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The Masters in Sound Design & Audiovisual Practice provides advanced training in creative practice with sound and audiovisual technologies. Read more
The Masters in Sound Design & Audiovisual Practice provides advanced training in creative practice with sound and audiovisual technologies. The programme offers topics relevant to practicing musicians, artists, and the creative industries, such as sound shaping and design, audiovisual composition, field recording, creative and experimental approaches to technology, live performance, interdisciplinary perspectives on sound, and sonic aesthetics. You then develop an individual portfolio of sonic and audiovisual artwork based on your particular skills and interests.

Why this programme

-We are Scotland’s leading research centre in Music, with a mutually supportive community of scholars and practitioners.
-Glasgow offers a huge range of venues for creative sound work, including the Old Hairdressers, Tramway, Mono, SWG3, and City Halls, all of which have hosted our students’ work.
-You will benefit from studying in the city of Glasgow, the UK’s first UNESCO city of music, with its vibrant and exciting music scene. Festivals abound, such as Sonica, Counterflows, and Tectonics, as does grass-roots sonic activity such as the Lights Out Listening Group. The presence of ensembles such as the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, RSNO, Scottish Opera, Scottish Ensemble, and experimental music ensembles such as the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra provides a rich context for your studies.
-The Glasgow Sound Network provdes a forum for sharing of sonic practice involving some of Glasgow’s leading creative media companies, artists and academics, offering excellent opportunities for building professional networks.
-Sound Design & Audiovisual Practice at Glasgow integrates sound design with visual media through a unit in Audiovisual Composition.
-The programme offers interdisciplinary perspectives and the chance to work with students from Glasgow School of Art through a unit called Sound Art in Dialogue.
-We work with the city’s cultural programme (Glasgow Life) to bring leading sonic artists to Glasgow, with associated workshops and collaborative opportunities for our students.
-Your work can be showcased in our annual postgraduate event Sound Thought, which takes place at the Centre for Contemporary Arts.
-Your work can also be showcased at the GLEAM (Glasgow Electronic and Audiovisual Media) Festival.
-You can experiment with building devices for making and controlling sound, enhanced by the presence of prototyping facilities in Glasgow such as Maklab, through our Creating with Technology unit.
-Our students and graduates engage in a wide range of professional creative work including sound design for film and theatre, live performance and award-winning composition.
-You will benefit from access to our facilities including an audio lab, three studios, the University’s Concert Hall with Genelec and d&b sound diffusion system, seminar and practice rooms.

Programme structure

The programme aims to:
-Provide artistic and technical experience in working with sound as a culturally significant medium.
-Enable you to build your knowledge of tools and methods for manipulating sonic and audiovisual media.
-Enable you to design, repurpose and reconfigure technologies for creative compositional ends.
-Enhance your creative practice through taking an exploratory and critical approach to sonic design and composition.

The MSc comprises 180 credits as follows:
Semester 1 compulsory courses (60 credits):
-Sound Shaping and Design
-Creating with Technology

Semester 2 compulsory courses (40 credits):
-Field Recording, Sound and Place
-Audiovisual Composition

Semester 2 option (one 20 credit course chosen from):
-Sonic Art Performance
-Sound Art in Dialogue
-Sonic Art Aesthetics and Criticism
-Music, Sound & Screen

Additionally you will produce an individual creative portfolio over the summer (60 credits).

Teaching methods include small group tutorials, seminars and workshops, lab and studio sessions, and individual guidance meetings.

Career prospects

The attributes you gain will be attractive to employers from the creative industries, and are particularly relevant for contemporary music, sound design and sound production, games, theatre, film and television. Many of our graduates undertake successful portfolio careers as artists and sound practitioners in their own right. The programme also offers an excellent foundation upon which to progress to PhD studies and an academic career.

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This online masters degree is for audio professionals who wish to enhance and formalise their industrial experience with industry relevant theory and practices. Read more
This online masters degree is for audio professionals who wish to enhance and formalise their industrial experience with industry relevant theory and practices.

The degree is made up of three parts: taught classes, work-based learning, and a research project. All of these elements are designed to apply theory and advanced practice to enhance current approaches to sound design for linear and interactive media.

The MSc Sound Design is delivered over either 18 or 30 months on a part time basis. All of the modules are delivered by distance learning. In addition, you will also develop a deep understanding of how to assess approaches of affecting audiences’ perceptions of linear and interactive media using sound design.

Emphasis is placed on cognisance with professional standards for the production and documentation of sound designs for linear and interactive media, and familiarity with a comprehensive set of methods of assessing listening experiences.

The course builds upon Edinburgh Napier University’s close contacts with internationally recognised professional sound designers for both linear and interactive media. Information about past guest lecturers can be found on Twitter (@SoundDesignMSc).

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MSc-Sound-Design-Postgraduate-Distance-Learning-part-time

What you'll study

Year 1:
- Listening
- Sound design for linear media
- Sound design for interactive media
- Advanced professional practice

In the first year, you will study Advanced Professional Practice (APP) for three trimesters. This allows you to tailor your learning needs to those of your organisation or the relevant industries.

Within the first few weeks of this module, under the direction of your academic supervisor you will develop your own learning agreement, which defines the deliverables of this module. If you are an employee you will do this in negotiation with your organisation.

If you are freelance, you may either negotiate with key clients or discuss an equivalent with your supervisor. Your supervisor will mentor you throughout the three trimesters towards the achievement of the deliverables. You will provide a reflective journal on your learning.

During the first year, you will also study one module per trimester: sound design for linear media, listening and sound design for interactive media. These modules will be taken in the order determined by the date of entry to the course.

Each module is independent of the others. One objective of the APP module is for you to apply immediately, in your practice, the knowledge gained from these three taught modules. After successful completion of the year, you will be eligible for a PG Dip Sound Design. In the second year, you will complete your MSc dissertation in part time mode.

Year 2:
Masters Dissertation:

In this 60 credit module you will take control of your studies to produce a substantial piece of focussed academic research. Success in the dissertation module indicates an ability to work independently, so you are expected to take the initiative and manage your own project. In effect, you are undertaking independent research as an apprenticeship to an experienced academic supervisor.

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

This degree gives you the opportunity to build on existing competencies and develop new skills in linear and interactive media sound design. The emphasis is on becoming an advanced sound professional within linear and/or interactive media.

Career opportunities:

sound engineer
sound editor
sound designer
sound researcher
sound archivist
sound artist
sound recordist

Currently sound designers can gain employment in:

art
audio Books
audio Branding
computing (Auditory Displays, Sonification, Web)
education
film
product design
radio
soundscape design (domestic, leisure, retail, travel, workplace)
television
theatre
video games

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From television, film and radio, to gaming, digital and online advertising, the demand for specialists who can use sound creatively has never been higher. Read more
From television, film and radio, to gaming, digital and online advertising, the demand for specialists who can use sound creatively has never been higher. This course will give you an understanding of the innovation and technology behind studio sound production and design.

You'll study the relationship between sound, music and image, and build your skills in sound production technology and music editing techniques. You'll develop the ability to produce original sounds and audio-visual media so you can create professional audio across a variety of media formats.

Our short course is a fantastic opportunity to learn from experienced music and film professionals in state-of-the-art studios. We're dedicated to providing you with hands-on, practical experience so you can produce your own work, developing your ability to deliver professional sound content to a specific brief.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/creativesound_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

We believe a short course can make a big difference.Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering,performance, digital media, gaming, music for film and television, production,radio, composition, sonic art, and music marketing and PR. If you would like tocontinue your studies, we offer a range of masters courses, such as AudioEngineering or Sound Design.

- Sound Designer
- Composer for Media
- Studio Engineer/Producer
- Audio Producer (Film, TV, Gaming)

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You might have just finished your degree, or be working in industry looking to acquire new skills for your professional development. Taught over four weekends in the year - Saturday to Monday - we've designed this course so that it fits around your lifestyle, requiring minimum time off work.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including recording rooms, audio booths, instruments, portable audio recorders, lab with soundcard and mixer, and computer workstations with software such as Sibelius, Pro Tools and SynthMaker, and music analysis tools.

You will access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

We also offer exciting short study opportunities in film, music and performing arts, taught during Easter and Summer. These creative workshops, ranging from two days to a week, are a great way to build your expertise for professional use, embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our postgraduate qualifications.

Core Modules

Sound, Music & Image
Evaluate the relationships between sound, music and image, and create examples of audio-visual media to a professional standard.

Creative Sound Design
We will equip you with the expertise to develop audio-based artefacts in the fields of electro-acoustic music, sonic art and sound design.

Martin Briggs

Senior Lecturer, Music & Sound

"We believe the particular combination of staff experience and expertise, first class facilities, real world practical assignments, guest lecturers and industry networks, contacts and accreditation make our specialist courses in sound second to none."

Originally training in music and media, Martin has worked as both a performer and producer in music, sound recording, video production and live events. His current research is concerned with collaborative partnerships and working practices in music and sound creation. Whilst still working as a musician and arranger, he is also involved in the promotion of local community music workshops, performances and events.

Facilities

- Sound recording & editing equipment
A comprehensive range of audio editing, composition and sound processing software is available.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

- Northern Film School
You will also be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course allows you to explore a wide range of films, contextual studies and critical debates, as well as the politics and cultural power of other media forms and institutions. Read more
This course allows you to explore a wide range of films, contextual studies and critical debates, as well as the politics and cultural power of other media forms and institutions.

Course overview

This Masters is for people who want to study films and culture at an advanced level. There is a high level of engagement with theories and practices of film studies and cultural studies, as well as a strong emphasis on rigorous research skills.

Given the importance of theory, an important attraction of this Masters is Sunderland’s research specialisms. These include star studies, performance, distribution and national cinemas, as well as sexualities, identities and how technology changes the way we experience the world.

The course is taught at the David Puttnam Media Centre on our Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s by staff from Sunderland’s Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which promotes a lively and inclusive research environment. As part of the course, you will have the opportunity to attend CRMCS’s regular research seminar series, which hosts both visiting and internal speakers discussing their latest research. You will also have the opportunity to benefit from the centre’s annual programme of national and international conferences, symposia and other research events.

You will focus on areas that you find particularly fascinating while contextualising your interests within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies. The course culminates in a dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with tutors.

Throughout the course, you will refine your powers of analysis, research and communication. These skills are highly valued by employers and will boost your employability. Postgraduates earn more, on average than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree.

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course are:
-Film and Cultural Studies 1 (60 Credits)
-Engaging with Theory: Key Thinkers, Texts and Concepts (30 Credits)
-Research Methods in Film, Media and Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Film and Cultural Studies 2 (60 Credits)
-Consumption and Everyday Life (30 Credits)
-Special Topic: Film, Media and/or Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Film and Cultural Studies 3 (60 Credits)
-You will complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Teaching and assessment

All modules are team taught, drawing on the wide range of research specialisms of our staff.

Co-taught with MA Media and Cultural Studies, this MA enables you to contextualise your own work within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies, as well as pursue your own specific interest in film. This approach is excellent preparation if you are thinking of continuing on to PhD level. You will also be able to specialise and pursue your own specific interests film via choice of assignment questions on the taught modules and via negotiation of topics in the Special Topic and Dissertation modules.
Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques and workshops. Via CRMCS’s research seminar programme, these are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. From stage 2 you will be expected to engage in a greater degree in self-directed study in preparation for the stage 3 dissertation. Your tutors will also give regular feedback and support.

Assessment methods include essays, projects, presentations, and a dissertation.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is home to the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which engages in world leading research, as well as hosting international visiting scholars, conferences, external speakers and two international refereed research journals.

Teaching rooms
We have well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, with overhead projection and full internet access.

Cinema
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The library buildings provide a variety of study spaces, IT facilities and experience library staff during core hours, with online services and support available at any time off-campus. In addition, both the St Peter’s and Murray libraries offer 24/7 access during main teaching weeks.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Sony EX1 and EX3 models, with associated location kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations with state-of-the-art HD Edit systems, including Final Cut Pro, Avid and Media Composer. There is also a digital audio postproduction area with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for a range of roles in the media and cultural industries. A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording. We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars. Read more
Embrace your interest in film, television and music by becoming a skilled professional in sound recording.

We have an excellent reputation for teaching film and music, with many of our graduates going on to win BAFTA's and Oscars.

You might be a budding filmmaker, journalist, photographer or documentary director, or simply have a creative passion for recording sound. Whatever your motivation, we will teach you professional techniques in music recording and post production so that you can record high-quality sound for the moving image.

This short course - taught over four weekends in the year - is a fantastic opportunity to learn from experienced film and recording professionals in state-of-the-art studios. We?re dedicated to providing you with hands-on, practical experience by giving you opportunities to produce your own work and explore the creative possibilities in sound recording and mixing.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/soundrecording_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

There is a strong demand for well-trained soundrecording professionals and we provide the skills to help you on your way tobecoming an expert in quality sound broadcasting. If you would like to continueyour studies in this area there are opportunities to move onto one of our masterscourses such as Music for the Moving Image or Sound Design.

- Audio Editor
- Audio Engineer
- Studio Manager
- Composer for Film and Television

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You'll be learning at our Northern Film School ? the first film school in the UK to receive JAMES accreditation. JAMES, a professional body that represents organisations across the media sector, described us as 'a benchmark against which all other film courses need to be measured'.

Taught over four weekends in the year - Saturday to Monday - we've designed this course so it fits easily into your lifestyle, requiring minimum time off work.

You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including recording rooms, audio booths, instruments, portable audio recorders and a lab with soundcard and mixer. You'll be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

We also offer exciting short study opportunities in film, music and performing arts, taught during Easter and Summer. These creative workshops, ranging from two days to a week, are a great way to build your expertise for professional use, embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our postgraduate qualifications.

Core Modules

Studio Skills
You will gain a strong understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment through the development of a musical product.

Studio and Sound Location
We will equip you with the theory and the techniques for recording and mixing sound for film, television and radio.

Laura Taylor

Senior Lecturer

"Our courses prepare you for an industry that is ever-changing, demanding and highly competitive. You will emerge with a strong understanding of your specialism, and with a focused approach towards personal development and career planning."

Specialist sound tutor Laura Taylor has worked for the BBC, Channel 5, ITV Yorkshire and Discovery Channel. She has experience in live television, post production sound and commercial and community radio, and has worked within the educational and community sector. Laura has very close links with community radio station ELFM and the Soundmill Studios in Leeds.

Facilities

- Sound recording & editing facilities
You'll have access to a suite of professional music studios, including film composition and audio post production rooms, instruments, together with portable field recording equipment and extensive computer workstation facilities.

A comprehensive range of audio editing, composition and sound processing software is available.

- Northern Film School
You will also be able to access an impressive range of facilities at our Northern Film School, including production studios, edit suites, production offices, and film and script archive.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The Masters in Sonic Arts provides advanced training in creative practice with sound and audiovisual technologies. Read more
The Masters in Sonic Arts provides advanced training in creative practice with sound and audiovisual technologies. The programme offers topics relevant to practicing musicians, artists, and the creative industries, such as sound shaping and design, audiovisual composition, field recording, creative and experimental approaches to technology, live performance, interdisciplinary perspectives on sound, and sonic aesthetics. You then develop an individual portfolio of sonic and audiovisual artwork based on your particular skills and interests.

Key facts

• MMus: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• PgDip 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• Contact: Dr Nick Fells:

Why Glasgow

• We are Scotland’s leading research centre in Music, with a mutually supportive community of scholars and practitioners.
• Glasgow offers a huge range of venues, including the Old Hairdressers, the Arches, Tramway, Mono, SWG3, and City Halls, all of which have hosted our students’ work.
• You will benefit from studying in the city of Glasgow, the UK’s first UNESCO city of music, with its vibrant and exciting music scene. Festivals abound, such as Sonica, Behaviour, Counterflows, and Tectonics, as does grass-roots sonic activity such as the Lights Out Listening Group. The presence of ensembles such as the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, RSNO, Scottish Opera, Scottish Ensemble, and experimental music ensembles such as the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra provides a rich context for your studies.
• Sonic Arts at Glasgow integrates sound design with visual media through a unit in Audiovisual Composition.
• Sonic Arts at Glasgow offers interdisciplinary perspectives and the chance to work with students from Glasgow School of Art through a unit called Sound Art in Dialogue.
• We work with the city’s cultural programme (Glasgow Life) to bring leading sonic artists to Glasgow, with associated workshops and collaborative opportunities for our students.
• Your work can be showcased in our annual postgraduate event Sound Thought, which has taken place at the Arches and the Centre for Contemporary Arts.
• Your work can also be showcased at the GLEAM (Glasgow Electronic and Audiovisual Media) Festival taking place in October this year.
• You can experiment with building devices for making and controlling sound, enhanced by the presence of prototyping facilities in Glasgow such as Maklab, through our Creating with Technology unit.
• Our Sonic Arts students and graduates engage in a wide range of professional creative work including sound design for film and theatre, live performance and award-winning composition.
• You will benefit from access to our facilities including an audio lab, three studios, the University’s Concert Hall with Genelec and d&b sound diffusion system, seminar and practice rooms, and a dedicated postgraduate research space.

Programme structure

The programme aims to:
• provide artistic and technical experience in working with sound as a culturally significant medium
• enable you to build your knowledge of tools and methods for manipulating sonic and audiovisual media
• enable you to design, repurpose and reconfigure technologies for creative compositional ends
• enhance your creative practice through taking an exploratory and critical approach to sonic design and composition

The MMus comprises 180 credits as follows:

Semester 1 compulsory courses (60 credits):
• Sound Shaping and Design
• Creating with Technology

Semester 2 compulsory courses (40 credits):
• Field Recording, Sound and Place
• Audiovisual Composition

Semester 2 option (one 20 credit course chosen from):
• Sonic Art Performance
• Sound Art in Dialogue
• Sonic Art Aesthetics and Criticism
• Music, Sound & Screen

Additionally you will produce an individual creative portfolio over the summer (60 credits).

Teaching methods include small group tutorials, seminars and workshops, lab and studio sessions, and individual guidance meetings.
The Postgraduate Diploma comprises 120 credits. You will produce two 15-minute creative portfolios each with a critical commentary of 2,000 words, under the guidance of a member of academic staff; they also attend research seminars and workshops.

The Postgraduate Certificate comprises 60 credits. You will produce a 15-minute creative portfolio with a critical commentary of 2,000 words, under the guidance of a member of academic staff; they also attend research seminars and workshops.

Career prospects

The attributes you gain will be attractive to employers from the creative industries, and are particularly relevant for contemporary music, sound design and sound production, games, theatre, film and television. Many of our graduates undertake successful portfolio careers as artists and sound practitioners in their own right. The programme also offers an excellent foundation upon which to progress to PhD studies and an academic career.

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Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies aims to provide students with high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world. Read more
Durham University's unique MA in Museum and Artefact Studies aims to provide students with high quality training relevant to a career in museums, the cultural heritage sector, and in the academic world. In particular, it is intended to equip students with a sound knowledge and critical understanding of current professional principles, good practice and contemporary debates relating to museum and artefact studies.

It aims to help students develop a variety of skills:
Professional skills - relevant to the care, management and exhibition of collections in museums.
Analytical skills - relevant to the study of a wide range of materials and artefacts, from different periods and cultures, and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
Research skills - relevant to studies of museums and artefacts, including an awareness of current theoretical issues.
Communication skills (oral, written and visual) - relevant to work in the museum profession and to academic research.

It also aims to encourage students to take personal responsibility for their own learning, team-work and professional conduct.

Course Structure

Two distinct routes can be followed through the MA in Museum and Artefact Studies. These comprise different combinations of modules.

Route 1

The first route is intended for students who firmly intend to pursue a career in museums and galleries. It comprises six compulsory taught modules:
-Approaches to museum and artefact studies
-Museum principles and practice
-Artefact studies
-Care of collections
-Museum communication
-Research paper

Route 2

The second route through the MA provides students with a different choice of modules. It is intended for students with a strong interest in artefact studies, who may wish to pursue a career in the cultural heritage sector or undertake further postgraduate research in museum or artefact studies after completing the MA course, but who also wish to keep their options open. It comprises four compulsory modules (one of which is a dissertation) and a choice of a fifth module:
-Approaches to museum and artefact studies
-Museum principles and practice
-Artefact studies
-Dissertation
And either
-Museum communication
Or
-Care of collections
Or
-A module from the MA in Archaeology (e.g. Prehistory; Roman Archaeology; Medieval Archaeology; Post-Medieval Archaeology; or the Archaeology of Egypt, the Near East and India (when available).

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in the Museums sector. Tutorials, seminars and workshops then provide opportunities for students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow students to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Museum and Artefact Studies through placements and curating an exhibition and/or developing an educational programme for the University Museums.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and ability as independent learners , giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject. The programme aims to develop these key attributes in its students thereby preparing them for work or further study once they have completed the programme.

In Terms 1 and 2 students typically attend 3-4 hours a week of lectures, up to 4 hours of tutorials or seminars, in addition to 2 workshops and 2-3 hours of practical sessions working with artefacts or museum environment-related matters or fieldtrips over the term. Students have a 20-day Museum placement at Easter in a museum or archive. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. Professional speakers are brought in to engage the students with issues within the professional body.

In Term 3 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required, to applying them within a real-life museum environment in the module Museum Communications where students work together on a specific project(s) with an opening date in May, June or July. Typically, students could be spending the equivalent of a working week as they complete the work for their projects, under supervision.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent research and research continues in Term 3, where the use of research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the Dissertation research project or the Research Paper. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have between 3 and 5 one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The Dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further academic work while the exhibition and Research Paper route is designed for a more professional environment.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend as well as Friends of the Oriental Museum events.

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This course allows you to examine the construction of meanings, experiences, identities and relationships in various contexts of social life, through advanced study of media practices and consumption. Read more
This course allows you to examine the construction of meanings, experiences, identities and relationships in various contexts of social life, through advanced study of media practices and consumption.

Course overview

This course is for people who want to explore the nature of the media and cultural power at an advanced level. There is a high level of engagement with theories of contemporary society, including cultural theory, modern television and popular culture.

Given the importance of theory, an important attraction of this Masters is Sunderland’s research specialisms. These include media power, sexualities, identities, and how technology changes the way we experience the world, as well as performance and distribution.
The MA is taught at the David Puttnam Media Centre on our Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s by staff from Sunderland’s Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which promotes a lively and inclusive research environment. As part of the course, you will have the opportunity to attend CRMCS’s regular research seminar series, which hosts both visiting and internal speakers discussing their latest research. You will also have the opportunity to benefit from the centre’s annual programme of national and international conferences, symposia and other research events.

You will focus on areas that you find particularly fascinating while contextualising your interests within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies. The course culminates in a dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with tutors.

Throughout the course, you will refine your powers of analysis and communication. These skills are highly valued by employers and will boost your employability. On average, postgraduates tend to find jobs more easily than people whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. They also achieve higher total earnings in the long-run.

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Media and Cultural Studies 1 (60 Credits)
-Engaging with Theory: Key Thinkers, Texts and Contexts (30 Credits)
-Research Methods in Film, Media and Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Media and Cultural Studies 2 (60 Credits)
-Consumption and Everyday Life (30 Credits)
-Special Topic: Film, Media and/or Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Media and Cultural Studies 3 (60 Credits)
-You will complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Teaching and assessment

All modules are team taught, drawing on the wide range of research specialisms of our staff.

Co-taught with MA Film and Cultural Studies, this MA enables you to contextualise your own work within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies, as well as pursue your own specific interest in a particular area of the media. This approach is excellent preparation if you are thinking of continuing on to PhD level. You will also be able to specialise and pursue your own specific interests film via choice of assignment questions on the taught modules and via negotiation of topics in the Special Topic and Dissertation modules.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, workshops and group work. Via CRMCS’s research seminar programme, these are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. From stage 2 you will be expected to engage in a greater degree in self-directed study in preparation for the stage 3 dissertation. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

Assessment methods include essays, projects, presentations, and a dissertation.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is home to the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which engages in world leading research, as well as hosting international visiting scholars, conferences, external speakers and two international refereed research journals.

Teaching rooms
We have well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, with overhead projection and full internet access.

Cinema
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The library buildings provide a variety of study spaces, IT facilities and experienced library staff during core hours, with online services and support available at any time off-campus. In addition, both the St Peter’s and Murray libraries offer 24/7 access during main teaching weeks.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Sony EX1 and EX3 models, with associated location kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations with state-of-the-art HD Edit systems, including Final Cut Pro, Avid and Media Composer. There is also a digital audio postproduction area with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24-year-olds.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for a range of roles in the media and cultural industries.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. Read more
The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. It satisfies all the requirements of the professional bodies including the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Transform your career

With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Study law in the heart of the capital - connected and convenient, with excellent transport options and a short walk from the Royal Courts of Justice.

Steps to becoming a solicitor or barrister

On successfully completing the CPE you are eligible to enter the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course (for intending barristers), which has some additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency.

Experienced tutors

The course is taught by an experienced team of tutors most of whom are solicitors or barristers which provides you with invaluable insight into the details of legal principals and real case examples.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/law-conversion-legal-pgdip-cpe

Modules

You'll study seven modules required by the professional bodies for students intending to apply for the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC):

- Introduction to the English legal system
You'll be introduced to the basic structure of the English Legal System and the essential aspects of civil and criminal litigation. You'll explore sources of law and key skills such as statutory interpretation, reading of law reports and the concept of judicial precedent. This introductory course will assist you in the study of the core modules, where legal skills will be developed further.

- Law of the European Union
Law of the European Union reflects the importance of EU law in the English Legal system. It is important to the management of the UK economy and relevant to the financial practitioners in the City. Business leader's decisions are influenced by EU competition law. It is important to migrants and practitioners of immigration law, to consumers and trading standards officials, to all employees through employment law and to all of us in relation to the environment.

- Obligations 1 (law of contract)
This module covers the principles of English contract law, sources, development, application in context and reform and includes reference to European developments. Contract is treated from formation to discharge and remedies with underlying concepts, rationales and influences and its relation to other forms of liability. Through the subject treatment, particularly examination of judicial reasoning and legislative technique, knowledge and skills are taught and/or developed. Skills include problem-solving, critical evaluation, reasoned argument and communication.

- Obligations 2 (law of tort)
You'll learn about civil liability in tort, focusing on an in-depth analysis of negligence, employers' liability for accidents at work, occupiers' liability for dangerous premises, manufacturers' liability for dangerous products, defences and vicarious liability. You'll develop your legal skills by reading and critically analysing cases and will apply your knowledge to complex, yet everyday, problem scenarios. You'll be encouraged to become critical and independent thinkers, and to communicate your ideas and awareness of the role of policy and the need for reform in the law of tort. In addition to its importance as an area of academic interest, tort is of practical significance to the intending practitioner, featuring heavily in the case scenarios of Legal Practice and Bar Professional Courses, as well as in everyday legal practice.

- Public law
You'll study the fundamental laws, practices and principles of Public law which define and influence the relationship between the individual and the state as characterised by various governmental institutions in the UK. Detailed consideration is given to the fundamental mechanisms by which human rights are protected and government is subject to legal and political accountability. Various skills are developed including those of analysis, critical evaluation and problem solving.

- Land law
Land law is a study of relationships. You'll study the relationship between the land and the rights which can exist in or over it, the relationship between the various persons who own an estate or interest over the land or want to defeat the competing interests in or over the land. You'll look at the rights and duties of each party to that relationship, how these relationships co-exit and what happens when the relationships come into conflict. Land Law governs the relative priorities enjoyed by two or more interests concerning the same piece of land. Land Law creates clear rules and formalities as to how the owner of an interest in land can acquire, transfer or extinguish that interest in land. You'll study the interests over land which Land Law is prepared to recognise and how these interests must be protected to ensure enforceability against third parties.

- Criminal law
This module aims to develop your ability to analyse and critically evaluate problems in Criminal Law so that you become independent and reflective legal practitioners able to contribute to public debate on legal issues. The main areas taught are: murder, manslaughter, non-fatal offences against the person including sexual offences and a variety of property offences including theft and fraud, accomplice liability and inchoate offences. You'll have additional support by way of on-line quizzes and narrated summaries.

- Equity and trusts
Principles of Equity are vital in the administration of justice. The 'trust' is a legal doctrine developed from those principles of equity which is fundamental to the commercial, business and employment worlds (pensions) and to individuals in the gifting of their property (personal trusts; wills).

- Project module
The project module satisfies the requirement of the academic stage of legal education that one other area of legal study must be successfully undertaken in addition to the seven modules which constitute the "Foundations of Legal Knowledge." It comprises the completion of a 4000 word extended essay, under the supervision of a member of the academic staff, based on the analysis of legal literature which takes differing interpretations over an issue related to law or its underlying theories. Its aim is to foster the development of the key elements of legal reasoning and legal method, research methods used in the conduct of autonomous research in law or law related topics as well as the development of skills in relation to the review and evaluation of journal articles, advanced texts and other secondary legal material.
Dissertation for the award of LLM

- Dissertation (LLM only)
This is an optional module as it is not required to complete the academic stage of legal education and so is not required to obtain the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. Its successful completion is required to obtain the LLM. A prerequisite to undertake this module is the successful completion and award of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. It comprises the completion of a 15,000 word Master's level dissertation under the supervision of an appropriate academic member of staff. It requires the student to independently conceive, plan and execute an appropriate piece of research based on firm academic and theoretical foundations. The module builds upon the research skills already acquired in the successful completion of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and common professional examination.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by exams, exams plus coursework or presentations.

Award
X8 modules = PgDip + CPE
X8 modules and dissertation = LLM

Employability

- Solicitor or Barrister
This course can lead to one of many careers in law from a professional qualification as solicitor or barrister to a wide variety of careers in both public and private sectors.

While our graduates may go on to join professional courses leading to qualification as a solicitor or barrister, the Diploma is also useful for numerous jobs that value skills in analysis, clear communication, efficient organisation and reasoned persuasion.

- BSB and SRA
This course is fully recognised by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority and constitutes completion of the Academic Stage of Training for the purposes of further study on either the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course for intending barristers (with additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency).

LLM Progression

Unlike a Graduate Diploma in Law our PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE is a postgraduate level qualification. After successfully completing the course you'll accumulate sufficient postgraduate credits to be eligible to submit for the further award of LLM by dissertation.

The LLM is an optional qualification additional to your Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies. To obtain the LLM you must successfully complete a supervised 15,000 word dissertation for which preparation has already been undertaken by your successful completion of the project module forming part of the programme leading to the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. The Masters dissertation is usually submitted in the semester following completion of the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. You'll not be required to attend classes when researching and writing your dissertation and you'll therefore be able to enrol on the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course in the September following the successful completion of the PgDip in Legal Studies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

The primary aims of the course are to ensure that you achieve a sound understanding of English law covered in the seven foundation subjects, which provides a solid grasp of the structure and operation of the English legal system.

Classes consist of a mixture of lectures and smaller group meetings where exam technique and problem solving approaches are practiced. The course is well supported by online materials and search resources, which can be accessed off-campus.

You'll have free access to OUP Law TROVE to access books for all foundation subjects.

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This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. Read more

Programme description

This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. It caters for a wide range of interests, with pathways in Traditional Arts and Culture, Medieval and Early Modern Celtic and Gaelic Development and Policy.

You will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding in professional research methods and inquiry, language skills, literary and textual analysis or fieldwork and archiving, and a range of core topics in Celtic and Scottish studies.

You will undertake full research training in Celtic and Scottish studies. You will learn to analyse and synthesise this knowledge in an interdisciplinary context, question assumptions about the primacy of one specific discipline over others and receive an introduction to subjects which you may not have experienced at undergraduate level. You will also have the opportunity to take courses offered by the School of History, Classics & Archaeology.

Programme structure

The programme takes one academic year (12 months) of full-time study, or two years (24 months) of part-time study (part-time options are only available for UK or EU students).

You will complete one core course (20 credits total), five option courses (100 credits total) and a dissertation of 15,000 words (60 credits).

Compulsory courses:

Research Skills and Methods in Celtic and Scottish Studies
Option courses may include:

Celtic & Scottish Studies Internship
The Supernatural World
Material Culture in Scotland
Scottish Emigrant Traditions

Work placement/internship opportunities

The internship is an opportunity for students to gain valuable work experience in an area relevant to their studies. The economic environment is challenging for many graduates, and evidence of an internship is often a decisive factor in hiring decisions.

The internship has three main elements:

a work plan agreed between the host institution, the student, and the programme director
the work itself
an assessed final report

The precise nature of the internship will depend on agreements with the host institution, but it is likely to involve archival work, research assistance, curatorial work, or work in public relations.

Participating institutions may include Storytelling Centre, the National Library of Scotland Special Collections and Manuscripts departments, the National Sound Archive, the National Museums of Scotland, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, and the special collections of Edinburgh University.

Learning outcomes

You will develop the critical skills to evaluate and compare texts and a historical understanding of literature and culture, as well as transferable skills such as carrying out academic research, writing commentaries and essays, improving your analytical thought, using electronic resources and giving oral presentations.

You will gain:

familiarity with the broad context of Celtic and Scottish Studies
a solid understanding of bibliography and study methods
the ability to engage at a high level with the subject material
an awareness of current issues and concerns within selected research fields
the ability to engage in original research resulting in a dissertation in an area of specialism
opportunities for engagement with the professional field through an internship, if desired
the opportunity to study modern Scottish Gaelic or medieval Celtic languages

Career opportunities

There are a wide range of sectors within which you could apply your knowledge and skills such as journalism; social, government or cultural research; publishing; higher education; advertising; arts administration; information work; or programme research in broadcasting.

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Building on the latest research on how organizations function, this Master’s program offers a inter-disciplinary, Social-Science perspective on the ways in which highly complex organizations respond to fast-changing, dynamic environments. Read more
Building on the latest research on how organizations function, this Master’s program offers a inter-disciplinary, Social-Science perspective on the ways in which highly complex organizations respond to fast-changing, dynamic environments.
The Master in Organization Studies provides you with a critical understanding of how organizations and people within them behave and is especially focused on organizational complexity and dynamics.

It is designed for those seeking a sound theoretical basis in organization studies, a deeper level of understanding about how organizations deal with complexity and dynamics and an advanced level study that will generate transferable skills and facilitate employment in a great variety of organizations.

Why should you choose to study MSc Organization Studies at Tilburg University?
1.This English-taught Master’s program is clearly structured and focused on complexity and dynamics.
2.You learn to understand and analyze organizations from an interdisciplinary perspective (i.e., involving Organization Science, Sociology, Psychology and Business Management), which is a unique approach in the Netherlands.
3.You will be prepared for teamwork through frequent group assignments in real-life settings, as well as through the acquisition of knowledge on team processes.
4.You will be trained by means of a variety of interactive teaching methods such as team work, peer review, case studies, presentations, workshops, etc.
5.You have the unique opportunity to expand your program with the Extended Master’s Program Organization Studies, which strengthens your career prospects by adding a one-year professional traineeship to your experience in a wide range of companies.
6.You will receive support and feedback from a small group of fellow students while writing your thesis in the so-called Thesis Circles.

Career Perspective

Students who graduate in Organization Studies at Tilburg University have very good career opportunities. In a society where changes follow changes ever more rapidly, organizations need people who have knowledge and a deeper understanding about organizations and organizing, and who can research and analyze problems in organizations and the way these problems are interconnected.

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There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. Read more
There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. If you are a recent graduate looking to stand out in the job market, already working but want to develop further, or simply looking to take your passion for English to the next level then we have the strength and depth of specialisms to fit your interests.

We are one of the strongest English departments in the UK with an excellent reputation for high quality research. Our Postgraduate students are an important part of our research community, and if you choose to join us at Exeter then you will be too.

Our Library and Special Collections offer modern study facilities and a vast amount of original source material, and if you’re interested in film or visual culture then the on-site Bill Douglas Cinema Museum is an invaluable resource.

You can choose to study one of the specialist pathways we have chosen to match the Department’s strengths or you can take an open pathway and tailor your own programme from our wide range of modules.

Programme Structure

Students may opt to follow one of our seven named pathways, each of which has its own pathway leader and associated modules. American and Atlantic Studies, Criticism and Theory, Enlightenment to Romanticism, Film Studies, Renaissance Studies, Modern and Contemporary, Victorian Studies, or opt for the ‘open’ English Literary Studies pathway.

Modules

Each Pathway has compulsory and optional modules some of these are listed here;
The Cultures of American Modernism; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Criticism and Theory: Critical and Literary Theory in a Global Context; Revival and Return: Using the Past from Pope to Keats; Body and Identity; Sense, Sensation, and Cinema; Hearing Film: Film Sound and Music; Country City and Court Renaissance Literature 1558-1618; Bodies Politic: Cultural and Sexual Politics in England, 1603-85; From Orientalism to Globalization: Debates in Postcolonial Studies; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Making Progress? Literature in a Changing Environment 1830-1870 and Empire, Decadence and Modernity: Literature 1870-1910.

Constituent modules and pathways may be updated, deleted or replaced in future years as a consequence of programme development. Details at any time may be obtained from the Department website at http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/ .

Careers

In recent years the positions some of our graduates have gone on to include: Copywriter; Marketing Assistant; Assistant Editor; Publishing Assistant; Editorial Assistant; Freelance Journalist and Writer

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Questions about security – what drives it and what undermines it – shape global politics. Read more
Questions about security – what drives it and what undermines it – shape global politics. Terrorism, conflict, environmental catastrophe, weapons of mass destruction and weak states are all security issues that are reflected in our media, dominate policy-making in international politics, and increasingly impinge on our daily lives.

This stream in Transnational Security Studies is an exciting new course that brings together many of the existing strengths of the Department of Politics and International Relations, including expertise in the areas of security studies, comparative politics, international law and conflict, political theory, and global politics.

The core of the course traces the security studies discipline from its traditional approaches through its evolution to include ever more transnational dynamics. You can tailor the course to your specific interests through optional units in subjects such as political violence, biopolitics, media, communication and conflict, international law of targeting, and regional international politics. You will be provided with both a firm academic foundation in the security studies discipline and a base of knowledge for careers in fields of policymaking, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and more.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdiptransnationalsecuritystudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in security studies while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- Our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has recently hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), and David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills).
Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Dr Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global.
The Centre recently won £54,000 from NORFACE, a partnership of European Research Councils including the ESRC, for a pan-European research network on globalisation and the transformation of Europe's borders, and £20,000 from the joint AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme for a research network on the normative foundations of public policy in a multi-faith society.
Dr Yasmin Khan’s recent book The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan (Yale University Press) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Book Prize of 2007.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Dr Ben O'Loughlin and Akil N. Awan, together with colleague Andrew Hoskins at the University of Warwick, were awarded £300,000 from the ESRC for a study of terrorist networks on the internet.
Unit Co-Director Professor Andrew Chadwick is one of the founding members of the US National Science Foundation's International Working Group on Online Consultation and Public Policymaking, a three year project focusing on how political interaction on the internet can contribute to better government policy. It is funded through part of an overall grant of $1m to the State University of New York at Albany, from the NSF Digital Government Programme. Andrew Chadwick’s recent book Internet Politics (Oxford University Press) was awarded one of the American Sociological Association Best Book Prizes in 2007.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to security studies

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The M.Phil. in 18th-Century and Romantic Studies provides a nine-month course of literary study in 'the long eighteenth century' (roughly 1688 to 1832), the period of Enlightenment and the rise of Romanticism, during which many of the structures of our modern world were formed. Read more
The M.Phil. in 18th-Century and Romantic Studies provides a nine-month course of literary study in 'the long eighteenth century' (roughly 1688 to 1832), the period of Enlightenment and the rise of Romanticism, during which many of the structures of our modern world were formed. The course, which consists of seminars and classes together with individual study and supervision, allows students to range widely across a rich array of literary and intellectual sources.

Training in relevant research skills is included. Students will have access to the magnificent resources of the Cambridge University Library, one of the few copyright libraries in the UK, as well as to many special holdings in College libraries. They will be able to take courses from other selected MPhils and to attend lectures in the English Faculty and in related faculties such as History, Classics, Modern Languages, History of Art, Philosophy, and History and Philosophy of Science.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmpesr

Course detail

By the end of the course students should have:

- developed a deeper knowledge of British 18th century and romantic literature in general, and of their chosen area of research in particular;

- developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field

Format

The required elements of the course consist of two seminars in both Michaelmas and Lent term selected from the course-options offered. Students may substitute one of the two courses required per term from another M.Phil. in the English Faculty or from another Faculty subject to the approval of the convenor.

In addition to the mandatory seminars students must attend the Resources and Methods classes in Michaelmas and Lent Term and the Dissertation Workshops in Lent Term:

Participants on the M.Phil are required to attend a minimum of ten sessions selected from the fortnightly Graduate Research Seminars for the year which must include the Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Graduate Seminar

Each student has a supervisor who gives advice on planning the year’s work and the dissertation in particular. Supervision on the coursework essays is offered by the convenor of the appropriate class. Documentation offering specifications and guidance in relation to each element of assessed work is provided to students. Progress is monitored through the discussion with each student of draft sections of their dissertations by their supervisor and through submitted work: The short-written exercise, which is submitted in Michaelmas Term, receives feedback from the supervisor; the first course-work which is submitted at the end of Michaelmas term is returned with examiner’s comments at the beginning of Lent term; the Lent-term course-work essay returned with comments at the beginning of Easter term. Supervisors write termly reports online which can be accessed by the student.

Assessment

- A 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation submitted at the end of Easter term which contributes 50% to the final mark.
- A short-written exercise which is marked on a pass/resubmission basis.
- Two 5,000-word essays. One is submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term the other at the end of Lent Term. These relate to the work pursued in the seminars taken and contribute 20% and 30% respectively to the final mark.

Continuing

If you wish to continue from the MPhil to the PhD you must obtain a minimum of 70 across the coursework with a minimum of 70 for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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