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The MA in South East Asian Studies provides exceptional opportunities for advanced study of one of the world’s most diverse and important regions. Read more
The MA in South East Asian Studies provides exceptional opportunities for advanced study of one of the world’s most diverse and important regions.

Students on the programme come from a wide range of backgrounds. Some come into the programme having acquired an interest in South East Asia during their undergraduate career or as a result of travelling in the region.

The programme also attracts mature students: some take the MA as a partial preparation for employment in the region; others, having lived in South East Asia for a number of years, seek to place their experience and impressions into a more structured, analytical framework.

Knowledge of a South East Asian language is not a requirement of the course. Language modules, however, are popular options.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/maseastud/

Structure

Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000 word dissertation related to the major.

The two minor courses can be taken from the same discipline (but different to that of the major) or two different ones. Some disciplines such as politics, economics or social anthropology require an appropriate qualification (such as part of a first degree) if any of their courses are to be taken as the major subject.

Programme Specification

MA South East Asian Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/maseastud/file80830.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

For most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in South East Asian studies from SOAS provides its students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law.

Postgraduate students are equipped with linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research, along with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in
many professional and management careers in business, public or charity sectors. These include written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Adequate availability of clean water is indispensable for food supply and health and hence key for the development of societies worldwide. Read more
Adequate availability of clean water is indispensable for food supply and health and hence key for the development of societies worldwide. However, pressure on water resources is increasing due to fast demographic and socioeconomic growth and unsustainable water uses. The concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) combined with current climate change adaptation best practices offers solutions to deal with these challenges by assessing and managing this precious resource in space and time considering other related sectors. Worldwide, there is a high and growing demand for experts adequately trained on the concepts of IWRM. Next to technical and managerial knowledge, they should also be familiar with the practices of projects between Europe and Vietnam and well trained in intercultural communication, language, culture and
politics.

The objective of the program is to capacitate such experts in the field of IWRM and related concepts and methods within the context of European-Vietnamese cooperation. The program targets graduated professionals with working experience in public or private institutions, authorities and enterprises of the water sector. The applicants should be active in or dealing with water or natural resources management and have an interest in learning and working in an intercultural and multidisciplinary environment.

The profile of the Master program “Integrated Water Resources Management - South East Asia” (IWRM SEA) is practice oriented. The aim is, besides providing the participants with an overview on the water sector in general, to educate experts in the field of Integrated Water Resources Management. This requires a diversification of their knowledge and leads to the capability of cross-linked thinking. The answer to complex environmental and water related problems requires economic and managerial competencies more than classical technical knowledge. The program addresses bachelor´s degree holders which wish to acquire management and leadership skills and develop appropriate solutions considering the linkages of water with economic, social and ecological aspects. The consolidation of different disciplines has not only a methodological dimension but a cultural and a human one, because interdisciplinary team work requires knowledge sharing and effective communication.

Contents

The program consists of basic modules, like “Water Science”, “Principles of IWRM”, “Water Economics”, ”Water Governance” and “Project and Business Management” with the aim of providing an overview on water resources management, economics, project management and the regional and institutional context. In addition, the participants select 10 specialized electives related to topics of water resources management and technology tools emphasizing the particular situation. The first and second semester will be conducted in Hanoi at the Vietnam Academy for Water Resources while in the third semester the student will study at TH Köln, Germany.

The fourth semester will focus on the preparation of the master thesis. Internships and research stays if possible together with a local institution or company guarantee the practical orientation of the master research. Tutors pay particular attention that the knowledge acquired in the first three semesters is applied in the individual projects.

Tuition

Tuition fees in Vietnam, basic course fees for field trips, conference participation and course material.

Funding

Applicants may receive one of the limited numbers of scholarships. Available are full time scholarships from the DAAD “Sur-Place” Program for Vietnamese and foreign applicants.

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Global population, economic growth and on-going environmental deterioration are increasing the pressure. on existing natural systems. Read more
Global population, economic growth and on-going environmental deterioration are increasing the pressure
on existing natural systems. Their ability to provide natural resources such as food, water and energy is at risk and waning. Under conditions of globalization, these processes are most forceful in developing countries and emerging economies with high growth rates, low awareness, loss of existing traditional knowledge bases and weak governance structures. This calls for specialists and leadership in order to develop and employ managerial, economical, governance, and technical solutions. Next to technical and managerial knowledge, they should also be familiar with the practices of projects between Europe and Vietnam and well trained in intercultural communication, language, culture and politics.

The objective of the program is to form such experts in the field of NRM and related concepts and methods within the context of European-Vietnamese cooperation. Participants are provided with appropriate knowledge and skills to analyze current problems related to the usage and management of natural resources. The program targets graduated professionals with working experience in public or private institutions, authorities and enterprises of the natural resources sector. The applicants should have an interest in learning and working in an intercultural and multidisciplinary environment.

The master program “Natural Resources Management & Development - South East Asia” (NRM SEA) provides a practice oriented and skills-based learning experience in which students develop their capacity for critical thinking, and creative problem solving. It addresses bachelor’s degree holders principally of Engineering, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences, who aim to deepen their knowledge in Natural Resources Management and wish to acquire management and leadership skills as well as regional and intercultural competences. These experts ought to be able to assess natural resources and develop appropriate solutions considering the complex linkages with economic, social and ecological aspects. The consolidation of different disciplines has not only a methodological dimension but a cultural and a human one, because interdisciplinary team work requires knowledge sharing and effective communication.

Contents

The program consists of basic modules, like “Management of Natural Resources Systems”, “Natural Resources Economics and Governance”, ”International Cooperation and Development” and “Project and Business Management” with the aim of providing an overview on natural resources management, economics, project management and the regional and institutional context. In addition, the participants select 10 specialized electives related to topics of natural resources management and tools emphasizing the particular situation. The first and second semester will be conducted in Hanoi at the Vietnam Academy for Water Resources while in the third semester the student will study at TH Köln, Germany.

The fourth semester will focus on the preparation of the master thesis. Internships and research stays if possible together with a local institution or company guarantee the practical orientation of the master research. Tutors pay particular attention that the knowledge acquired in the first three semesters is applied in the individual projects.

Tuition

Tuition fees in Vietnam, basic course fees for field trips, conference participation and course material

Funding

Applicants may receive one of the limited numbers of scholarships. Available are full time scholarships from the DAAD “Sur-Place” Program for Vietnamese and foreign applicants.

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This programme offers you extensive instruction in the theory of Japanese language learning, teaching and research methods. If you are seeking an advanced level training course or to pursue a career in higher education, research or publishing, this programme is for you. Read more
This programme offers you extensive instruction in the theory of Japanese language learning, teaching and research methods. If you are seeking an advanced level training course or to pursue a career in higher education, research or publishing, this programme is for you.

This programme focuses on the practical study of second language acquisition and Japanese language teaching in relation to linguistic theory, specifically in higher education.

The programme includes teaching on how to evaluate published materials and research papers related to Japanese language teaching, conducting pedagogical research, as well as designing teaching materials and lesson plans.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-japanese-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Students take core modules up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory modules, Language Pedagogy and Japanese Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory module, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. The remaining units can be taken from the list of optional modules.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. The programme provides you with the skills and knowledge to succeed, whether you are interested in pursuing a career in linguistic research or Korean teaching.

You will study general areas of linguistic inquiry and study how they relate to the study of second language acquisition and language teaching. You will also learn about teaching Korean in higher education.

Throughout the degree, you will evaluate published materials (e.g. textbooks) and research papers related to Korean language teaching, conduct pedagogical research, and design teaching materials and lesson plans.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-korean-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Students take core courses up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory courses, Language Pedagogy and Korean Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory course, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. Students that have studied Linguistics before are required to take, History and Structure of the Korean Language.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline. Read more
The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline.

Our research programmes provide a combination of formal research training and individual supervision within a supportive environment, with regular interaction between staff and students. For example, the School runs a weekly Graduate Research Training Seminar, where students are encouraged to present their work and receive feedback from peers and staff. Students enjoy regular meetings with a supervisor and supervisory team, and are also given opportunities to collaborate with other members of staff through the staff research seminar and the activities of the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (http://www.kent.ac.uk/politics/carc/index.html).

Students are encouraged to participate in the annual postgraduate research conference, during which various staff members discuss the work of research students, and outside speakers offer plenary lectures. Research students will also be able to benefit from the skills training offered by the University’s Graduate School.

The breadth of expertise within the School enables us to provide research supervision on a very wide range of topics across the area of International Conflict Analysis. Current projects of students studying in this area include: Peacebuilding Palestinians: the Hamas-Fatah Rapprochment, The Impact of Music on Conflict Resolution, Young People, Peace and Education, Horizontal Inequalities, Intra-State and Social Conflict.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/62/international-conflict-analysis

Research areas

Our research interests span a broad spectrum of the discipline, with particular strengths in the fields of conflict analysis and resolution, political theory and European politics. The strength of the School’s research culture is reflected in the numerous books and articles published and in the existence of its four University-recognised research centres: the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC), the Centre for Federal Studies (CFS), the Global Europe Centre (GEC). and the Centre for Critical Thought (CCT).

All members of staff can supervise theses leading to research degrees. We encourage potential research students to refer to our postgraduate research handbook (pdf) for detailed information.

In 2011, the University successfully applied for ESRC recognition as a provider of doctoral training in political science and international studies (and other areas of the social sciences) as part of a consortium. As a result, we are now part of the South East ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, making us one of the key training outlets in our subject in the UK. Further details can be found on the South East DTC website.

Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC)
Kent has been at the forefront of conflict negotiation and resolution for almost 50 years. The Conflict Analysis Research Centre brings together academics working on different aspects of conflict and security as well as PhD and Master’s students studying International Conflict Analysis, International Law and International Relations. Current research includes an investigation into how migrant communities can support peacebuilding in their home society and how South Africa and the UK treat refugees and security. The Centre is also at the forefront of trying to resolve actual conflicts – for example, it played a role in the Moldova-Transnistria peace process and has supported reconciliation efforts in Africa.

Global Europe Centre (GEC)
The Global Europe Centre is a pioneering research-led learning centre focusing on the study of Europe and its relations with the outside world. The GEC’s research focus is on contemporary policy challenges to Europe and its nation states, the engagement with policy-makers and policy-shapers is at the core of its activities. The GEC mission is to promote excellence, through innovative research and knowledge exchange and to facilitate research-driven impact through its learning and teaching activities. The GEC’s activities include dissemination of policy-relevant research via publications, research-led knowledge transfer workshops, conferences and public lectures, and keynote addresses by leading public figures. The Centre has a strong commitment to the creation of the next generation of ideas innovators and policymakers and pursues these through its learning, teaching and knowledge exchange activities and via the Global Europe Student Forum. GEC is an interdisciplinary research centre aiming to develop synergies across Politics and International Relations, Economics, Law, Business, History, and European Languages and Culture.

Centre for Critical Thought (CCT)
The Centre for Critical Thought is an exciting multidisciplinary initiative across both the Social Sciences and Humanities Faculties, co-ordinated by staff in Politics and International Relations, Law and Italian Studies. It enables staff and students interested in cutting-edge critical thought to discuss their work together and to explore the insights of interdisciplinary collaboration. In addition, it serves as a forum for distinguished lectures, seminars and an annual workshop. The Annual Kent Lecture in Political and Social Thought is the headline lecture series and recent speakers have included Professor Bernard Stiegler, Professor Chantal Mouffe and Professor William Outhwaite. All students interested in contemporary critical thought are encouraged to become members while at Kent.

Centre for Federal Studies (CFS)
The Centre for Federal Studies, officially launched in October 2005, is the only one of its kind in the United Kingdom and it welcomes expressions of interest from both students and established scholars in any branch of federal studies. The focus of the Centre’s activities is not only the established federations, such as the United States, Canada, Australia, Switzerland, Germany and Austria but also the European Union (EU) as an emergent federal union together with those parts of the world where federal arrangements have the practical possibility to promote peace, justice and stability. The work of the Centre is consonant with world trends that indicate a renaissance of federal ideas, proposals and practices appropriate to the new age of justice as the recognition of difference, diversity and human rights.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities. Read more
This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities: University of Kent, Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London, University of Southampton, University of Surrey, and University of Sussex. This consortium consists of around 160 academics, with an exceptionally wide range of expertise.

The first year consists mainly of taught courses in the University of London; the second research year can be at Royal Holloway or one of the other consortium members. This is a unique opportunity to collaborate with physics research groups and partner institutions in both the UK and Europe. You will benefit from consortium led events as well as state of the art video conferencing.

With some of the leading physics departments in the world, all the universities have their own accolades in both urban and countryside locations, with a wide choice of accommodation options, sporting facilities, international student organisations and careers services. South East England, with its close connections to continental Europe by air, Eurotunnel, and cross channel ferries, is an ideal environment for international students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/physics/coursefinder/mscphysics(euromasters).aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught in collaboration with other University of London Colleges and the Universities of Kent, Southampton, Surrey and Sussex, providing an incomparably wide range of options.

- The Department of Physics at Royal Holloway is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, and Biophysics, as well as other areas.

- We offer exceptional teaching quality and are consistently near the top of the league tables.

- The Department has strong links with leading international facilities, including CERN, ISIS and Diamond.

- We hold a regular series of colloquia and seminars on important research topics and host a number of guest lectures from external organisations.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Physics Department is one of the major centres for Physics research within the University of London.

- We have excellent clean rooms for the nanofabrication and testing of devices within the centre for nanophysics and nanotechnology.

- The London Low Temperature Laboratory is a centre for fundamental research in the mK and μK temperature regime and the development of new instrumentation and thermometry.

- The Hubbard Theory Institute combines theoretical studies of strongly correlated matter with experimental activities on the Harwell Campus.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of the discipline

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

- originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and

- enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different physics-related areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics, and many of our graduates have gone on to study for a PhD.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MA Choreography and Professional Practices programme invites students to examine innovative and experimental approaches to choreographic practice, research and scholarship. Read more
The MA Choreography and Professional Practices programme invites students to examine innovative and experimental approaches to choreographic practice, research and scholarship. It provides you with time and space to explore choreographic dance practices and methods of research, experimentation and innovation i.e. improvisation methods / techniques, somatic approaches, developing new movement vocabularies, collaboration and devising to develop your own artistic voice.

The MA Choreography and Professional Practices draws on expertise from a number of professionals within the dance industry and is delivered in close relationship with a national dance agency, South East Dance based close by, in Brighton.

The degree incorporates opportunities for engaging in Continuing Professional Development opportunities such as workshops, career planning, master classes and residencies alongside the development of your own choreographic skills.

The MA offers an introduction to research methods in the arts and to strategies for documenting live performance practice and promoting your work to wider audiences.

It provides opportunities to pursue live performance practices as a choreographer and to consider how your work is situated in relation to the wider field of professional contemporary dance practice.

It allows for you to develop your own artistic voice and to explore single discipline or interdisciplinary practice-based arts research projects involving choreography, performance, fine art, music, installation, and so forth – led by you and your interest in performance making.

The MA is designed to cater both for students who wish to develop their dance-making skills in order to further their careers as reflective practitioners, and as a foundation programme for those hoping to pursue practical and/or theoretical research at M.Phil or Ph.D level.

For the award of the MA you need to attain 180 credits at Level 7 including the Dissertation module.

The MA Dissertation project can involve practical performance and or written work determined by your needs as a performance researcher and maker.

Course fees for 2017

1 Year full time including dissertation £8460.00.

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Our facilities
At Chichester, we teach in small groups and pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we have created for our students. The Dance courses are delivered on our Bishop Otter Campus where the Learning Resource Centre (LRC) is the hub of your learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources with dedicated areas for silent work or group study, while on the ground floor you will find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources. There are over 130 open access PC workstations, 45 Apple IMacs and ample printing and media facilities. A state-of-the-art wireless network offers fast internet as well as access to all our online resources. You will also have a dedicated subject librarian who will be available to help you access all the library resources you need for your course, both on the shelves and online.
Our Dance facilities include four superb dance studios, a fully equipped 250-seat theatre and a 110-seat studio theatre.

Where this can take you
The MA in Choreography and Professional Practices will equip you for a range of careers in choreography, performing arts, dance development, arts administration, performance, teaching or dance research.
It will also prepare you for further study i.e. PhD or professionally-related qualifications.

Work placements
The programme has an industry-facing identity facilitated through the relationship with South East Dance, the region’s dance development agency, and you will be able to draw on the skills and expertise arising from this partnership.

The programme includes opportunities for presenting your work at choreographic platform sharings, participating in artist networking opportunities, developing your marketing, fundraising and ‘pitching’ / presentation skills.

Guest lecturers will introduce you to issues affecting dance employment, and your learning is supported by individual tutorials and group meetings to discuss your progress.

Indicative modules
Choreographic Practices
Artist as Producer
Dissertation (practical and written components)
Optional Modules
Choose one from
New Media and Performance Practices
The Body in Site distance learning module over the summer period
Technique for Performance
Writing and Performance
Performing Politics
N.B. This list is indicative not all optional modules will be available in any one academic session.

Teaching and Assessment
The Dance department is a leading provider of excellence in dance education and draws on the expertise of the teaching team. The team is made up of international professional dancers, choreographers, researchers, writers and directors. Each member of the team is renowned for his or her theoretical and practical expertise. You’ll work with, and learn from, a wealth of professional specialist tutors whose backgrounds stem from highly respected performance companies.
As an MA student you will have access to the lively arts research culture at the University including: regular full programmes of research presentations given by staff, web-based learning, research students and visiting artists/researchers, performances by visiting artists/companies, theatre trips to performance events, arts research training events and national arts conferences.

Learning is assessed using various methods chosen as the most appropriate for demonstrating achievement of the learning outcomes for each module. All modules are assessed by means of programme work in the form of practical choreography presentations, essays, reports, presentations, learning journals, portfolios, online tasks and group working.

Students are expected to carry out an independent research project on a topic relevant to the field of choreography. For this module students are supported through seminar sessions and tutorials during the two semesters so that they can develop research skills which are essential for lifelong learning, career flexibility; and for professional practice as well as for personal and professional development. In addition, students have the option to become involved in a number of collaborative projects through which they can, as part of the degree, develop project management, time management and interpersonal team work skills.

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The two-year MA Intensive South Asian Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Read more
The two-year MA Intensive South Asian Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Students on the programme take four taught courses at SOAS during their first year, of which a course at an appropriate level in Bengali, Hindi, Nepali or Urdu and the course ‘The Politics of Culture in Contemporary South Asia’ are core. In addition to the two core courses, students must choose courses to the value of 90 credits from the list of options advertised for the MA South Asian Area Studies. The disciplines available include Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Cinema, Cultural and Regional Studies, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Music, Politics, and Study of Religions.

In their second year, students will undertake an extended period of study attached to a university or research institute in India, Pakistan or Nepal (the location depending on their choice of language), where they will further develop their language proficiency and conduct research for an extended dissertation. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London.

The programme is aimed at students pursuing careers in the academic world, business, government and the media that require a skill set which encompasses disciplinary rigour, comprehensive area knowledge and cultural and linguistic fluencies. No prior knowledge of a South Asian language is required but applicants should provide evidence of their language-learning ability. The language element of the training will be tailored to meet the needs of students with existing language skills.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/south-asia-institute/ma-intensive-south-asian-studies/

Structure

Students take The Politics of Culture in Contemporary South Asia - 15PSAC314 and a course in Bengali, Hindi, Nepali or Urdu in their first year, plus courses to the value of two full units (90 credits) from the list given below. These courses should be chosen in close consultation with the programme convenor.

Students spend the first half of their second year studying at one of our partner institutions in South Asia, before returning to work on their 20,000-word dissertation.

MA Intensive South Asian Studies - Programme Specification 2014-2015 (pdf; 393kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/south-asia-institute/courses/file97965.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance.

Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework.

The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers.

- Dissertation

A 20,000-word dissertation will be written by each student on this programme after his/her return from South Asia, for submission in September of the second year. The dissertation will be on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The South Asia collection consists of approximately 88,000 volumes in English and other European languages and about 70,000 volumes in South Asian languages.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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If you are seeking an advanced level of specialised training that will set you on course for a career related to Arabic language learning or teaching in higher education, research, publishing or consultation, this programme offers a firm grounding in the theory and practice of language learning and teaching, as well as in linguistic research methods. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

If you are seeking an advanced level of specialised training that will set you on course for a career related to Arabic language learning or teaching in higher education, research, publishing or consultation, this programme offers a firm grounding in the theory and practice of language learning and teaching, as well as in linguistic research methods.

You will study both the general areas of linguistic inquiry and Arabic linguistics. This programme will also allow you to explore the relationship between linguistics and second language acquisition, and how this relationship supports Arabic language teaching, specifically in higher education.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-arabic-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Core Modules:
You must take all of the core modules listed below including: 15PLCH013: Teaching Communicative Arabic

- Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Arabic Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Dissertation in Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC989 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Compulsory Module
Compulsory module for students with no background of general linguistics.

- Introduction to the Study of Language - 15PLIC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Optional Modules
If you are not taking the compulsory module for students with no linguistics background, you must take module/s to the value of 1 unit from the courses below and/or from the list of running Linguistics PG modules.

- Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism - 15PLIH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Language, Society and Communication (Masters) - 15PLIH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1

The Department

Key Facts
- Long and distinguished tradition in leading in-depth study of African, Asian and Middle Eastern languages and the contexts in which they are used
- Complementary thematic and regional expertise among staff, leading to the potential of original research synergies
- We offer a BA programme with a wide range of joint degrees, five postgraduate taught MAs with several pathways, and the PhD in Linguistics

Linguistics Department in UK top 10 for research of world-leading quality:
18 December 2014: The Department is now in the top ten nationally for its research output of world-leading quality and for the vitality of its research environment. Find out more... (http://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem98001.html)

- Our strengths

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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If you are pursuing intensive research-related and practice-related training for a career in Chinese language learning or teaching, this programme offers a firm grounding in theory and practice of language learning and teaching; as well as in research methods. Read more
If you are pursuing intensive research-related and practice-related training for a career in Chinese language learning or teaching, this programme offers a firm grounding in theory and practice of language learning and teaching; as well as in research methods.

You will study general areas of linguistic inquiry (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse structure, if you have not previously studied linguistics). You will also study how linguistic inquiry informs second language acquisition and language teaching. You will also learn about teaching Chinese in higher education.

By the end of the degree, you will be fully adept at evaluating published materials (e.g. textbooks) and research papers related to Chinese language teaching, conducting pedagogical research, in addition to designing teaching materials and lesson plans.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-chinese-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Students take core modules up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory modules, Language Pedagogy and Chinese Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory module, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. The remaining units can be taken from the list of optional modules.

Core Modules
You must take all of the core modules listed below:

- Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Chinese Language Learning and Teaching - 15PCHC019 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Dissertation in Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC989 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Compulsory Module:
Compulsory module for students with no background of general linguistics.

- Introduction to the Study of Language - 15PLIC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Optional Modules:
If you are not taking the compulsory module for students with no linguistics background, you must take module/s to the value of 1 unit from the list below or other linguistics course(s) approved by the programme convenor.

- Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism - 15PLIH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Topics in the Structure of Chinese (Masters) - 15PLIH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2
- Language, Society and Communication (Masters) - 15PLIH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1

The Department

Key Facts
- Long and distinguished tradition in leading in-depth study of African, Asian and Middle Eastern languages and the contexts in which they are used
- Complementary thematic and regional expertise among staff, leading to the potential of original research synergies
- We offer a BA programme with a wide range of joint degrees, five postgraduate taught MAs with several pathways, and the PhD in Linguistics

Linguistics Department in UK top 10 for research of world-leading quality:
18 December 2014: The Department is now in the top ten nationally for its research output of world-leading quality and for the vitality of its research environment. Find out more... (http://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem98001.html)

- Our strengths

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/. Read more
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/

Why study MA Social Work at Goldsmiths?

-This Masters programme is ideal if you are a graduate, with relevant experience, interested in pursuing a professional career in social work

-It prepares you according to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency – Social Workers in England and the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), the Quality Assurance Agency subject benchmark for social work, and the Department of Health's requirements for social work training

-Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record – we house one of the most respected social work units in the UK, and you will be taught by established social work academics and associate lecturers who have considerable research and/or practice experience in their fields

-Our social work programmes are highly regarded by potential employers within London and further afield, and our graduates have an excellent record of securing employment; they've gone on to work in local authority children's services departments, adult services departments, and independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as the NSPCC, Family Action and Mind, and a recent graduate was named Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year

-We'll equip you with the knowledge, values and skills you'll need to practise as a reflective and ethical social worker, equipped for the challenges of contemporary social work practice

-You will cover areas of human growth and development; community; needs and services; law and organisational contexts of social work; and research methods. Specific learning will include mental health and disability, and social work processes of assessment, planning, intervention and review

-The Masters includes practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups, so you'll be able to gain invaluable real world experience

-We'll encourage you to think deeply about human rights and social justice, and to embed these values in your practice

-You will develop your skills for reflective and evidence-based practice and will be able to further your research mindedness

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council.

Excellence in practice and teaching

Goldsmiths has a long tradition of social work education, and our programmes are internationally regarded as excellent in both practice learning and critical studies. They also have a strong focus on anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practice.

We have a lively programme of research taking place in areas as diverse as:

-the links between child abuse and domestic violence
-multi-family group work with teenage parents
-service user perspectives and transnational adoption
-mental health social workers' use of mental health laws and coercion
-equality and diversity in social work education
-the effects of political conflict on social work practice and education
-reflective professional social work practice
-evaluative approaches to service provision

Our research informs and underpins our teaching and students are invited to share our interests as well as develop their own through undertaking a small scale research project and developing their research mindedness in a final year extended essay.

Find out more about service user and carer involvement in social work education at Goldsmiths.

South East London Teaching Partnership

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies at Goldsmiths has recently entered into a formal Teaching Partnership with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lewisham for the delivery of social work education at Goldsmiths.

We are one of only four sites across the country to have received government funding to develop and test new and innovative approaches to social work qualifying education, early career training and continuing professional development programmes. As a result, a significant number of social work practitioners, from all levels within these three local authorities, are involved in the MA Social Work programme, delivering or co-delivering lectures, workshops and seminars. This means that there is a very close relationship with practice to ensure that by the end of the programme students are equipped to deliver authoritative, compassionate, social work practice that makes a positive difference to people’s lives.

You will be encouraged to make links between anti-oppressive practice, social work values, the legal framework, theories, methods and skills of intervention and social work practice throughout the course.

Intake

The programme has an intake of around 35-40 students each year. Goldsmiths is committed in its policy and practice to equal treatment of applicants and students irrespective of their race, culture, religion, gender, disability, health, age or sexual orientation. We particularly welcome applications from members of minority groups.

The teaching includes lectures and workshops with the entire student group and small study groups, reflective practice discussion groups and seminars of between 10 and 14 students. A significant proportion of the course takes the form of small study groups and seminars.

The MA is a full-time course. It is not possible to study the course part-time. It is not possible for students to transfer from a social work course at another university onto the second year of the Goldsmiths MA in Social Work course.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Admissions Tutor.

Modules & Structure

Successful applicants on the MA in Social Work commit to studying on a full-time taught course over two years. On successful completion you will receive a MA in Social Work which is the professional entry qualification to be a social worker and it enables you to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The curriculum aims to provide you with the value, knowledge and skill base for practice and is organised around study units, workshops, lectures/seminar modules, projects and private study. The teaching and learning opportunities centre on the key areas of the social sciences and their application to Social Work practice, as well developing your intellectual capacity, and the skills necessary to get you ready for practice. There is an expectation that you attend at least 85% of all aspects of the programme.

The structured learning includes specific learning in:

human growth and development, mental health and disability
social work theories and methods; assessment, planning, intervention and review
communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs
law, and partnership working across professional disciplines and agencies
social science research methods, including ethical issues
Practice is central to the programme, and there will be practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups (eg child care and mental health). The learning on the programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply your knowledge to practice situations. We work closely with a range of practice organisations in the Greater London Area. The placements are allocated by our placement tutor and matched with individual profiles. In some instances you may have to travel long distances to your placement organisation. You will need to cover the cost of travel to your placement. You will be expected to work the core hours.

At Goldsmiths we recognise:

the unique contribution that all students bring as individuals to the programme in terms of their personal qualities and life experiences
that professional training builds on the uniqueness of each individual by facilitating the student’s exploration of the values, knowledge base and skills of Social Work practice
that it is the student’s responsibility not only to develop a technical acquaintance with the framework of Social Work practice but also to demonstrate competence through its application in practice
that Social Workers are at the interface of society’s attempts to promote welfare
Social workers have a dual responsibility to act within the state’s welfare framework and also to recognise the pervasive influence of oppression and discrimination at an individual and a structural level in most of the situations in which they work. We will prepare you for this professional responsibility.

Year 1

In year 1 you are introduced to social work as a professional activity and an academic discipline. You consider key concepts such as the nature of need, community, social work services, and the significance of the service user perspective.

You are also provided with an introduction to: life-span development, assessment in social work and a range of social work intervention approaches. Your assessed practice consists of 70 days spent as a social worker; this gives you the chance to develop your communication and social work practice skills with service users, and to work in partnership across professional disciplines and agencies.

Year 2

Year 2 provides you with an overview of the legal and organisational context of social work, and extends your knowledge and skills in one of the two main specialist areas of social work practice: working with children and families, or working with adults in need. You will work in small groups to explore methods of intervention, research and theories which are relevant to a particular area of social work, while another assessed practice element enables you to meet the professional requirements for social work training via 100 days of practice under the guidance of a practice assessor.

You are expected to demonstrate competence across a range of standards and this is formally assessed. The learning on the MA Social Work programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply that knowledge to practice situations.

Practice placements

You are required to spend 170 days in practice settings.

In Year 1 there is a practice placement lasting 70 days and in Year 2 the practice placement lasts 100 days. These placements are arranged through the allocation system devised by the College. The practice placements will be supported by 30 days for the development of practice skills.

You have an identified Practice Educator for each of the two practice placements. Most of our placements are located in South East London, so if you live elsewhere you will need to travel.

We have partnership agreements with the following organisations for placements in social work:

London Borough of Brent – Childrens Services
London Borough of Brent – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea – Adults Services
London Borough of Lambeth – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Adults Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Childrens Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Adults Services
London Borough of Croydon – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Childrens Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Adults Services
London Borough of Bromley – Childrens Services
London Borough of Bromley – Adults Services
NSPCC (London Region)

We also work with about 20-30 voluntary/private social care agencies each year. Here are some that we've worked with recently:

Equinox Care Mental Health Services
Body and Soul HIV Service
Jamma Umoja Family Assessment Services
Advocacy in Greenwich Learning Disability Service
Lewisham Refugee Network
Turning Point Mental Health Services
Carers Lewisham

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a range of methods including essays, assessed role plays, take home papers, project work, a practice based case study, a final year dissertation, and the production of a practice portfolio for each placement.

Assessment of practice is by reports by your Practice Educator. This includes direct observation of your work with service users as well as your practice portfolio, and a narrative giving an evaluation of your work.

Professional standards

Social work is a regulated profession. From 1 August 2012, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) took on the regulation of social workers and the regulation of the performance of social work courses. This means that social work students will need to adhere to the standards set out in the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Guidance on conduct and ethics for students (HCPC 2009), and work towards meeting the HCPC Standards of Proficiency - Social workers in England (HCPC 2012). These are the standards social work students are expected to demonstrate at the end of their last placement/ qualifying level.

Skills

You'll develop the ability to practise social work in a wide variety of settings with different service user groups.

Careers

The programme will enable you to register and practise as a qualified social worker.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments.

ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice.

The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. Students choose a combination of modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva.

Programme Objectives

- Excellent inter-disciplinary understanding of key concepts, theories and debates in the study of international affairs

- Excellent knowledge of international policy debates and principle issues from perspectives of both the global North and South

- Ability to undertake critical analysis of contemporary international policy issues and challenges

- Development of module specific practical skills such as policy analysis and policy advocacy, negotiation, mediation, communication and media relations.

We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, it is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to the programme.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/

Duration: MA: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time). PGDip: One academic year (full time). Two academic years (part time).

Structure

Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation

1. One unit (or two half units) from A
2. One unit (or two half units) from A or B
3. One unit (or two half units) from A, B or C
4. Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes

Postgraduate Diploma candidates take modules as the MA, excluding the dissertation.

A). International Studies and Diplomacy Modules
General Diplomatic Studies and Practice
International Politics of Transitional Justice
International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics
International Relations 2; Contemporary World Politics
International Law 1; Foundation
International Economics
International Security
Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game"
History and Future of the United Nations
Global Advocacy

B). Additional modules available within CISD
Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific
Global Energy and Climate Policy
Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising world – Economic and Legal Perspectives

C). Electives
Please note that acceptance onto an elective module is subject to availability of places, timetabling, and the approval of the convenor of that course.

Suggested electives for International Studies and Diplomacy students
Full Unit modules (1.0):
China and International Politics
Chinese Commercial Law
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Economic Development of South East Asia
Economic Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Region
Economic Problems and Policies in Modern China
Government and Politics in Africa
Government and Politics of Modern South Asia
Government and Politics of Modern South East Asia
International Politics of East Asia
Modern Chinese Law and Human Rights
State and Society in the Chinese Political Process
Taiwan's Politics and Cross-Strait Relations
Theory, Policy and Practice of Development

Half-Unit modules (0.5):
Economic Development of Modern Taiwan
International Political Communication
Japanese Modernity I
Japanese Modernity II
Power in World Politics
The Making of the Contemporary World
The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use
Topics in the Chinese Economy

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 234kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/file80889.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time (MA only), with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full-time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the modules for International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) accessible to part-time students. Where possible the majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00; however, lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some modules (between evening and daytime slots) so that part-time students will have access to as many modules as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each ISD module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:
- Wide range of modules: Diplomatic Studies and Practice, International Relations, International Economics, International Law, and International Security
- Wide choice of electives: Global Energy and Climate Policy, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a module offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law, Languages)
- Interaction with diplomats, policy makers, NGO officials and other international practitioners.
- Training in negotiation, policy analysis, policy advocacy, communication and media and other skills through practical exercises including strategy, communication and media workshops, moots courts, and negotiation and mediation workshops.

Further activities:
Included in the degree programme:

- Week long study trip to United Nations organisations in Geneva
- Media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners, and policy conferences (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts)
- Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/pg/research)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Read more
The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Together, they make up one of the most diverse and important regions in the world.

SOAS has more expertise in this part of the world than any other institution in Western Europe; indeed there are very few places anywhere in the world that can boast the same range of expertise.

This degree is a way of bringing together the large number of modules on Pacific Asia currently on offer in SOAS Masters programmes for Chinese Studies, Japanese Studies, South East Asian Studies, and Korean Studies.

The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three taught units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As a Regional Studies programme students will be expected to select their modules from more than one discipline, The two minor units can be taken from the same discipline (but different to that of the major) or two different ones. The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Programme Specification

MA Pacific Asian Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 33kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/file80829.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

For most modules there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Pacific Asia, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Pacific Asia.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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