• Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Northampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
"south" AND "america"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (South America)

We have 160 Masters Degrees (South America)

  • "south" AND "america" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 160
Order by 
The Master of Arts programme in North and Latin American Studies combines North American and Latin American Studies into a single and unique syllabus which draws from a variety of academic disciplines and gives its students profound insight into the two Americas as distinct entities, as well as their global ties and relations. Read more

About the programme

The Master of Arts programme in North and Latin American Studies combines North American and Latin American Studies into a single and unique syllabus which draws from a variety of academic disciplines and gives its students profound insight into the two Americas as distinct entities, as well as their global ties and relations. This answers to a rising demand for graduates with a broad academic background and specific knowledge of America, particularly at a time when North and South are growing together on many levels, while the gap between Europe and America is widening.
This is an accredited programme which has received the Seal of Quality of the Foundation for the Accreditation of Study Programmes in Germany.

Features

– Emphasis on both Americas
– Core subjects: Geography, Literary and Cultural Studies, Political Science and Business Administration
– The degree programme includes foreign study in Latin America in which students learn first-hand about the South Americans' attitudes towards their big neighbour in the north
– Transferable skills are developed with the aim of generating inter-disciplinary co-operation
– Students can create an individual study profile

Syllabus

The programme consists of three module groups:

A) Foundation module
B) American modules
C) Profile modules

A) General themes of the core module are intercultural communication and comparative cultural studies as relating to North and South America. This module draws from the course content and methodologies of a number of disciplines to lay the foundation for the profile-setting and consolidation in subsequent modules.

B) Module group B comprises the three American modules: Anglo-American Studies and Latin America (I), Political Science (II) and Geography (III). Students can set a specific focus by subject or geographic region.

C) In the two profile modules, Transnational America (I) and Management and Marketing (II), students may choose their electives in accordance with their own abilities and interests. This freedom of choice enables students to create a distinct academic profile and enhances their employability. The entire Transnational America profile module is to be completed in South America, e.g. while enrolled at one of the the University of Passau's partner universities in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador or El Salvador.

The degree programme includes a written Master's thesis on a topic chosen from module group B. Students who complete the programme will receive a total of 120 ECTS credits.

Read less
The MRes in Latin American Studies is a specialised degree that provides a unique opportunity for students interested in Latin American history, anthropology, geography, and culture to broaden and deepen their knowledge of Latin America and to develop an independent research project on a topic of their choice. Read more
The MRes in Latin American Studies is a specialised degree that provides a unique opportunity for students interested in Latin American history, anthropology, geography, and culture to broaden and deepen their knowledge of Latin America and to develop an independent research project on a topic of their choice.

Students gain an in-depth overview of key research problems and debates in the field of Latin American studies as well as an introduction to a range of research methods particularly useful for undertaking scholarly work on Latin America. Students are taught by leading scholars in the field of Latin American studies.

Students who successfully complete the programme receive a University of London Master of Research degree.

Degree Highlights

In their first term, students take Research Themes and Debates in Latin America, a 30-credit module that provides a historical introduction to key research problems and debates in the field of Latin American studies. Students learn how to recognise, problematise, and analyse themes and tropes within Latin American studies and identify where gaps in knowledge exist or where new approaches could enrich the field. In developing these skills, students become independent scholars. In their second term, students complete Research Methods in Latin American Studies, a 30-credit module that introduces the range of methods that can be applied in humanities and social science research in Latin American studies. Students are introduced to the practical issues that may be encountered in the field while conducting research in Latin America. Over the summer term, students complete a dissertation of 30,000 words based on their own independent research.

Resources

The Institute offers students a range of resources in Latin American studies that are unparalleled in the field. The ILAS Library collections, which have been integrated with the Senate House Latin American and Caribbean Studies collection, include more than
90,000 volumes. The holdings cover most aspects of Latin America and the Caribbean: the geographical spread covers all territories of Central and South America and the islands of the Caribbean, as well as the islands of the South Atlantic and Antarctic territories administered by Chile and Argentina. Most of the material is focused on the humanities and cognate social sciences. Through the ILAS collections, students also have access to primary materials that will be useful for their dissertations—for example, the material of the Political Archives, which includes pamphlets, posters, and reports from every country in the region. The ILAS Special Collections also contain many rare materials that are difficult to find elsewhere in the UK; some items are difficult to access even within Latin America itself, and are frequently in better condition than those in Latin American libraries and archives.

Why Study with Us?

The Institute of Latin American Studies is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for research. It has an extensive range of networks and contacts in the field of Latin American Studies as well as substantial library and digital resources. The Institute hosts hundreds of events every year and students will have the opportunity to work with leading visiting scholars and be part of a close-knit research community within ILAS.

Teaching is provided by core academic staff and features guest lectures from experts in the field for specific topics.

The ILAS Library collections are unparalleled and provide access to primary and secondary material related to most aspects of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Students also have access to Senate House Library, with its millions of books and journals, digital resources, special collections, beautiful study spaces and laptop loans.

Read less
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

Read less
Overview. The programme is designed for those wishing to pursue PhD research and those seeking to develop careers as policy analysts or applied researchers in international development. Read more

Overview

The programme is designed for those wishing to pursue PhD research and those seeking to develop careers as policy analysts or applied researchers in international development.

The programme:

- combines the academic study of key international development issues with a comprehensive exploration of research methods and skills

- offers a detailed examination of current and applied international development research

- supports the application of knowledge and skills to address contemporary research questions.

- comprises a mix of Faculty-wide research-based units and departmental disciplinary-based specialisations.

- South West Doctoral Training Centre

This MRes is accredited by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC), specifically, as part of the larger South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC). It forms part of the Area and Development Studies Discipline-specific Pathway.

The MRes can be taken as a course in its own right, or as part of the 1 + 3 (MRes + PhD) pathway, where successful graduates could proceed onto a PhD in the Department of Social & Policy Sciences.

If applying for an MRes + PhD (the 1 + 3 programme) you should indicate on the Application Form, your preferred PhD route.

Progression from the MRes to the MPhil or PhD stage is dependent on achieving an acceptable level of achievement (typically an overall average of 60% on at least the taught component of the MRes).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mres-inte-deve/

Programme structure

Core Units

- International development and poverty

- Short and long research apprenticeship projects

- Quantitative methods 1

- Qualitiative methods 1

- Principles & skills of social research

- Research skills and dissertation preparation

- Dissertation

Optional Units

- Sociology & anthropology of development

- Policy theory & the politics of developing countries

- Comparative European social policy

- Globalisation 1: political sociology of globalisation

- Economics for International Development

- International policy analysis

- Quantitative methods 2

- Qualitative methods 2

- Critical issues in social development

- Management of Development

- International development extended essay

- World politics, conflict , security & development

- Sustainable development livelihoods and wellbeing

- Wellbeing & human development 2 : development ethics

- One of Regional research specialisms (Africa, South America or South East Asia)

Programme intake is limited to 10 students per year, fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

About the department

The Department of Social & Policy Sciences (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/) includes academics from social policy, sociology, social work and international development.

The international excellence of our research (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/) was recognised by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

We are committed to advancing learning and knowledge through teaching and research. Our Department collaborates with a wide range of users at the local, national, European and global levels.

Postgraduate programmes:

We offer a wide range of postgraduate programmes. Our postgraduate teaching strongly reflects our research and our links to policy-makers and development institutions at the national, European and global level.

Our Department also has an active MPhil/PhD research programme. We take great pride in fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

Seminar series:

We run a lively and well attended postgraduate research seminar series. Each of the Research Centres run seminar series and conferences associated with their research activities. The University of Bath also has a Research in the World public lecture series where key national and international academics are invited to speak.

Careers information:

We are committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their training. Our graduates generally go on to work in a wide variety of organisations, for example:

- social research in universities and research institutes, government, business, voluntary organisations and international organisations

- public policy analysis at local, national and international levels

- public information and campaigning within organisations concerned with wellbeing, sustainability and social justice.

Main areas of research

We are an internationally-recognised research-intensive department with a strong focus on policy and practice and a commitment to contribute to social wellbeing and social justice.

We draw together academic staff with backgrounds in Social Policy, Sociology, Social Work and International Development and work closely with colleagues in Psychology, Economics, and Health.

We also have an active and vibrant community of research students (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) undertaking their own research alongside our academic staff.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



Read less
How is the global financial crisis affecting international politics?. Do foreign military interventions in civil wars help or hinder peace-making?. Read more
How is the global financial crisis affecting international politics?

Do foreign military interventions in civil wars help or hinder peace-making?

Why are economic resources so unevenly spread across the world, and what are the prospects for global justice?

If you are interested in these questions, and want to know more, then the PGCert in International Relations is the programme for you. Staff in the School have internationally recognised research strengths in the politics of the developing world, globalisation and development, conflict and war, and critical theory, as well as regional expertise in South America, South East Asia, the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan Africa.

This programme:

Will provide you with a set of cutting-edge analytical skills and knowledge that will allow you to think talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as providing a firm foundation for further study
Is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues in international relations
Will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations, including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations
Will undertake a critical survey of the main theories and concepts associated with the study of international politics.

Why study with us?

The School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary was rated amongst the top 20 Politics departments in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The MA in International Relations will be of particular interest to students looking for a course on contemporary global issues. The school has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, the political economy of North-South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the contemporary post-Cold War world.

"...The knowledge gained here will give me the required grounding to excel in my chosen field"
Gloria Caleb

* Cutting-edge critical programme � theory included, with a real focus on developing students' critical thinking and analytical skills
* A focus on the traditional geographic areas of international relations as well as emerging areas of interest in the developing world
* This programme is led by research active staff, who are responding to the very latest global events, so content is very timely
* The diversity of our staff and students, and the local area, mean that Queen Mary is a great place to study International Relations
* The programme is very flexible, so you can choose from a large number of modules, depending on your interests

Facilities

You will have access to postgraduate only facilities which include the Lock-keeper's Cottage Graduate Centre dedicated solely to the use of graduate students in the faculty of Humanity and Social Sciences, with the use of a common room and interdisciplinary training workshops. The Learning Resource centre has 200 networked PCs and is open to students round the clock, there are dedicated workstations for postgraduate students.

You will also have access to Queen Mary's comprehensive libraries, including the Postgraduate Reading Room, and The British Library can also be accessed as a research resource.

Read less
This course enables students to learn how anthropological ideas and approaches are vital for understanding the environmental, social and economic crises of the contemporary world. Read more

This course enables students to learn how anthropological ideas and approaches are vital for understanding the environmental, social and economic crises of the contemporary world. It teaches how to engage with local knowledge and community-based approaches, rather than rely on global blueprints for sustainable development. The programme is taught by an active, interdisciplinary team involved in world-class research on development issues. We offer comparative knowledge about achieving environmental and social sustainability through participatory approaches and active collaborations with projects for empowerment in the Global South. Geographical areas of expertise include Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Melanesia. Staff also help students connect with Durham’s excellent research communities such as the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, and the Durham Energy Institute.

The MSc is based around core modules focusing on the challenges of pro-poor transitions to sustainability, aided by culturally informed perspectives on new themes in development such as resilience, and energy justice. Options allow you to pursue subject interests with specialist guidance. The dissertation enables you to conduct independent research under the supervision of an expert, and become a master of your chosen topic.

Please see the website for further information on modules.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Sustainability, Culture and Development (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research networks and projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, film showings and discussion, workshops, and optional fieldtrips, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lecture formats deliver key concepts and case study comparisons on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in modules and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. They give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week, and are also expected to attend weekly departmental research seminars, often given by prominent visiting speakers, as well as relevant seminars at the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience and the Durham Energy Institute. Students also have the opportunity to present their work at the Department’s annual postgraduate conference. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Throughout the programme, all students meet fortnightly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis, or can be e-mailed to arrange a mutually agreeable time. Students work closely with leading academics to develop an original piece of research for their dissertation, and guidance on the dissertation is also provided by the dissertation leader. Before the academic year starts, we make contact with incoming students via the postgraduate office. On arrival, we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. The Programme Tutor will also lead local excursions, to orient students with important, beautiful, interesting and fun places around Durham. Students also attend an 'Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology'.

Career Opportunities

Students with a postgraduate qualification in Anthropology pursue a diverse array of careers in areas such as conservation, tourism, public health, health research and management, captive primate care and zoological research management, local government research and management, education (secondary, further and higher), social care, social research, in addition to academia.



Read less
Explore the critical events influencing International Relations and obtain a prestigious postgraduate degree from one of the top universities in the UK in the heart of Paris. Read more

The Programme

Explore the critical events influencing International Relations and obtain a prestigious postgraduate degree from one of the top universities in the UK in the heart of Paris. The MA in International Relations (Paris) - offered jointly by the University of London Institute in Paris and Queen Mary University of London - is concerned with analysing the key issues and concepts in world politics. The programme will provide you with a sophisticated theoretical and applied understanding of international relations including areas of expertise such as war and security, globalization and development, and US foreign policy. It will enable you to develop a set of analytical skills and knowledge that will allow you to think, talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as building a firm foundation for further study.

This programme will focus on the traditional geographic areas of international relations as well as emerging areas of interest in the developing world. You will be given the opportunity to discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations.

Structure

Students benefit from an integrated and flexible approach when it comes to teaching. The programme will be delivered through a combination of workshops, guest lectures and Masterclasses based at the University of London Institute in Paris and online teaching by a dedicated tutor via a sophisticated e-learning platform.

You will be taught by staff who have internationally recognised research strengths in the politics of the developing world, globalisation and development, conflict and war, and critical theory, as well as regional expertise in South America, South East Asia, the Middle East and SubSaharan Africa.

Why study International Relations with us?

The University of London Institute in Paris (ULIP) is an institute of the University of London based in the heart of Paris. Established in the 19th century, it became a full part of the University of London in 1969. The Institute offers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate studies with a focus on French Studies, Law and International Relations. Its research priorities include French and European history, post-colonial studies and urbanism. Studying at ULIP offers you unique access to France, the Francophone world and Europe, along with all of the benefits of studying at one of the UK’s leading universities.

Queen Mary University of London is one of the UK’s leading research focused higher education institutions. Queen Mary offers outstanding students a stimulating, supportive and high-quality learning experience, with teaching inspired by our world leading research across a wide range of subjects. Queen Mary University of London is one of 24 leading UK universities represented by the Russell Group, that are committed to maintaining the very best research, an outstanding teaching and learning experience, excellent graduate employability and unrivalled links with business and the public sector. Queen Mary University of London is in the top 100 universities in the Times Higher Education World University Ranking.

The School of Politics and International Relations has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, the political economy of North South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the contemporary post-Cold War world. This programme is led by research -active staff, who are responding to the very latest global events.

Read less
How can (and should) we talk about the challenges and possibilities for development in the 21st century?. Development has long been held up as an ideal for societies and peoples, and the pursuit of it has been decisive in shaping the modern world. Read more

How can (and should) we talk about the challenges and possibilities for development in the 21st century?

Development has long been held up as an ideal for societies and peoples, and the pursuit of it has been decisive in shaping the modern world. Many degrees treat it as an uncontested term and presume that the only task is to consider the best means towards this end. By contrast, the MA in Politics, Development and the Global South begins by showing that in the 21st century ‘development’ – what it means and how it is to be achieved – has become a site of struggle, one where new forms of politics and theory have emerged.

Major changes in recent decades, including the emergence of new geopolitical powers on the international stage, growing challenges to neoliberal dogmas, heightened concern with increasing global inequality, and recognition of the danger of ecological devastation, have meant that the study and pursuit of development requires a fresh, innovative approach. Throughout this degree you’ll study the Global South as a producer, not simply a consumer, of theory, and as a site where novel forms of political struggle are emerging.

The MA in Politics, Development and the Global South reflects Goldsmiths’ interdisciplinary academic spirit, drawing on expertise in the Centre for Postcolonial Studies, the Department of Politics and International Relations, and other departments from across the university. You’ll learn from scholars with an international reputation across a diverse range of research and area specialisms including Latin America, India, China, Japan, the Middle East and Africa.

Alongside the core modules, you’ll also gain insight into development as a career through a series of industry and activist seminars. You’ll have the opportunity to shape the speakers, format and content of these events to explore different facets of development, such as: politics, activism, policy, journalism, charities, consultancy and NGOs.

Modules & structure

In this innovative and interdisciplinary course of study you’ll be able to explore:

  • The defining features of contemporary forms of capitalism
  • The emergence of geopolitical powers over the past 20 years
  • The interplay between informal and illegal economies
  • The connections between violence, politics and religion
  • Patterns of immigration worldwide
  • The slum as a fundamental site of the contemporary world
  • The current debates on globalisation from below
  • The prospects for radical politics

There will also be the opportunity to get involved in a student-led speaker and event series, where you’ll be encouraged to approach industry partners including journalists, activists, senior staff in NGOs, politicians, and public intellectuals, who can offer differing perspectives and expose you to current debates in the professional community.

Core modules

Option modules

You’ll also choose options from a wide range of courses available through the Department of Politics and other departments at Goldsmiths, including Anthropology, Cultural Studies, History, Media and Communications, and Sociology.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills & careers

You’ll consider a range of debates and approaches that are pertinent to the development sector, and so this is an ideal programme for anyone thinking of pursuing a career in this area – whether you’re interested in working for high profile charities, grass-roots organisations, social enterprises, or global activism.

It’s also an ideal foundation for a career in research or policy, or if you’re thinking of pursuing a research degree in the future.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



Read less
The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. Read more

The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. It equips senior and mid-career professionals and managers with the relevant skills required to establish resilient and sustainable value chains / supply chains that are fit for the future.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16062

About the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)

The University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL), an institute within the School of Technology, has run executive development programmes in sustainability for 25 years, with open programmes in the UK, Europe, North America, South America, South Africa and Australia, and customised programmes for many leading organisations.

Who is the course designed for?

The course has been designed for current and future leaders working in organisations that recognise the importance of sustainable development, and are committed to sharing their knowledge, experience and learning from others. It is an award of the University of Cambridge, and equivalent to one third of a Master’s degree.

It is assumed that participants will have a reasonably good general knowledge of some of the issues dealt with during the programme. However, it is not essential to have specialised knowledge, and it is not assumed that participants have direct responsibility for sustainability or related areas, such as CSR or environmental affairs.

Format

In recognition of the practical challenges of participants undertaking study whilst holding down a full-time job, the programme does not require prolonged periods away from the workplace. Besides the short residential workshops, the core of the programme is an individual piece of work-related research and the development of a strategic action plan that is relevant to the participant's organisation.

A group project helps to ensure that as much inter-organisational learning takes place as possible. An online Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) facilitates communication and collaboration between the short, intensive workshops.

The course runs for nine months and encompasses the following key elements:

- A three-week preparatory phase;

- Two residential workshops;

- Ongoing virtual and non-residential learning activities, including preparatory materials (readings / videos / audios) in advance of the residential workshops;

- Two individual assignments and a collaborative research project;

- Support and facilitation from a team of programme tutors;

- Informal and formal collaboration with fellow participants via email, teleconferences, face-to-face meetings, and the VLE.

In addition to attending the workshops, it is estimated that participants need to undertake at least 3–4 hours of work every week to complete the programme successfully.

Lectures: 40 hours

Seminars and classes: 4 hours

Small-group teaching: 6 hours

Supervision: 6 hours

Structure

The following topics are covered at the two workshops:

  • Environmental, social and economic pressures and drivers
  • Sustainable development concepts and frameworks
  • Developing a critical and analytical mind
  • Building the business case for sustainability
  • Identifying risks and opportunities
  • Systems thinking
  • Sustainable production and consumption
  • Design and technology policy, standards and regulations
  • Finance, investment and enterprise
  • Sustainability as core business strategy
  •  Culture and governance
  •  Embedding and integration
  •  Resourcing and skills development
  • Influencing and communication
  • Leadership and ethics

Assessment

Analysis paper, 3000 words

Strategic action plan, 3000 words

Group project, 7,000 words

Each assignment contributes one third to the final overall grade.

Continuation

PCSVC is the equivalent to the first third of the Master of Studies in Sustainability Leadership programme. The topics covered correspond with those taught during the first Master's workshop and the assignments undertaken are similar to those completed in the first year of the Master's programme.

Alumni of PCSVC who are admitted on to the Master's may be exempt from attending the first Master's workshop (although they are welcome to join for the week), and undertaking the first-year assignments. If exemption is granted, the fee payable is reduced.

It is not necessary to complete the Postgraduate Certificate prior to applying for the Master’s. Furthermore, while completing the PCSVC successfully may strengthen applications to the Master’s, it does not result in preferential access or negate the need to satisfy the Master’s-specific admissions requirements.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Bursary funding is available for deserving candidates who are currently prevented from applying due to financial reasons. These will offer financial support of 25-30% of the programme fee, and in some exceptional cases up to 50% of the programme fee, to assist selected applicants.



Read less
The MRes in Social Anthropology and Amerindian Studies is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the Department of Social Anthropology within the School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies. Read more

The MRes in Social Anthropology and Amerindian Studies is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the Department of Social Anthropology within the School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies.

The programme aims to prepare you for a range of related activities in different parts of the world, to participate in national and regional debates, and to provide the delivery of academic and extension talks and courses in different countries of the Hispanic world.

Highlights

  • Opportunities for learning a South American language, such as Quechua or Spanish.
  • Provides an understanding of the highly complex social, political and cultural experiences of the historic populations of South America.
  • Equips you for a wide range of extension, development and support activities in relation to Amerindian and South American peasant and urban communities.

Teaching format

The MRes in Social Anthropology and Amerindian Studies is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the Department of Social Anthropology within the School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies.

Over two semesters, students take two compulsory and two optional modules. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, tutorial supervisions and reading groups. Lecture class sizes range from five to ten students and tutorial sizes range from two to six students. Modules are assessed through coursework consisting of two essays per module.

Over the course of the year, with particular focus during the summer months, you will devise a research project culminating in a 15,000-word dissertation. Every taught postgraduate student is assigned an individual supervisor from among the Anthropology staff who works with them closely to develop a topic and direction for the end of degree dissertation.

The Department of Social Anthropology provides postgraduates access to a museum collection of ethnographic objects and a common room that includes a general anthropological class library, providing a space that is shared by both staff and postgraduates. The departmental libraries, along with the main library which holds a fine anthropology collection, include materials from all ethnographic regions of the world.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.

Each module typically comprises:

  • Four contact hours per week (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and reading groups)
  • 100% coursework assessment consisting of two essays.

Non-ESRC funded students may substitute up to 30 credits from 3000 or 4000-level Social Anthropology modules, with the approval of the course coordinator.



Read less
Note that this course is delivered by the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL). The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Business (PCSB) is a Master's-level accredited programme from the University of Cambridge. Read more

Note that this course is delivered by the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Business (PCSB) is a Master's-level accredited programme from the University of Cambridge. Designed for senior and mid-career professionals, it is a flexible, practically-applied option for continued professional development, exploring innovations in sustainable business. This course is part of CISL’s mission to empower individuals and organisations to take leadership to tackle critical global challenges.

More specifically, it aims to provide an academically grounded, highly participatory and applied forum for learning around topical sustainability issues, to help professionals develop:

  • a strong foundation in wider global social, environmental and economic trends, and the strategic business case for change
  • the knowledge, skills and confidence to critically engage with a range of strategies and tools for practical action
  • an on-going capacity to work with others to co-create solutions to complex problems, and contribute to a wider community of learning and practice.

About the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)

The University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL), an institute within the School of Technology, has run executive development programmes in sustainability for 25 years, with open programmes in the UK, Europe, North America, South America, South Africa and Australia, and customised programmes for many leading organisations.

Who is the course designed for?

The course has been designed for current and future leaders working in organisations that recognise the importance of sustainable development, and are committed to sharing their knowledge/experience and learning from others. It is an award of the University of Cambridge.

It is assumed that participants will have a reasonably good general knowledge of some of the issues dealt with during the programme. However, it is not essential to have specialised knowledge, and it is not assumed that participants have direct responsibility for sustainability or related areas, such as CSR or environmental affairs.

Structure

The course compromises of two parts:

Part 1 consists of completing one of the Postgraduate Certificates in Sustainable Business (PCSB) or Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC). Following successful completion of one of the Postgraduate Certificates, participants move to the individually tailored PG Dip Part 2.

Please visit our website for details of part two.

Aims of the programme

Participants successfully completing the programme will:

  • Gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Business accredited by the University of Cambridge;
  • Deepen their understanding of how sustainability issues impact on their sector, their organisation and their role;
  • Develop the means to articulate the business case for sustainability, whilst balancing stakeholders' needs;
  • Analyse global business challenges, responses and organisational change;
  • Build confidence to discuss emerging trends and issues which affect the business agenda with senior colleagues;
  • Explore best practice and learn collaboratively with other professionals with different perspectives and experts in the field;
  • Enhance their skills and experience in embedding sustainability in mainstream business operations and driving organisational change
  • Become a member of the Cambridge Sustainability Network, which includes over 5,000 CISL alumni, faculty and contributors from around the world, who are leading the way in turning sustainability thinking into practice.

Format

The Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Business is completed in two parts, with the second part offering considerable flexibility and choice. Part 1 lasts 10 months (part-time) and students complete with the Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Business or the Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains

Part 2 is completed in 6 months – 3 years depending on the student’s circumstances.

During PG Dip Part 1 participants will:

  • Attend two four-day residential workshops in Cambridge
  • Engage in a range of structured e-learning, reading and reflection, in preparation for the residential workshops
  • Undertake two individual practical assignments based on applying learning in their own organisational context
  • Complete a group project with a small group of 5-8 participants, supported by a programme tutor. Groups work on their projects at and between workshops, and an online platform is provided to aid collaboration.
  • Co-operate with fellow participants, share ideas generously and contribute to the fullest extent.

Having successfully completed the PG Dip Part1, participants will move to the PG Dip Part 2, during which they will:

  • Attend three two-day Sustainability Leadership Laboratories of their choice, according to business relevance or area of interest. The Sustainability Leadership Laboratories take place in Cambridge at least four times per year and are currently delivered under the following four broad themes: Operationalising Sustainability, Sustainability Leadership, Sustainable Innovation and Sustainable Finance.
  • Attend two half-day supervisions to meet their Director of Studies and assignment Supervisors. These take place in Cambridge on days adjacent to the Sustainability Leadership Laboratories.
  • Engage in self-study preparatory readings, webinars and an e-learning module.

Assessment

Students:

  • Complete two individual assignments – an analytical case study and a thought leadership essay.
  • Host an interactive webinar on a theme of relevance to sustainability leadership.

Continuation

The department are currently exploring with the University of Cambridge the possibility of Diploma students continuing their study on to a Master’s degree.



Read less
The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. Read more

The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. It equips senior and mid-career professionals and managers with the relevant skills required to establish resilient and sustainable value chains / supply chains that are fit for the future.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16062

About the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)

The University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL), an institute within the School of Technology, has run executive development programmes in sustainability for 25 years, with open programmes in the UK, Europe, North America, South America, South Africa and Australia, and customised programmes for many leading organisations.

Who is the course designed for?

The course has been designed for current and future leaders working in organisations that recognise the importance of sustainable development, and are committed to sharing their knowledge, experience and learning from others. It is an award of the University of Cambridge, and equivalent to one third of a Master’s degree.

It is assumed that participants will have a reasonably good general knowledge of some of the issues dealt with during the programme. However, it is not essential to have specialised knowledge, and it is not assumed that participants have direct responsibility for sustainability or related areas, such as CSR or environmental affairs.

Format

In recognition of the practical challenges of participants undertaking study whilst holding down a full-time job, the programme does not require prolonged periods away from the workplace. Besides the short residential workshops, the core of the programme is an individual piece of work-related research and the development of a strategic action plan that is relevant to the participant's organisation.

A group project helps to ensure that as much inter-organisational learning takes place as possible. An online Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) facilitates communication and collaboration between the short, intensive workshops.

The course runs for nine months and encompasses the following key elements:

- A three-week preparatory phase;

- Two residential workshops;

- Ongoing virtual and non-residential learning activities, including preparatory materials (readings / videos / audios) in advance of the residential workshops;

- Two individual assignments and a collaborative research project;

- Support and facilitation from a team of programme tutors;

- Informal and formal collaboration with fellow participants via email, teleconferences, face-to-face meetings, and the VLE.

In addition to attending the workshops, it is estimated that participants need to undertake at least 3–4 hours of work every week to complete the programme successfully.

Lectures: 40 hours

Seminars and classes: 4 hours

Small-group teaching: 6 hours

Supervision: 6 hours

Structure

The following topics are covered at the two workshops:

  • Environmental, social and economic pressures and drivers
  • Sustainable development concepts and frameworks
  • Developing a critical and analytical mind
  • Building the business case for sustainability
  • Identifying risks and opportunities
  • Systems thinking
  • Sustainable production and consumption
  • Design and technology policy, standards and regulations
  • Finance, investment and enterprise
  • Sustainability as core business strategy
  •  Culture and governance
  •  Embedding and integration
  •  Resourcing and skills development
  • Influencing and communication
  • Leadership and ethics

Assessment

Analysis paper, 3000 words

Strategic action plan, 3000 words

Group project, 7,000 words

Each assignment contributes one third to the final overall grade.

Continuation

PCSVC is the equivalent to the first third of the Master of Studies in Sustainability Leadership programme. The topics covered correspond with those taught during the first Master's workshop and the assignments undertaken are similar to those completed in the first year of the Master's programme.

Alumni of PCSVC who are admitted on to the Master's may be exempt from attending the first Master's workshop (although they are welcome to join for the week), and undertaking the first-year assignments. If exemption is granted, the fee payable is reduced.

It is not necessary to complete the Postgraduate Certificate prior to applying for the Master’s. Furthermore, while completing the PCSVC successfully may strengthen applications to the Master’s, it does not result in preferential access or negate the need to satisfy the Master’s-specific admissions requirements.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Bursary funding is available for deserving candidates who are currently prevented from applying due to financial reasons. These will offer financial support of 25-30% of the programme fee, and in some exceptional cases up to 50% of the programme fee, to assist selected applicants.



Read less
This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains. Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Read more
This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains.

Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Gain the theoretical knowledge needed to reconstruct biological profiles from hard tissue, supported by laboratory based training.

You learn from a team of internationally respected academics with extensive professional experience. You have the opportunity to access one of the largest human skeletal collections in the UK, with extensive skeletal pathology and accompanying radiographs. The collection is curated by the Skeletal Biology Research Centre, in the School's Human Osteology Research Laboratory.

The programme is suited for students from a wide range of BA and BSc backgrounds. This MSc will provide a firm foundation for continued work, or PhD research, in anthropology, archaeology and related forensic fields.

For more information about this new MSc programme please contact the programme director Dr Chris Deter:

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

With specialisation in forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes Kent is one of the largest institutions for biological anthropolgy. The School also houses the Skeletal Biology Research Centre (SBRC) which brings together innovative research, novel methodologies and international collaborations. Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) is an enterprise unit based within SBRC offers osteological analyses of human skeletal remains.

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany). We maintain an active research culture, with staff working in many different parts of the world.

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia.

Careers

Higher degrees in forensic anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, archaeology, police sector, the civil service and non-governmental organizations through work in areas such as human rights. A forensic anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Read less
Globalisation and an ever-changing economic landscape are introducing new opportunities and practices to effective Human Resource Management (HRM). Read more

Globalisation and an ever-changing economic landscape are introducing new opportunities and practices to effective Human Resource Management (HRM). Our MSc in International Human Resource Management will develop your understanding of real-world HR issues, developing your knowledge and practical skills, with a focus on how a strategic approach to HR can add value to organisations across the globe.

This course is particularly suitable if some, or all, of your career will involve working outside the UK or if you have an interest in global employment issues. Our MSc International HRM is fully accredited by the UK professional body (CIPD) and leads directly to Associate Membership.

The course is taught by an experienced team of lecturers, many of whom have extensive experience as HR professionals, and others who are actively researching and publishing in the field.

The course includes a work placement, and the opportunity of a live research project leading to your dissertation. It also includes a residential event and a visit to the CIPD’s national conference.

Features and benefits of the course

  • Manchester Met Business School has a long-standing reputation for excellence in teaching Human Resource Management to the CIPD Standards. Our programme has been designed to provide an ideal foundation for your career in HRM/HRD or related fields, including international HRM
  • This course meets the advanced professional standards set by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), it is accredited by CIPD, and gives full exemption from their level 7 Advanced Diploma in HRM. Upon successful completion of your qualification, and depending on your relevant HR or development experience, you can then apply to upgrade to Chartered Membership. You can read more about Chartered Membership here
  • The course is taught by an experienced team of lecturers, many of whom have extensive experience as HR professionals, and others who are actively researching and publishing in the field, including internationally
  • Staff are active in researching internationally, including comparative employment practices, studies of international management development with recent major projects in China, East-Asia, and Europe
  • You will be taught in the multi-award-winning Business School on All Saints Campus.
  • The course provides you with an opportunity to attend the annual CIPD National Conference held in Manchester in November and this is included in the course fee
  • A human resources work experience placement is part of the course. Many students choose to research their dissertations in their placement organisation. Our placement team will help and support you in finding your placement, including CV and job/placement application and interview skills preparation. These skills are an excellent foundation to enhance your employability on completion of your studies
  • We have strong links with the CIPD, which is increasingly international. Recent research from the CIPD suggests that over 30% of HR practitioners in the UK have an international dimension to their work, and the international links and partnerships between CIPD and lead bodies in other counties is growing. The CIPD has members located internationally In SE Asia, South America, Latin America, Africa, Middle -East, Europe and beyond
  • Business and Management research is supported, undertaken and applied in the Business School.
  • The Business School holds accreditation many professional bodies, including AACSB, AMBA, CMI, CIPD. Research firmly underpins our curriculum but we are also characterised by our strong external focus through the application of research to organisations and policy formation. See more here
  • Our programme is closely linked to the MMU Centre for People and Performance which conducts independent research in partnership with a wide range of organisations, to explore the challenges of managing, leading and developing people to create sustainable high-performing organisations
  • Our experts deliver tailor-made solutions to organisational and sector-specific challenges and issues for a range of private and public sector clients and policy-makers. Many of the Centre for People and Performance staff teach on our HRM programmes, you can read more about our Centre and the staff here
  • We also host Conferences, Workshops and Symposiums on a variety of HRM and HRD themes. 
  • Manchester Met Business School hosts the Manchester Industrial Relations Society which runs frequent (monthly) talks and debates by national recognised experts in the field.

About the course

Our postgraduate business programmes aim to equip you with the specialist skills in management, leadership and strategy and are intensively focused on developing your employability skills so that you can develop rewarding careers as HR leaders.



Read less
As well as inviting the comparative study of literary works of different linguistic and cultural origins, this absorbing programme encourages you to explore the interrelation between literature and the other arts, such as music, visual arts and film. Read more

As well as inviting the comparative study of literary works of different linguistic and cultural origins, this absorbing programme encourages you to explore the interrelation between literature and the other arts, such as music, visual arts and film.

You’ll embrace a range of languages and cultures within Europe, North America, South America and Asia, and draw on the teaching and research expertise of our internationally renowned departments, including several of the highest-rated literature departments in the UK.

The programme introduces you to subjects related to your studies, such as comparative literature, world literature and post-colonialism, translation studies, intermediality, psychoanalytical criticism, formalism, feminist literary theory, structuralism and post-structuralism, and deconstruction.

The programme also allows you to follow your own research interests through other tutorial work and your independently researched dissertation.

Programme structure

The programme combines seminar and tutorial work. You will take two compulsory and two option courses, plus compulsory research skills and methods courses. The two semesters of taught courses are followed by your independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

  • Theories and Methods of Literary Study (I and II)
  • Research Methods and Problems
  • Research Skills and Methods

Option courses may include:

  • Film and Gender
  • Poet-Critics: the Style of Modern Poetry
  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
  • Fairy Tales
  • The Great Russian Novel
  • Poetry, Music and Translation
  • Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature

Learning outcomes

On completion of the programme you will have gained:

  • a thorough understanding of Comparative Literature, as a subject and as a practice
  • knowledge of a number of literary theories and different approaches to literary study, and the ability to use them for literary analysis
  • the ability to focus on detail on literary themes, genres and historical periods from a comparative perspective
  • transferable skills such as critical thinking, analytical and interpretative ability, communication and writing skills

Career opportunities

This interdisciplinary programme will help take your research interests further into a broad range of fields. You may decide to concentrate on an academic career, or apply your learning to a diversity of roles, from teaching to publishing or cultural heritage. You will also graduate with skills that can be applied to any career.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X