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. This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

Specialist resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History of Health, Medicine and Society) 60 credits
  • Approaches to the History of Health and Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, project reports and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a diverse range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level. Your knowledge and skills will appeal to a wide range of employers, including in the charitable, education, healthcare, and heritage sectors .

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



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Space Physiology & Health MSc is a unique programme providing training for biomedical scientists & physicians delivered by international experts from academia, contractors and space agencies (eg NASA). Read more
Space Physiology & Health MSc is a unique programme providing training for biomedical scientists & physicians delivered by international experts from academia, contractors and space agencies (eg NASA). Graduates will be equipped through lectures, seminars and extensive laboratory practicals and visits to RAF & Space Agency (ESA & DLR) facilities to serve future manned space expeditions.

Key benefits

- The programme is unique within Europe.

- Has input from professionals within the Space industry.

- Provides experiences with external partners including the Crew Medical Support Office at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne.

- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/space-physiology-and-health-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skills in the following areas:

- Detailed and in depth knowledge of the physiological effects of the space environment upon humans and of the methods employed to mitigate such effects.

- Provide practical experience in experimentation methods appropriate to investigate the physiological effects of the space environment and those employed to mitigate such effects.

- A knowledge of instrumentation, calibration, data acquisition and the analysis of results whilst applying the appropriate statistical methods.an understanding of the effect of the space environment upon human behaviour and performance.

- An understanding of the effect of the space environment upon human behaviour and performance.

- A detailed knowledge of the practical implications of disease and physical deconditioning in space-faring humans and the practices required to counter and manage such events.

- Knowledge of the characteristics and practices associated with medical and life science research environments in space.

- Course purpose -

The aim of this programme is to provide graduates with advanced theoretical and practical training in the physiology, psychology and operational medicine of humans exposed to or working in the Space environment.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: Approximately 20 hours of taught classes per week with some entire weeks spent at research establishments in the UK and abroad. Part-time study: Not offered. The programme will comprise lectures, tutorials and seminars with a large practical component. The latter will provide personal experience and experimental studies of a wide variety of Space relevant environments including flight, acceleration, heat and cold, noise, and spatial disorientation. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 10,000 word dissertation (with 10+5 min oral presentation) aims to facilitate student research in the labs of world renowned supervisors in space agencies, academia and industry across the globe.

Career prospects

The programme provides a range of multidisciplinary skills and will help those wishing to pursue a career in human physiology in its broadest sense, either in academic research i.e. PhD, in industry, in Ministry of Defence research laboratories or National/International Space agencies including ESA.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The History of Medicine MA will take you from classical antiquity to the 21st century, covering classical antiquity, medieval, early modern and modern periods. Read more
The History of Medicine MA will take you from classical antiquity to the 21st century, covering classical antiquity, medieval, early modern and modern periods.

The History of Medicine MA is part of the Northern Centre for History of Medicine, one of the UK's leading centres for Medical History. This interdisciplinary and comprehensive course is open to students from the humanities and social sciences and also to candidates with a health care or medical sciences background.

As part of the course you will also have the opportunity to study an additional language.

Facilities

You will have access to dedicated MA study space, PC clusters and free printing in the Armstrong Building. You will also receive a personal study allowance of £100.

The School of History, Classics and Archaeology provides access to some top quality facilities such as:
-The Great North Museum: Hancock
-Our libraries
-The Gertrude Bell Archive
-Computing facilities with access to relevant databases

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This interdisciplinary MSc offers a wide programme of study related to the physics of planetary and space environments, including planetary interiors, atmospheres… Read more
This interdisciplinary MSc offers a wide programme of study related to the physics of planetary and space environments, including planetary interiors, atmospheres and magnetospheres; the impact of the space environment on human physiology; and research project work which provides potential opportunity to work with established planetary researchers at UCL and Birkbeck, some of whom are involved in active or planned space missions.

Degree information

Students develop insights into the techniques used in current projects, and gain in-depth experience of a particular specialised research area through project work as a member of a research team. The programme provides the professional skills necessary to play a meaningful role in industrial or academic life.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a choice of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research essay (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma consisting of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research essay (30 credits); full-time nine months is offered.

Optional modules 1 (15 credits each) - students choose three from:
-Deep Earth and Planetary Modelling
-Earth and Planetary Materials
-Planetary Atmospheres
-Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
-Remote Sensing and Planetary Surfaces
-Physics of Exoplanets

Optional modules 2 (15 credits each) - students choose three from the following:
-Earth and Planetary System Science
-Melting and Volcanism
-Solar Physics
-Astronomical Spectroscopy
-Physics of the Earth
-Space Medicine and Extreme Environment Physiology
-Comets, Asteroids and Meteorites
-Advanced Topics in Planetary Science

Alternatively students may also choose a fourth module from the Optional modules 1 list and two from the Optional modules 2 list above.

Dissertation/report
All students submit a critical research essay and MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation and oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, practical classes, computer-based teaching, fieldwork, and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through coursework and written examination. The research project is assessed by literature survey, oral presentation and the dissertation.

Careers

Physics-based careers embrace a broad band of areas, e.g. information technology, engineering, finance, research and development, medicine, nanotechnology and photonics. Graduates of MSc programmes at UCL go on to a variety of careers as research associates, postdoctoral fellows, consultants, and systems test engineers.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Chartered Surveyor, Dunphys
-PhD in Planetary Science, The Open University (OU)

Employability
An MSc qualification from UCL is highly regarded by employers. Students engage in a variety of learning activities, including undertaking their own research projects, which encourages the development of problem-solving skills, technical and quantitative analysis, independent critical thinking and good scientific practice. In addition, teamwork, vision and enthusiasm make physics graduates highly desirable members in all dynamic companies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Physics & Astronomy is among the leading departments in the UK for graduate study. The curriculum of the Planetary Science MSc draws on a variety of other academic departments within UCL including Space & Climate Physics (Mullard Space Science Laboratory), Earth Sciences, Cell & Developmental Biology and Birkbeck's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. The programme thus has a strong interdisciplinary flavour, in line with the ethos of the Centre for Planetary Sciences at UCL/Birkbeck.

The combination of taught courses, tutorials and project work allows prospective students to study a wide variety of topics related to planetary and space environments, such as: planetary interiors, atmospheres and magnetospheres; the impact of the space environment on human physiology and life; and the application of current knowledge to investigations of extrasolar planets, i.e. worlds in other stellar systems.

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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/18/chemistry

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Research areas

- Applied Optics Group (AOG):

Optical sensors
This activity largely covers research into the fundamental properties of guided wave interferometers, and their application in fields ranging from monitoring bridge structures to diagnostic procedures in medicine.

Biomedical imaging/Optical coherence tomography (OCT)
OCT is a relatively new technique which can provide very high-resolution images of tissue, and which has a major application in imaging the human eye. We are investigating different time domain and spectral domain OCT configurations.

The Group is developing systems in collaboration with a variety of different national and international institutions to extend the OCT capabilities from systems dedicated to eye imaging to systems for endoscopy, imaging skin and tooth caries. Distinctively, the OCT systems developed at Kent can provide both transverse and longitudinal images from the tissue, along with a confocal image, useful in associating the easy to interpret en-face view with the more traditional OCT cross section views.

The Group also conducts research on coherence gated wavefront sensors and multiple path interferometry, that extend the hardware technology of OCT to imaging with reduced aberrations and to sensing applications of optical time domain reflectometry.

- Forensic Imaging Group (FIG):

The research of the forensic imaging team is primarily applied, focusing on mathematical and computational techniques and employing a wide variety of image processing and analysis methods for applications in modern forensic science. The Group has attracted approximately £850,000 of research funding in the last five years, from several academic, industrial and commercial organisations in the UK and the US. The Group also collaborates closely with the Forensic Psychology Group of the Open University.

Current active research projects include:

- the development of high-quality, fast facial composite systems based on evolutionary algorithms and statistical models of human facial appearance

- interactive, evolutionary search methods and evolutionary design

- statistically rigorous ageing of photo-quality images of the human face (for tracing and identifying missing persons)

- real and pseudo 3D models for modelling and analysis of the human face

- generating ‘mathematically fair’ virtual line-ups for suspect identification.

- Functional Materials Group (FMG):
The research in FMG is concerned with synthesis and characterisation of functional materials, as exemplified by materials with useful optical, catalytic, or electronic properties, and with an
emerging theme in biomaterials. The Group also uses computer modelling studies to augment
experimental work. The research covers the following main areas:

- Amorphous and nanostructured solids
- Soft functional material
- Theory and modelling of materials

- Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science (CAPS):
The group’s research focuses on observational and modelling programmes in star formation, planetary science and early solar system bodies, galactic astronomy and astrobiology. We gain data from the largest telescopes in the world and in space, such as ESO’s Very Large Telescope, the New Technology Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. We also use our in-house facilities which include a two-stage light gas gun for impact studies.

Staff are involved in a wide range of international collaborative research projects. Areas of particular interest include: star formation, extragalactic astronomy, solar system science and instrumentation development.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Read more
Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council

Overview

Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Our course will provide you with a wide range of experiences and prepare you to deliver high quality care with confidence. All of our pre-registration nursing courses are developed by nurses for nurses and will support you to work with health care teams to meet the needs of vulnerable adults requiring health care across a variety of settings. Learning and working at Masters level will support you to shape and improve your future profession and the health care experiences of patients in your care.

Adult nurses have a unique role within the healthcare setting. Making a positive change or improving the quality of people’s lives is a central tenet of this role. This may involve enabling people to improve, maintain, or recover their health, and to achieve the best possible quality of life, whatever the circumstances.

We are committed to the principles and values of the NHS Constitution (DH, 2013) and our Adult Nursing course promotes the behaviours and values that patients and staff believe to be at the heart of our NHS. These include respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, improving lives, working together for patients and the understanding that everyone counts.

The course places equal value on clinical practice and theory. It will take you from university lectures to clinical placement settings, from young to mature adults. You may well find yourself at a GP surgery, working with mulita-skilled teams in patients’ own homes or in the middle of a variety of hospital settings, from accident & emergency through to medical or surgical areas or providing compassionate care for patients with life limiting illnesses.

We’ll support you all the way. You’ll soon discover that our faculty is a stimulating place to learn, with modern facilities and registered, practising tutors who’ll make sure you’re being taught the latest techniques. We’re passionate about healthcare and dedicated to delivering the values set out by the NHS Constitution.

You’ll have the chance to share experiences and knowledge with other health care disciplines and to see how the professions work together.

Teaching on campus takes place between 9am and 7pm, Monday to Friday. On placement, you’ll be allocated to a mentor who will support your development and you’ll be expected to work the same shifts as the health care team and your mentor. Each week you will work 37.5 hours. This will include early, late and night shifts, as well as working weekends and bank holidays. Each year, five weeks’ of annual leave is built into the course at set points to support you in balancing your course and relaxation time.

Each of the two years is divided in three 30-credit modules. Each module will start with theory, followed by a hospital or community placement. A series of short Medicines Calculations modules are also embedded through the course.

Placements last around 5 weeks and will include both acute and community settings. Placement opportunities include: Older Person’s Care, Dementia Care, District Nursing, Surgical Setting, Acute Care Nursing and many more. Your final placement will be 12 weeks in length and you will also undertake additional placements each year which will enable you to explore other areas.

You’ll be linked to one of our NHS healthcare trust partners for your placements in hospitals or community settings.

If you study in Cambridge or Peterborough, you’ll do your placement in or around Cambridge, Huntingdon or Peterborough. You’ll get plenty of support from experienced mentors.

Our state of the art skills laboratories provide an ideal environment in which to learn a suite of practical skills in the safety of the university. This ensures that you gain understanding about the underpinning evidence that supports these skills, preparing you for the delivery of these skills in the practice setting.

In year 2 of the course you may choose the option to undertake an overseas placement and gain insight into another health care system.

Careers

All pre-registration nursing courses delivered by Anglia Ruskin University are approved by the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). On successful completion of the MSc Nursing course, you’ll be eligible to apply for registration with the NMC and join a profession with a wide range of opportunity. You may choose to become a community professional, such as a practice nurse, or to work as a staff nurse within a hospital. With experience you could become a nursing specialist or nurse consultant. You may enjoy managing a health care team or leading a specialist team in, for example, the community setting. Nurses also undertake roles in research and education.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules -

- Evidence Based Knowledge and Skills for Nursing:
This first module aims to prepare students for the knowledge and skills required to deliver fundamental and safe care. A series of key strands which underpin nursing practice will be commenced in this module including: patient safety; human anatomy and physiology; health promotion and the recognition of the nurse’s role in public health; mental health and common mental health problems; leadership skills and the use of research evidence that underpins care provision. Communication and interpersonal skills will also be considered including principles of de-escalation and the importance of sound interpersonal and professional skills in practice.

- Promoting Professional Practice in Nursing:
In this module students will be supported to understand the significance of prioritising patients as central to the role of the nurse and a key component of the NMC Code (2015). Person-centred care will be addressed through the exploration of patient autonomy and patients' rights. The concepts of advocacy, raising concerns and candour will provide students with an understanding of the legal and ethical parameters that support the delivery of safe care. The module builds on knowledge of bioscience and clinical skills to further enhance delivery of safe fundamental care. Introductions to leadership, management and team working will be provided.

- Nursing Adults with Challenging Health Needs:
This module addresses the complexities of long term conditions and palliative care for adult patients. Preventing the development of long term conditions and life-threatening disease, promoting health and wellbeing and supporting adults with long term conditions to live well independently are key aspects of the nurse’s role. Effective integrated care is critical to the patient experience and students will explore the impact of national drivers from a theoretical and practice based perspective, with a focus on the use and effectiveness of care pathways. This module provides the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical skills and ethical and legal issues to meet the challenges faced by those affected by long term and life limiting conditions.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 1

Year two, core modules -

- Ensuring the Safety of Patients Experiencing Acute Illness:
Patients become acutely unwell in clinical or home settings. This module will provide students with the knowledge, skills and experience to recognise, communicate and respond competently when a patient’s clinical condition indicates that they are becoming acutely unwell. Students will explore how psychological well-being can impact on recovery and the importance of patient focused care and empowerment. Alongside theory input students will participate in clinical scenarios around deteriorating patients (e.g. acute respiratory failure, acute coronary syndrome, and sepsis). Computer-controlled mannequins and simulation skills environments will be utilised to develop students’ skills in recognising and responding to patient deterioration.

- Decision Making, Leadership and Management in Nursing:
This theory/practice module enables students to enhance their leadership, peer coaching and decision making skills. The module aims to develop a varied and flexible repertoire of skills to be able to work effectively within multi-disciplinary teams, in the often challenging environments encountered in modern clinical practice. The module promotes students’ growth and expertise in professional knowledge and judgment, focusing on self-awareness and personal development. Development of key management skills of leadership, assertiveness, delegation and coaching will be provided as well as tools for resilience to withstand the stresses and pressures of practice.

- Major Project - MSc Nursing Adult:
This theory/practice module comprises a major project that is situated in and developed from the care setting. During the final practice placement, students will be expected to negotiate an area for service improvement to enhance the patient experience. This module will consolidate the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained in clinical management and leadership and seeks to complement these with insight to mechanisms for improving the quality of healthcare. Understanding and applying concepts of quality assurance, clinical governance, standard setting and the role of audit in maintaining standards will be key drivers.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 2
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 3

Assessment -

To make sure you’re developing the skills and knowledge needed for professional practice, we use a range of assessment methods. These include essays, presentations, written exams, and multi-choice questions. We know feedback is essential for your progress and our lecturers take pride in giving you clear guidance on how to improve your expertise. Assessment also takes place in the practice setting and your mentor will support your development and undertake your assessment in each of your placements.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Cambridge - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/cambridge-campus

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The only program in British Columbia to educate audiologists and speech-language pathologists, the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences (SASS) offers a solid academic foundation, valuable opportunities for practical experience, and a stunning location in which to study. Read more
The only program in British Columbia to educate audiologists and speech-language pathologists, the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences (SASS) offers a solid academic foundation, valuable opportunities for practical experience, and a stunning location in which to study.

The School gives students a strong theoretical foundation, equipping them with problem-solving abilities that will last throughout their careers. The academic component is enhanced by externships: real-life experience in the field, where students learn and work alongside practitioners. State-of-the-art teaching labs, research, and study areas create an ideal learning space, while the city of Vancouver provides an enjoyable and beautiful locale.

The Master of Science is the basis for certification as an audiologist or speech-language pathologist.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Audiology and Speech Sciences
- Subject: Health and Medicine
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Medicine
- School: School of Audiology and Speech Sciences

We accept applications for our M.Sc. programs in Audiology or Speech-Language Pathology only from individuals who have Canadian citizenship or permanent residency status. We are unable to accept applications for this program from individuals who require a student visa to study in Canada.

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Our Master of Science program is designed to prepare individuals to conduct research independently and in collaboration with other scientists. Read more

Overview

Our Master of Science program is designed to prepare individuals to conduct research independently and in collaboration with other scientists. Students will investigate an area of research relevant to rehabilitation through critical analysis of problems related to basic sciences, clinical practice, or to development of theory.

Rehabilitation Sciences constitutes the study of physical and occupational performance with special emphasis on individuals with impairments and disabilities. It encompasses the three dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (body structure and function, activity and participation) and thus spans the individual, community and society. Our faculty have active research programs that cover this diverse spectrum.

Our faculty have an excellent record of scholarly productivity, receiving funding from provincial and national research granting agencies. Over 20 graduate students from a broad range of backgrounds including occupational therapy, physical therapy, recreation therapy, social sciences, human kinetics, and engineering have graduated from our program. These students have authored numerous peer-reviewed journal publications and won various scholarships and awards.

Graduate students will have the opportunity to study in state of the art laboratories, such as the UBC MacDonald Research Laboratory at St. Paul’s Hospital, the Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Research Clinic in Kelowna, the McGregor-Hudson Physical Therapy Research Lab, the Margaret Hood Occupational Therapy Lab, the Post Polio Research Lab, the Rehabilitation Research Laboratory at GF Strong Rehab Centre and the ICORD building. Office space and computer terminals are also available for students within the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy as well as at the Department of Physical Therapy.

Courses offered by our team of internationally renowned scholars and educators help students learn critical evaluation of the scientific literature relevant to rehabilitation, analysis of theoretical constructs through of quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry, and the design, execution and presentation of their results.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Rehabilitation Sciences
- Subject: Health and Medicine
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Medicine

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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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This MSc provides students with the skills, knowledge and research ability for a career in astrophysics. The programme is designed to satisfy the need, both nationally and internationally, for well-qualified postgraduates who will be able to respond to the challenges that arise from future developments in this field. Read more
This MSc provides students with the skills, knowledge and research ability for a career in astrophysics. The programme is designed to satisfy the need, both nationally and internationally, for well-qualified postgraduates who will be able to respond to the challenges that arise from future developments in this field.

Degree information

Students develop insights into the techniques used in current astrophysics projects, and gain in-depth experience of a particular specialised research area, through project work, as a member of a research team. The programme provides the professional skills necessary to play a meaningful role in industrial or academic life.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a choice of six optional modules (90 credits), a research essay (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months, part-time two years) is offered.

Optional modules 1 (15 credits each)
Students choose four of the following:
-Planetary Atmospheres
-Solar Physics
-High-energy Astrophysics
-Stellar Atmospheres and Stellar Winds
-Galaxy and Cluster Dynamics
-Cosmology
-Mathematics for General Relativity
-Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics

Optional modules 2 (15 credits each)
Students choose two of the following:
-Physics MSc core modules
-Space and Climate Science MSc core modules
-Medical Physics MSc core modules
-Intercollegiate fourth year modules
-Physics and Astrophysics MSc fourth-year modules
-Plastic and Molecular (Opto)electronics

Dissertation/report
Students submit a critical research essay of approximately 8,000 words and undertake an in-depth research project which culminates in a formal report and oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical, laboratory and computer-based classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework and written examination. The research project is assessed by literature survey, oral presentation and the dissertation.

Careers

Astrophysics-based careers embrace a broad range of areas, for example information technology, engineering, finance, research and development, medicine, nanotechnology and photonics. Employers regard a physics degree as flexible and highly desirable university training.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PhD in Astrophysics, Kiel University, Germany
-Research Assistant, University College London
-Research Assistant, Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (Nuclear Physics)
-PhD in Astrophysics, University of Crete

Employability
Astrophysics opens up many avenues to employment through the skills acquired: problem-solving; the training of a logical and numerate mind; computation skills; modelling and material analysis; and the ability to think laterally. In addition, work vision and enthusiasm make physics graduates highly desirable members of all dynamic companies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Physics & Astronomy is among the top departments in the UK for graduate study.

The department's participation in many international collaborations means we provide exceptional opportunities to work as part of an international team. Examples include the Dark Energy Survey - investigating the origin of the accelerating universe and the nature of dark matter, the Hubble Telescope and the Cassini project.

In some cases, opportunities exist for students to broaden their experience by spending part of their time overseas.

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The Civil Society, NGO and Non-profit Studies PDip/MA provides you with an advanced understanding of social science debates, theories and concepts relevant to organised civil society. Read more

The Civil Society, NGO and Non-profit Studies PDip/MA provides you with an advanced understanding of social science debates, theories and concepts relevant to organised civil society.

Course detail

Strengthening the profile and capacity of civil society is now seen as a top priority by political commentators, social scientists and policy-makers all over the world. There has never been a greater need to develop a critical yet constructive understanding of the actions, behaviours and institutions that populate the space between states and markets, ranging from local voluntary associations to national social enterprises and transnational charities.

This programme draws deeply on the unique combination of scholarly and practical knowledge of the third sector, social movements and philanthropy situated in the School. You develop an in-depth understanding of the evolution of the meanings of civil society across time and space and the role its organisations and institutions play in political, social and economic life.

Programme aims

Teaching imparts country-specific as well as cross-national and transnational empirical and theoretical knowledge of the historical and contemporary challenges faced by these organisations.

You are also engaged in analysing how third sector organisations relate to ongoing social, political and economic transformations. In particular, your capacity to think sympathetically, but critically, about third sector contributions to policy through welfare systems and in other public policy arenas is developed.

Through the successful completion of this programme you will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • Foundational social science conceptualisations of civil society and their applicability to the modern world and its problems
  • Contemporary theories and ideologies of OCS and associated institutions and practices in a global age
  • Comparative and multi-level approaches to organised civil society
  • The impact of globalisation, shifts in governance, and a range of related ongoing processes of political and economic change for OCS
  • Leading public policy developments in Europe and across the world as these apply to civil society
  • The relationship of international actors to national social policy systems
  • Researching design and methodologies for studies of civil society
  • The use of qualitative and quantitative research methods and their critical application in the scholarly literature and in policy papers.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Design of social research 
  • The idea of civil society 
  • Organised civil society and the third sector 
  • The family, parenting culture and parenting policy
  • Governing science, technology and society in the 21st Century
  • The art and science of fundraising
  • The sociology of risk
  • Foundations of sociology
  • Comparative social policy
  • Sociology of health, illness and medicine
  • Social change and political order

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/113/civil-society-ngo-and-nonprofit-studies#structure

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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The Biomedical Engineering (BME) program seeks to prepare graduate engineers to face 21st-century challenges by advancing student understanding of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human injury, disease and the health complications associated with aging as they work to improve human health through advances in healthcare and medicine. Read more
The Biomedical Engineering (BME) program seeks to prepare graduate engineers to face 21st-century challenges by advancing student understanding of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human injury, disease and the health complications associated with aging as they work to improve human health through advances in healthcare and medicine.

The master's degree program prepares students for careers in the biotechnology industry and medical/healthcare centers or providers of medical/healthcare technology.

Doctoral students will also develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the health care industry, preparing them for academic or industry careers related to medical technology, as well as the background necessary to pursue an entrepreneurial role in medical/healthcare technology. To assist students in pursuing new ventures, incubator space and technology transfer mechanisms are available.

In 2014, the first two doctoral graduates of this program went on to postdoctoral work at Pennsylvania State University, and a permanent position at American Systems in Washington D.C.

Educational Objectives

The goal of biomedical engineers is to improve human health through advances in healthcare and medicine. This includes advancing our understanding of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human injury, disease and the health complications associated with physiologic and sociologic factors such as aging, environment and diet. In this regard, we are living in an exciting time. In the last two decades or so we have witnessed, among numerous achievements, the decoding of the entire human genome, the birth of proteomic methods, the maturation of computerized tomography, dramatic advances in imaging and sensing technologies, the culture of stem cells, and advances in biomaterials that may eventually enable us to engineer tissues and even organs. Altogether, these achievements have dramatically augmented our potential for improving health care. However, addressing how to use these basic science research advances for improved health care represents a major challenge for biomedical engineers of the coming generation.
Chronic illness is now a dominant issue in health care, consuming vast sums of healthcare dollars, personnel and facilities usage. This situation will only be exacerbated over the coming decades with the aging of the population. As a result, improvements in our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat chronic illness, and to do so at reasonable cost, has become a focus of the national healthcare agenda. Accordingly, the goal of the biomedical engineering program at Binghamton University is to prepare graduate engineers to face not only these new 21st century challenges, but also to advance new technologies for better healthcare.

MS and PhD applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Two letters of recommendation
- Personal statement of no longer than one page describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The Department's Open Day for prospective PhD students will take place on Thursday 17 December. For details, please contact Simon James ([email protected]). Read more
The Department's Open Day for prospective PhD students will take place on Thursday 17 December. For details, please contact Simon James ().

We have a strong research record in many branches of philosophy. Research degrees in the Department of Philosophy are supervised by a member of staff who specialises in the topic. If you are interested in applying for the MA by Thesis or PhD, please request a prospectus from the Postgraduate Secretary. Our departmental staff list and list of current students will give you an idea of topics and potential supervisors.

The department provides its research students with comprehensive training, designed to support their research and professional development, which is integrated into its broader research environment. Students are assigned to a research cluster and co-supervised by at least two staff members. They participate in research group workshops, giving presentations on their ongoing research and receiving detailed feedback and advice from academic staff with relevant expertise. They also present their work at conferences in the UK and abroad, with financial support from the department. This environment ensures that our PhD graduates are well placed for academic employment, and our placement record is correspondingly strong, with many of our PhD students going on to lectureships and postdoctoral fellowships in the UK and abroad.

We have expertise across a broad range of philosophical areas:

Aesthetics: Prof. Andrew Hamilton
Environmental Philosophy: Dr. Simon James & Dr Wendy Parker
Ethics: Prof. Geoffrey Scarre, Dr. Simon James, Prof. Alison Wylie, Dr Benedict Smith & Dr Andreas Pantazatos
History and philosophy of science and medicine (including the social sciences and economics): Prof. Nancy Cartwright, Prof. Julian Reiss, Prof. Alison Wylie, Dr. Wendy Parker, Dr. Peter Vickers, Dr. Matthew Eddy, Dr Robin Hendry & Prof. Holger Maehle
History of philosophy: Dr. Matthew Eddy, Prof. Andrew Hamilton
Metaphysics: Dr. Sophie Gibb & Dr. Matthew Tugby
Phenomenology and continental philosophy: Dr Benedict Smith, Dr. Sylvie Gambaudo & Dr. Simon James
Philosophy of mind and action: Dr. Sophie Gibb, Dr Clare Mac Cumhaill
Philosophy of psychology and psychiatry: Prof. Andrew Hamilton
Feminist philosophy: Dr Sylvie Gambaudo and Prof. Alison Wylie

Postgraduate research facilities

Durham University Library has excellent holdings of books and journals in philosophy, and the history of science and medicine, and access to a wide range of electronic resources. There are dedicated postgraduate rooms with IT facilities in the Department, a Common Room to foster informal interaction between staff and postgraduate students, and a substantial collection of books and journals in the Departmental Library. The Faculty Postgraduate Centre, located nearby, provides generous space for private study and IT facilities. Each full-time research student is a member of a College of the University, which provides pastoral support, and further IT facilities.

Thesis

Maximum thesis length: 50,000 words (suggested maximum length of 35,000).

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This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of EU commercial law before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of EU commercial law before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our School of Law.

At Essex, you can progress onto our LLM European Union Law.

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Our law course will develop your intellectual and critical faculties, encourage you to think independently and teach you to present rational, coherent and accurate arguments orally and in writing. It will provide you with an excellent foundation for any career.

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are Top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are among the Top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World University rankings (2015).

Our expert staff

Our internationally diverse community of staff and students gives us a breadth of cross-cultural perspectives and insights into law and justice around the world.

This community, combined with opportunities to study abroad during your time with us, ensures you graduate with a genuine worldview and a network of international contacts.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our extensive law facilities:
-Volunteer at the Essex Law Clinic where you can work alongside practicing solicitors to offer legal advice to clients
-Gain commercial awareness at our Business and Legal Advice Clinic
-Work on key human rights projects at our Human Rights Clinic
-Test your mediation and negotiation skills in our Client Interviewing Competition (sponsored by Birkett Long Solicitors)
-Join our Model United Nations society, which can improve your skills of argumentation, oral presentation and research
-Network at our student-run Law Society, Human Rights Society, and Bar Society, which provides legal advice to the Commonwealth Students’ Association (CSA)
-Our Essex Street Law project is one of the first of its kind and is the primary pro-bono project provided by our Law Society
-Take advantage of networking opportunities with visiting law firms

Example structure

-English for Academic Purposes
-Law of the European Union
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-Legal Research and the English Legal System
-Criminal Law
-Tort Law (optional)
-Equity and Trusts (optional)
-Public Law II (optional)
-Family Law (optional)
-Introduction to Public International Law (optional)
-Selected Issues in Public International Law (optional)
-European Human Rights Law (optional)
-Banking Law (optional)
-Company Law (optional)
-Investigating Miscarriages of Justice (optional)
-Race Equality Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law II (optional)
-Clinical Legal Education (Law Placement) (optional)
-Consumer Contract Law (optional)
-Commercial Contract Law (optional)
-Employment Law and Practice
-Understanding Judges (optional)
-Jurisprudence I (optional)
-Land Law (optional)
-Law of Evidence (optional)
-International Trade Law (optional)
-Intellectual Property Law (optional)
-Commercial Property I (optional)
-Cybercrime (optional)
-Competition Law (optional)
-Internet Law and Regulation (optional)
-Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: Law, Policy and Practice (optional)
-Music Law (optional)
-Project: Law (optional)
-Advanced Legal Advice Case Work (optional)
-Criminology (optional)
-Justice (optional)

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This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of international commercial and business law before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of international commercial and business law before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our School of Law.

At Essex, you can progress onto our LLM International Commercial and Business Law.

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also develop an understanding of the substantive issues of law necessary for the successful study of law at Masters level, improving your knowledge in the subject area and familiarising you with the legal terminology and concepts.

Our law course will develop your intellectual and critical faculties, encourage you to think independently and teach you to present rational, coherent and accurate arguments orally and in writing. It will provide you with an excellent foundation for any career.

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are Top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for law.

Our expert staff

Our internationally diverse community of staff and students gives us a breadth of cross-cultural perspectives and insights into law and justice around the world.

This community, combined with opportunities to study abroad during your time with us, ensures you graduate with a genuine worldview and a network of international contacts.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our extensive law facilities:
-Volunteer at the Essex Law Clinic where you can work alongside practicing solicitors to offer legal advice to clients
-Gain commercial awareness at our Business and Legal Advice Clinic
-Work on key human rights projects at our Human Rights Clinic
-Test your mediation and negotiation skills in our Client Interviewing Competition (sponsored by Birkett Long Solicitors)
-Join our Model United Nations society, which can improve your skills of argumentation, oral presentation and research
-Network at our student-run Law Society, Human Rights Society, and Bar Society, which provides legal advice to the Commonwealth Students’ Association (CSA)
-Our Essex Street Law project is one of the first of its kind and is the primary pro-bono project provided by our Law Society
Take advantage of networking opportunities with visiting law firms

Example structure

-Legal Research and the English Legal System
-English for Academic Purposes
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-International Trade Law
-Criminal Law
-Tort Law (optional)
-Equity and Trusts (optional)
-Public Law II (optional)
-Family Law (optional)
-Introduction to Public International Law (optional)
-Selected Issues in Public International Law (optional)
-European Human Rights Law (optional)
-Banking Law (optional)
-Company Law (optional)
-Investigating Miscarriages of Justice (optional)
-Race Equality Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law II (optional)
-Clinical Legal Education (Law Placement) (optional)
-Consumer Contract Law (optional)
-Commercial Contract Law (optional)
-Employment Law and Practice
-Understanding Judges (optional)
-Jurisprudence I (optional)
-Law of the European Union (optional)
-Land Law (optional)
-Law of Evidence (optional)
-Intellectual Property Law (optional)
-Commercial Property I (optional)
-Cybercrime (optional)
-Competition Law (optional)
-Internet Law and Regulation (optional)
-Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: Law, Policy and Practice (optional)
-Music Law (optional)
-Project: Law (optional)
-Advanced Legal Advice Case Work (optional)
-Criminology (optional)
-Justice (optional)

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