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Air and Space Law is an intensive one-year Advanced Master’s at the internationally acclaimed Leiden Law School of Leiden University. Read more
Air and Space Law is an intensive one-year Advanced Master’s at the internationally acclaimed Leiden Law School of Leiden University. This unique programme offers a combination of public air law, private air law and space law, both from an international and a European perspective.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/air-and-space-law/en/introduction

Course detail

The Leiden Air and Space Law programme is unique. Our teaching and research has a clearly defined European dimension and is in line with the highest academic standards. At the same time, the programme focuses on professional applications, particularly through its internship requirements.

The International Institute of Air and Space Law (IIASL), which houses this advanced master’s specialisation, is one of the leading international academic research and teaching institutes in this field. The Institute maintains close relations with national and international organisations and institutions worldwide and enjoys the guidance of a prestigious International Advisory Board.

Purpose

This programme is specifically designed for:

• law graduates wishing to pursue a challenging advanced master’s study at postgraduate level, possibly followed by a PhD position;
• legal practitioners in internationally operating law firms, private companies (e.g. airlines, aircraft parts manufacturers), civil aviation authorities, telecommunications authorities, international and regional organisations and representatives from governments wishing to specialise in the area of air and space law.

Programme

The courses in Leiden’s Air and Space Law programme are taught by the International Institute of Air and Space Law’s expert faculty, visiting international professors and distinguished legal practitioners specialised in specific aspects of air and space law. We encourage an intensive interaction between students and teachers, typically resulting in greater involvement on the side of the students and, consequently, better results for you as a student.

Special features

As a student of Air and Space Law, you will benefit from:
• the Institute’s proximity to relevant European and international organisations and institutions such as the EU, the International Court of Justice, the European Space Agency (ESA, ESTEC), Eurocontrol, the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) and the UN COPUOS;
• frequent visits to these and other organisations and institutions with the aim to closely follow their activities and to expand your personal network;
• the International Advisory Board, some of whose members teach in the programme, and who can be of great help to build your network;
• the extensive library of the International Institute of Air and Space;
• the proximity of the Peace Palace in The Hague, which has a library with one of the world’s largest legal collections.

Internship

After completion of the scheduled lectures (in May),you will undertake a 6-8 week internship in an institution dealing with either air or space law, often located beyond the Dutch border. Blended learning students are not required to complete an internship.

Careers

This Leiden advanced master’s programme, offered by the Law School’s renowned International Institute of Air and Space Law, is optimally designed to suit requirements for professional positions.

Career options include:

• positions in law firms or in consulting firms with an aviation and space law practice;
• positions at legal departments of airports and airlines, aerospace companies;
• positions at civil aviation authorities;
• positions at ministries of transportation;
• positions in academia.

We are proud that most of our graduates find a high-level job soon after, and often before, graduation.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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Space Physiology & Health MSc is a unique programme providing training for biomedical scientists & physicians delivered by international experts from academia, contractors and space agencies (eg NASA). Read more
Space Physiology & Health MSc is a unique programme providing training for biomedical scientists & physicians delivered by international experts from academia, contractors and space agencies (eg NASA). Graduates will be equipped through lectures, seminars and extensive laboratory practicals and visits to RAF & Space Agency (ESA & DLR) facilities to serve future manned space expeditions.

Key benefits

- The programme is unique within Europe.

- Has input from professionals within the Space industry.

- Provides experiences with external partners including the Crew Medical Support Office at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/space-physiology-and-health-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skills in the following areas:

- Detailed and in depth knowledge of the physiological effects of the space environment upon humans and of the methods employed to mitigate such effects.

- Provide practical experience in experimentation methods appropriate to investigate the physiological effects of the space environment and those employed to mitigate such effects.

- A knowledge of instrumentation, calibration, data acquisition and the analysis of results whilst applying the appropriate statistical methods.an understanding of the effect of the space environment upon human behaviour and performance.

- An understanding of the effect of the space environment upon human behaviour and performance.

- A detailed knowledge of the practical implications of disease and physical deconditioning in space-faring humans and the practices required to counter and manage such events.

- Knowledge of the characteristics and practices associated with medical and life science research environments in space.

- Course purpose -

The aim of this programme is to provide graduates with advanced theoretical and practical training in the physiology, psychology and operational medicine of humans exposed to or working in the Space environment.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: Approximately 20 hours of taught classes per week with some entire weeks spent at research establishments in the UK and abroad. Part-time study: Not offered. The programme will comprise lectures, tutorials and seminars with a large practical component. The latter will provide personal experience and experimental studies of a wide variety of Space relevant environments including flight, acceleration, heat and cold, noise, and spatial disorientation. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 10,000 word dissertation (with 10+5 min oral presentation) aims to facilitate student research in the labs of world renowned supervisors in space agencies, academia and industry across the globe.

Career prospects

The programme provides a range of multidisciplinary skills and will help those wishing to pursue a career in human physiology in its broadest sense, either in academic research i.e. PhD, in industry, in Ministry of Defence research laboratories or National/International Space agencies including ESA.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gerontology and Ageing Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gerontology and Ageing Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Gerontology and Ageing Studies course is designed to meet employer needs and prepares students with the knowledge and experience needed to work with older people, design policies, manage and deliver services and manufacture products for an ageing population.

Key Features of Gerontology and Ageing Studies

Performance:

- International approach that is unique in the UK

- Hosted in the internationally renowned research centre, the Centre for Innovative Ageing

- The centre is the largest gerontology research centre in Wales and the second largest in the UK

- The Centre hosts the Older People and Ageing Research and Development Network and the Wales Stroke Research Interest Group

- Offers strong national and international links as well as links with the Wales Dementias and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network.

Teaching and Employability:

- programme is designed to meet employer needs

- encompasses a range of disciplines delivered by subject leaders and experts from around the world

- opportunities for work placements within local NGO’s (non-Governmental Organisations)

- opportunity to study abroad at one of the College’s partner institutions in Alberta, Canada

The field of ageing is becoming increasingly important: Over the last 25 years the percentage of the population aged 65 and over increased from 15% in 1983 to 16 per cent in 2008, an increase of 1.5 million people in this age group. This trend is projected to continue. By 2033, 23 per cent of the population will be aged 65 and over compared to 18% aged 16 or younger. The fastest population increase has been in the number of those aged 85 and over, the 'oldest old'.

In 2012, the Welsh Government launched the third phase of the Strategy for Older People. Gerontology and Ageing Studies at Swansea looks at policy, practice and application to put you at the forefront of current developments.

Gerontology and Ageing Studies takes a holistic approach. It shifts the central focus from the medical model of ageing, to one that encompasses a range of disciplines including psychology, sociology and demography, viewing ageing more positively.

Why choose Gerontology and Ageing Studies?

The course in Gerontology and Ageing draws on the research and expertise of The Centre of Innovative Ageing (CIA) within the College of Human and Health Sciences.

The CIA is at the forefront of interdisciplinary work on ageing and provides the infrastructure, focus and leadership for ageing research across the University. The Centre houses a unique cluster of researchers and lecturers who contribute to each of the postgraduate courses in Gerontology and Ageing studies.

The Gerontology and Ageing Studies course is designed to meet employer needs and prepares students with the knowledge and experience needed to work with older people, design policies, manage and deliver services and manufacture products for an ageing population.

Modules

Modules on the Gerontology and Ageing Studies programme typically include:

• Population Ageing and Policy: An Introduction

• Perspectives on Ageing

• Foundations in Research

• Health and Ageing

• Policies and Practices for an Ageing Population

• Older People, Citizenship and Participation

• Critical Practice with Older People

• Environment and Ageing

• Psychology of Ageing

Gerontology and Ageing Studies Course Structure

The Gerontology and Ageing Studies course is offered on a full-time or part-time basis.

Full-time students normally complete six modules and submit their dissertation by the end of the first year. Part-time students will normally take two years to complete six modules, and one further year to complete the dissertation.

The MSc in Gerontology and Ageing Studies comprises 6 modules (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Four compulsory modules (20 credits each) cover the context of population ageing and explore theoretical perspectives on ageing.

Post-Graduate Certificate and Diploma Options in Gerontology and Ageing Studies:

These courses, similar to the MSc, can also be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Certificate students will take three modules totalling 60 credits, comprising two compulsory modules and one optional module selected from the College MSc catalogue.

The diploma students will complete the same 120 credits as the MSc but will not be required to complete the 60 credit dissertation.

Both options are flexible for students looking to study specific areas of interest whilst still obtaining a solid foundation in the principles of gerontology. These options provide the perfect alternative for individuals or employers who want the world-leading education provided by the Centre for Innovative Ageing, but for whom the research project is not integral to their learning experience.

Career Prospects

Other recent graduates work across a diverse range of sectors including:

- local government

- social worker/social services

- academic and policy research

- insurance and financial services

- architecture and town planning

The College of Human and Health Sciences offers full training in research methodology in addition to the core gerontology education which demonstrate a set of research and analytical skills that are fully transferable and highly desirable to employers.

Work Placements

Although not an assessed component off the course, students are provided with the opportunity to undertake volunteer placements within a local NGO (Non-Governmental Organisation). This enhances the student’s employment options and widens their exposure to the practical field of gerontology. Students who undertake a placement will receive a certificate from the NGO detailing the number of hours of their placement to act as a record for employment and development purposes.

Staff Expertise

Research undertaken by members of the CIA falls into seven broad themes:

Rights, Equality and Inclusion

Environments of ageing

Environmental hazards – Falls, shared space

Community, intergenerational and family relationships

Technology and its facilitation

Future of ageing

Social care – Health and wellbeing



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This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society. Read more
This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society.

Whether you prefer ancient Greek dramas, medieval Dutch poetry, contemporary American literature, or general literary theory, this Master’s is suited to students wishing to contribute to textual research. The Master’s in Literary Studies will teach you how to approach historical and contemporary texts from an international perspective, as well as to examine the current societal significance of literature. By the end of the programme, you’ll be able to discuss literary texts and scholarly approaches with other scholars at the highest academic level.

At Radboud University, we believe that to fully understand literature, you need to broaden your scope. You will gain insight into methods and theories in both literary studies and the humanities in general. You’ll become familiar with a wide range of literary traditions, critical approaches and theoretical debates. This will enhance your own research. In order to expand your horizon as a literary scholar, you’ll spend a semester conducting research and taking courses abroad.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

Europe and its worlds

The programme welcomes students with interest in all fields of literary studies, but our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including the ways Europe interacts with and differs from the rest of the world. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups.

Why study Literary Studies at Radboud University?

- There is a strong focus on textual scholarship and methods of literary interpretation. The programme studies all forms of literary texts and written records from all historical periods.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s as Historical Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of other disciplines within the humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic world.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Literary Studies will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

- Thematic research groups
There is a literary scientist in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to a literary researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Literary Studies students:

- European Literary History
This group explores the various forms, functions, agents, media, infrastructures, traditions and theories of literature that, now or then, have been involved in relating ‘Europe’ to a certain space, tradition, or identity.

- Studying Criticism And Reception Across Borders
This group researches literary reception in its broadest sense, from analysing the practice of book reviewers and literary criticism, to studying all sorts of literary institutions like publishers, literary magazines.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Literary Studies:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Classicism under Justinian. A study of Justinian's classicising policies in the fields of literature, legislation and military conquest.
- The early transmission of Sappho's songs reflected in the ancient sources.
- Performing the Past, Staging the Future: Memory, Modernity, and (Inter)nationalist Identities at the Dublin Gate Theatre.
- Austen: The Next Generation. Modern reworkings of Pride and Prejudice and the Quest for New Audiences.
- De naam van de schrijver. Auteur, lezer en pseudoniem.
- Lolita - ethiek, lezer & effect. Een cognitief narratologische analyse van Vladimir Nabokovs Lolita (1955).

Academia and beyond

This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also do well and often find academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:
- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre
- Assistant of a senior researcher
- Teacher at an institution for higher education
- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science
- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship
- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals
- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector
- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Gerontology and Ageing Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Gerontology and Ageing Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This degree in International Gerontology and Ageing Studies aims to provide students with a unique insight into the policy differences between the devolved countries of the UK and across the globe.

Key Features of International Gerontology and Ageing Studies

Performance:

- international approach that is unique in the UK

- hosted in the internationally renowned research centre, the Centre for Innovative Ageing

- the centre is the largest gerontology research centre in Wales and the second largest in the UK

- the Centre hosts the Older People and Ageing Research and Development Network and the Wales Stroke Research Interest Group

- offers strong national and international links as well as links with the Wales Dementias and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network

- connections to policy-makers which are unparalleled in other parts of the UK

Teaching and Employability:

- delivered by subject leaders and experts from around the world

- programme is designed to meet employer needs

- opportunities for work placements within local NGO’s (non-Governmental Organisations)

- opportunity to study abroad at one of the College’s partner institutions in Alberta, Canada

The International Gerontology and Ageing Studies programme acknowledges that ageing is accompanied by biological changes, but takes a holistic approach to ageing. It shifts the central focus from the medical model of ageing, to one that encompasses a range of disciplines including psychology, sociology and demography, viewing ageing more positively.

The MSc in International Gerontology and Ageing draws on the research and expertise of The Centre of Innovative Ageing (CIA) within the College of Human and Health Sciences. The CIA is in the forefront of interdisciplinary work on ageing and provides the infrastructure, focus and leadership for ageing research across the University. The Centre houses a unique cluster of researchers and lecturers who contribute to each of the postgraduate courses in Gerontology and Ageing studies.

Why choose International Gerontology and Ageing Studies?

The MSc in International Gerontology and Ageing Students is a unique course in the UK and provides students with an extended Master’s degree from a recognised global centre of excellence for gerontological education and research.

Students are immersed in global theories of gerontology and have the opportunity to experience first-hand the practical application of their studies.

Students are supported and mentored by the team at Swansea both whilst at the home and host institutions so there is continuity in the support provided, ensuring that the student gets the most from the experience.

Being hosted in an internationally renowned research centre, the MSc in International Gerontology and Ageing Studies benefits from lectures delivered by subject leaders both domestically and from around the globe.

The course is designed to meet employer needs and prepare students with the knowledge and experience needed to work with older people, design policies, manage and deliver services and manufacture products for an ageing population.

Modules

Modules on the International Gerontology and Ageing Studies course typically include:

Population Ageing and Policy: An Introduction

Perspectives on Ageing

Foundations in Research

Health and Ageing

Dissertation

Policies and Practice for an Ageing Population

Critical Practice with Older People

Environment and Ageing

Older People, Citizenship and Participation

Psychology and Ageing

Semester Abroad, University of Alberta

International Gerontology and Ageing Studies Course Structure

This course is delivered over 18 months, with students studying at Swansea University for one academic year, and then at the University of Alberta, Canada for approximately four months in the second year undertaking three modules of study and assessment to broaden their study and employment possibilities.

Each module provides the opportunity to explore cutting-edge debates and issues on ageing in a global context.

Career Prospects

Graduates work across a diverse range of sectors including:

local government

social worker/social services

academic and policy research

insurance and financial services

architecture and town planning

The College of Human and Health Sciences offers full training in research methodology in addition to the core gerontology education which demonstrate a set of research and analytical skills that are fully transferable and highly desirable to employers.

Work Placements

Although not an assessed component off the course, students are provided with the opportunity to undertake volunteer placements within a local NGO (Non-Governmental Organisation). This enhances the student’s employment options and widens their exposure to the practical field of gerontology. Students who undertake a placement will receive a certificate from the NGO detailing the number of hours of their placement to act as a record for employment and development purposes.

Staff Expertise

Research undertaken by members of the CIA falls into seven broad themes:

Rights, Equality and Inclusion

Environments of ageing

Environmental hazards – Falls, shared space

Community, intergenerational and family relationships

Technology and its facilitation

Future of ageing

Social care – Health and wellbeing

MSc research dissertations and subsequent PhD programmes of research are encouraged and supported within each of these themes.

Staff teaching on the MSc Gerontology and Ageing Studies has expertise in at least one of the research themes of the centre. Through the duration of the course staff are rotated to ensure lectures are given by the person with the most knowledge and experienced in that field.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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Whether it is the history of Europe, the development of modern European literature or the art of Rome that fascinates you, the Research Master's specialization are an excellent choice for talented students who want to prepare themselves for an international academic career. Read more

Overview

Whether it is the history of Europe, the development of modern European literature or the art of Rome that fascinates you, the Research Master's specialization are an excellent choice for talented students who want to prepare themselves for an international academic career. Indeed, the diversity of interests of our teaching and research staff will allow you to specialize in almost any subject, and the space we offer within the Master's specialization for research and studies at home and abroad allows you to put together a training programme that perfectly meets your wishes.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs

Specialisations

Within the Master's programme in Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies, you can choose between three English-taught Master's specializations:

1. Historical Studies
Students can specialize in any historical theme from antiquity to the present day. Many students specialize in Ancient History, Medieval History, Cultural History from 1500 to the present, the History of Dutch Catholicism, Gender studies, Modern Political History, Globalisation and Presented History. Students, working in small numbers, will pursue their own specialty and discuss developments in contemporary historiography, debate research ideas and critique other's writings and research.

2. Literary Studies
If you have completed your Bachelor's degree in one of the classical or modern languages and have strong ambitions to conduct international research, this programme is your springboard to an academic career in literary studies. The specialization admits students of various languages and literatures, including German, French, Spanish, English (both American and British), Dutch, Ancient Greek and Latin as well as other languages and literary studies. Central to this programme is the attention paid to methods of textual interpretation and New Philology. Students select courses to fit the needs of their specialism and discuss contemporary developments and research ideas. Whether you prefer ancient Greek tragedy, contemporary American literature or Dutch poetry, the new Literary Studies Research Master's is very well suited for talented students wishing to contribute to (inter)national research in this field.

3. Art and Visual Culture
If you are interested in visual and material culture from Antiquity to the present and aspire a career in international scientific research in the fields of art, visual culture or classical archaeology, Radboud University Nijmegen is pleased to offer a two-year research Master's specialisation which offers exactly that. This programme is based on the unique cooperation of the departments of Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History, allowing a broad perspective on the visual heritage of western culture from classical antiquity to the present as well as specialist training.

The Research Master's in Art and Visual Culture is designed for highly motivated students who are interested in the art and visual culture of Europe from classical antiquity to the present, and have ambitions for an international career in these fields.

HLCS institute

The HLCS institute greatly values the close interaction between students and top researchers, which is why our courses are open only to small numbers of students working under the supervision of experienced professors. At the start of the first year, you will choose a tutor (always an excellent researcher with relevant expertise) who will personally guide your development as a specialist in your field. Regular meetings with your tutor will ensure the steady increase of your academic skills. They will also offer the opportunity to exchange research ideas at an advanced level. Your tutor will help you apply for international funding to support research trips and the attendance of conferences, as well as guide the preparation of your PhD proposal, which is an integral part of the course programme.

Career prospects

During the Master’s programme you will gain a broad perspective on the humanities in general because of the collaboration between the programmes of Historical Studies, Literary Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. Through your personal Master’s research, you will also have concentrated on a very specific phenomenon in your own field. This combination of broad and specific focus will open a lot of doors for you. Our research programme has produced graduates that are appreciated by employees for their research skills as well as their insightfulness and analytical skills, and who have not only learned how to delve into large quantity of data and master it but also how to place their results in a larger context.

In short, at the end of the programme you’ll:
- Have acquired heuristic research skills at an advanced level.
- Have gained general knowledge of leading perspectives, theories, concepts, and paradigm shifts in the humanities and advanced knowledge specifically for own field.
- Be able to engage in the public debates regarding issues in the humanities.
- Have acquired English academic writing skills and have practiced writing a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- Have started to build up a professional international network.

Academia and beyond
This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also obtain academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:
- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre
- Assistant of a senior researcher
- Teacher at an institution for higher education
- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science
- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship
- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals
- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector
- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs

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The political and social dimensions of religions are at the heart of this innovative programme, which explores the role of religions and theology in global development. Read more

The political and social dimensions of religions are at the heart of this innovative programme, which explores the role of religions and theology in global development. You’ll consider religion as a resource, obstacle and participant in development, exploring the relationships between religions, aid agencies and local communities.

You’ll develop your understanding of both development and religious studies, as core modules introduce you to theories and issues in development and how they relate to developing countries across the Global South. In addition, you’ll choose from optional modules in each area, allowing you to specialise in topics such as the links between conflict or gender and development, or the role of religion in public life.

Drawing on sociological, historical, anthropological and political approaches, this diverse degree will equip you with the skills and knowledge to research the relationship between religions and development in a stimulating environment.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

This course is taught jointly by Theology and Religious Studies and the Centre for Global Development.

Across the year you’ll study a core module introducing you to theories and approaches in development studies, and how social, economic and political inequalities lay at the heart of development. In Semester Two another core module will focus on the complex relationships between religions and global development – the views of different religious traditions towards issues such as poverty, gender and welfare, and the roles they can play in development.

At the same time you’ll be thinking about your dissertation: an independent research project on a topic of your choice which allows you to demonstrate the skills and subject knowledge that you gain. You can choose to extend your dissertation if you want to go into even greater depth. You’ll submit the finished dissertation by the end of the programme in August.

You’ll also have other opportunities to specialise, as you choose from optional modules to focus on topics that suit your interests or career plans. In development studies, you’ll select from modules on topics such as democracy and development, or Africa in the modern world. If you opt for the standard dissertation, you’ll choose another module from religious studies.

If you decide to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

There are three compulsory modules throughout the programme including the Dissertation (60 credits). You’ll then choose an optional module, or if you select the Extended Dissertation (90 credits) you’ll take a single optional module.

  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • Religions and Global Development 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Modernity and the Jews 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Democracy and Development 30 credits
  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • Muslims, Multiculturalism and the State 30 credits
  • Religion and Society: Research Process and Methods 30 credits
  • Religion, Politics and the Future: From Apocalypse to Utopia 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits
  • Research Project (Theology and Religious Studies) 30 credits
  • Special Options in Theology and Religious Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Religious Studies and Global Development MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Religious Studies and Global Development MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules use a combination of lectures and seminars, which allow you to discuss the issues arising from your lectures and reading. Independent study is also an important element of this programme, as it allows you to develop your skills and gives you space to form your own ideas.

Assessment

We also use a range of assessment methods. These usually include essays, but some modules may involve project reports and presentations. Modules taught by other Schools within the University may also use different methods.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with diverse and in-depth subject knowledge, as well as strong political and cultural awareness. These are all valuable in a wide range of careers – and you’ll also have advanced skills in areas such as analysis and interpretation, oral and written communication, and different types of research.

Graduates pursue careers in a variety of sectors where they can use their knowledge of development and religion, as well as a variety of other fields. These include the charity sector, NGOs, education, local government, civil service and policy work, business and legal services, the media and social work. Many also continue their studies at PhD level, and even pursue academic careers after this.

We offer plenty of support to boost your employability, including an impressive array of research training offered by the School, the University Library and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute. The School also has a dedicated postgraduate employment advisor who can offer tailored careers advice.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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Research profile. Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion. Read more

Research profile

Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion.

You can specialise in a variety of areas which include contemporary and historical topics and fields such as Asian Studies, History of Religions/New Religions, and Jewish Studies.

You will be encouraged to frame your research using a range of theoretical and methodological approaches, from the classic to the cutting-edge. You will be able to draw on methodological expertise which includes biographical analysis, discourse analysis, ethnography, historical and textual studies, memory studies and narrative studies. The thematic interests of academic staff include ethnicity, gender, indigeneity, nationalism, textuality and the transnational.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Religious Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term-time.



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The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Read more

Why American Studies in Nijmegen?

The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Our Master's program gives students the opportunity to become experts in the concept of ‘America' in a variety of fields: US history, literature, culture (including popular culture, film, theatre, political history, foreign policy, constitutional law, religion and social science. Radboud University's programme distinguishes itself from other's by emphasizing the cultural and political relations between the United States, its neighbours and Europe.

The open classroom experience is what teachers and researches of the Master`s program “North American Studies” want to create for their students. For an example of the experience, in the project “Politics & Culture of Liberation” students and teachers worked closely with the National Liberation Museum in Groesbeek, the Regional Archive in Nijmegen and the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The project resulted in an exhibition on the impact of American culture on Europe and the Transatlantic World. This is only one example of the many creative seminar projects that students realize in the Master`s program.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

Specializations

Specialisations in the Master's in North American Studies. The Master's programme in North American Studies offers two specialisations:

1. Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective
2. Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

America's cultural icons are the world's cultural icons. From Walt Disney to the Statue of Liberty, from Hollywood to Time magazine, and from Jack Kerouac to Philip Roth, the influence of American culture and literature around the world is huge. Our program allows students to critically explore the significance of American culture in countries around the globe. Aside from studying the variety of meanings assigned to American cultural products abroad, students will explore the diversity of the American cultural expressions themselves.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks beyond national borders. In this program you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States within, outside and at its borders. Central themes are the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe, and related issues in the field of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

Study American issues with an interdisciplinary view

True to the tradition of American Studies, our program teaches students to approach issues from different angles and to think in multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary ways. We also offer excellent internships, thanks to our global network. Furthermore, we are the only university in the Netherlands to teach oral communication skills in the American language throughout our Bachelor's program, so that students who go on to study for a Master's degree have near-native language abilities.

High level of communication in American English

In Nijmegen, you will find yourself in a dynamic learning environment where the level of scholarship and communication in (American) English is extremely high. This is one of the reasons why our program is so popular. Another reason is the choice the University offers between two fascinating fields within which you can create your own custom-made program: ‘Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective' and ‘Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society.'

Program outline

Within the program in North America Studies, you can choose from the following two specialisations. Each specialisation comprises of a one-year, 60 EC program including a 20 EC Master's thesis project. For more information about program outline, structure, and courses, please click on the links below.

Literature and Cultures of North America in International Perspective
All students enrolled in this Master's specialisation take compulsory foundational courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is an elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include courses on Native Americans, African-American literature and the American borderlands.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society
If you follow this specialisation, you will take several obligatory foundation courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is a small elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include a special course on the Beat Generation, one of America's most influential avant-garde movements; Native Americans; African-American Literature and Culture; American Borders: Contact Conflict and Exchange; or American Constitutional Law (taught in Dutch).

Career prospects

There is a wide range of opportunities for graduates from the Master's program in North American Studies. Your broad interdisciplinary education and excellent command of English will help you find a job in an international setting. You could work in school or university education, in research, in journalism or other media, in publishing, museums, international finance, government, business, international affairs or as a diplomat.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Urban Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Urban Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

For the MSc by Research Urban Studies programme you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element. The MSc by Research in Urban Studies has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

The MSc by Research Urban Studies enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Urban Studies programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As part of the Urban Studies programme, you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features of Urban Studies

Swansea is a research-led University and the Department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a Postgraduate Geography Student in Urban Studies you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

In the latest Research Assessment Exercise, 95% of Geography research at Swansea was judged to be of international quality, and 60% was regarded as World-leading or internationally excellent.

Facilities

As a student of the Urban Studies programme you will have access to:

Computer laboratory with 24 computers providing general IT software and programmes dedicated to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing Computer laboratory with 10 high-performance Linux workstations delivering software tools for advanced GIS and remote sensing applications

Specialist laboratory suites for stable isotope ratio analysis; tree ring analysis; extraction and identification of organic compounds; pollen extraction and analysis; rainfall simulation; tephra analysis; soil and sediment characterisation

In addition, the computing facilities include 15 dual-processor workstations for Earth Observation, a 20-node multiprocessor Beowulf cluster, and the Department’s IBM ‘Blue Ice’ Supercomputer, used mainly for climate and glaciological modelling.

Research

All academic staff in Geography are active researchers and the department has a thriving research culture and a strong postgraduate community.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that Geography at Swansea University is ranked joint 9th in the UK for research impact and 11th in the UK for research environment.

Research groups include:

Environmental Dynamics

Glaciology

Global Environmental Modelling and Earth Observation

Migration, Boundaries and Identity

Social Theory and Urban Space



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What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena. Read more
What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena.

With the expertise in basic research that you will gain in the programme, you can pursue a career in research. You will also acquire proficiency in the use of mathematical methods, IT tools and/or experimental equipment, as well as strong problem-solving and logical deduction skills. These will qualify you for a wide range of positions in the private sector.

After completing the programme, you will:
-Have wide-ranging knowledge of particle physics and/or astrophysical phenomena.
-Have good analytical, deductive and computational skills.
-Be able to apply theoretical, computational and/or experimental methods to the analysis and understanding of various phenomena.
-Be able to generalize your knowledge of particle physics and astrophysical phenomena as well as identify their interconnections.
-Be able to formulate hypotheses and test them based your knowledge.

The teaching in particle physics and astrophysical sciences is largely based on the basic research. Basic research conducted at the University of Helsinki has received top ratings in international university rankings. The in-depth learning offered by international research groups will form a solid foundation for your lifelong learning.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The understanding of the microscopic structure of matter, astronomical phenomena and the dynamics of the universe is at the forefront of basic research today. The advancement of such research in the future will require increasingly sophisticated theoretical, computational and experimental methods.

The study track in elementary particle physics and cosmology focuses on experimental or theoretical particle physics or cosmology. The theories that form our current understanding of these issues must be continuously re-evaluated in the light of new experimental results. In addition to analytical computation skills, this requires thorough mastery of numerical analysis methods. In experimental particle physics, the main challenges pertain to the management and processing of continuously increasing amount of data.

The study track in astrophysical sciences focuses on observational or theoretical astronomy or space physics. Our understanding of space, ranging from near Earth space all the way to structure of the universe, is being continuously redefined because of improved experimental equipment located both in space and on the Earth’s surface. Several probes are also carrying out direct measurements of planets, moons and interplanetary plasma in our solar system. Another key discipline is theoretical astrophysics which, with the help of increasingly efficient supercomputers, enables us to create in-depth models of various phenomena in the universe in general and the field of space physics in particular. Finally, plasma physics is an important tool in both space physics and astronomy research.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme includes two study tracks:
-Particle physics and cosmology
-Astrophysical sciences

Courses in the programme have been compiled into modules. Both study tracks contain a mandatory core module that includes a research seminar. The study tracks are divided into specialisations that focus on astronomy, space physics, particle physics or cosmology. Courses typically include lectures, exercises, group work and research literature and end in examinations and/or final assignments. In addition, some studies can be completed as book examinations.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master’s programme is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be completed in two years. The degree consists of:
-90 credits of Master’s studies, including a Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-30 credits of other studies from the Master’s programme or other degree programmes.

In addition, your studies include a personal study plan as well as career orientation and planning. You might also take part in a traineeship, elective studies offered by the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, or studies offered by other degree programmes.

Career Prospects

A Master’s degree in elementary particle physics or astrophysical sciences provides you with excellent qualifications for postgraduate education in research or for a career in diverse positions both in Finland and abroad. As a Master’s graduate you could begin a career in research and development in industry as well as in universities and other research institutes that enable you to conduct independent research on a topic that interests you.

Potential employers and career opportunities include:
-Research institutes in Finland and abroad (basic scientific research).
-Universities and universities of applied sciences (teaching).
-Industry, particularly high technology companies (applied research and development, managerial duties).
-Software production, e.g., the game sector.
-Diverse planning and consulting positions.

Master’s graduates from equivalent study tracks under the previous degree system have embarked on careers in:
-Research and teaching positions in Finnish universities and research institutes.
-Research and teaching positions abroad, for example at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research), ESA (the European Space Agency), ESO (the European Southern Observatory), and NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration).
-Administrative positions, for example at the Academy of Finland or the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation (Tekes).
-The business sector.

The strong theoretical and analytical skills you will acquire in the programme are in great demand in fields such as:
-Data analysis (industry, media companies, game companies, financing).
-Industrial research, development and consulting (at, e.g., Nokia, Ericsson, Apple, Sanoma, Spinverse, Supercell, Nielsen, Valo -Research and Trading, Planmeca, Reaktor, Comptel, and Goldman Sachs).

Internationalization

Our multilingual Master’s programme is highly international. The Department hosts a large number of international students and staff members. In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science provide many opportunities for international engagement:
-Student exchange at one of the destinations available through the Faculty or the University.
-International traineeships.
-English-language teaching offered by the Faculty.
-Master’s thesis project as a member of one of the international research groups operating under the programme.
-Cooperation with international students enrolled in the programme.
-International duties in subject-specific student organisations or the Student Union of the University of Helsinki.
-Language courses organised by the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki.

The Faculty of Science is a top research institute in its fields among European universities. Its partners include many leading international research institutes, such as the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

As a student at the Faculty of Science, you will have the opportunity to complete a research traineeship period at, for example, CERN in Geneva. By completing a traineeship at one of the internationally active research groups on campus you will be able to acquaint yourself and network with the international scientific community during your Master’s studies. The international student exchange programmes available at the University provide numerous opportunities to complete part of your degree at a university abroad.

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MA Childhood Studies is based on an informed and critical approach to the academic study of childhood and youth and is intended to reflect both the desires and ambitions of postgraduate students and the philosophical traditions and current developments in the social studies of childhood and youth. Read more
MA Childhood Studies is based on an informed and critical approach to the academic study of childhood and youth and is intended to reflect both the desires and ambitions of postgraduate students and the philosophical traditions and current developments in the social studies of childhood and youth.

This taught Masters course has been developed for postgraduate students or senior professionals interested in specialised or advanced study of childhood and youth. It will, therefore, be of particular interest to those wishing to be or already employed in the children and young people’s workforce. In line with recent international developments in social studies of childhood and youth, the MA Childhood Studies is transdisciplinary in approach but has a strong emphasis on perspectives drawn from sociology, social policy, geography, anthropology and history. The course is informed by the United Nations Rights of the Child (UNCRC) framework and draws on current methodological standpoints in childhood and youth research that emphasis participation. It is committed to adopting a ‘child/young person - centred’ philosophy throughout, and reflects the principles of protecting the rights and interests of children and young people and the increasing importance of participation. The changing conditions of childhood and youth and the ways in which children and young people themselves experience and understand their everyday lives is emphasised.

The aims of the MA (including PG Dip/PG Cert) Childhood Studies are:

• To offer an innovative, dynamic and flexible programme that critically considers developments in the academic study of childhood and the changing contexts of childhood and youth in a globalised world.
• To critically explore the cultural and social constructions of childhood and youth and the implications that they have had and continue to have on children and young people’s everyday lives.
• To advance students’ knowledge of the complexity of understanding the relationship between children’s rights, the ideologies and responsibilities for welfare and the lived realities of children’s and young people’s diverse experiences.
• To provide a robust theoretical framework for students to develop an integrated and critically aware understanding of childhood and youth studies and to cultivate a critical and analytical approach to contemporary methodological advances in childhood research.
• To develop in students a range of intellectual skills reflecting both the ethos of lifelong learning and the rigour required at M level, a high level of student autonomy and self-direction in order to facilitate the student to demonstrate initiative, originality alongside integrity and ethical judgement in their advanced scholarship and to become influential and effective specialists in the field of childhood and youth studies.

The MA Childhood Studies course is delivered on a flexible, blended learning basis using both traditionally taught elements of the course with lectures, seminars and tutorials during study days, weekend learning programmes and a research summer school and through new media technologies and the online learning environment. Combined, these provide an effective and dynamic space for engaging students and effectively promoting student learning through a knowledge sharing philosophy.

The course team have a commitment to high quality teaching and they incorporate a wide variety of technological tools and learning and teaching techniques to form a collaborative space that enables a seamless transition between classroom based and online learning. Tutors are able to monitor understanding and clarify and expand on points quickly and efficiently to support student learning. Using audio and video, online lectures, links to key reading and relevant web based materials these methods of technology enhanced learning are part of a blended learning programme. whilst some modules can be studied by students at a time and pace that best suits them, other modules have a more structured approach in their design and students access the course content on a week by week basis. All modules are designed to offer students a shared learning experience with other students and module tutors. They involve discussion boards and blogs and more interactive learning tools and techniques as well as the self-study materials, downloadable documents, email, eportfolio||, podcasts and vodcasts found throughout the course.

Students will require access to Broadband either at home, in their workplace or in a public library and standard PC or MAC technology. Ipods/Mp3 players would be helpful to also facilitate mobile learning for students to download and listen to podcasts.

The course uses a range of different assessment strategies, which could include: essays and reports; critical reviews and commentaries; analytical exercises; individual or group presentations; a project-based or work-experience report; a dissertation; computer-based assessments and informed discussion and debate via module Blogs.

Most modules run along the UCS based semester September to June but the actual arrangement of the taught content of the modules varies. Some modules can be accessed and studied on a more flexible, independent basis than others allowing greater autonomy in student learning whilst other modules follow a more structured approach and provide a more formalised approach to learning with study days, weekend workshop or a summer school. All modules fulfil UCS requirements in providing the necessary hours of study for students to succeed and obtain credits and masters level. A full-time student is expected to study 3 modules in one year, giving 120 credits and undertake a 60 credit research dissertation. A part-time student will take either 40, 60 or 80 credits per year as taught modules and finally the 60 credit research dissertation.

Students can expect to have to study between four to five hours per module each week and to spend at least an equivalent amount of time per week in additional reading and set learning activities and preparing for assignments. Students will be provided with timetables and learning schedules when they join the course. Personal tutorial advice is a key feature of the course and the course team offer students support either on a face-to-face basis, via telephone or personalised blog.

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The Master of Science in Communication Studies. Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. Read more

About the programme

The Master of Science in Communication Studies: Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. The Master looks at journalism and media from an economic, political-ideological and policy perspective. It pays attention to the impact of recent economic, political and technological developments on journalism and media. The Master zooms in on media and journalism in a European context, looking comparatively at journalism across Europe and at journalism in the context of European integration. It makes optimal use of Brussels with its range of European and international institutions and the many media, journalism and communication professionals working in and around those institutions.

This master offers...

- A high-level and integrated programme and interdisciplinary approach to journalism and media in Europe
- Teaching in small groups, using interactive methods, stimulating individual participation
- The possibility of writing your thesis in English, Dutch, French or German (the last three on approval)
- Close collaboration with researchers from the research centers Studies on Media, Information and Telecommunication (SMIT), Studies on Media and Culture (Cemeso), and Democracy, Signification, Resistance (Desire), and the Brussels Platform for Journalism (BPJ)
- Teaching in Brussels, the capital of Europe and home to an emerging European communication space. The Master will acquaint you with European institutions and media players. The Master includes a yearly lecture series with representatives of European media industry, journalism and institutions, organizes site visits, and offers the possibility of an internship.

Structure

https://my.vub.ac.be/sites/default/files/faculteit/ES/Documenten/msc_in_communication_studies_jnm.pdf

This daytime programme consists of two semesters and can be completed in one academic year.
Alternatively, it can be completed in one and half or two years. It comprises compulsory courses including a master's thesis (48 ECTS), and two optional courses or an internship (12 ECTS).

Compulsory Courses (48 ECTS)

Advanced Methods for Journalism Research
Advanced Theoretical Debates: Journalism, Politics and Ideology
Brussels talking: Lecture Series on Europe, Media and Society
Current Case Studies in Journalism
The Political Economy of Journalism in the EU
Master's Thesis in Communication Studies

Optional Courses (12 ECTS)

Traineeship in Communication Studies
Journalism Practice in Europe
Media, Public Spheres and Public Opinions in Europe
Policy Advocacy and Media in the EU
Challenges and Mutations of Journalism (course at the Université Libre de Bruxelles - in English)

Admission requirements

Direct access is granted for students with a Belgian Bachelor’s degree in Communication Studies.

All other applicants' files will be evaluated by the Admission Board on an individual basis. Applicants with a bachelor diploma in a field other than Communication Studies may still be accepted provided they take a few additional courses in the form of a short preparatory programme (consisting of maximum 24 ECTS credits). This preparatory programme can be followed while starting the Master.

Please note: An academic BA or MA degree is required to apply.

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This innovative international programme offers you the unique opportunity to undertake study (in English) and research in at least three different countries at our renowned partner institutions, culminating in the award of a multiple degree according to your chosen pathway. Read more
This innovative international programme offers you the unique opportunity to undertake study (in English) and research in at least three different countries at our renowned partner institutions, culminating in the award of a multiple degree according to your chosen pathway.

Why this programme

◾If you are interested in the challenges faced by the states and societies of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia and their place within the new global order, this two-year programme is for you.
◾Guaranteed placements at external organisations are included under each pathway.
◾The programme is delivered by leading experts in their specialist areas of research.
◾Language tuition is available throughout the progamme.
◾The programme builds upon the foundations of the successful IntM in Russian, Central and East European Studies double degree which was recognised by the European Commission as an Erasmus Mundus Master Course of ‘outstanding academic quality’.

Programme structure

The programme is structured around three predefined mobility periods at three different universities across Europe, Russia, and Eurasia. Also included is a fourth flexible mobility period during which you will undertake independent study. The mobility periods are designed to enable you to engage with a variety of perspectives on the programme’s core themes.
A research proposal submitted at the end of semester 1 in year 1 will determine future mobility patterns and study pathway diversification in semester 2. In year 2 you will continue under the same study pathway. The research proposal will have a strong influence on the allocation of the year 2 pathway partner, where you will undertake coursework plus a placement at an external organisation.

Year 1– semester 1

]]
University of Tartu

[[Core courses

 Introduction to Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
 Language – Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Estonian OR Russian
 Social sciences methodology.

Optional courses (1 chosen)

 Baltic history and politics
 Comparative ethnopolitics
 Conflict management and resolution
 Elections and political behaviour
 Foreign policy analysis
 International relations
 Political and social change
 Post-communism
 The politics of history & memory.

Year 1 – semester 2

University of Glasgow
You will select a specialist pathway.

Core courses

Central and East European Studies
 Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
 Language: Czech, Hungarian OR Polish
Russian Studies
 Russian foreign policy OR Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating global and local identities
 Language: Russian
Eurasian Studies
 Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
 Language: Russian
Optional courses (1 chosen)
 Contested States: The South Caucasus after 1991
 De-facto states in the post-Soviet space
 Developments in Czech society since 1989
 Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
 Media and democratisation in CEE and the former Soviet Union
 Rethinking Central Asian security
 Russian foreign policy
 Statehood and nationality in Central & Eastern Europe
 The geopolitics of Central & Eastern Europe.
Note: Courses may not be available every year

Summer school

Focusing on research methods (not credit-bearing)
Year 2 – semester 1
Central and East European Studies
Russian Studies
Eurasian Studies
Year 2 – semester 2
You will continue on the mobility pattern started in semester 1. One-year study mobilities in the region are aimed at strengthening the language skills acquired during Year 1 in Tartu & Glasgow. You will complete your dissertation under the principle supervision of the pathway partner institution, with Glasgow and Tartu as co-supervisors.

Career prospects

You will be prepared for careers in policy-making in government, foreign ministries, the EU, Intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. Other career opportunities include higher education and business.

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