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Masters Degrees (Soviet)

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Thinking bigger. Going outside the disciplinary boundaries. Observing things and occurring with the unprecedented solutions. Those are just few characteristics of an ideal student for the MA in Public Policy on the Post-Soviet Space. Read more

Thinking bigger. Going outside the disciplinary boundaries. Observing things and occurring with the unprecedented solutions. Those are just few characteristics of an ideal student for the MA in Public Policy on the Post-Soviet Space.

The new MSU Master in Public Policy on Post-Soviet Space is a two-year degree designed to prepare future professionals in all dimensions of public affairs for a great diversity of careers worldwide.

Our Programme seeks to prepare future leaders and professionals, who will be able to produce positive changes in Post-Soviet Societies.

The objective of the programme is to help students to think critically about complex policy issues, to make decisions and to transform their ideas into action. Besides, the program aims to educate young political scientists and potential policy-makers with deep knowledges in fields of Post-Soviet policy-making process and comparative politics. Finally, another principal objective of the programme is to provide our students with modern methodology of public policy analysis and elaborate the skills of critical public policy evaluation.

The programme consists of a number of mandatory core courses in public policy analysis, economics, law, and methods. In addition to the mandatory core curriculum, students have the opportunity to develop thematic expertise by pursuing one of the optional areas of concentration.

Core Modules:

  • Power Networks and political institutions in Post-Soviet States
  • Different Norms and Realities: Post-Soviet and Western Values
  • The Soviet Civilization
  • Political and Social Profile of Post-Soviet Elites
  • Post-Soviet Political Economy
  • International Policy in the Post-Soviet space
  • Regional security in the Post-Soviet Space
  • The models of the Political Integration in the Post-Soviet Space

Optional Modules:

  • USSR disintegration: political and economic causes
  • Color revolutions in the post-soviet space
  • Neo-patrimonial democracy in Ukraine
  • Belorussia: the specific model of state-building
  • Military threats in the Post-Soviet Space
  • Baltic States: from Soviet to European Union
  • Political Islam in Post-Soviet Countries
  • Political Regimes in Central Asia: Post-Soviet Specific
  • EU “Eastern Policy”: prospects and restrictions
  • Post-Soviet Space in the Context of China’s Integrational Project
  • Eurasian Integration’s Economic Model
  • Political Regimes in Caucasus Republics: Post-Soviet Specific
  • BRICS as Alternative Globalization
  • “Frozen Conflicts” in the Post-Soviet Space
  • Post-Soviet Space in Context of Russian Foreign Policy
  • “Problem States” of the Post-Soviet Space
  • State Companies as Economy and Policy Actors in the Post-Soviet Space.


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This Master's programme is designed to respond to the growing strategic importance of Russia and the former Soviet Union and meet the emerging demand for area-focused academic training. Read more

This Master's programme is designed to respond to the growing strategic importance of Russia and the former Soviet Union and meet the emerging demand for area-focused academic training. The programme focuses on the unique and challenging political and social environment of the region and students gain valuable analytical and research skills.

About this degree

This degree offers students a structured, focused programme as well as flexibility to pursue individual interests. Study of Russian and post-Soviet politics is supplemented by a wide range of options on other regions of the former Soviet Union and broad thematic issues such as corruption and governance, ethno-political conflict, sexual identity and security. Students are also encouraged to learn Russian, Ukrainian or Estonian.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 or 60 credits), optional modules (60 or 75 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

Students take one core module in Russian Politics (30 credits) and either a 15- or 30-credit core module on another aspect of Russian or post-Soviet politics. 

  • Russian Politics
  • Plus at least one chosen from:
  • Baltic Politics and Society
  • Corruption and Governance Causes, Consequences and Control
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Making of Modern Ukraine
  • Post-Soviet Politics
  • Russian Foreign Policy

Optional modules include

  • Advanced Quantitative Methods
  • Being Soviet: Typologies of Soviet Identity in Russian Cinema 1917-1956
  • Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research
  • Contemporary Russian Cinema and Society since the Collapse of the Soviet Union: The Journey into the Unknown
  • Ethno-political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Governance and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis
  • Politics of South-East Europe
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Security, Identity, Polarity
  • Sexuality and Society in Russia and Eastern Europe
  • Understanding and Analysing Data
  • SSEES language module in Russian, Ukrainian or Estonian at beginner's level or at intermediate or advanced level as appropriate

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions, workshops, presentations, self-study and specialist language classes. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and a dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

SSEES Master's graduates with expertise in the politics and societies of Russia and the post-Soviet states have achieved success in both public and private sectors. Career destinations include NGOs, think tanks, risk and business consultancies, diplomacy, government and international organisations, journalism and the media; often – but not always - in roles dealing directly with Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Employability

The programme allows students to develop a blend of specialist area knowledge, analytical expertise and language skills tailored to their individual interests and requirements. The programme – together with regular workshops and events such as the weekly Post-Soviet Press Group discussion forum - provides opportunities to develop understanding of current developments in Russia and the post-Soviet region alongside deeper theoretical and historical insights into their politics and societies. This skill set leaves students well placed to meet the requirements of employers and policy-makers, or to move on to further study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest UK centre, for the study of Russia and the post-Soviet region.

The school has superb research facilities and can point to expertise in a range of disciplines, including language training. The SSEES Library, in particular, is unequalled in Britain in the scope and size of its specialist collections.

Our central London location, regular workshops and events, and close links with employers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.



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This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Read more
This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Why this programme

-This programme is for those planning careers in major public, commercial and voluntary institutional settings who wish to acquire a specialised knowledge of Central and Eastern Europe and proficiency in one of the region's languages.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Choose between three specialist pathways: Central and East European Studies, Russian Studies, and Eurasian Studies.
-You will examine the history of communism and why it collapsed. You will learn about the impact of international organisations (e.g. the European Union, NATO) and of major world powers on the region as well as retaining an appreciation of the region’s internal diversity in a variety of spheres (cultural, economic, ethnic, political and social).
-You can participate in our extensive range of conferences, workshops, business days, seminars and networking activities involving representatives of the business, policy-making and third sector communities.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.

Programme structure

You will take four core and one optional course, as well as complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. You will select a specialist pathway, which includes a specialist core courses and a language. (choices vary depending on pathway).

Core courses
All pathways
-Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies
-Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe & Eurasia

Central and East European Studies
-Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
-Language options: Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian OR Polish

Russian Studies
-Gender and identity in Soviet & Post-Soviet Russia OR Russian foreign policy
-Language: Russian

Eurasian Studies
-Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
-Language options: Russian OR Chinese

Optional courses
-Contested states: The South Caucasus since 1991
-De facto states in the Post-Soviet space
-Developments in Czech society since 1989
-Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
-Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
-Political modernisation: The Georgian case
-Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating global and local identities
-Post-Soviet Ukraine: a case study in socio-economic and political transformation
-Rethinking Central Asian security
-Russian foreign policy
-Statehood and nationality in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe
-The geopolitics of Central Europe

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy, and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Our graduates have also been very successful in establishing careers with organisations such as BBC World Service, British Army, British Civil Service, British Council, Centre for Defence Information (Moscow), Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (London), Jamestown Foundation (Washington D.C), KPMG, Ministry of Defence, UK, Open Society Foundation (Bratislava), Open Society Institute (Budapest), Operation Mobilisation, Czech Republic and the Trust for Civil Society in Central & Eastern Europe (Warsaw).

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This is an advanced and progressive programme that presents you with a unique opportunity to understand historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture, and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Read more

This is an advanced and progressive programme that presents you with a unique opportunity to understand historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture, and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Why this programme

  • This programme is for those planning careers in government, global and local media, and international organisations, who wish to acquire a specialised knowledge of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia and proficiency in one of the region’s languages.
  • Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia are some of the world’s most intriguing regions right now: think of politics, migration, and energy. You can learn about this region, its history, and its languages.
  • You will have the unique opportunity to study in one of the world’s leading centres in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, with teaching staff who have first-hand knowledge of the region and deliver cutting edge courses on politics and society in the region.
  • The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.

Programme Structure

You will take four core courses and one optional course, as well as complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. You will select a specialist pathway, which includes a specialist core courses and a language. (Choices vary depending on pathway). 

Core courses

All pathways

  • Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies
  • Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe & Eurasia

Central and East European Studies 

  • Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Language options: Czech, Hungarian OR Polish

Russian Studies

  • Gender and identity in Soviet & Post-Soviet Russia OR Russian foreign policy
  • Language: Russian

Eurasian Studies

  • Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
  • Language options: Russian OR Chinese

Optional courses may include

  • Contested states: The South Caucasus since 1991
  • De facto states in the Post-Soviet space
  • Developments in Czech society since 1989
  • Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
  • Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
  • Rethinking Central Asian security
  • Russian foreign policy
  • Statehood and nationality in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe
  • The geopolitics of Central Europe.

Career Prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy, and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Our graduates have also been very successful in establishing careers with organisations such as BBC World Service, British Army, British Civil Service, British Council, Centre for Defence Information (Moscow), Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (London), Jamestown Foundation (Washington D.C), KPMG, Ministry of Defence, UK, Open Society Foundation (Bratislava), Open Society Institute (Budapest), Operation Mobilisation, Czech Republic and the Trust for Civil Society in Central & Eastern Europe (Warsaw).



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This innovative international programme offers you the unique opportunity to undertake study (in English) and research in at least three different countries at our renowned partner institutions, culminating in the award of a multiple degree according to your chosen pathway. Read more
This innovative international programme offers you the unique opportunity to undertake study (in English) and research in at least three different countries at our renowned partner institutions, culminating in the award of a multiple degree according to your chosen pathway.

Why this programme

◾If you are interested in the challenges faced by the states and societies of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia and their place within the new global order, this two-year programme is for you.
◾Guaranteed placements at external organisations are included under each pathway.
◾The programme is delivered by leading experts in their specialist areas of research.
◾Language tuition is available throughout the progamme.
◾The programme builds upon the foundations of the successful IntM in Russian, Central and East European Studies double degree which was recognised by the European Commission as an Erasmus Mundus Master Course of ‘outstanding academic quality’.

Programme structure

The programme is structured around three predefined mobility periods at three different universities across Europe, Russia, and Eurasia. Also included is a fourth flexible mobility period during which you will undertake independent study. The mobility periods are designed to enable you to engage with a variety of perspectives on the programme’s core themes.
A research proposal submitted at the end of semester 1 in year 1 will determine future mobility patterns and study pathway diversification in semester 2. In year 2 you will continue under the same study pathway. The research proposal will have a strong influence on the allocation of the year 2 pathway partner, where you will undertake coursework plus a placement at an external organisation.

Year 1– semester 1

]]
University of Tartu

[[Core courses

 Introduction to Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
 Language – Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Estonian OR Russian
 Social sciences methodology.

Optional courses (1 chosen)

 Baltic history and politics
 Comparative ethnopolitics
 Conflict management and resolution
 Elections and political behaviour
 Foreign policy analysis
 International relations
 Political and social change
 Post-communism
 The politics of history & memory.

Year 1 – semester 2

University of Glasgow
You will select a specialist pathway.

Core courses

Central and East European Studies
 Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
 Language: Czech, Hungarian OR Polish
Russian Studies
 Russian foreign policy OR Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating global and local identities
 Language: Russian
Eurasian Studies
 Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
 Language: Russian
Optional courses (1 chosen)
 Contested States: The South Caucasus after 1991
 De-facto states in the post-Soviet space
 Developments in Czech society since 1989
 Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
 Media and democratisation in CEE and the former Soviet Union
 Rethinking Central Asian security
 Russian foreign policy
 Statehood and nationality in Central & Eastern Europe
 The geopolitics of Central & Eastern Europe.
Note: Courses may not be available every year

Summer school

Focusing on research methods (not credit-bearing)
Year 2 – semester 1
Central and East European Studies
Russian Studies
Eurasian Studies
Year 2 – semester 2
You will continue on the mobility pattern started in semester 1. One-year study mobilities in the region are aimed at strengthening the language skills acquired during Year 1 in Tartu & Glasgow. You will complete your dissertation under the principle supervision of the pathway partner institution, with Glasgow and Tartu as co-supervisors.

Career prospects

You will be prepared for careers in policy-making in government, foreign ministries, the EU, Intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. Other career opportunities include higher education and business.

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This innovative online programme allows you to take advantage of Edinburgh’s remarkable range of historical expertise from the comfort of your own home. Read more

This innovative online programme allows you to take advantage of Edinburgh’s remarkable range of historical expertise from the comfort of your own home. Thanks to our e-learning tools and extensive digital resources, you can gain a world-class postgraduate qualification without the expense of relocating.

Our flexible structure allows you to fit your studies around work or family commitments and to develop your own specialised interests under the expert guidance of experienced academics. The thematic breadth of this programme means you can choose from a diverse range of topics and you will be able to further your own specialised interests through the dissertation.

Online learning

The online MSc History is delivered entirely online. Both the core and option units are taught through a combination of live virtual seminars and discussion board forums. We aim to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of selected topics in history, as well as enhancing skills in independent research, critical analysis, and both oral and written presentation.

All of our teaching is divided into themed weeks. The method of teaching will vary from course to course and may include podcast lectures, group work and reflective diary posts. Each course has a dedicated lecturer responsible for running it and you can expect to receive regular feedback on your discussion posts and all written assignments from them.

Programme structure

This programme can be taken at your own pace and can be completed in a period of between one and six years. You can exit the programme at any stage with the qualification you have earned which is determined by the number of credits successfully achieved at the required level. You will be examined through a combination of coursework and discussion forum tasks, source reviews, article reviews or recordings of oral presentations. To complete the MSc you will complete two compulsory courses and select a further four options from a wide range on offer, followed by independent research in the form of a supervised dissertation.

Many students balance their studies alongside other commitments and the programme’s flexible structure supports this, allowing part-time students to take up to two fallow semesters, in which you remain on programme but do not register for courses.

Compulsory courses:

  • Historical Research: Approaches to History
  • Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Empire or Continent?: British Foreign Policy in the Era of the Great War
  • Theories of Empire in the Early Modern Period
  • The Lords of the Isles: Clan Donald, c.1336 - c.1545
  • Ideology and Politics in the Soviet and Post-Soviet Space
  • The Rise of Modern US Conservatism
  • Questioning the 'Revolutions' in Economic and Social History
  • Modern Latin American History
  • The Holocaust
  • The Closest of Enemies: Cuban-American Relations, 1898-2014
  • The Trial of the Templars
  • Athens of the North - The Origins and Ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment
  • Willingly to War? The Origins of the First World War
  • The Crusades and the Euro-Mediterranean World
  • British Politics and Policy in the Second World War
  • Consensus to Thatcherism: Government and Politics in Post-War Britain
  • The American Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Myth and the History of Scholarship in Early Modern Europe
  • The Shadow of Versailles: Interwar Europe, 1918-1939
  • Seeking 'Japan' in a Westernizing World: Revolution, Romance and Imperialism 1868-1945
  • Scotland and Ireland, 1800 - 1945
  • British Empires, 1601-1948
  • Diaspora, Migration and Exile: The History of the Global Irish since 1600
  • Ancient Egyptian Religion and the Afterlife
  • Society and Culture in the Soviet and Post-Soviet Space

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Others are interested in long-term academic careers and consider the MSc as preparation for a PhD. The combination of skills training, specialised seminars, and independent research provides you with transferable skills that will be beneficial whatever path you choose.

Graduates work in related areas such as museums, policy think tanks, national and international civil services, non-governmental organisations, galleries, libraries and historic trusts while others build their transferable skills to enter business, media, public administration or marketing.



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This programme offers you the unique opportunity to combine a year of study in Glasgow with a year studying overseas (in English) at one of our renowned partner institutions and leads to the award of a double degree or a single degree. Read more
This programme offers you the unique opportunity to combine a year of study in Glasgow with a year studying overseas (in English) at one of our renowned partner institutions and leads to the award of a double degree or a single degree.

Key facts

• International Master (Double degree/single degree): 24 months full-time;
• Contact:

Why Glasgow

• If you are interested in the challenges faced by the states and societies of Central and Eastern Europe and their place within the new global security order, this two-year programme is for you.
• The programme has been recognised by the European Commission as an Erasmus Mundus Masters Programme of ‘outstanding academic quality’.
• The Erasmus Mundus label allows the programme to annually grant a substantial number of scholarships (including several full scholarships to non-European students).
• Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russian. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.

Programme Structure

Year 1

You will take two core courses and two optional courses at the University of Glasgow.

Core courses
• Language - Czech, Estonian (tbc), Hungarian, Polish, Russian
• Issues in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
• Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Optional courses
• Developments in Czech society since 1989
• Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
• Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
• Post-Soviet Russia: renegotiating global and local identities
• Rethinking Central Asian security
• Russian foreign policy
• Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
• A maximum of one outside option from an approved subject.

Note: Some courses might not be available every year.

Year 2: study abroad & dissertation

In semester 1 you will attend lectures/seminars at an international partner university and may choose your study programme from a wide range of options. Dissertation topic will have a strong influence on the selection of Year 2 double degree partner. Relevant language options to a maximum of 6 ECTS may also be selected. In semester 2 you will complete a 20,000-25,000 word dissertation.

Erasmus Mundus graduates will receive the official degree of International Masters in Russian, Central & East European Studies and an official degree from one of our partner universities.

Background and Aims

This challenging and innovative programme enables you to understand the history of communism and why it collapsed. You gain an informed knowledge of the process of economic and political transformation in the former communist states.

We want to develop world class researchers specialising in one or more of the following critical geopolitical areas: Central Asia; the Caucasus & Caspian Sea Basin; Russia; Central and Eastern Europe, including the Baltic Sea Region. This should support bodies like the European Union to address the myriad of socio-economic, political and security challenges of the 21st century. Flexible and high quality language training is an essential part of the programme.

You will get international experience in at least two countries, develop your skills in area research and acquire a range of key employability skills through our well-developed placements with associate partners from the business, public policy and third sector communities. You will also participate in conferences, workshops and other socio-cultural events, making the experience truly rewarding.

Career Prospects

You will be prepared for careers in policy-making in government, foreign ministries, the EU, Intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. Other career opportunities include higher education and business.

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This Master's programme is an applied, policy-oriented programme reflecting SSEES's leading-edge expertise in comparative economics. Read more

This Master's programme is an applied, policy-oriented programme reflecting SSEES's leading-edge expertise in comparative economics. The programme is centred around the economics and economic policy of emerging markets, viewed through the prism of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, but relevant to the emerging economies and societies of South and South-East Asia, the Middle East and North Africa as well as Latin America.

About this degree

The programme focuses on the development experiences of the 28 nations that have emerged from the former Soviet bloc in Europe and Asia. Students analyse the impact of institutional reforms on diverse outcomes, including economic performance, socio-economic development, financial integration, democratisation, innovation and entrepreneurship, and internationalisation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), a choice of a further one of three core modules (15 credits), optional modules (45 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

60 credits of compulsory core modules:

  • International Macroeconomic Policy
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

60 credits of optional modules, including at least one policy-related module. Options may include:

  • Public Choice-Private Interest
  • Economics of Health and Population
  • Trade and FDI Policy with reference to Eastern Europe
  • Economic Development and Policies
  • Corporate Finance and Investment in Emerging Markets
  • Financial Development
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Political Economy of International Business
  • The Economics of Property Rights
  • Corporate Governance
  • Language modules offered by SSEES

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, laboratory sessions and workshops. Students will be assessed by a variety of methods: unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Analyst, Jordgaf
  • Programme Management Expert, National Trust Eco Fund
  • Researcher, CoreData Research
  • Advanced Researcher, Instituti Riinvest
  • Risk Manager, China Development Bank

Employability

The MA opens up a range of opportunities and we expect that graduates from this programme will go on to work in think tanks, political parties, national, European and international private and public sector organisations and in media and non-governmental organisations as economic and political analysts. Similarly, we hope others will go on to doctoral studies. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

Our unique specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policymakers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: SSEES - School of Slavonic & East European Studies

64% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies. Read more
Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies.

The International Studies (Environment) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies. In particular it applies these to contemporary debates on global environmental issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-environment/

Why choose this course?

- A dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as global environmental governance, the rise of environmental social movements and whether we can achieve development whilst still maintaining the quality of our natural environment. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- You will have the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library, as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A high level of student support during your time with us. Each student is allocated an academic adviser and student support co-ordinators are also available to help you with any issues you might encounter.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in the fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
- Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

Professional advice

Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. Read more
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. The International Studies (Global Political Economy) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies, and in particular applies these to the globalisation of economic relations, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2016/international-studies--global-political-economy-/international-studies-global-political-economy/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers. .

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as the globalisation of economic relations and the potential challenges it poses for states and the governance of the international system. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of this is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables you to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional Advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by n international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Read more
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations.

The International Studies (International Relations) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced International Studies, including the application of these to real world cases and issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-international-relations/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- It covers the central foundations of the contemporary study of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip provides you with first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. This programme offers you the opportunity to examine many of these contemporary threats.

Why this programme

◾You will study research methods within the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School which is one of the top research training centres in the UK and benefits from ESRC recognition for many of its courses.
◾You will combine your research methods training with a range of security focused optional courses from a broad spectrum of subject areas, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
◾The programme includes a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.
◾You will have the opportunity to take part in special formative learning workshops and training days - working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course, as well as submit a dissertation.

Core courses
◾International security and global politics
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis
◾Research design
◾Thematic issues in global security.

Optional courses
◾British military power since 1945
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
◾Development, postcolonialism and environment
◾Ethics in global politics
◾Freedom, security and justice in the European Union
◾Globalisation and European integration
◾Globalisation and the new security agenda in Central and Eastern Europe
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
◾International relations theory
◾Post-Soviet Russia: renegotiating global and local identities
◾Social change and social justice: activism, social movements and democracy
◾Society, environment and the concept of sustainable development in post Soviet Russia
◾The American way of war: from the revolution to the war on terror
◾The European Union in international politics and development
◾The global criminal economy
◾The Internet and civil society.

Career prospects

The programme provides a dedicated research training pathway if you are to looking to go onto doctoral study or to seek a career within a social research field.

Read less
The taught postgraduate masters programme in International Studies provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies and international relations, including the application of these to real world issues. Read more
The taught postgraduate masters programme in International Studies provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies and international relations, including the application of these to real world issues. The MA and PGDip awards also provide training in social scientific methods.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with ever stronger links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- A flexible and exciting range of postgraduate courses as well as interdisciplinary opportunities provided through collaboration with our colleagues in Business and Law.

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed throughout the different pathways, including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
This MA allows you to build an individual, 'tailor-made' programme of study, which incorporates the intellectual concerns, skills and understandings that lead to a clearly focused research dissertation. . Read more

This MA allows you to build an individual, 'tailor-made' programme of study, which incorporates the intellectual concerns, skills and understandings that lead to a clearly focused research dissertation. 

You choose four modules, including at least one of two core modules, which provide you with specific research skills relevant to your interests.

This route is appropriate for those who have a particular interest they wish to develop not covered by one of our specialist pathways, or for those who are seeking a broadly based programme of music study at postgraduate level (taking both core modules, for example, would provide exceptional training for those going on to doctoral study).

Applicants should note that departmental timetable restrictions apply; consequently, part-time study offers the most flexible range of potential course combinations. This programme is not suitable if you're keen to take composition or performance modules – if this is what you'd like to do, please explore our MMus study options

The programme appeals to a wide range of students developing intellectual skills in music, perhaps as preparation for further postgraduate research, prior to entering teaching, or as a basis for a employment in arts administration, journalism, or other occupations in the creative and cultural industries.

Find out more about the MA in Music.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Core modules 

You choose three modules from a list that currently includes:

Dissertation



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This course offers intensive training for composers and provides excellent preparation for doctoral work or a career in the professional world. Read more

This course offers intensive training for composers and provides excellent preparation for doctoral work or a career in the professional world. With a strong focus on practical music making and supported by an outstanding programme of workshops and performances by professional musicians, it offers an invaluable opportunity for composers to hone their skills and develop their personal voice.

What makes us distinctive?

  • Links to ensembles as an integral part of the course.
  • Interaction with the music profession, including the BBC Philharmonic and Manchester Camerata.
  • Opportunities to develop professional skills, for example through collaborating, rehearsing and networking with professional musicians; learning to arrange/orchestrate; undertaking outreach opportunities; and collaborating in the creation of performances.
  • Flexibility to develop your own compositional and research interests.
  • Close ties with electroacoustic composers in NOVARS, and the flexibility to combine electroacoustic course units with those for instrumental and vocal composition.
  • Integration into the active research culture of the University of Manchester, through research seminars, performance workshops and concerts.

In addition to the submission of a final Portfolio of Compositions , all instrumental and vocal composition students take the core course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit, Compositional Etudes. Optional course units normally include Contemporary Music Studies , Advanced Orchestration , Fixed Media and Interactive Music , Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound , Historical or Contemporary Performance (subject to audition). For further information about the content of individual course units, see Course Unit Details below.

SALC Placement offers students the opportunity to spend a minimum of 20 days over a period of up to 12 weeks with an arts and cultural organisation, business or service provider. Placements will be established in Semester 1 to take place early in semester 2; they will be supervised by a work-based mentor and overseen by an academic staff member. The placement may take the form of an investigation of a specific business idea, development strategy or management proposition to resolve a problem or particular issue, and will result in a placement report, proposal or essay.

Aims

This programme aims to:

  • Enable students to develop compositional techniques and professional skills appropriate to their creative needs.
  • Enable students to work with both student and professional performers toward the performance of recently composed prices.
  • Develop awareness of aesthetic, analytical and technical issues relating to contemporary Western art music.
  • Encourage students to discuss with clarity and conviction issues relating to contemporary music.
  • Enable students to compose several works worthy of public performance.
  • Equip students with skills appropriate to the development of further postgraduate study on MPhil and PhD programmes.

Special features

Our close links with in-house and Manchester-based ensembles allow us to guarantee that every student taking the MusM Composition programme will have their music performed and/or workshopped by professional ensembles, including the Quatuor Danel, Psappha, Trio Atem and the Manchester Camerata.

  • The Quatuor Danel enjoys a huge international reputation and their repertoire seemingly knows no limits. From early Haydn through Beethoven and Schubert, to neglected masterpieces from the Soviet Union, to white-knuckle rides through Ligeti, Xenakis and Lachenmann and premieres of new works by Manchester composers, our intrepid String Quartet-in-Residence regularly scales the summits of chamber music. Their visits to Manchester form a backbone of the university's concert series.
  • Psappha is one of this country's leading contemporary music ensembles, specialising in the performance of music by living composers and that of the 20th and 21st centuries . The ensemble has an extensive repertoire and a reputation for technical assurance and interpretive flair. Psappha has commissioned and premiered works by a wide range of composers, achieving particular notoriety for their performances of music by Peter Maxwell Davies.

In addition, MusM students frequently have their work performed by   the University of Manchester's new music ensemble.

Teaching and learning

The MusM degree consists of 180 credits in total, made up of four 30-credit taught course units and a 60-credit portfolio. Full-time students take two course units per semester; part-time students take one. Most course units are delivered via regular seminars and/or tutorials, supported where appropriate by practical workshops. The composition portfolio is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Each student meets regularly with their supervisor (for full-time students usually on a weekly basis during term-time, less frequently during vacations), allowing for in-depth exploration of ideas and intensive support for the various course units offered. Other members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultation during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units - all of which must be satisfactorily completed - are assessed by submission of compositions, coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The Composition Portfolio is created over the entire duration of study and is submitted at the end of the academic year (after the summer vacation). All work is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner.



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