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Solid State Chemistry covers the latest advances in advanced inorganic materials with applications ranging from energy storage systems, electronic materials and sensors to the more traditional, but increasingly hi-tech materials and industries that include glass, cement and refractories. Read more

About the course

Solid State Chemistry covers the latest advances in advanced inorganic materials with applications ranging from energy storage systems, electronic materials and sensors to the more traditional, but increasingly hi-tech materials and industries that include glass, cement and refractories.

This course is specifically designed to give students a broad overview of the synthesis, structure and properties of inorganic materials together with in-depth coverage of the main groups of ceramic materials and allows you further specialisation when it comes to choosing your personal research project.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Core modules

Solid State Chemistry; Functional and Structural Ceramics; Glasses and Cements; Science of Materials; Materials Processing and Characterisation; Materials Selection, Properties and Applications; Technical Skills Development; Heat and Materials; Research project in an area of your choice.

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Our Chemistry Master's programme provides you with an exceptional toolbox for your future. The programme is closely associated with the research Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Read more

Interdisciplinary approach

Our Chemistry Master's programme provides you with an exceptional toolbox for your future. The programme is closely associated with the research Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Its mission is to fundamentally understand, design and control the functioning of molecules and materials. The institute is a centre of excellence that trains the next generation of leaders in science and entrepreneurship. Research in the IMM ranges from condensed matter science to chemical biology, and builds on novel theoretical, synthetic and spectroscopic methods. Our goal is to explore new roads proceeding from synthesis and growth to design and architecture of molecular constructs and materials with specific, desired properties. The cooperation of chemists and physicists, and increasingly biologists, in one research institute is unique worldwide. It is the secret of IMM's success and its many scientific breakthroughs.

Specialisations within the Master's in Chemistry

The Master's programme in Chemistry offers you three specialisations:
- Chemistry for Life
- Molecular Chemistry
- Physical Chemistry

Top scientists

The funding we have received for our research reflects the achievements we have made. Prof. dr. Wilhelm Huck received an ERC Grant for his research on chemical reactions in extremely small drops of water. The ultimate goal is to build a synthetic cell for this. We need to understand how complex networks function in confined spaces and how the physical environment of the cell impacts on enzymatic reactions. Prof. dr. Roeland Nolte received an ERC to do research on the development of supramolecular catalysts and materials using nature as a guide. Prof. dr. Jan van Hest received funding from the Gravitation programme for his work on self-repairing materials, materials that continually adapt to their environment. This includes the idea of how the body repairs its cells and ensures that the right substances reach the right places at the right time. They want to gain fundamental understanding of the complexity of that dynamic.

The Nijmegen approach

The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the people that you will meet, working, exploring and studying there. It is no wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, in direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personal Master's programme.

Quality label

For the third time in a row, this programme was rated number one in the category Chemistry in the Netherlands by the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

Most of our graduates take up a PhD position, either in Nijmegen or elsewhere in the world. Our research institutes have many vacancies for PhD projects every year. Our graduates also find work as researchers and managers in industry, in business and in research institutes.

Our approach to this field

"The Republic has no need of chemists and savants", were the words with which Antoine Lavoisier, one of the founders of modern chemistry, ended up on the guillotine during the French revolution. Fortunately these days the importance of chemistry for the benefit of a sustainable society is well-recognised. As such, chemistry has been designated a key area by the Dutch "innovatieplatform". So there will be many chemistry-related innovation initiatives in both industry and academia. This will be substantiated by a steering committee formed by the Association of Dutch Chemical Industries (VNCI) and the Chemical Science division of the Netherlands' Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO/CW). These developments demand a continuous influx of well-trained chemists.

An integrated Chemistry programme was set up at the University of Nijmegen in 1962. The current Master's degree programme in Chemistry derives from the integrated programme that was established in 1999.

Radboud University Nijmegen aims to provide a Master's degree programme in Chemistry at an internationally recognised level. The programme is based on the research themes that exist within the Research Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM) and to a somewhat lesser extent, the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (RIMLS). In recent years, the IMM has focused on chemistry research in the areas of organic chemistry (synthetic, bio-organic, supramolecular and materials), nuclear magnetic resonance (solid state NMR and biophysical chemistry), and solid state chemistry. Furthermore, increasing research interaction with biology and physics groups has emerged to offer ample opportunities for new research and education. Based on this research, modern, high quality education can be provided within the Master's degree programme.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/chemistry

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The program aims to form Master graduates with a comprehensive and solid scientific and technological background in Electronics Engineering, able to design and to use electronic devices, electronic circuits and electronic systems of any complexity as well as to promote the diffusion of electronic technologies in the fields of human activity where benefits can be envisaged. Read more

Mission and goals

The program aims to form Master graduates with a comprehensive and solid scientific and technological background in Electronics Engineering, able to design and to use electronic devices, electronic circuits and electronic systems of any complexity as well as to promote the diffusion of electronic technologies in the fields of human activity where benefits can be envisaged.
To meet these training needs, the Master of Science in Electronics Engineering bases its roots on a full spectrum of basic courses (mathematics, classical and modern physics, computer science, signal theory, control and communications, basic electronic circuits) that are prerequisites required from the Bachelor, and focuses on the most advanced disciplines in electronic design (analog and digital electronics, solid state physics and devices, microelectronics, optoelectronics, sensors and electronic instrumentation, communications and control systems) to provide a complete and updated preparation. Upon graduating, students will have developed a “design oriented” mindset and acquired a skill to use engineering tools to design solutions to advanced electronic challenges in scientific and technological fields.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/electronics-engineering/

Career opportunities

Thanks to the deep and solid scientific and technological knowledge provided, Master of Science graduates in Electronics Engineering will be able to hold positions of great responsibility, both at technical and management level, in a wide variety of productive contexts:
- Scientific and technological research centers, national and international, public or private;
- Industries of semiconductors, integrated circuits and in general of electronic components;
- Industries of electronic systems and instrumentation, such as consumer electronics (audio, video, telephone, computers, etc.), optoelectronics, biomedical, etc.;
- Electromechanical industries with high technological content such as aeronautics, transportation, aerospace, energy, robotics and plant automation, etc.;
- Work as a freelance in the design and fabrication of custom electronic systems.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Electronics_Engineering_01.pdf
The Master of Science in Electronics Engineering aims to form graduates with a comprehensive and solid scientific and technological knowledge in the field of Electronics, able to design and to use electronic devices, electronic circuits and electronic systems of any complexity as well as to promote the diffusion of electronic technologies in the fields of human activity where benefits can be envisaged. The course focuses on the most advanced aspects of Electronics (analog and digital integrated circuits design, solid state devices, microelectronics, optoelectronic devices and sensors, electronic instrumentation, communications and control systems) to provide a complete and updated professional preparation. Upon graduating, students will have developed a “design oriented” mindset enabling them to successfully deal with the complex needs of today’s industrial system. They will have also acquired a skill to use engineering tools to design solutions to advanced electronic challenges in scientific and technological fields as well as a maturity to hold positions of great responsibility both at technical and management level. The programme is taught in English.

Required background from Bachelor studies

The Master of Science in Electronics Engineering bases its roots on a full spectrum of knowledge that students are expected to have successfully acquired in their Bachelor degree, like advanced mathematics, classical and modern physics, computer science, signal and communication theory, electric circuits and feedback control, basic electronic devices and analog & digital circuit analysis.

Subjects

- Analog & Digital Integrated Circuit Design
- MEMS and Microsensors
- Electronic Systems
- Electron Devices and Microelectronic Technologies
- Signal recovery and Feedback Control
- Optoelectronic Systems and Photonics Devices
- RF Circuit Design
- Power Electronics
- Semiconductor Radiation Detectors
- FPGA & Microcontroller System Design
- Biochip and Electronics Design for Biomedical Instrumentation

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/electronics-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/electronics-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics. Read more
The Department gives MSc students an opportunity to study and perform a research project under the supervision of recognized experts and to acquire specialist knowledge of one or a few topics at the cutting edge of contemporary physics.

The project will be devoted to one of several topical areas of modern physics including high-temperature superconductivity, terahertz semiconductor and superconductor electronics, quantum computing and quantum metamaterials, physics of extreme conditions and astrophysics.

Core study areas currently include mathematical methods for interdisciplinary sciences, research methods in physics, superconductivity and nanoscience and a research project.

Optional study areas currently include characterisation techniques in solid state physics, quantum information, advanced characterisation techniques, quantum computing, and physics of complex systems.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Mathematical Methods for Interdisciplinary Sciences
- Research Methods in Physics
- Superconductivity and Nanoscience
- Research Project Part 1
- Research Project Part 2

Optional Modules:
- Characterisation Techniques in Solid State Physics
- Fundamentals of Quantum Information
- Matlab as a Scientific Programming Language
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques
- Quantum Computing
- Physics of Complex systems

Learning and teaching

Knowledge and understanding are acquired through lectures, tutorials, problem classes and guided independent study. Assessment in taught modules is by a combination of examination and coursework. The MSc includes a significant research project completed through guided independent study with a research supervisor.

Careers and further study

The aim of the course is to equip students with key skills they need for employment in industry, public service or academic research.

Why choose physics at Loughborough?

We are a community of approximately 170 undergraduates, 30 postgraduates, 16 full-time academic staff, seven support staff, and several visiting and part-time academic staff.

Our large research student population and wide international links make the Department a great place to work.

- Research
Our research strengths are in the areas of condensed matter and materials, with a good balance between theory and experiment.
The quality of our researchers is recognised internationally and we publish in highly ranked physics journals; one of our former Visiting Professors, Alexei Abrikosov, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics.

- Career Prospects
100% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They have gone on to work with companies such as BT, Nikon Metrology, Prysmian Group, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS and Smart Manufacturing Technology.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/advanced-physics/

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We have a long history of internationally recognized research in the study and development of new materials. Read more
We have a long history of internationally recognized research in the study and development of new materials. This course gives the possibility of working with and learning from expert researchers in the physics of materials in a friendly and vibrant research atmosphere provided by the international team of scientists at the Department of Physics.

This programme contains a combination of supervised research work, development of research skills and taught material. The programme involves a set of taught modules and an experimental or theoretical research project.

The theme of the project will be dedicated to one of the topical areas in physics of materials including graphene-based materials, thin film materials, shape memory compounds or nanomaterials or experimental study of properties of materials.

Core study areas mathematical methods for interdisciplinary sciences, research methods in physics, superconductivity and nanoscience, characterisation techniques in solid state physics, and a research project.

Optional study areas include polymer properties, polymer science, advanced characterisation techniques, simulation of advanced materials and processes, and materials modelling.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/physics-materials/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Mathematical Methods for Interdisciplinary Sciences
- Research Methods in Physics
- Superconductivity and Nanoscience
- Research Project Part 1
- Research Project Part 2
- Characterisation Techniques in Solid State Physics

Optional Modules:
- Polymer Properties
- Polymer Science
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques
- Simulation of Advanced Materials and Processes
- Materials Modelling

Learning and teaching

Knowledge and understanding are acquired through lectures, tutorials, problem classes and guided independent study. Assessment in taught modules is by a combination of examination and coursework. The MSc includes a significant research project completed through guided independent study with a research supervisor.

Careers and further study

The aim of the course is to equip students with key skills they need for employment in industry, public service or academic research.

Why choose physics at Loughborough?

We are a community of approximately 170 undergraduates, 30 postgraduates, 16 full-time academic staff, seven support staff, and several visiting and part-time academic staff.

Our large research student population and wide international links make the Department a great place to work.

- Research
Our research strengths are in the areas of condensed matter and materials, with a good balance between theory and experiment.
The quality of our researchers is recognised internationally and we publish in highly ranked physics journals; one of our former Visiting Professors, Alexei Abrikosov, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics.

- Career Prospects
100% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They have gone on to work with companies such as BT, Nikon Metrology, Prysmian Group, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS and Smart Manufacturing Technology.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/physics/physics-materials/

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/microelectronic-engineering-1. Read more
See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/microelectronic-engineering-1

The master of engineering in microelectronics manufacturing engineering provides a broad-based education for students who are interested in a career in the semiconductor industry and hold a bachelor’s degree in traditional engineering or other science disciplines.

Program outcomes

After completing the program, students will be able to:

- Design and understand a sequence of processing steps to fabricate a solid state device to meet a set of geometric, electrical, and/or processing parameters.

- Analyze experimental electrical data from a solid state device to extract performance parameters for comparison to modeling parameters used in the device design.

- Understand current lithographic materials, processes, and systems to meet imaging and/or device patterning requirements.

- Understand the relevance of a process or device, either proposed or existing, to current manufacturing practices.

- Perform in a microelectronic engineering environment, as evidenced by an internship.

- Appreciate the areas of specialty in the field of microelectronics, such as device engineering, circuit design, lithography, materials and processes, and yield and manufacturing.

Plan of study

This 30 credit hour program is awarded upon the successful completion of six core courses, two elective courses, a research methods course, and an internship. Under certain circumstances, a student may be required to complete bridge courses totaling more than the minimum number of credits. Students complete courses in microelectronics, microlithography, and manufacturing.

Microelectronics

The microelectronics courses cover major aspects of integrated circuit manufacturing technology, such as oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, metalization, plasma etching, etc. These courses emphasize modeling and simulation techniques as well as hands-on laboratory verification of these processes. Students use special software tools for these processes. In the laboratory, students design and fabricate silicon MOS integrated circuits, learn how to utilize semiconductor processing equipment, develop and create a process, and manufacture and test their own integrated circuits.

Microlithography

The microlithography courses are advanced courses in the chemistry, physics, and processing involved in microlithography. Optical lithography will be studied through diffraction, Fourier, and image-assessment techniques. Scalar diffraction models will be utilized to simulate aerial image formation and influences of imaging parameters. Positive and negative resist systems as well as processes for IC application will be studied. Advanced topics will include chemically amplified resists; multiple-layer resist systems; phase-shift masks; and electron beam, X-ray, and deep UV lithography. Laboratory exercises include projection-system design, resist-materials characterization, process optimization, and electron-beam lithography.

Manufacturing

The manufacturing courses include topics such as scheduling, work-in-progress tracking, costing, inventory control, capital budgeting, productivity measures, and personnel management. Concepts of quality and statistical process control are introduced. The laboratory for this course is a student-run factory functioning within the department. Important issues such as measurement of yield, defect density, wafer mapping, control charts, and other manufacturing measurement tools are examined in lectures and through laboratory work. Computer-integrated manufacturing also is studied in detail. Process modeling, simulation, direct control, computer networking, database systems, linking application programs, facility monitoring, expert systems applications for diagnosis and training, and robotics are supported by laboratory experiences in the integrated circuit factory. The program is also offered online for engineers employed in the semiconductor industry.

Internship

The program requires students to complete an internship. This requirement provides a structured and supervised work experience that enables students to gain job-related skills that assist them in achieving their desired career goals.

Students with prior engineering-related job experience may submit a request for internship waiver with the program director. A letter from the appropriate authority substantiating the student’s job responsibility, duration, and performance quality would be required.

For students who are not working in the semiconductor industry while enrolled in this program, the internship may be completed at RIT. It involves an investigation or study of a subject or process directly related to microelectronic engineering under the supervision of a faculty adviser. An internship may be taken any time after the completion of the first semester, and may be designed in a number of ways. At the conclusion of the internship, submission of a final internship report to the faculty adviser and program director is required.

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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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Ceramic materials range from new electroceramics and high-temperature materials for aerospace, as well as other engineering applications, to the more traditional refractories and cements where new systems are being developed. Read more

About the course

Ceramic materials range from new electroceramics and high-temperature materials for aerospace, as well as other engineering applications, to the more traditional refractories and cements where new systems are being developed. Our course introduces you to the theories and concepts that make it all possible.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Core modules

Functional and Structural Ceramics; Glasses and Cements; Science of Materials; Materials Processing and Characterisation; Materials Selection, Properties and Applications; Technical Skills Development; Heat and Materials; Research project in an area of 
your choice.

Examples of optional modules

Solid State Chemistry; Materials for Energy; Nanomaterials.

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The global challenges of climate and energy require new technologies for renewable energy sources, methods of energy storage, efficient energy use, new lightweight vehicular structures, techniques for carbon capture and storage and climate engineering. Read more
The global challenges of climate and energy require new technologies for renewable energy sources, methods of energy storage, efficient energy use, new lightweight vehicular structures, techniques for carbon capture and storage and climate engineering. This is a broad-based MSc, designed for graduates who wish to acquire skills in energy and materials science in order to participate in the emerging challenges to meet climate change targets.

Degree information

Students gain an advanced knowledge of materials science as it applies to energy and environmental technologies and research skills including information and literature retrieval, critical interpretation and analysis, and effective communication. They can benefit from modules in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering or mechanical engineering, thus offering future employers a wide-ranging skills base. Graduates will be well qualified to deal with the problems of energy decision-making and the implications for the environment.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (15 credits each) and a research project (60 credits). An exit-level only Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is available. An exit-level only Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is available.

Core modules - students take all of the following, totalling 90 credits, and a 60 credit research dissertation.
-Advanced Topics in Energy Science and Materials
-Microstructural Control in Materials Science
-Energy Systems and Sustainability
-Transferable Skills for Scientists
-Research Project Literature Review

Optional modules - students take 30 credits drawn from the following:
-Climate and Energy
-Materials and Nanomaterials
-Electrical Power Systems and Alternative Power Systems
-Atom and Photon Physics
-Solid State Physics
-Mastering Entrepreneurship

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words, an oral presentation and a viva voce examination (60 credits).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory classes and research supervision. Assessment is through unseen written examination and coursework. The literature project is assessed by written dissertation and oral presentation, and the research project is assessed by a written report, an oral presentation and a viva voce examination.

Careers

The UK has committed to 80% reduction in CO2 emissions on a 1990 baseline by 2050. CERES, the organisation that represents the largest institutional investors would like to see 90% reduction by 2050. National Systems of Innovation (NSI), which includes the universities, research centres and government departments working in conjunction with industry, will need to apprehend new opportunities and change direction, diverting personnel to energy and climate issues in response to changing markets and legislation. This MSc will contribute to the supply of personnel needed for the era of sustainability.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Process Innovation Executive, Samsung Electronics UK
-Chemical Engineer, Jing Eong Fang
-Research Intern, CECP
-PhD Nanomaterials, University of Oxford
-PhD Sugar Chemistry, Monash University

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is designed for graduates from a wide range of science and engineering backgrounds who wish to broaden their knowledge and skills into materials science with an emphasis on the energy and climate change issues that will drive markets over the next century. It delivers courses from five departments across three faculties depending on options and includes a self-managed research project which is intended to introduce the challenges of original scientific research in a supportive environment.

Research activities span the whole spectrum of energy-related research from the development of batteries and fuel cells to the prediction of the structure of new water-splitting catalytic materials.

Students develop experience in scientific method, techniques for reporting science and in the many generic skills required for a future career.

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The Masters in Physics. Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014, the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
-You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Physics: Advanced Materials include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of advanced materials.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Nano and atomic scale imaging
-Research skills
-Solid state physics
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Detectors and imaging
-Environmental radioactivity
-Nuclear power reactors
-Semiconductor physics
-Statistical mechanics

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-The School of Physics and Astronomy plays a world-leading role in the design and operation of the worldwide network of laser interferometers leading the search for gravitational waves. These interferometers are among the most sensitive scientific instruments ever built.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Read more
The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Though it may be taken as a free-standing qualification, most students take this programme as a pathway to the MSc. This pathway forms the first year of a two-year programme with successful students (gaining a merit or distinction) progressing onto the MSc Physics in second year.

Key benefits

- King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.

- Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".

- The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".

- Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/physics-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Students will undertake a total of 120 credits, from the following modules:

- Mathematical Methods in Physics III
- Statistical Mechanics
- Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics
- Particle Physics
- Optics
- Solid State Physics
- General Relatvity and Cosmology
- Fundamentals of Biophysics and Nanotechnology
- Introduction to Medical Imaging
- Laboratory Physics II
- Computational Lab
- Nuclear Physics
- Quantum Mechanics for Physics I
- Mathematical methods in Physics
- Symmetry in Physics
- Electromagnetism
- Astrophysics

- Course purpose -

For students with an undergraduate degree or equivalent who wish to have the experience of one year in a leading UK Physics Department, or who may not be immediately eligible for entry to a higher degree in the UK and who wish to upgrade their degree. If you successfully complete this programme with a Merit or Distinction we may consider you for the MSc programme.

- Course format and assessment -

The compulsory modules are assessed via coursework. The majority of the other optional modules avaiable are assessed by written examinations.

Career prospects

Many students go on to do a higher Physics degree, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering. You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including. Read more

Why this course?

This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering.

You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including:
- high-power microwave technology
- laser-based particle acceleration and enabled applications
- physics and the life sciences
- materials and solid state physics
- photonics
- quantum optics and quantum information technology

You‘ll put the knowledge gained in the taught classes to use on a research project. You can design the project to fit in with your interests and career plans.

The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master a wide range of applied physics skills. It teaches you transferable, problem-solving and numeracy skills that are widely sought after across the commercial sector.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/appliedphysics/

You’ll study

You’ll have two semesters of taught classes made up of compulsory and optional modules. This is followed by a three-month research project.

Facilities

This course is run by our Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:
- cutting-edge high-power laser and particle acceleration research with SCAPA, enabling generation of radiation from the terahertz to - the X-ray region, and biomedical applications
- the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
- a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
- access to top-of-the-range high-performance and parallel computer facilities
- state-of-the-art high-power microwave research facility in the Technology & Innovation Centre
- advanced quantum optics and quantum information labs
- several labs researching optical spectroscopy and sensing

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments and research projects.

Assessment

The final assessment will be based on your performance in examinations, coursework, a research project and, if required, in an oral exam.

What kind of jobs do Strathclyde Physics graduates get?

To answer this question we contacted some of our Physics graduates from all courses to find out what jobs they have. They are working across the world in a number of different roles including:
- Medical Physicist
- Senior Engineer
- Professor
- Systems Engineer
- Treasury Analyst
- Patent Attorney
- Software Engineer
- Teacher
- Spacecraft Project Manager
- Defence Scientist
- Procurement Manager
- Oscar winner

- Success story: Iain Neil
Iain Neil graduated from Strathclyde in Applied Physics in 1977 and is an optical consultant, specialising in the design of zoom lenses for the film industry. He has received a record 12 Scientific and Technical Academy Awards, the most for any living person.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Whether you intend to gain skills and expertise that will enable you to take up a position in a key industrial sector or embark on further postgraduate… Read more

Course Summary

Whether you intend to gain skills and expertise that will enable you to take up a position in a key industrial sector or embark on further postgraduate research, you will find that our MSc Photonic Technologies will give you the solid intellectual foundation and hands-on practical and technical skills that you need for a successful professional career in science, engineering and related photonics-based industry.

Working in our new, state-of-the-art cleanroom complex with access to our extensive range of optical laboratories, as part of the course you will work with leading local and national photonics companies, and see first-hand their products and emerging photonics technologies.

Our broad programme will give you the solid intellectual foundation and hands-on practical and technical skills that you need for a successful professional career in science, engineering and related photonics-based industry, or to embark on further postgraduate research.

Modules

Semester one
Compulsory modules: Lasers; Microfabrication; Photonics Laboratory and Study Skills
Optional modules: Light and Matter; Matlab/Numerical Methods; Silicon Photonics

Semester two
Compulsory modules: Solid State and Ultrafast Lasers; Photonic Materials; Plasmonics, Metamaterials and Nanophotonics
Optional modules: Nanoscience Technology and Advanced Materials; MEMS Sensors and Actuators

Semester three
Lab and cleanroom project; four-month, independent research project culminating in a dissertation

Visit our website for further information...



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The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

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