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Masters Degrees (Sociology Of Health)

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The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. Read more

Course Description

The Department of Public Health and Policy at the University of Liverpool has a flourishing research portfolio in Public Health and Health Inequalities. The University of Liverpool has been at the forefront of Public Health for over 150 years and now has an influential voice on the world stage and close links with many institutions, disciplines and public health bodies. The aim of the Department is to contribute to the improvement and maintenance of the health of people, locally, nationally and internationally, through:
• excellence in education and research
• the development of a learning environment that encourages staff and students to fulfil their potential

The Department provides advice to governmental policy makers locally, nationally and internationally and hosts the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Policy Research on the Social Determinants of Health. The Department is home to a multi-disciplinary team of academic staff drawn from a range of subjects including medical and health sciences, epidemiology, sociology, community development, policy analysis, statistics, and history. It is actively involved in research, education and health service work related to promoting the health of the public.

The Master of Public Health programme is delivered at both our Liverpool and London campuses. On completion of the Master of Public Health, students should have a foundation in the science and art of public health, including an understanding of the concepts of health and disease and factors, which may affect these. The resulting knowledge, skills and attitudes should enable them to put public health principles into effect in a variety of settings including research, practice and the interface of applied research. They will be able to demonstrate an in-depth systematic understanding of public health research and all students carry out a small-scale original research project that conveys the public health context and implications.

Public Health encompasses a broad range of subjects some of which require traditional analytical scientific thinking (for example statistics) whilst others require a more flexible and creative approach (for example health inequalities). The practice of effective public health requires the synthesis of these aspects and the MPH is designed to enable students to gain competence in the application of these disciplines.

The modules are designed to cover the set syllabus whilst allowing students the flexibility to learn in a way and time best suited to their individual needs. Areas that are most effectively covered by interaction and discussion, as well as those that may be conceptually difficult, are covered by direct contact. Even here a didactic teaching style is used only as necessary, with the emphasis of teaching being on interaction and experiential learning. The intention is to develop the ability in students for self-directed learning, so the styles of teaching and learning change in emphasis through the modules. In the early stages the material is subject based but as the student matures in knowledge and skill the material becomes more interactive and problem solving in approach. Broadly a student will be encouraged and guided in the development of five key areas:

1. In-depth knowledge of the main disciplines of public health.
2. Ability in self-directed learning and management of personal development.
3. Ability to critically evaluate, reflect and analyse.
4. Effective communication of ideas in both written and spoken formats.
5. Ability to work effectively both alone and in teams.

The programme offers the option of full-time study over one year, or part-time for up to 3 years for students who wish to study while in employment and where the programme can form an integral part of their professional development.

Here’s what some of our students said about the MPH Programme at the University of Liverpool:

“I loved the level of interaction and discussion. I’ve really enjoyed this year and I’ve found it very useful.”
“Fantastic lecturers. The most amazing support and constantly guiding the course along.”

“Standard of teaching – lecturers / speakers was exceptional. I enjoyed meeting and interacting with the people in the group as we were from quite different backgrounds. “
“The MPH at Liverpool has been key in enabling progression to my current role.”

“The MPH has proved to be a real asset and I certainly wouldn't have got the job without having studied at Liverpool.”

“The modules covered a wide range of topics and issues relevant to public health.”

“Well coordinated – lots of support. Lots of enthusiastic tutors.”

**Additional Entry Requirement Information

The Master of Public Health (MPH) programme is available to any University graduate in a health or health-related profession, as well as non-health-related graduates and others approved by the University. This includes:

• Graduates in medicine of an approved university who have not less than one year (and preferably longer) post-registration professional experience;
• Other health-related graduates of an approved university or other institution who have not less than two years of professional experience;
• Non-health-related graduates, and others who have satisfied the requirements of approved Exam Boards, or have satisfied the University that they are suitably qualified to undertake a postgraduate course. They must have at least three years approved professional experience, and either completed the final examination of an approved professional institution, or obtained some other qualification approved for this purpose by the University.
• In addition, applicants require a GCSE Grade C or GCE O Level pass in Mathematics and English, or an equivalent qualification.
International students

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This stream provides a sound understanding of the theoretical and empirical basis of health promotion, equipping students with the conceptual and practical skills to design and evaluate health promotion interventions and programmes. Read more
This stream provides a sound understanding of the theoretical and empirical basis of health promotion, equipping students with the conceptual and practical skills to design and evaluate health promotion interventions and programmes. Health promotion draws on ideas from sociology, psychology, anthropology, education, epidemiology and other disciplines to understand how the health of populations can be maintained and strengthened.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/ph_hp_progspec.pdf)

This course is accredited by the Agency for Accreditation of Public Health Education in the European Region (APHEA) which is the accreditation body of the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region (ASPHER). - See more at: http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msphhp.html#first

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msphhp.html

An additional requirement for the MSc Public Health (all streams) is some evidence of ability in mathematics, post-16 year education. Preference will also be given to applicants with relevant work experience.

Any student who does not meet the minimum entry requirement above but who has relevant professional experience may still be eligible for admission. Qualifications and experience will be assessed from the application.

Objectives

By the end of this stream, students should be able to demonstrate ability to apply knowledge of the core disciplines of public health, consisting of: statistics; epidemiology; health economics; and social research, to real health problems. In addition, they should be able to:

- demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principal theories, methods and interventions used in health promotion

- understand the development of the discipline of health promotion in the UK and internationally

- assess the appropriate use of population-wide versus targeted health promotion interventions

- formulate health promotion policy and practice that is relevant to varying needs in diverse contexts

- be able to appraise and communicate research evidence

- apply the knowledge and analytical skills gained to inform health promotion policy-making, programme planning, implementation and evaluation

Structure

Term 1:
Students complete the Public Health common core, consisting of four compulsory modules:

Basic Statistics for Public Health & Policy
Basic Epidemiology
Introduction for Health Economics
Principles of Social Research

In addition, students intending to follow this stream must take Health Promotion Theory. The remaining module can be selected from:

Environment, Health & Sustainable Development
Health Policy, Process & Power
Health Services
Issues in Public Health

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods (compulsory)

- Slot 2:
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Family Planning Programmes*
History & Health*
Population, Poverty and Environment*
Qualitative Methodologies*
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology*
Health Systems

- Slot 3:
Applied Communicable Disease Control*
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood and Perinatal Health*
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases*
Medical Anthropology and Public Health*

- Slot 4:
Environmental Epidemiology*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights*
Evaluation of Public Health Interventions*
Globalisation & Health*
Reviewing the Literature*
Sexual Health*
Analytical Models for Decision Making

- Slot 5:
Integrating Module: Health Promotion (compulsory)

By arrangement, students may be able to substitute specified Distance Learning modules for up to two modules in certain timetable slots. Any such substitutions will need to be discussed with the Course Directors. Full details are contained in the MSc Course Handbook.

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tphe_3.html

Project Report:
Students prepare a project report during the summer months (July - August), for submission by early September.

Intercalating this course

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:
Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)
- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)
- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)
- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msphhp.html#sixth

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If you are interested in solving societally relevant, complex health issues, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the specialisation Health and Society students become context-sensitive experts in the domains of science and health promotion. Read more

MSc Health and Society Specialisation

If you are interested in solving societally relevant, complex health issues, then Wageningen is the place to be! In the specialisation Health and Society students become context-sensitive experts in the domains of science and health promotion. Health and Society studies the social and behavioural aspects of health and health promotion, but also other factors that affects health, for instance the organization of the food system and the interaction between individuals and the physical environment.

Programme summary

Health is a resource that enables people to lead an individually, socially and economically productive life. For many centuries, the care for individual and population health has been the domain of medical sciences. However, it is widely acknowledged that contemporary health problems are complex and cannot be solved by simply extending existing health services. Chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes are important contributors to the burden of disease; as are communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmittable diseases.

There is no single cause to such health problems. Biological factors aside, lifestyle and the social and physical environment are major contributors in both a positive and negative way. Many diseases are related to the way in which people behave and take care of their own health, for example, substance abuse (smoking, alcohol, drugs), nutrition, physical exercise, and sexual behaviour. Lifestyles are often rooted in the social environment of family and friends, the neighbourhood, and the school and working environment. Aspects of the physical environment also affect individual and population health including housing conditions, environmental pollution, the availability of green space, and the availability and accessibility of health services. Moreover, societal changes, such as demography (e.g. aging populations, single parent families), consumption patterns, communication technology developments, globalisation and commercialisation influence the health status of individuals and populations.

Since health is influenced by such a diversity of interconnected factors, the development of cross border public health policies is essential. Within the health care system, organisations and professionals have to increasingly work together in the provision of care, prevention and health promotion. The set-up of the programme reflects its focus on societal issues in the domain of health, health promotion and health care systems. The programme covers a niche in the Netherlands by primarily taking a sociological approach to this domain, centralising the link between health and human relationships. Here, human relationships are interaction patterns and dependencies both differing in nature, scope and intensity. In conjunction with this sociological approach, anthropological and social psychological approaches are key to the social scientific analysis of health within the program.

The study programme takes a comparative perspective with respect to the empowerment of individuals, communities and populations. In other words, to what degree do people have the (financial) means to arrange their lives and are they able to use facilities for health protection and health improvement. This way, emphasis is on the societal embedding of health and activities of health promotion in relation to social processes, structures and institutions. Together with sociology, the programme combines the domains communication science and health promotion but also includes perspectives from economics, management and public policy.

Specialisation

The Health and Society programme is already a specialisation. However, depending on education background and personal interests, the programme schedule may vary.

Your future career

The Health and Society study domain is becoming more and more relevant as a consequence of changing patterns in health problems and the factors influencing health. Policymakers are becoming more aware of the impact of health policy; and recent national and international policy documents have emphasised the importance of health promotion. The improvement and sustainability of acceptable levels of health remains a major challenge. This specialisation prepares you for careers as researchers, health promoters, health policy advisors or managers of health-oriented organisations.

Student Sofia Sutherland Borja.
Sofia comes from Chile where she finished her BSc in Nutrition and Dietetics. In her MSc internship at the Standing Committee on Nutrition at the United Nations in Geneva, she worked on policies related to Public Health Nutrition. “For me, this has been a great opportunity to experience at first-hand how nutrition promotion policies are developed, and also meet influential people in the field I’m passionate about. Health and Society was the perfect complement to my background in Nutrition and Dietetics, because I can now approach nutrition problems from both a medical and social perspective.”

Related programmes:
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc Development and Rural Innovation

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Child Public Health at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Child Public Health at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Child Public Health course aims to equip students with a knowledge of the multitude of factors that affect infant, child and family health and the importance of health in early childhood for future national health, well being and growth.

Key Features of Child Public Health

Course:

- The course explores the evidence base behind current child public health, policy and practice
- Considers the real world implications of research for infants, children and families in health, social and educational settings
- Equips students with the knowledge and evidence base to develop and change practice in their field
- Developed by researchers with leading international reputations in the field of child health
- Delivered by experts with professional backgrounds in their field

Teaching and Employability:

- Taught by an interdisciplinary team including Public Health experts, Psychologists, Sociologists, Midwives and Child Nurses
- Teaching staff have strong professional links in practice in health, social care, social work and education
- Teaching is research led, informed by the research expertise and international networks of the team
- Opportunity to pursue a PhD supervised by a well-qualified member of the team

Ever wondered why mothers are encouraged to breastfeed?

Or why so much attention is paid to childhood obesity?

Do you believe that mothers should be ‘grateful that they have a healthy baby’ or is birth experience more important than that?

Perhaps you are a Professional working in practice and want to know the latest evidence behind what you do?

Or perhaps you are a Professional who wants to know the evidence behind an issue to strengthen your argument to drive forward a new policy?

Then this taught Master’s programme in Child Public Health is for you. Exploring the evidence base underpinning Child Public Health policy in the UK and Internationally, this course examines health issues for children (and their families) aged 0 – 11 years such as perinatal health, nutrition and immunisations. It highlights the importance of child health, not only as a concept of illness, but as affecting wider long term educational, social and emotional development.

The Child Public Health programme uses a bio-psycho-social approach to critically evaluate the multitude of factors that influence child health and the role of multi-disciplinary professionals, policy makers and government in child health promotion and governance. Overall, it will emphasise the importance of the early years upon future child and population health and consider the public health policies and interventions established to promote and enhance this.

The Child Public Health course will:

- Enhance understanding of the evidence base that drives Child Public Health policy, promotion and practice
- Develop students critical perspective on the importance of child health, the interplay of factors that affect it and the impact it can have upon child outcomes
- Promote critical understanding of child health from an integrated, holistic perspective examining evidence from biological, psychological and social angles
- Raise awareness of the number of professions who play a role in Child Public Health and explore the importance of inter-professional working
-Equip students with the knowledge to understand and promote child health in professional settings

Modules

Modules on the Child Public Health course may include:

Issues in Child Public Health
Sociology of Child Public Health
Childhood Nutrition and Growth
Common Childhood Illness
Research Methods
Understanding and Observing Child Development
Advanced Practice with Children
Therapeutic Work with Children
Children's Rights and Safeguarding Children and Young people

MSc Child Public Health students will take 180 credits comprising five compulsory modules (20 credits each), one optional module (20 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Students wishing to exit on successful completion of 60 credits at level M can be awarded a PGCert in Child Public Health.

Students who successfully complete 120 credits at level M but do not successfully complete the Dissertation module can exit with a PGDip in Child Public Health.

Staff Expertise

The teaching team consists of staff with backgrounds in teaching, research and professional expertise in the field of child public health. The team is active in their research and have considerable experience of encouraging students to publish their research; an indicator of high quality.

Facilities

Child Public Health students have access to a multi-media teaching suite; take part in interactive teaching sessions where student involvement enhances learning and practical hands-on sessions with visiting speakers.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of key developments in the fields of health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. Read more
The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of key developments in the fields of health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. It examines the political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of contemporary trends in medicine, the biosciences and health, in changing social and regulatory contexts, and at national and international levels.

Key benefits

- Taught within a world-leading Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, by internationally recognised experts who have trained across a range of disciplines – from sociology, anthropology, geography, gerontology, socio-legal studies and political science to psychology, bioethics, philosophy, biology and medicine.

- Covers a broad range of substantive topics and offers a wide selection of specialist options addressing key social and ethical concerns related to, for example, psychiatry and mental health; ageing; war and trauma; pharmaceuticals, genomics, and biotechnology and clinical research; pandemics and biosecurity; and the political economy of health.

- Offers advanced training in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods, as well as critical policy research methods, allowing students to acquire the skills needed to undertake cutting-edge, social scientific analyses of diverse health-related issues.

- Provides opportunities to join a thriving research community, to participate with active researchers in a range of extra-curricular events such as reading groups and roundtable discussions, and to attend a rich programme of seminars and lectures by world renowned visiting speakers.

- Equips students with a set of skills and understandings necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.

- Provides internship opportunities and career support to enhance students’ employability

- Taught in the heart of London, at the Strand Campus on the banks of the Thames, with access to policy-makers, private sector organizations, government agencies and other research and academic institutions relevant to health, and to London’s key cultural activities.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medicine-health-and-public-policy-msc-pg-dip-pg-cert.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of developments in health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. It is designed for graduates who wish to develop specialist understanding of the complex interconnections between (1) changing social, economic and political contexts, (2) advances in the biosciences and technological innovation, and (3) the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities. Drawing on concepts, theories and methods from the social sciences and from philosophy and ethics, students are encouraged to combine rigorous theoretical analysis with concrete, problem-based and policy-relevant research addressing key issues and controversies relevant to recent developments in health and medicine.

Students will have the opportunity to study a wide range of topics, which may include: inequalities in health and access to healthcare; the dynamics and policy implications of ageing societies; the securitization of public health; the impact of war and conflict on health and well-being; transnational trends in medical research, pharmaceutical regulation and health technology assessment; ethical issues in clinical research; the implications of recent scientific advances in genomics, molecular biology and neuroscience for ideas of personhood and identity, and for the organisation and funding of healthcare; patient advocacy, health movements and citizen participation in health policy making; the commodification of the body; the role of psychiatry in the cultural construction of normality and abnormality; and the marketization and privatization of medical care.

- Course purpose -

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations, and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research within socio-ethical studies of health, medicine and public policy, and provides a firm grounding in the knowledge, analytical techniques and research methods used within advanced social research. In doing so, it equips students with a set of skills and understandings that are necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.

- Course format and assessment -

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, seminars and workshopsthat place an emphasis on group dialogue, presentations and debate. Assessment includes a mix of examinations, written work and oral presentations.

Career prospects

Students may go on to pursue careers in academia, in the fields of policymaking, research, and regulation in the public and private sectors, in government agencies, think-tanks and in national and international NGOs. We collaborate closely with the Careers & Employability Office at King's College London to enhance the employability of our students, and we organise targeted careers sessions with guest-speakers from relevant fields.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners. Read more
As populations grow and competition for space and resources increases, society’s most pressing issues will need to be addressed by those who can work in collaboration with cognitive, occupational and social psychologists, as well as architects, educationalists, environmental scientists, engineers, landscape architects and planners.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

How do individuals and groups react to different environmental situations (home, office, hospital, street, shop, and so on)? What psychological processes are triggered by our environment, and how do they affect our perception, attitude and actions?

How can individuals and groups change their environment so that it provides a more stimulating, less stressful and more enabling setting in which to live? How are our identities tied up with place? How might sustainability in environmental policy be better informed by current research?

Our MSc Environmental Psychology programme will help you gain advanced knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in environmental psychology.

You will also acquire a range of research skills that will give you the confidence and ability to undertake environmental psychology research in a professional setting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Ergonomics and Human Factors
-Inquiry and Design
-Dissertation
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Quantitative Research Methods
-Key Questions in Environmental Psychology: People and Place
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Conducting Health Psychology Research
-Social Change and Influence
-Maintaining Health Throughout the Lifespan
-Psychological Neuroscience: Electrophysiology

FUNDING

Funding is now linked to continuation funding for a PhD – that is, successful applicants to the Economic and Social Research Council will be given a grant for the MSc year and then further support (subject to satisfactory progress) to enable them to undertake a PhD.

Occasionally students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship. This would involve students undertaking a piece of research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company.

In the past, this sponsorship has ranged from £500 to £6,000. This is mutually beneficial to both the student and sponsor, and allows the student to undertake a ‘real’ piece of research that has practical or policy implications, whilst receiving a sum of money to assist with fees and subsistence costs.

ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey was the first in the world to establish an MSc in Environmental Psychology, in 1973. Since then there have been well over 250 graduates of the programme from over 25 countries worldwide.

It remains one of a few such postgraduate programmes in the world and the only one in the UK.

The MSc Environmental Psychology programme is part of a larger modular programme, thereby providing a flexible teaching and learning structure. The School of Psychology has a reputation for developing professional and innovative programmes reflecting contemporary societal concerns and employment opportunities.

Environmental Psychology at Surrey has always sought to be a multidisciplinary research activity. We are driven by psychological theories and methodologies, but draw on other social sciences, as well as the environmental and design disciplines.

We investigate environment behaviour relationships at every spatial scale and environment, from personal space and office design, through neighbourhood renewal, to the public understanding of global climate change.

PSYCHOLOGY AT SURREY

The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the country. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research within a strong theoretical context. The international, interdisciplinary, policy and applied strengths of the School mean that students’ theoretical and methodological research puts them at the cutting edge of the discipline.

We are one of the highest ranked Schools in the country for graduates entering employment, and also one of the largest providers of postgraduate training in the UK.

The University of Surrey’s School of Psychology has been the centre for many cross-national studies and has attracted funding from research councils and local and national government departments, such as:
-ESF
-Defra
-The Ministry of Defence
-Home Office
-The Environment Agency
-The Countryside Agency
-Surrey County Council
-The EU

If you choose to study psychology at the University of Surrey, you will be provided with a combination of opportunities that would be hard to match elsewhere. We offer you a degree that provides a thorough grounding in the theories, methods and practice of contemporary psychology.

Our programmes lay particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, and also consider issues related to professional practice in preparation for your career as a professional psychologist.

The basis of good postgraduate programmes is the research activity of staff, the incorporation of current research programmes in teaching material and a reciprocal relationship between theory development and applied research in everyday contemporary issues.

We believe in involving all postgraduate students in the research life of the School through active participation in one of the research groups, attendance at research seminars and, where possible, an attachment to ongoing research projects.

As a student of the School of Psychology, you will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

COLLABORATIONS

Environmental psychology researchers have always enjoyed collaboration with other disciplines.

Current and recent research collaborations include an EPSRC funded research project on energy technologies in homes (REDUCE) with colleagues of environmental sciences (CES) and communications technology (CCSR), a DEFRA/ESRC-funded research programme on lifestyles in transition (SLRG) and a major ESRC funded research program on sustainable lifestyles (RESOLVE: research on lifestyles, values and the environment) both with colleagues from sociology, economics and environmental sciences.

We have long-established links with national and international academic institutions including the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde, the Centre for Transport Studies at the University of West England and the Department of Psychology at Bath University.

The environmental psychology community is strongly international and this is reflected in the long-term active teaching and research collaboration we enjoy with the universities of Groningen, Madrid, La Coruña, Umeå and Rome.

Students on the MSc programme are encouraged to take advantage of these links during their dissertations.

MSc students are actively encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects. Our recent research clients include:
-Building Research Establishment
-Surrey County Council
-Eden Project
-Defra
-Environment Agency
-Forestry Commission
-European Commission
-Rentokil Initial
-King Sturge

RESEARCH

The Environmental Psychology Research Group (EPRG), of which students on the MSc in Environmental Psychology are automatically members, has been undertaking research for more than 30 years and has gained an international reputation.

Research undertaken by the EPRG is both ‘fundamental’ (that is, contributing to the development of the discipline and our understanding ofpsychological processes) and ‘applied and policy-oriented’.

Both government and business are concerned with effective policy development and delivery, and it is increasingly recognised that these can only be successfully achieved by informed evidence.

Students on the MSc Environmental Psychology programme are encouraged to make their research not only useful, but useable.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Recent graduates have progressed into careers in central and local government, undertaking policy-oriented research on a variety of environment behaviour (E-B) issues. Many of our graduates have become practice consultants, using their E-B research skills.

This could be a specialist E-B practice or an architecture, planning, design or engineering practice where graduates with a sensitivity to people-environment issues and a training in E-B research can provide an important and unique set of skills and expertise.

Those who have a background in architecture, landscape architecture, planning or design often return to their profession, but with an enhanced range of skills.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The aims of the programme are as follows:
-To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct environmental psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
-To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social and environmental issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
Knowledge and understanding
-Contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to environmental psychology
-The practical applications and action implications of environmental psychological theories and empirical findings
-The principles of research design
-Quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
-Ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to environmental psychology
-Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of environmental psychological theories and research methods in environmental behaviour issues
-Evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of environmental domains
-Design, conduct and evaluate environmental psychological research
-Apply insights from environmental psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills
-Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
-Apply problem solving techniques to environmental and psychological topics effectively
-Use effective learning strategies
-Analyse and interpret environmental psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate theories and methods in relation to environmental psychology by oral and written means
-Use information technology effectively
-Manage own personal development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Public health aims to promote health, prevent disease, reduce inequalities in health, and prolong life. The population perspective of public health ensures that its practitioners are well placed to improve health wherever they are. Read more
Public health aims to promote health, prevent disease, reduce inequalities in health, and prolong life. The population perspective of public health ensures that its practitioners are well placed to improve health wherever they are. Our Master of Public Health degree reflects the multidisciplinary nature of public health through its flexible and innovative curriculum. Our programme enjoys strong links with the NHS, its public health practitioners and other regional and national bodies, ensuring student access to some of the country's leading authorities in public health.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow has provided education in public health since 1839 and has offered a diploma in public health since the early 20th century. The Master of Public Health (MPH) programme has been offered here since 1981.
-The Master of Public Health programme is taught by academics and practitioners from a wide variety of organisations and disciplines including; Health Protection Scotland, environmental health, environmental protection, public health medicine, health economics and business/management.
-The programme is multidiscplinary in focus attracting students with undergraduate degrees in nursing, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and other health related specialisms.
-Public health has a central role in guiding health care practice, influencing health policy, protecting the public, and improving population health. If you work or intend to work in an organisation which has public health responsibilities or aims to improve population health then this Master of Public Health Degree will be suited to you.
-Public Health at the University was among the earliest academic fields to move towards a multidisciplinary range of programmes involving staff from a number of areas. Current disciplines represented include: Health promotion, health protection, sociology, psychology, epidemiology, statistics, and health economics.
-Public health practitioners are employed in health services, academia, national and local government, the voluntary sector, as well as in international humanitarian relief. The MPH degree is recognised in most countries as an essential qualification for a career in public health.

Programme structure

You will attend interactive lectures, seminars and individual tutorials and take part in project and team work.

Core courses
-Principles of public health
-Introduction to statistical methods
-Introduction to epidemiology

Optional courses (three courses chosen)
-Communicable diseases
-Environmental health
-Further epidemiology and statistics
-Globalisation and public health
-Health economics
-Health promotion: principles and practice
-Managing healthcare organisations
-Oral health (this course is offered every second year)
-Psychosocial approaches to public health
-Qualitative research methods
-Research methods

If you are studying for the MPH, you will also undertake a research project of 15,000–20,000 words and your project studies here will incorporate a series of research methods lectures.

Continuing Professional Development

Our taught courses are available to take on an individual basis for continuing professional development purposes by those who meet the MPH entry requirements.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include: lecturer, health development manager, public health advisor, health programme specialists, epidemiologist, medical practitioner positions in public health, clinical university teacher, research positions.

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This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Read more
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. It attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences which makes for a lively and challenging atmosphere.

The degree is designed to provide students with a fairly detailed knowledge of anthropology, development issues, research methods and either an ethnographic region (and/or language) and/or thematic interest in health/gender/food/ media. Advice will be given to match the choice of optional components to the requirements, interests, and qualifications of individual students whose background may be in general social science, regional, language or other studies. While the focus of the degree is on development issues and practice, its disciplinary orientation remains anthropological.

Students explore the contribution of anthropology to contemporary development debates, for example, on donors/aid agencies and NGOs, poverty, migration and development, dominating discourses, human rights, violence and complex emergencies, refugees, gender, social capital and community action, health, climate change, the ‘market’ (as a core metaphor of globalised development), whether there are alternatives to the market, the role of business in development (corporate social responsibility and markets for the poor) and the importance of ethical, professional conduct by anthropologists. Anthropological studies provide the basis for understanding issues of state and governance in development, as well as the meaning of community development, and of popular ‘participation’ and ‘empowerment’. Throughout the programme, the role of, and opportunities for anthropologists as professionals in development is discussed, in part through a dedicated series of seminars in term 2.

Note: (1) Students registered in other departments who wish to take this course MUST write to the Director of Study for this course for permission to take it.

The programme consists of four elements: three assessed course units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

The degree’s core course – ‘Anthropology of Development’ – provides an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of anthropological perspectives on policy and practice in contemporary international development, and gives a theoretical overview of the relationship between development and anthropology. The course examines the politics of aid, shifting aid frameworks, and concrete intervention programmes, bridging the disparate worlds of planners and beneficiaries. This involves close reading of anthropological monographs/studies which examine the nature of policy-making, bureaucracy and programmes in a variety of sectors – health, agriculture, water and others – while always paying close attention to the specific cultural contexts of intervention. Students should note that the course is continuously assessed which each term students are expected to write 1 book review, 1 essay and sit a 50 minute examination. This form of assessment has been found to be much fairer to overseas students whose first language is not English. While continuous assessment requires students to organize their studies efficiently from the very beginning of the year, we have found that a much higher proportion of our students graduate having achieved a distinction.

Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme

The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-hakluyt-scholarship.html) has been extended to cover the MA Social Anthropology of Development.

Note (2). Students registered in other departments at SOAS, notably in Development Studies, must apply in writing/email to the Director of Studies for permission to take this course as part of their degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/

Structure

Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined taught courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Social Anthropology of Development and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme can be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- A total of either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may be selected.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 134kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/file39771.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Social Anthropology of Development at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised with a particular focus on how anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Understand and have your say in the challenges that globalisation presents. From the sustainability of economic growth to the eradication of poverty, you will identify the impact of globalisation on the world around us. Read more
Understand and have your say in the challenges that globalisation presents. From the sustainability of economic growth to the eradication of poverty, you will identify the impact of globalisation on the world around us.

We will help you achieve an understanding of diverse issues such as the changing nature of international competition, trade, migration and global governance. You will expand your knowledge of modern political economy and explore global consumption as an engine of growth. You will debate the recent financial crisis, discussing how it began, the definition of crisis and how the world has responded.

You will gain an understanding of how international political economy differs from economics. As well as measuring economic growth, you will also understand its distribution of costs and benefits, together with its social, political and environmental impact.

This is an opportunity for you to embrace and interrogate aspects of politics, sociology, history, philosophy and geography in relation to economic globalisation.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/internationalpoliticaleconomy_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Employment opportunities are available in the UK and overseas working for Non Government Organisations, the public sector, international organisations and the media. Employers will value your ability to think and work independently and challenge conventional wisdom in order to solve complex problems. Our expert staff are well associated with many major organisations, which will benefit you when looking for a career in this field.

- Government Policy Advisor
- Economist
- Social Researcher

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course is aimed at students who already work or have aspirations to pursue careers in campaigning organisations, internationally oriented Non-Governmental Organisations, international organisations and government departments, as well as graduates interested in further academic study.

Like all our courses, our MA incorporates employability, personal effectiveness and the development of research skills throughout our modules. You will also benefit from our links with relevant stakeholders and employers, and will have access to the diverse and research active teaching team drawn from across our University.

Core Modules

Political Economy of Crisis and Global Governance
Explore the role of crisis in capitalist development, covering conceptual understandings of crisis as well as investigating several historical episodes of capitalist crisis.

Political Economy of Globalisation
Consider a variety of contemporary issues such as the globalisation of production and finance and the politics of competitiveness and migration, as well as associated issues of cultural and social change.

Theories of International Political Economy
You will be intoriduced to the main theoretical approaches to IPE, starting with classical theories of political economy and then the emergence of the orthodox and more radical contemporary theories of IPE.

The Global Consumer Economy
Analyse and critically evaluate the pivotal role of the global institution of marketing and the ways in which it amplifies the drivers of, and relaxes the constraints on, abundant spending.

Developing and Managing Projects
Consider how projects fit within organisations and how they are developed, funded and managed. You will be introduced to the essential components, including planning, evaluation, ethics and governance issues, and stakeholder engagement.

Research Methods
You will also undertake a research methods module before completing a significant piece of independent study on a topic of your choice.

Dissertation
Engage in critical depth with a research-based project aligned to your personal interests and professional aspirations.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

[[Facilities]
- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Learn about concepts of health and illness, including. -An introduction to the social determinants of health. -Poverty and Health. Read more
Learn about concepts of health and illness, including:
-An introduction to the social determinants of health.
-Poverty and Health.
-Explanations for the Social Patterning of Health.
-Tackling Health Inequalities.
-Gender and Health.
-Ethnicity and Health.
-Disability and Health.
-‘New’ Public Health.

Options

-Available as a core option on MSc in Health Research; or on Masters in Public Health
-Not sure an MSc is for you? Take this module as a Postgraduate Award. Contact us for more information:

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Public health aims to promote health, prevent disease, reduce inequalities in health, and prolong life. The population perspective of public health ensures that its practitioners are well placed to improve health wherever they are. Read more
Public health aims to promote health, prevent disease, reduce inequalities in health, and prolong life. The population perspective of public health ensures that its practitioners are well placed to improve health wherever they are.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow has provided education in public health since 1839 and has offered a diploma in public health since the early 20th century. The Master of Public Health programme has been offered here continuously since 1981.
-The Master of Public Health programme will be taught by academics from a wide variety of organisations and disciplines including: Environmental protection, public health medicine, sociology, and health economics.
-Public health has a central role in guiding health care practice, influencing health policy, protecting the public, and improving population health. If you work or intend to work in an organisation which has public health responsibilities or aims to improve population health then this programme will be suited to you.
-The programme will be multidisciplinary in focus and it is envisaged will attract students with undergraduate degrees in nursing, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and other health related specialisms.
-During each course, you will interact with your teachers and fellow students each week using online discussion boards. Your teachers will direct and observe the discussion, and respond to student questions about the course content.
-The Master of Public Health programme will be useful to practitioners of public health and those seeking to enter this field.
-Public Health at the University was among the earliest academic fields to move towards a multidisciplinary range of programmes involving staff from a number of areas. Current disciplines represented include: Health promotion, health protection, sociology, psychology, epidemiology, statistics, and health economics.
-Public health practitioners are employed in health services, academia, national and local government, the voluntary sector, as well as in international humanitarian relief.

Programme structure

You will attend interactive lectures, seminars and individual tutorials and take part in project and team work.

Core courses
-Principles of public health
-Introduction to Statistical Methods
-Introduction to epidemiology

Optional courses (one course chosen)
-Communicable Diseases
-Further Epidemiology and Statistics
-Globalisation and public health
-Health Economics
-Health Promotion: Principles and Practice
-Psychosocial Approaches to Public Health
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Research Methods

If you are studying for the MPH, you will also undertake a research project of 15,000–20,000 words and your project studies here will incorporate a series of research methods lectures.

Career prospects

The Masters will evidence the start of post graduate study in public health and a commitment to the field of public health. Holders of our campus based Masters in Public Health have been employed in a public health capacity prior to study. Career opportunities for those holding the MPH degree include: lecturer, health development manager, public health advisor, health programme specialists, epidemiologist, medical practitioner positions in public health, clinical university teacher, research positions.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. Read more
The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The Global Mental Health academic programmes offered by the University of Glasgow are unique to Scotland and are the only online Global Mental Health Postgraduate courses offered anywhere in the world. These online programmes are intended for people who are unable to come to Glasgow to complete on-campus delivery of the programmes.

Why this programme

-You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
-The Global Mental Health academic programmes will help people to develop the knowledge to integrate innovative initiatives related to mental health and wellbeing into the wider aims of international development, and address the global inequities in the provision of mental health services.
-The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
-We have collaborative partnerships with organisations working in low and middle income countries. You will have opportunities to complete placements and projects with them.
-The Global Mental Health academic programmes at the University of Glasgow place specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
-Contributors to the Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
-The Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides.

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents.

Year 1 (exit with PgCert Global Mental Health)
-Introduction to mental health and disability
-The global burden of mental health difficulties
-Cultural, social and biological determinants of mental health
-Improving access to mental health care in the global context

Year 2 (exit with PgDip Global Mental Health)
-Research methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
-Mental health promotion across the life-span
-Mental health and disability: international law and policy

Year 3 (exit with MSc Global Mental Health)
-Dissertation

Career prospects

Graduate of the Global Mental Health academic programmes establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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