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Masters Degrees (Space Technology)

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Taught jointly by UCL’s Space & Climate Physics and UCL’s Electronic & Electrical Engineering Departments by expert researchers and engineers in… Read more

Taught jointly by UCL’s Space & Climate Physics and UCL’s Electronic & Electrical Engineering Departments by expert researchers and engineers in the field, this MSc programme aims to provide a broad understanding of the basic principles of space technology and satellite communications together with specialised training in research methods and transferable skills, directly applicable to a career in the public and private space sectors.

About this degree

The Space Technology pathway is focussed on the application of space technology in industrial settings, and therefore has as its main objective to provide a sound knowledge of the underlying principles which form a thorough basis for careers in space technology, satellite communications and related fields. Students develop a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of:

  • spacecraft, satellite communications, the space environment, space operations and space project management
  • the electromagnetics of optical and microwave transmission, and of communication systems modelling
  • a range of subjects relating to spacecraft technology and satellite communications.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), a Group Project (15 credits) and an Individual research Project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
  • Space Systems Engineering
  • Communications Systems Modelling Type
  • Group Project

Optional modules

  • At least one module from the following:
  • Spacecraft Design – Electronic Sub-systems
  • Mechanical Design of Spacecraft
  • Antennas and Propagation
  • Radar Systems
  • Space-based Communication Systems

  • At least one module from:
  • Space Instrumentation and Applications
  • Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
  • Principles and Practice of Remote Sensing
  • Global Monitoring and Security
  • Space Data Systems and Processing

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an Individual research Project, which normally involves attachment to a research group, and culminates in a report of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, coursework problem tasks, team-based coursework exercises, presentations and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examinations, coursework, and the individual and group projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Space Science and Engineering: Space Technology MSc

Funding

STFC and NERC studentships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The programme aims to prepare students for careers in space research or the space industry, or further research degrees.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Pushtribe
  • Signal Processing Engineer, Thales UK
  • Junior Consultant, BearingPoint
  • Satellite Communication Engineer, National Space Agency of Kazakhstan

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Space & Climate Physics, located at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, is a world-leading research organisation and is the largest university space science group in the UK.

It offers a unique environment at the forefront of space science research, where scientists and research students work alongside top engineers building and testing instruments for space as well as studying the data from these and other spaceborne and ground-based instruments.

The close contact that the laboratory enjoys with space agencies such as ESA and NASA and with industrial research teams encourages the development of transferable skills which enhance job prospects in industrial and research centres in the public and private space sectors.



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MSE (M.Sc. in Space Engineering) is an international full-time Master’s programme in space engineering that starts at Technische Universität Berlin in April each year. Read more
MSE (M.Sc. in Space Engineering) is an international full-time Master’s programme in space engineering that starts at Technische Universität Berlin in April each year. The aim of the programme is to educate systems engineers equipped to become leaders in the space industry.

At the Chair of Space Technology of TU Berlin

The course is offered by the Chair of Space Technology at Technische Universität Berlin and combines excellent teaching in space technology with project management and intercultural skills. The entire programme, over four semesters, is taught in English.

Highly project oriented Master’s programme

The Master’s programme is highly project oriented and designed to prepare students for the requirements of the global space industry. Students have the chance to be involved in challenging satellite projects, working within intercultural teams. Especially, they benefit from the worldwide leading expertise and network of TU Berlin in the field of small satellites. Interdisciplinary skills, such as project management, innovation marketing and business will complement the curriculum.

Internship experience in the European space industry

Furthermore, the opportunity to gain internship experience in the European space industry will be provided. After graduation, students will be equipped with skills, experience and a strong network to boost their space career either in Europe, in their home country or anywhere else.

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What is the Master of Space Studies all about?. The Master of Space Studies programme is designed to prepare scientists to respond to a myriad of challenges and opportunities. Read more

What is the Master of Space Studies all about?

The Master of Space Studies programme is designed to prepare scientists to respond to a myriad of challenges and opportunities. In addition to coursework in space sciences, the curriculum is enriched by a Master's thesis and a series of guest lecturers from international, national and regional institutions.

This is an advanced Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The programme is conceived as an advanced master’s programme and as such it requires applicants to have successfully completedan initial master’s programme in either the humanities and social sciences, exact sciences and technology or biomedical sciences.

  • The interdisciplinary nature of the programme is expressed by the common core of 25 ECTS in introductory coursework. These courses are mandatory for every student. They acquaint the student with the different aspects that together form the foundation of space-related activities. The backgrounds of the students in programme are diverse, but all students have the ability to transfer knowledge across disciplines.
  • Depending on their background and interests, students have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge through more domain-specific optional courses, for a total of 20 ECTS, covering the domains of (A) Space Law, Policy, Business and Management, (B) Space Sciences and (C) Space Technology and Applications, with the possibility to combine the latter two. 
  • For the master’s thesis (15 ECTS), students are embedded in a research team of one of the organising universities, or in an external institute, organisation or industrial company, in which case an academic supervisor is assigned as the coordinator of the project. The master’s thesis is the final section of the interdisciplinary programme, in which the acquired knowledge and abilities are applied to a complex and concrete project.

Department

The mission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is exploring, understanding and modelling physical realities using mathematical, computational, experimental and observational techniques. Fifteen teams perform research at an international level. Publication of research results in leading journals and attracting top-level scientists are priorities for the department.

New physics and innovation in the development of new techniques are important aspects of our mission. The interaction with industry (consulting, patents...) and society (science popularisation) are additional points of interest. Furthermore, the department is responsible for teaching basic physics courses in several study programmes.

Learning Outcomes

After the completion of the programme, students will have attained the following learning outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding

LO1: Are capable of analysing and understanding the main scientific, technological, political, legal and economical aspects of space activities.

LO2: Demonstrate an advanced knowledge in one of the following fields: A. Space Law, Policy, Business and Management; B. Space Sciences; C. Space Technology.

Skills

LO3: Are capable of discussing and reporting on the main scientific, technological, political, legal and economical aspects of space activities.

LO4: Can apply, in the field of space studies, the knowledge, skills and approaches they obtained during their previous academic master.

LO5: Are able to integrate their own disciplinary expertise applied to space related activities within their broad and complex multi-disciplinary environment, taking into account their societal, technological and scientific context.

LO6: Can communicate clearly and unambiguously to specialist and non-specialist audiences about space projects in general and their specific area of expertise.

LO7: Have the skills to commence participation in complex space projects in multi-disciplinary and/or multinational settings in the framework of institutions, agencies or industry. This includes information collection, analysis and drawing conclusions, individually and/or as part of a team.

LO8: Can undertake research in the space field individually, translate the findings in a structured fashion, and communicate and discuss the results in a clear manner (oral and written).

Approaches

LO9: Have a multi-disciplinary approach to complex projects, with special attention to the integration of the different and complementary aspects of such projects.

LO10: Understand and are able to contribute to exploiting the benefits of space for humanity and its environment and are familiarised with the broad spectrum of aspects of peaceful space activities, including the societal ones.

LO11: Have a critical approach towards the place of space activities in their societal framework, including ethical questions arising from space activities.

Career perspectives

Graduates will be in a position to develop a career in the space sector or in space research.

Depending on his/her previous degree, the student will find opportunities in the space industry (engineers, product developers and technical-commercial functions with a high degree of technical and financial responsibilities), research institutions with activities in space (researchers and project developers), (inter)governmental bodies with responsibilities in research and development programmes related to space (project managers and directors, policy makers on national, European and international levels). The spectrum of employment possibilities encompasses not only the space sector as such, but also the broader context of companies and organisations which use or are facilitated by space missions.



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This postgraduate qualification is designed for those with an academic or professional interest in space science and the technology that underpins this discipline. Read more
This postgraduate qualification is designed for those with an academic or professional interest in space science and the technology that underpins this discipline. It equips students with the skills to carry out scientific investigations using space-based instrumentation, both individually and as a team. Students learn how to use a programming language in support of space science applications and develop other skills that are relevant to further research or employment in the space sector. The qualification also requires students to conduct an in-depth research project on a topic in space science or space technology.

Key features of the course

•Develops skills in conducting science in the space environment through the use of robotic experiments
•Explores current debates in space and planetary sciences using data from space missions
•Develops technical and professional skills according to individual needs and interests
•Culminates with an in-depth individual research project in space science or space technology.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England. For more information, see our fees and funding webpage.

Modules

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

60 credits from the compulsory module:

• Space science (S818) NEW

Plus

30 credits from List A: Optional modules

• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Project management (M815)
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)

Plus

30 credits from List B: Optional modules

• Finite element analysis: basic principles and applications (T804)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Software development (M813)
• Software engineering (M814)

a 60-credit compulsory module:

Compulsory module

The MSc project module for MSc in Space Science and Technology (SXS810)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

If you’ve successfully completed some relevant postgraduate study elsewhere, you might be able to count it towards this qualification, reducing the number of modules you need to study. You should apply for credit transfer as soon as possible, before you register for your first module. For more details and an application form, visit our Credit Transfer website.

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This MSc effectively transfers to students the knowledge and expertise gained by UCL space scientists over more than four decades and is taught by world-recognised researchers in the field. Read more

This MSc effectively transfers to students the knowledge and expertise gained by UCL space scientists over more than four decades and is taught by world-recognised researchers in the field. The programme aims to provide a broad understanding of all aspects of space science together with specialised training in research methods, directly applicable to a career in academia, the public and private sectors.

About this degree

The Space Science pathway is focussed on scientific research applications of space technology; it aims to equip participants with a sound knowledge of the physical principles essential to sustain careers in space research and related fields. Students develop a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of:

  • a range of space science fields
  • spacecraft, space science instrumentation, the space environment, space operations and space project management

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a group project (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Space Data Systems and Processing
  • Space Instrumentation and Applications
  • Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
  • Space Systems Engineering
  • Group Project

Optional modules

  • Planetary Atmospheres
  • Solar Physics
  • High Energy Astrophysics
  • Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
  • Principles and Practice of Remote Sensing
  • Global Monitoring and Security

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project, which normally involves attachment to a research group, and culminates in a report of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, team-based coursework exercises, presentations and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examination, coursework, and the individual and group projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Space Science and Engineering: Space Science MSc

Funding

STFC and NERC studentships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The programme aims to prepare students for further research degrees and/or careers in space research or the space industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL’s Space & Climate Physics Department, located at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, is a world-leading research organisation and is the largest university space science group in the UK.

It offers a unique environment at the forefront of space science research, where scientists and research students work alongside top engineers building and testing instruments for space, as well as studying the data from these and other spaceborne and ground-based instruments.

The close contact that the laboratory enjoys with space agencies such as ESA and NASA and with industrial research teams encourages the development of transferable skills which enhance job prospects in academic circles and beyond.



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The space sector plays an important role in economic, social, technological and scientific developments. The future of the sector and its manifold applications require highly skilled experts with a broad interdisciplinary perspective. Read more

The space sector plays an important role in economic, social, technological and scientific developments. The future of the sector and its manifold applications require highly skilled experts with a broad interdisciplinary perspective. The development of innovative space technologies is fostered by an intense symbiosis between technological sectors and the challenges set by fundamental research in exact and biomedical sciences. Additionally, the economic and social valorisation of space technologies requires an efficient relationship between project developers and the economic sector.

The large scale of space projects imposes important constraints on management. The international character of the space sector and of its broad applications, including the relevance of space for security and defence, implies a need for European and international legal and political measures.

What is the Master of Space Studies all about?

The Master of Space Studies programme is designed to prepare scientists to respond to a myriad of challenges and opportunities. In addition to coursework in space sciences, the curriculum is enriched by a Master's thesis and a series of guest lecturers from international, national and regional institutions.

This is an advanced Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The programme is conceived as an advanced master’s programme and as such it requires applicants to have successfully completedan initial master’s programme in either the humanities and social sciences, exact sciences and technology or biomedical sciences.

  • The interdisciplinary nature of the programme is expressed by the common core of 25 ECTS in introductory coursework. These courses are mandatory for every student. They acquaint the student with the different aspects that together form the foundation of space-related activities. The backgrounds of the students in programme are diverse, but all students have the ability to transfer knowledge across disciplines.
  • Depending on their background and interests, students have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge through more domain-specific optional courses, for a total of 20 ECTS, covering the domains of (A) Space Law, Policy, Business and Management, (B) Space Sciences and (C) Space Technology and Applications, with the possibility to combine the latter two. 
  • For the master’s thesis (15 ECTS), students are embedded in a research team of one of the organising universities, or in an external institute, organisation or industrial company, in which case an academic supervisor is assigned as the coordinator of the project. The master’s thesis is the final section of the interdisciplinary programme, in which the acquired knowledge and abilities are applied to a complex and concrete project.

Department

The mission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is exploring, understanding and modelling physical realities using mathematical, computational, experimental and observational techniques. Fifteen teams perform research at an international level. Publication of research results in leading journals and attracting top-level scientists are priorities for the department.

New physics and innovation in the development of new techniques are important aspects of our mission. The interaction with industry (consulting, patents...) and society (science popularisation) are additional points of interest. Furthermore, the department is responsible for teaching basic physics courses in several study programmes.

Objectives

The objectives of the programme are to develop students' knowledge of all aspects of space studies generally and, specifically, to impart:

  • the ability to situate the relevance of students' own curriculum in the broad field of space studies
  • specialised knowledge and attitudes in specific fields relevant to space studies;
  • insight in the development and realisation of large international projects;
  • abilities necessary for the guiding of complex projects.

Career perspectives

Graduates will be in a position to develop a career in the space sector or in space research.

Depending on his/her previous degree, the student will find opportunities in the space industry (engineers, product developers and technical-commercial functions with a high degree of technical and financial responsibilities), research institutions with activities in space (researchers and project developers), (inter)governmental bodies with responsibilities in research and development programmes related to space (project managers and directors, policy makers on national, European and international levels). The spectrum of employment possibilities encompasses not only the space sector as such, but also the broader context of companies and organisations which use or are facilitated by space missions.



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Our Masters in Space Engineering programme is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary knowledge and skills required for a career working with space technology and its applications. Read more

Our Masters in Space Engineering programme is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary knowledge and skills required for a career working with space technology and its applications.

Surrey students have access to all aspects of the design and delivery of spacecraft and payloads, and as a result are very attractive to employers in space-related industries.

As we develop and execute complete space missions, from initial concept to hardware design, manufacturing and testing, to in orbit operations (controlled by our ground station at the Surrey Space Centre), you will have the chance to be involved in, and gain experience of, real space missions.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:

  • Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
  • Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
  • Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
  • Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
  • Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
  • Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:

  • Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin space engineering.
  • Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
  • Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
  • Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within space engineering.
  • Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
  • Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
  • Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
  • Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Technical characteristics of the pathway

This programme in Space Engineering aims to provide a high-level postgraduate qualification relating to the design of space missions using satellites. Study is taken to a high level, in both theory and practice, in the specialist areas of space physics, mechanics, orbits, and space-propulsion systems, as well as the system and electronic design of space vehicles.

This is a multi-disciplinary programme, and projects are often closely associated with ongoing space projects carried out by Surrey Satellite Technology, plc.

This is a large local company that builds satellites commercially and carries out industrially-sponsored research. Graduates from this programme are in demand in the UK and European Space Industries.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space. Read more

Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space.

About this degree

Students will learn about a wide variety of natural hazards, how to prepare and plan for emergencies and disasters and how to respond. Students will also learn practical aspects of designing, building and operating satellites and spacecraft including the challenges and risks posed by the environment of outer space.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
  • Emergency and Crisis Management
  • Research Appraisal and Proposal
  • The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks
  • Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
  • Space Systems Engineering

Optional modules

Students choose two 15-credit optional modules from the following:

  • Decision and Risk Statistics
  • Emergency and Crisis Planning
  • Global Monitoring and Security
  • Mechanical Design of Spacecraft
  • Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
  • Risk and Disaster Research Tools
  • Space-Based Communication Systems
  • Space Instrumentation and Applications
  • Spacecraft Design - Electronic Sub-systems

Optional modules are subject to availability of places.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent project culminating in a report of between 10,000 and 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is delivered by lectures, seminars and interactive problem sessions. Assessment is by examination, poster, presentation and written essay coursework.

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

This programme aims to prepare students for careers in space research, space and defence industries as well as most industries with risk management requirements.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The unique selling point of the programme is the direct access to key government and business drivers in the field of space weather, with invited seminars and reserch projects supported by the UK Met Office, EDF, Atkins and other institutions interested in the hazards of space. 

The natural hazard of space weather is a "new" hazard which has only recently been identified as a significant risk to human society. As the first generation of researchers, practitioners and engineers in this field, students will be at the forefront of major new issues in an expanding sector of the economy. As disaster response comes to rely on more advanced technology aid, relief and disaster response agencies require experts trained in the technological infrastructure to innovate, explain, operate and understand the limitations of these novel systems and the help they can provide before, during and after disasters.

The programme will also provide students will advanced training in many transferable skills, such as computor programming, technical writing, oral and written presentation, the use of engineering design tools and graphic visualisation software.



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The Technology Management Group of UCL's Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) and UCL Centre for Systems Engineering (UCLse) have pooled expertise to develop this exciting programme, which equips students with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a career in technology management or engineering management. Read more

The Technology Management Group of UCL's Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) and UCL Centre for Systems Engineering (UCLse) have pooled expertise to develop this exciting programme, which equips students with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a career in technology management or engineering management.

About this degree

Students learn about the challenges and opportunities of working with new and legacy technology, and are introduced to key concepts such as technology maturity, lifecycles, risk, reliability and resilience. Systems and strategic thinking is promoted throughout, and the importance of the enterprise context. The research elements aim to instil a deep knowledge of at least one area of technology management with industrial relevance.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core taught modules (60 credits), two optional taught modules (30 credits) and three research modules (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Technology Strategy
  • Systems Thinking and Engineering Management
  • The Business Environment
  • Risk, Reliability, Resilience

Optional modules

Students choose two of the following:

  • Project Management
  • Delivering Complex Projects
  • Lifecycle Management
  • New Product Development
  • Systems Design
  • Defence and Security Systems
  • Rail Systems
  • Space Systems

Research modules

Students undertake a structured research programme comprising:

  • Emerging Technology Review (group project, 15 credits)
  • Technology Management Project Concept (15 credits)
  • Technology Management Research Project (60 credits, including a 12,000-word dissertation)

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods incorporate a mix of lectures and case study-based teaching, and groupwork, in which students will be challenged to come up with novel ideas, lead groups to innovative solutions and manage complex tasks under tight time pressure. Assessment is through coursework, examinations, written reports and presentations, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Technology Management MSc

Careers

UCLse has strong links with companies in the aerospace, communications, construction, energy, transport and defence sectors and our Industrial Advisory Board ensures relevance to industry.

Typical career destinations might include:

  • Graduate Systems Engineer (Airbus, BAE Systems, Boeing, GE, GDUK, SELEX, THALES, Ultra Electronics)
  • Technology/Business Consultant (Accenture, Capgemini, Deloitte, Ernst & Young, KPMG, PwC).

Employability

Drawing on our experience of providing short training courses for industry (such as the Project Manager training courses we run for the European Space Agency) we will integrate a large amount of skills development into our teaching, including skills in communication, negotiation, leadership and motivation, decision-making, and managing complex, time-constrained tasks, all of which will be beneficial for future careers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme blends general principles of management with technology-focused teaching and integrates aspects of systems engineering and project management; the UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory has nearly fifty years’ experience of developing cutting-edge spacecraft technology, and the programme content builds on research conducted by the Technology Management Group at MSSL in these areas.

The programme contains two compulsory modules relevant to leadership and entrepreneurship (Technology Strategy, and Business Environment). These modules will give students the knowledge and skills necessary to lead new technology-driven enterprises.

The curriculum has an international focus, with case studies from major technology companies around the world including Apple, Samsung and Lenovo. A number of industrial visits are anticipated and this ‘real world’ exposure to organisations will help contextualise the theory and techniques learnt.



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Quantum technology has been selected by the UK Government as a key area of innovation, moving science into real-world applications. Read more

Quantum technology has been selected by the UK Government as a key area of innovation, moving science into real-world applications. The first phase of the UK National Quantum Technology initiative has received £350 million of government funding to create a flourishing industry in this area in the UK.

Four Quantum Technology Hubs have been established as flagship projects in this program. This postgraduate training programme is aligned with the UK National Quantum Technology Hub in Sensors and Metrology, an £80 million collaborative effort led by the University of Birmingham in partnership with the Universities of Glasgow, Nottingham, Southampton, Strathclyde and Sussex, the National Physical Laboratory and over 70 companies.

Course details

The MRes programme offers a unique opportunity for students to undertake a research-based Masters degree in a multi-disciplinary environment between science, engineering and industry. Students benefit from participating in both the technology translation and applied research activities carried out within the UK National Quantum Technology Hub in Sensors and Metrology, and from the educational programmes offered by the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences. The programme comprises classroom taught quantum physics-oriented modules for students with engineering backgrounds; technology-orientated modules for students with physics backgrounds; and an independent research project that is documented in a substantial thesis.

The research project consists of a team element; all students will organise themselves to present a technical demonstration at a national or international conference. There is also an individual research element, which takes place in industry or in relation to a participating company.

It will include 70 credits of classroom taught modules and a research project worth 110 credits, consisting of team and individual elements.

The team element of the research project teaches technical, team working, project management, communication and presentation skills with an emphasis on responsible research and innovation. The individual element of the research project focuses on problems relevant to industry and will be carried out in close collaboration with industry partners.

Related links

Learning and teaching

The Birmingham led UK National Quantum Technology Hub in Sensors and Metrology is a cross-disciplinary centre, involving staff from the Schools of Physics, Civil, Electrical and Materials Engineering, as well as staff from a number of other Schools across the University. It will translate fundamental science and applied research in quantum sensors and metrology based on atomic probe particles, providing high level educational opportunities in these fields.

The Hub’s research activities include research in the development of sensors for gravity, magnetic fields, rotation, electromagnetic fields and time. It also researches their applications in a diverse range of sectors including aviation, communication, construction, defense, energy, finance, healthcare, oil and mineral exploration, transport and space.

The Translational Quantum Technology programme aims at preparing students for the challenges in translating quantum sensors and metrology devices based on atoms as probe particles into real-world applications. After the programme, students should understand the underpinning science and technology; the needs of end-user applicants; and the impact of these quantum technology devices on society. They should be able to move seamlessly between academia and industry, and translate scientific outcomes into technology.

The programme will create a strongly networked cohort of students with practical experience in academia and industry. It aims:

  • to develop students' research and technological skills, and their knowledge of research methods applicable to the specific issues arising in quantum technology-related research;
  • to ensure that students are aware of state-of-the-art developments in quantum technology in specific technical and operational topic areas;
  • to allow students to develop the understanding necessary to identify new and emerging research needs in the emerging quantum technology industry;
  • to enable students to develop the knowledge and skills required to independently undertake a significant research project of relevance to the quantum technology industry including users of quantum technology.

Employability

This programme is a unique opportunity to acquire translational skills, including specific skills of relevance to the emerging quantum technology industry. The UK National Quantum Technology Hub in Sensors is actively engaged with a growing number of industry partners, currently standing at 70 companies from various sectors of the economy. Industry secondments to our partners will foster career prospects.



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This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Read more
This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Students with an interest in topics covered by our research teams will find this is an excellent opportunity to get involved in progressive research.

Why study MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The MSc Computing Research degree is designed for graduates with a good degree in Computing or a related subject who wish to gain deep knowledge of research methods and experience of working in an active research environment.

The School of Computing provides a distinctive, balanced and enjoyable learning environment, matched to the future needs of both society and the computing field. Its research has strong foundations in mathematical and logical techniques, and in probabilistic and machine learning algorithms that are applied in its work on computer vision and multi-agent systems. In its applied research, the multi-disciplinary School has an international reputation in computer support for older and disabled people, healthcare computing, space systems and interaction design. All these areas of research have been developed through strong, long-term relationships with other leading academic institutions worldwide, and in collaboration with professional and industrial partners. The School is also active in commercialising its research, with several recent spin out companies fostering an entrepreneurial atmosphere.

The School of Computing has four major research groups:
Assistive and Healthcare Systems
Computational Systems
Interactive Systems Design
Space Technology Centre

What's so good about MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The University of Dundee is at the forefront of computing research. We currently have 23 academics and 35 researchers working alongside our 27 PhD students. Since January 2008 our school of computing has generated 313 publications and counting. In this time, we've produced 129 projects totalling more than £12.3 million in funding making Dundee a great place to come to engage in computing research.

We encourage a professional, inter-disciplinary and user-centred approach to computer systems design and production, and will enable you to develop the skills so that you can undertake independent research and participate in proposal development and innovation.

Our facilities

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

Postgraduate culture

The School of Computing maintains a friendly, intimate and supportive atmosphere, and we take pride in the fact that we know all of our students - you're far more than just a matriculation number to us. We have a thriving postgraduate department with regular seminars and guest speakers.

How you will be taught

We know how important it is to be at the leading edge of computing and so you will learn from research-active staff in the School of Computing. Leading researchers teach you and small class sizes mean that they really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

What you will study

You study three taught modules, during the period January-March, making your module selections with your advisor, as follows:
Computing Research Frontiers
One of: Designing Innovative Research OR Research Methods
One of: Human Computer Interaction OR Multi-agent Systems and Grid Computing

Subject to examination performance, you then progress to the individual research project which runs from May to December. You will be based with one of the research groups within the School of Computing:

Assistive & healthcare technologies
Computational systems
Interactive systems design
Space technology centre

How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Careers

Our students are highly employable:
They develop the expertise that employers want from computing graduates - our Industrial Advisory Board includes experts from a range of industries including Amazon, Scottish Enterprise Tayside, NCR, Chevron and Microsoft
They are prepared for a wide range of good career prospects in computing - the UK faces a massive shortage of graduates qualified to fill the 120,000 new jobs in computing and IT every year

Graduates may also choose to continue to a PhD in the School of Computing or elsewhere.

Computing at the University of Dundee is ranked 21st in the UK according to most recent Times Good University Guide and 12th in the UK according to the Guardian University League Table 2009. The University of Dundee has powered its way to a position as one of Scotland's leading universities with an international reputation for excellence across a range of activities. With over 18,000 students, it is growing fast in both size and reputation. It has performed extremely well in both teaching and research assessment exercises, has spawned a range of spin-out companies to exploit its research and has a model wider-access programme.

Dundee has been described as the largest village in Scotland which gives an indication of how friendly and compact it is. With a population of 150,000 it is not too large but has virtually all the cultural and leisure activities you would expect in a much larger city. It is situated beside a broad estuary of the river Tay, surrounded by hills and farmland, and for lovers of the great outdoors it is hard to imagine another UK location that offers so much all year round on land and water. The University is situated in the centre of Dundee, and everything needed is on the one-stop campus: study facilities, help, advice, leisure activities... yet the attractions of the city centre and the cultural quarter are just a stroll away.

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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The complete Masters (MSc) course in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of modern technical textiles, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career. Read more

The complete Masters (MSc) course in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of modern technical textiles, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career.

Graduates of this programme are expected to understand the whole process of converting fibrous materials into the end product and to be able to identify and analyse the appropriate material and production route for a specific end product. You will also have developed the expertise and skill to conduct quality evaluation of textile products.

The complete MSc programme is made up of taught course units and a research dissertation. The taught course units are delivered through a combination of lectures and practical laboratory work.

Special features

The Masters programme in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of the advanced Technical Textiles sector, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career.

After successfully completing the programme, you will have gained a thorough grounding and understanding of the whole process of converting fibrous polymeric materials to the end product. This successful delivery to the Technical Textiles sector involves materials performance, Computer Aided Design (CAD), 2D/3D product design and specification, sustainability, effective supply chains and an understanding of diverse product sectors such as textile composites, protective wear, filtration, sportswear, medical textiles and the integration of electronics into textile structures.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed by a combination of exams and coursework. The coursework supports the development of your transferable skills such as literature review and report writing. You will complete your MSc programme with a dissertation project. Your dissertation is an opportunity to apply your learning on a five-month technical textiles project. It also enables you to further develop your knowledge and skill in your chosen field. Your choice of topic, in consultation with your personal tutor, will range in purpose from investigatory and problem-solving work, through studies of state-of-the-art technology and current practice, to experimental and analytical research.

Course unit details

 The taught units are:

  • Textile Materials and Performance Evaluation
  • Yarn Technology
  • Applied Manufacturing Processes
  • Advanced Manufacturing Techniques
  • Technical Textiles
  • Advanced Coloration and Performance Evaluation

Textile Materials and Performance Evaluation

This programme unit provides a wide range of topics in textile materials science, performance enhancement and testing that are fundamental for effective functioning in a technical capacity within any textiles or materials related organisation. 

  • Nature of man-made and natural fibres.
  • Characteristics of fabrics and fabric mechanical properties. Yarn and Nonwovens Technology
  • Principles and applications of KES-FB and FAST fabric evaluation systems. Comfort in garment microclimates.
  • Dimensional stability, surface modification techniques, oil/water repellency, waterproofing, coating, lamination, flame retardants and smart materials.
  • Microscopy and surface analysis.

Yarn and Nonwovens Technology

This programme unit introduces the technologies of producing yarns and nonwovens from staple fibres and continuous filaments and provides knowledge in the quality and quality control aspects of yarn production. 

  • Fibre preparation, ring and other modern spinning technologies, texturing, yarn quality control, fancy yarns, composite yarns and yarn preparation.
  • Nonwovens web forming technology including dry laying, air laying, wet laying, spun-bonding, melt-blowing. Nonwovens consolidation/bonding technologies; mechanical and chemical bonding; thermal bonding; applications of nonwoven products.

Applied Manufacturing Processes

This programme unit provides a working knowledge of the weaving, knitting and joining processes, types of machinery used, types of fabric structures and associated properties of the product fabrics.

  • Fundamentals of weaving. Shuttle and shuttleless looms; multi-phase weaving machines and other modern developments in weaving technology; warp preparation; technical weaving and braiding.
  • Classification and analysis of knitting techniques and knitting cycles; patterning and shaping; flat bed, circular, Tricot and Raschel knitting machines; modern knitting techniques; cycle of high-speed circular knitting machines; machine performance; yarn performance and properties in knitting; quality and the dimensions stability of the fabric.
  • Fabric joining techniques.

Fundamental Technology and Concepts for Industrial Manufacture

This programme unit provides a working knowledge of concepts of `production for profit', `economy of scale', the importance of the Supply Chain in Textile manufacturing, the importance of pre-competitive research, Design of Experiments(DoE), prototyping and technology transfer and the basics concepts of textile engineering & machine mechanics.

  • The fundamentals of engineering & machine mechanics in order to deal with the Technical Textiles end users in Aerospace, Automotive and other industries, sustainability and recycling issues in manufacturing and design.
  • The nature of the global traditional and technical textiles industry and concepts relating to successful manufacturing and supply chain. Nature of engineering & chemical industry as opposed to the textile industry. Certification requirements (e.g. Aerospace, Automotive, Healthcare, Sportswear), product development in real industrial context, Design of Experiments, quality & inspection, product lifecycles, Sustainable Design. The nature of the research and production environment, individual and team R&D activities.

Technical Textiles - Industrial Applications

This programme unit introduces industrial applications for technical textiles and covers the production and application of textile composites, architectural textiles, geotextiles, automotive textiles, and industrial filtration.

  • Composites: Basic concepts, classification, manufacturing techniques-from fibre to composite, textile composites, composite applications, reuse & recycling; geotextiles: basic classification, main functions of a geotextiles, applications; Architectural textiles, concepts of tensegrity structures.
  • Automotive Textiles: requirements on automotive textiles including tyre cords, air bags, seat belts and seat fabrics, carpets, trims.
  • Principles of filtration, industrial filtration in textile, chemical, food and metallurgical applications.

Technical Textiles - Personal Environment

This programme unit introduces the production and use of technical textiles in human related areas including medical, smart, protective, sportswear, space applications.

  • Medical textile materials and structures; application of compression bandage technology for medical care; integrating electronic sensors into medical textiles; knitted electro-textiles.
  • Protective Textiles: Bullet proof, stab proof vests. Impact protection: impact mechanism and cellular textile composites. Ballistics and body armour.
  • Technical clothing, sportswear, spacewear, sailing equipment.
  • Medical and Smart Textiles

Accrediting organisations

Accredited by the Institute of Minerals, Materials and Mining (IOM 3 ) as meeting the Further Learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.



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This Postgraduate Certificate is designed for engineering professionals who are interested in developing their careers into systems engineering or project management roles in the space domain. Read more

This Postgraduate Certificate is designed for engineering professionals who are interested in developing their careers into systems engineering or project management roles in the space domain.

About this degree

Students will develop a powerful set of skills and knowledge about space systems and gain awareness and understanding of the economic and organisational context within which space sytems are developed including the limitations these can impose. Depending on the modules chosen, students may focus more on business, project management, reliability or design aspects.

Students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits.

The programme consists of four taught modules of 15 credits each.

Core modules

Students must take Space Systems (15 credits) and either three from the list below or two from the list below and one optional module.

  • Business Environment
  • Lifecycle Management
  • Risk, Reliability and Resilience
  • Systems Thinking and Engineering Management

Optional modules

  • Systems Design
  • Technology Strategy
  • Project Management (leading to Association for Project Management exam)
  • Delivering Complex Projects

Teaching and learning

The programme consists of four taught modules, each of which is delivered as a five-day block week consisting of a blend of interactive lectures, small-group exercises and presentations, case studies and workshop activity. Formative feedback is given to students throughout the modules. Modules are formally assessed through coursework to be completed a few weeks after the module, and for some modules there is also a short test or a 1.5 hour written examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Space Systems Engineering PG Cert

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Students who have studied this subject have found employment in aerospace, defence, communications, rail, construction, engineering, IT, management consultancy and many other areas.

Employability

Systems engineering is a highly sought-after expertise, particularly in engineering and technology-based organisations.

The programme's industrial advisory board ensures that the subjects students learn about cover the key issues faced by industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme combines interactive lectures, group exercises and case studies to reinforce key points. Lecturers are experts in the field, many of whom have engaged in the practice of systems engineering in industry, and all of whom oversee research across a broad range of subjects relating to systems engineering, project management and technology management.

Students with this degree will gain the skills, knowledege and confidence to further their careers. They will be able to build their professional contacts with like-minded individuals from different organisations.

On completion of the 60-credit programme, students may choose to apply to transfer their credit towards a 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma or a 180-credit MSc in Systems Engineering Management.

Accreditation:

The MSc in Systems Engineering Management (which students may choose to go on to study on successful completion of this Postgraduate Certificate) is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.



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The technology and applications of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) are wide-ranging and constantly evolving. Major fields of application include the aerospace industry, oil, gas and energy generation, chemical industries, space technology, rail transport, shipping and manufacturing. Read more
The technology and applications of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) are wide-ranging and constantly evolving. Major fields of application include the aerospace industry, oil, gas and energy generation, chemical industries, space technology, rail transport, shipping and manufacturing.

Other applications are constantly emerging and there are strong links with medical technology. New NDT techniques need to be developed to meet the changing needs of nano-technologies.

Course Overview

Careers in NDT often offer opportunities to travel and to work in new, high technology industries. The series of taught modules that form part one of the course will develop your in-depth knowledge and understanding of non-destructive testing technologies. The University has access to a range of state-of-the-art equipment and technologies including: Infrared Thermography; Ultrasonics; Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer; a ballistics testing cell and, DeltaVision computer software for the measurement of photoelasticity. Practical tasks undertaken with these facilities will enable you to develop your skills in applying a variety of testing and measurement techniques and critically examining the results.

Upon the successful completion of 120 credits in part one, you will be required to undertake an independent research project worth 60 credits. Your dissertation supervisor will be available to you to help guide you through the independent research phase.

Collaboration and Knowledge Transfer
Non Destructive Testing (NDT) and evaluation is a key area of research for UWTSD Swansea, where we are the lead academic partner in the NDT Validation Centre in Port Talbot (just outside Swansea), operated by TWI, a global leader in technology engineering and one of the UK's largest research organisations, with an international reputation. This partnership offers excellent opportunities to our students, providing industrial links relevant to the Part 2 project. Furthermore, funding from the Welsh Government and from the EPSRC has facilitated the acquisition of state-of-the-art equipment. Other links with industry include: Knauf Insulation; Silverwing UK Ltd; Oceaneering Inspection Services; Team Precision Pipeline Assembllies; Cyden; and, Rikoset.

UWTSD Swansea is the lead academic partner in the NDT Validation Centre, just outside Swansea, and through this partnership has strong links with TWI, one of the UK's largest research organisations, with an international reputation. The Institute has received significant funding for equipment and has an active research group in NDT,

Modules

The programme is structured in two parts. Part I (120 Credits) comprises the following taught modules:
-Research Methods
-NDT Systems, Standards and Applications
-Materials
-Ultrasonic Methods
-Radiographic Methods
-Electromagnetic Methods
-Thermal and Optical Methods

Part II (60 Credits)
-Major Project

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