Munich all a few hours away. St.Gallen lies near the shores of Lake Constance, and the borders to Germany and Austria. To the south of the city lie the Alps.

MBA Programme Overview

Core courses provide the broad range of skills that MBAs seek. Integration courses tie together the functional skills encountered in the Core phase. They are strategic and practical. Electives enable MBAs to narrow their focus and drill deeper into subject matter of personal or professional interest. MBAs work in-house with companies for 10-12 weeks. Students also have the option to write a business plan or a research paper, if this better aligns with pursuing their post-MBA career goals. Interaction with Career Services happens throughout the entire programme. The purpose is to deliver soft skill training and clarify post-MBA goals. Ongoing 1-to-1 support.

Full-time MBA

The 11 month Full-Time MBA programme is taught in English and has a weekly structure. The programme starts in September each year. In addition to the core and elective courses taught in St.Gallen Switzerland, students also have the opportunity to take a study mission to a foreign country. We offer exchange and elective options at Copenhagen Business School, Imperial College London, Macquarie University and Nanyang Technological University.

Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid

The following fees are for the 2018 intake.

Full-time MBA tuition: 56,500 CHF

1. Early Enrolment Discount

The early enrolment discount of CHF 5,000 is available to students who enrolled and paid the enrolment fee before 31 December 2017.

2. Early Payment Discount

Any fee payment, in excess of the application and enrolment fee, paid by 31 March 2018 prior to the start of the programme, will be eligible for a 5% early payment discount. Any remaining fee must be paid according to the payment schedule.

Scholarships and loans may be awarded. Please contact our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers for more details.

Entry Requirements

1. Bachelor's Degree

You are required to hold a degree from a recognised university or accepted institution of higher education. Please contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers for more information on whether your degree is from a recognised university.

2. GMAT, GRE, Admissions Test and Test Waivers

Applicants for the MBA programme are required to demonstrate their numerical, grammatical and critical thinking abilities. This can be done in one of the following three ways:

a. Submit a competitive GMAT or GRE score no older than five years (no minimum score)

b. Complete our MBA admissions test with a minimum score of 80%

c. Hold one or more of the following qualifications: PhD, CFA Level 2, CPA, or a similar qualification assessed on a case-by-case basis

Please feel free to contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers to learn more about your options. If you plan to take the GMAT, but haven't yet, you can also contact them for more information about our GMAT preparation courses in Zurich.

To submit a GMAT or GRE score, please use the following school codes for the University of St.Gallen MBA:

GMAT: 5RK-QG-13

GRE: 0413

3. Fluency in English

Evidence of English fluency must be provided in order to gain acceptance to our programmes, as all coursework, lectures, guest speaking events and academic material is conducted in English. If you have completed another degree in English, this would be considered. For evidence via language proficiency testing, we accept TOEFL, IELTS, Cambridge Certificate and PTE Academic.

Institution Code TOEFL: 0198

4. Work Experience

A minimum of two years full-time post-Bachelor degree work experience is required, with at least four years of work experience recommended.

5. Speak with our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers

Before submitting your application, we strongly encourage you to contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers to learn more about whether our programme matches your MBA goals.

Website and Contact

Website: http://www.mba.unisg.ch

Email:



Read less
University of St. Gallen Introduction. The University of St.Gallen is a leading European business school located in Switzerland. Founded in 1898, today it has the leading business school in the German-speaking area, with more than 7,000 enrolled full-time students. Read more

University of St. Gallen Introduction

The University of St.Gallen is a leading European business school located in Switzerland. Founded in 1898, today it has the leading business school in the German-speaking area, with more than 7,000 enrolled full-time students.

St.Gallen offers a full range of undergraduate, postgraduate, executive and doctoral Programmes, and is accredited by both EQUIS and AACSB. It benefits from a strong reputation for quality, particularly in the German-speaking countries of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. It is also recognized in major rankings, both at the MBA-level and the university as a whole. Students benefit from the University's close ties to leading international companies and 20,000 strong alumni network. The MBA programmes are part of the Executive School within the University of St.Gallen.

St.Gallen is located in Eastern Switzerland, one hour from Zurich city centre and 45 minutes from Zurich International Airport. It is at the heart of Europe, well-served by rail links to Paris, Geneva, Milan and Munich all a few hours away. St.Gallen lies near the shores of Lake Constance, and the borders to Germany and Austria. To the south of the city lie the Alps.

MBA Programme Overview

Core courses provide the broad range of skills that MBAs seek. Integration courses tie together the functional skills encountered in the Core phase. They are strategic and practical. Electives enable MBAs to narrow their focus and drill deeper into subject matter of personal or professional interest. MBAs work in-house with companies for 10-12 weeks. Students also have the option to write a business plan or a research paper, if this better aligns with pursuing their post-MBA career goals. Interaction with Career Services happens throughout the entire programme. The purpose is to deliver soft skill training and clarify post-MBA goals. Ongoing 1-to-1 support.

Part-time MBA

The 24-month Part-Time MBA programme is taught in English and has a monthly modular structure with students attending class 4 days per month. Classes are delivered in Zurich and St.Gallen, with additional modules in Copenhagen and Oxford. The programme starts in August each year. The programme is designed with working professionals in mind to allow participants to remain in full-time employment while benefiting from the merits of an MBA education. Part-time MBAs can also take electives at Copenhagen Business School, Imperial College London, Macquarie University and Nanyang Technological University.

Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid

The following fees are for the 2018 intake.

Part-time MBA tuition: 70,000 CHF

1. Early Enrolment Discount

The early enrolment discount of CHF 5,000 is available to students who enrolled and paid the enrolment fee before 31 December 2017.

2. Early Payment Discount

Any fee payment, in excess of the application and enrolment fee, paid by 31 March 2018 prior to the start of the programme, will be eligible for a 5% early payment discount. Any remaining fee must be paid according to the payment schedule.

Scholarships and loans may be awarded. Please contact our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers for more details.

Entry Requirements

1. Bachelor's Degree

You are required to hold a degree from a recognised university or accepted institution of higher education. Please contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers for more information on whether your degree is from a recognised university.

2. GMAT, GRE, Admissions Test and Test Waivers

Applicants for the MBA programme are required to demonstrate their numerical, grammatical and critical thinking abilities. This can be done in one of the following three ways:

a. Submit a competitive GMAT or GRE score no older than five years (no minimum score)

b. Complete our MBA admissions test with a minimum score of 80%

c. Hold one or more of the following qualifications: PhD, CFA Level 2, CPA, or a similar qualification assessed on a case-by-case basis

Please feel free to contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers to learn more about your options. If you plan to take the GMAT, but haven't yet, you can also contact them for more information about our GMAT preparation courses in Zurich.

To submit a GMAT or GRE score, please use the following school codes for the University of St.Gallen MBA:

GMAT: 5RK-QG-13

GRE: 0413

3. Fluency in English

Evidence of English fluency must be provided in order to gain acceptance to our programmes, as all coursework, lectures, guest speaking events and academic material is conducted in English. If you have completed another degree in English, this would be considered. For evidence via language proficiency testing, we accept TOEFL, IELTS, Cambridge Certificate and PTE Academic.

Institution Code TOEFL: 0198

4. Work Experience

A minimum of two years full-time post-Bachelor degree work experience is required, with at least four years of work experience recommended.

5. Speak with our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers

Before submitting your application, we strongly encourage you to contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers to learn more about whether our programme matches your MBA goals.

Website and Contact

Website: http://www.mba.unisg.ch

Email:



Read less
This is a unique programme that offers professional training in population studies that emphasises health and social epidemiology. Read more

This is a unique programme that offers professional training in population studies that emphasises health and social epidemiology. It aims to provide a broad training in the theories and methods of demography and population sciences and their application to health, social welfare and economic development.

Overview

The course is designed for those interested in acquiring technical expertise in demography and understanding the interlinkages between population studies and health, including fertility, sexual behaviour, ageing, health inequalities and life expectancy.

Graduates from the course would be equipped to pursue careers in public health, academic research of a very wide nature, NGOs, reproductive health programmes, health services, government statistical offices, as well as policy and planning organisations.

Course delivery

The Demography & Health programme is delivered through provision of interactive learning materials supplied online through the School’s online learning site (Moodle), and supported by CD-ROMs, practical workbooks and textbooks (depending on the module chosen). Students are actively encouraged to participate in web-based discussion boards. Training is also provided in the use of Stata statistical software.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (https://london.ac.uk/sites/default/files/programme-specifications/progspec-demographyhealth.pdf)

- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/request-prospectus)

Visit the website https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/courses/demography-health-online

Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved,

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking,

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking, or

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening.

Study materials

After registration, study materials are sent to students in September. Access to online study materials is given from 1 October. Study materials may include online materials, subject guides, readers, textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata), past examination papers and examiners’ reports, and handbooks. You also have access to the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine’s online library resources from 1 October. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while a couple of the EPM modules modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. Tutorial support is available throughout this time. Students carrying out projects are assigned personal supervisors to support their project work which is mostly carried out between June and the end of September in their final year.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/distance_demography_health.html#seventh



Read less
English for Academic Study is a pre-sessional English programme that can be taken up to one academic year before your degree course. Read more

English for Academic Study is a pre-sessional English programme that can be taken up to one academic year before your degree course.

This programme can be taken as a 30, 20 or 10-week course. You don’t need to have an offer of a degree to apply for this programme, and don’t need to have taken an English language test to apply.

The programme is divided into three 10-week stages: Develop Your English, Extend Your English and Consolidate Your English. Successful completion of assessments at the end of each stage allows progression to the next stage. Successful completion of the final stage Consolidate Your English, allows progression to University of Brighton degree courses.

The programme is suitable for undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. It is also suitable for those wishing to study at another UK university, and prepares students for IELTS, if required.

Why study EAS?

  • This programme can be studied on a short-term study visa.
  • You can join this programme without a formal English language qualification such as IELTS. If you don’t have an English language qualification you'll be asked to complete a placement test to determine the length of course needed.
  • You can take this programme without holding a formal offer of a place on a degree course.
  • The flexibility of this programme means that you can take any individual stage as a stand-alone course.
  • Successful completion of the final stage will enable you to continue to a University of Brighton degree course at undergraduate or postgraduate level.

Overview

The English for Academic Study programme consists of up to three 10-week stages. Where you enter the programme depends on your current level of English.

  • Stage 1: develop your English – intermediate level
  • Stage 2: extend your English – higher intermediate level
  • Stage 3: consolidate your English – lower advanced level

If you are not sure which entry stage is right for you, please call or email us and we will help you decide.

Successful completion of your assessments at the end of each stage allows progression to the next stage.

The minimum age of enrolment for this programme is 18.

Stage 1: intermediate

You will improve your level of general English and be introduced to English for academic purposes. You will also learn about British culture and go on organised visits to local places of interest.

  • Practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking
  • Introduction to English for academic purposes
  • Grammar review and vocabulary development
  • Pronunciation and intonation practice
  • Language learning strategies
  • Guided self-study
  • British culture
  • Visits to sites of cultural interest in the south-east of England

Stage 2: higher intermediate

You will extend your English language knowledge and skills and further develop your ability to study effectively in a British academic environment.

General English

  • Intensive practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking
  • Grammar review and vocabulary development
  • Pronunciation and intonation practice
  • Language learning strategies

Academic English

  • Preparation for studying in English
  • Listening and note-taking skills
  • Extensive reading
  • Writing academic essays and reports
  • Taking part in seminars and tutorials
  • Giving academic presentations
  • Introduction to British academic conventions

Stage 3: lower advanced

Your written and spoken English will become more fluent and accurate and you will develop confidence in your English academic study skills.

General English

  • Strategies for effective reading, writing, listening and speaking
  • Grammar consolidation
  • Pronunciation and intonation practice

Academic English

  • Research skills – productive use of learning resources
  • Efficient note-taking from lectures and reading
  • Extensive academic reading
  • Extension of academic vocabulary
  • Writing successful academic essays, reports and summaries
  • Taking part in seminars and tutorials
  • Giving confident academic presentations
  • British academic conventions

Facilities and support

Whilst you are studying on one of our English language programmes you will have full access to all of the facilities enjoyed by other students at the university. This includes a wide range of academic and personal support services as well as full use of libraries and computer systems.

Our Open Learning Centre is home to facilities including:

  • Brand-new computer workstations.
  • Viewing station equipped with a large screen for group work.
  • Extensive collection of graded readers.
  • Large collection of English language books and dictionaries for general and academic English.
  • Pronunciation worksheets tailored to several first languages.
  • Local access to photocopier, scanner and printing facilities.
  • Searchable online catalogue of materials
  • Live satellite television in English, French, German, Spanish
  • English and foreign language news, documentaries and films.

You'll also have access to University of Brighton support services including:

  • our iASK international academic study kit
  • visa advice
  • careers guidance
  • academic study resources
  • specialist international student advice
  • health, disability and dyslexia support.


Read less
In what way does society influence the way that we use language? And conversely, how far does the way we use language influence society? Can language use impact the class system? Sexism? Mental health?. Read more
In what way does society influence the way that we use language? And conversely, how far does the way we use language influence society? Can language use impact the class system? Sexism? Mental health?

On our MA Sociolinguistics, you address questions like these through exploration of the stylistic, cognitive and functional aspects of language variation and change. We familiarise you with the foundations of contemporary sociolinguistics, including:
-Language variation and change
-Ethnography of speaking
-Multilingualism
-Discourse

We additionally offer modules in some of the most prominent sub-disciplines in linguistics such as variation theory, socio-pragmatics, conversation analysis, language contact, language and gender, and language rights.

You also gain first-hand experience of interview, questionnaire and observation data and learn quantitative and qualitative methodologies for coding and analysing sociolinguistic interview and questionnaire data.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis
-MA Dissertation
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Sociocultural Linguistics
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

Read less
Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism. Read more
Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism.

You build a programme best-suited to your individual needs. This course is ideal if you need to study on a part-time basis and wish to fit your course choices in with your existing commitments, as you can also study on an accumulation basis over a period of up to five years.

The optional modules you choose come from a broad list including:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Pragmatics
-Semantics
-Syntax

You also gain a basic familiarity with some common research methodologies and paradigms used in linguistics. You will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice. This takes place between April and September.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

Read less
How do socialisation contexts influence the development of children and adolescents?. Read more

How do socialisation contexts influence the development of children and adolescents?

Why is it that young males in particular tend to get involved in crime? Is it because they have the "wrong" friends? Were they not socialised properly? Is it due to dispositional factors? Are there hereditary factors at work?

From the day a child is born, his family and the culture in which he’s raised have a huge impact on his socioemotional development and psychological adjustment. As he grows up, his school and networks of friends and peers become more and more influential in his development. The two-year Master’s programme in Development and Socialisation in Childhood and Adolescence (DaSCA) gives you the theoretical and methodological background to analyse this development. 

NORMAL AND ABNORMAL SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The programme focuses on both normal and abnormal development processes. Explicit attention is given to the study of interventions and risk factors in children’s and adolescent’s cognitive and social-emotional development and adjustment. Working through the course topics, you’ll address questions such as:

  • What are the early markers of development that has gone awry?
  • How can we improve the way negative outcomes in children and adolescents' are prevented or treated?

This Master’s programme combines advanced coursework with the development of hands-on skills.

HIGH QUALITY

The programme is recognised as a high quality programme and has been awarded high ratings in the past years by established rankings in the Netherlands. 

INTERNATIONAL FOCUS

All courses and communications are in English. The programme is designed to allow you to practice advanced English communication skills while gaining an international perspective on topics related to development and socialisation. Some of the lecturers are from abroad (US, Belgium, Croatia, and Finland) or hold positions abroad (UK), and the programme attracts a number of international students. You will also have the opportunity to visit English-speaking conferences held in the Netherlands that are organised by the participating research groups.

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

The Master’s programme in Development and Socialisation in Childhood and Adolescence is designed as preparation for a PhD position. By starting the programme with the foundation of a Bachelor’s degree in (developmental) psychology, pedagogy, or interdisciplinary social sciences, you’ll develop into a qualified researcher with excellent job perspectives. The programme is strongly driven by research, and your lecturers and supervisors will be members of the four interdisciplinary research groups in the research priority Child and Adolescent Studies (CAS). 

Do you wish to pursue a professional career as a researcher outside of a university environment? This programme provides training for that as well.

Clinical work

For students who are, in addition to research, also interested in clinical work, there is a possibility to follow a clinical track within DaSCA. As an important part of the clinical track involves a clinical internship, this track is only open for the students with a suitable BA programme (i.e., containing courses on psychopathology, diagnostic assessment, interventions, and clinical skills). After following the clinical track, Dutch students can obtain the Dutch clinical starting qualification: registration as ‘basis orthopedagoog’, basic entry psychodiagnostics (BAPD) and entry requirements for further education as Health psychologist (GZ psycholoog).

International students should be aware that for a large majority of the clinical internship places, command of the Dutch language is required. We are willing to work together with you on a creative solution (such as a clinical internship in your own or in a English speaking country, Dutch international school etc.), but at this moment we cannot offer any guarantees that suitable places and qualified supervision for such clinical internships can be found.



Read less
The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course enables students who have acquired a non-law undergraduate degree to complete the academic stage of legal professional education (CPE) in one year (full time) or two years (part time), in order to then begin the vocational stage of training as either a solicitor (Legal Practice Course) or barrister (Bar Professional Training Course). Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course enables students who have acquired a non-law undergraduate degree to complete the academic stage of legal professional education (CPE) in one year (full time) or two years (part time), in order to then begin the vocational stage of training as either a solicitor (Legal Practice Course) or barrister (Bar Professional Training Course).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/law-gdl/

Why choose this course?

- Expert and highly-qualified teaching team, with over 20 years' experience of delivering the GDL

- An active student law society, and a course intake limited to 100 students, which promotes a friendly, personal and supportive learning environment

- A 99%+ pass rate, and 20% above national average rate for number of merit awards and above

- Access to the excellent Bodleian Law Library

- Strong links with law firms and barristers' chambers in both London and Oxford and members of staff provide practical advice and guidance as you begin your career

- Opportunities to boost employability skills through participation in internal and national mooting and client interviewing competitions as well as a national award winning pro bono scheme

Teaching and learning

Diverse teaching methods (predominantly two hour lectures and one-and-a-half hour workshops) are employed throughout the GDL programme in order to give you the best opportunity to acquire legal knowledge and skills.

A number of those teaching on the GDL have qualifications and experience as barristers or solicitors, and a significant number of others hold research degrees.

Assessments (both coursework and exams) are spread throughout the course so that you will have an ongoing awareness of your progress. These teaching and assessment methods are described in the course handbook, and their effectiveness is monitored and analysed by students and staff in the module feedback system and the GDL annual review process.

Practical skills

In recognition of the professional nature of the course, our GDL places special emphasis on helping you to gain the legal skills you need to acquire to be a successful lawyer.

- Mooting
Mooting is a must on the CV of any aspiring barrister, and for many aspiring solicitors. Mooting gives you the chance to test your advocacy skills in a safe but exciting environment, and the opportunity to hear other students argue and learn from the questioning of the judges.
The School of Law runs a mooting competition each year and enters its champion mooting team into the English Speaking Union/Essex Court Chambers National Mooting Competition. In 2012 the Oxford Brookes GDL Mooting Team won the national final of the English Speaking Union/Essex Court National Mooting Competition, and went on to win the Commonwealth Mooting Championship in Cape Town in April 2013.

- Client Interviewing
Client interviewing is one of the key skills which every lawyer needs. GDL students, coached by members of staff, have the opportunity to take part in an annual internal Client Interviewing Competition here at Oxford Brookes.

The winners of the internal competition go on to take part in the regional and national finals of the Client Interviewing Competition of England and Wales. The winning team from the national finals has the opportunity to go forward to the International Client Consultation Competition which is hosted internationally and which includes students from around the world.

In recent years Brookes GDL students have had great success in the National Client Interviewing Competition. They achieved third place in the National Final in both 2009 and 2011, and won the National Final in 2010, going on to be overall runners-up in the International Client Consultation Competition 2010 in Hong Kong. In 2012 the Brookes student team were overall runners-up in the national final and won the trophy for best GDL team.

- Pro Bono Activity
Pro Bono offers students a valuable introduction to the world of legal practice, and involvement in pro bono work helps to demonstrate to potential employers a student's commitment to the law.

Students wishing to be involved in pro bono work can do so through our established pro bono scheme, winner of the Solicitors Pro Bono group national award.

In 2010 and 2013, GDL students were shortlisted for the Attorney General's National Student Pro Bono Awards for 'Best Contribution by an Individual Student' and attended the awards ceremonies at the houses of parliament.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford Brookes has strong links with law firms and barristers' chambers in both London and Oxford and members of staff provide practical advice and guidance as you begin your career in law.

Events such as the annual Oxford Law Fair further enhance opportunities for professional networking.

Careers

Having completed the GDL most students go on to become solicitors or barristers by taking the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

- Training contracts
Many of our students come to the GDL having already obtained training contracts with solicitors’ firms, and their GDL studies are funded by these firms.

- Scholarships for barristers
Oxford Brookes GDL students going to the bar are exceptionally successful in securing much sought-after funding and scholarships. Each year a significant proportion of Brookes students gain prestigious scholarships through the Inns of Court.

- Further careers options with law
A small number of our students use the legal knowledge and analytical skills gained through the GDL course to pursue a business, public sector or financial career, or continue on to further academic study.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

There is a wide range of research interests among staff, with particular strengths in the areas of public law, international law and human rights, employment, religion and the law, criminal justice, and IT and the law. In the latest government research rating exercise, the 2014 REF, 85% of staff research output is internationally recognised.

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Read less
Qualifications and durations. - Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation). Languages offered. - Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish. Read more

Qualifications and durations

- Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation)

Languages offered:

- Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish

Pathways

Students may follow one of two possible paths:

- Path 1: allows students with English as their ‘A’ language to offer two other languages - from Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish - working only into English.

- Path 2: allows students to work in both directions between Chinese/English or Russian/English.

Overview

This programme is designed to prepare linguists for careers as professional interpreters and/or translators. It has done this most successfully over more than four decades, and graduates are to be found working in language services throughout the world.

All students follow a core programme involving professional translation and simultaneous, consecutive and public and commercial service interpreting or liaison/public service interpreting. A number of options are available in the second semester to allow students to further focus on their translation or interpreting skills.

The MA is awarded for a 15,000-word dissertation/project submitted after successful completion of the taught programme.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-inte-and-tran/

Why study with us?

- Team of highly experienced professional staff

- State of the art digital interpreting suites provide excellent teaching and practice space.

- Small class sizes provide high levels of student and teacher contact.

- Work placements in interpreting and translating are often an option during the programme and provide invaluable practical experience.

- Motivated and multi-national student cohort offers a diverse and stimulating learning environment.

- Students are exposed to realistic training from experienced translation and interpreting trainers which prepares them for work after graduation.

- A number of funding opportunities are available and students with EU languages are eligible to apply for EU bursaries.

Programme structure

European Stream (French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish):

- Consecutive interpreting (all year core unit)

- Simultaneous interpreting (all year core unit)

- Public speaking (Semester 1 option)

- Professional translation I (Semester 1 core unit)

- Professional translation II (Semester 2 core unit)

- Public service interpreting (Semester 2 option)

- Using technology in the T & I Industry (Semester 2 option)

- Dissertation: 15,000 word thesis: annotated translation or a project type

Chinese Stream

- Consecutive interpreting (all year core unit)

- Simultaneous interpreting (all year core unit)

- Liaison/Public service interpreting (all year core unit)

- Public speaking (Semester 1 option)

- Professional translation I (Semester 1 core unit)

- Professional translation II (Semester 2 option)

- Using technology in the T & I Industry (Semester 2 option)

- Dissertation: 15,000 word thesis: annotated translation or a project type

Through our extensive network of contacts, we aim to organise placements for all students with the language services of international organisations, government departments or translation companies.

These placements provide an invaluable insight into the work of professional linguists and are valued highly by employers. They are not however compulsory and are not always guaranteed.

Our students have previously undertaken placements/internships in:

- United Nations (New York, Geneva, and Vienna)

- European Commission and European Parliament

- Council of Europe

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures and intensive translation and interpreting. We also use the software MemoQ for the delivery of the unit, Using Technology in the Translation & Interpreting Industry; this is one of the leading tools in the industry.

Careers

The MA Interpreting & Translating is a highly vocational programme with a worldwide reputation for training professional translators and conference interpreters.

Our graduates have excellent employment prospects. While some have found rewarding jobs in smaller companies and institutions, or chosen to remain as a freelancer, many have gone on to pursue stimulating careers as professional translators and interpreters with major international organisations.

Graduates have worked for the following organisations:

- Institutional markets:

United Nations

European Commission

European Parliament

Council of Europe

International Court of Justice

NATO

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

European Bank

BBC World Service

- Private markets:

Microsoft

Talk Finance

Sophos

Prudential

Power Network

Gazprom

Some of our graduates have shared their experiences on our alumni blog.

About the department

The Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies (PoLIS) is one of the largest departments in the University.

Many staff are leading scholars in their field and are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

International and industrial links:

- Our department has links with 22 Erasmus partner institutions, as well as universities in Russia and Mexico.

- Research students regularly engage in fieldwork abroad, especially in the countries of the European Union, but also in Russia, Latin America and the United States.

- Students on the Euromasters programme study at two or three different sites in either Europe or the USA.

- In the case of the MA Interpreting & Translating and the MA Translation & Professional Language Skills, a number of work placements in Western Europe are made available to students in the language services of international organisations, government departments and commercial enterprises.

Our research

Experts from our department are publishing regularly in the most highly ranked international journals.

Our academic expertise and research activities are organised into three broad Research Clusters:

International collaboration:

Many staff are internationally leading scholars in their field. We are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Projects are funded by a variety of bodies such as:

- Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC)

- European Commission Framework Programme

- Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Our diversity and the disciplinary mix of political science, political theory, policy analysis, social anthropology, political sociology and others make for a very stimulating environment for students to develop their own research projects.

The integration of our research community is further enhanced through the International Relations & European Politics (IREP) postgraduate group.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X