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The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher. Read more
The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher.

The programme is ESRC-recognised. This means it meets the research training requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and that you are eligible to apply for ESRC funding for PhD research. Only a handful of Law Schools in the UK offer ESRC recognised programmes in this field.

The taught programme offers research training in generic social-science skills, providing you with a solid basis in social science theory and methodology through modules offered to all social science postgraduates across the University. These are then built on within the socio-legal context through two skills-based modules offered by the Law School. Specialist modules reflect the socio-legal research expertise of staff. The supervised research dissertation will allow you to bring together the conceptual and practical skills acquired in the taught modules and demonstrate your understanding by applying them to your own research ideas in the socio-legal context. Teaching is mainly seminar and workshop based.

For further information on this programme please visit our website: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/sociolegalmres

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The Master Socio-Ecological Economics and Policy (SEEP) is an innovative, internationally unique program that equips participants with the necessary theoretical background and factual information about the interconnected dynamics of economic and social systems and the physical environment. Read more
The Master Socio-Ecological Economics and Policy (SEEP) is an innovative, internationally unique program that equips participants with the necessary theoretical background and factual information about the interconnected dynamics of economic and social systems and the physical environment. The program also enables participants to use appropriate analytical tools to engage in decision processes and longer-term policy on multiple spatial levels.

Visit the website: https://www.wu.ac.at/en/programs/masters-programs/socio-ecological-economics-and-policy/overview/

Course detail

Rapid environmental change, population dynamics, poverty, and exclusion are interrelated processes that challenge human development. To tackle these complex issues, traditional disciplinary approaches to analysis and policy formulation are not sufficient. Instead, integrated and interdisciplinary approaches to studying the working of the human-environment system are needed. The Master Socio-Ecological Economics and Policy presents integrated approaches to development and human well-being that go beyond the usual polarization between socioeconomic development and environmental goals.

Purpose

The program offers training in socioeconomic analysis and focuses on the interfaces between environmental, economic and social challenges. This interdisciplinary and internationally oriented approach is based on three major pillars: theory, methodology, and application. The theory courses include concepts from a variety of disciplines, chosen for their relevance to global challenges. The methodological courses offer an integrated introduction to qualitative and quantitative methods and thus illustrate how they are best combined in empirical analyses. Relevance for policy making and organizational practice is emphasized throughout the program.

Our main focus lies on providing a thorough internationalization at the home university by attracting a diverse set of students from all over the world. The “international classroom at home” thus created is meant to allow students to experience foreign (academic) cultures, languages (especially English), and an international renowed faculty without having to leave the campus.

Format

The program offers four concentration areas of which you can choose two: Environment, Population, Multi-Level Policy and Social Policy.

- Semester 1 -

- Contemporary Global Policy Challenges
- Methodology for Interdisciplinary Research
- Growth, Well-Being, and Development
- International Institution, Governance, and Policy Evaluation
- Service Learning 1

- Semester 2 -

- Actors, Behaviors, and Decision Processes
- Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
- Service Learning 2

Concentration Area 1 and 2 – choice of two:

- Environment
- Population
- Multi-Level Policy
- Social Policy

- Semester 3 -

- Qualitative and Quantitative Methods 2

Concentration Area 1 and 2 – continuing the chosen two areas from 2nd semester:

- Environment
- Population
- Multi-Level Policy
- Social Policy

- Semester 4 -

- Research Seminar
- Master Thesis

Career Prospects

The program has been designed to provide students with the necessary understanding of global sustainability issues, an ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and sound training in socio-economic concepts and methods.

The MSc program prepares graduates for:

- Employment as policy analysts, program managers, consultants, civil servants, project managers, and advisors who provide an insight into and support decision processes relating to sustainability issues by, for example, undertaking risk and uncertainty analyses in the social and environmental sectors; analyzing long-term developments relating to climate change, population development or aging in society; undertaking sustainability appraisals at company, regional or policy levels; helping design social, environmental, economic or educational policies; designing and facilitating participatory processes

- Working in international organizations, consultancies, companies, ministries, national and international NGOs, and research institutes where interdisciplinary skills and knowledge about the interactions of sustainability issues are needed

- Doctoral studies in the social sciences, in particular in economics, social policy, environmental studies and demography

How to apply: https://www.wu.ac.at/en/programs/masters-programs/socio-ecological-economics-and-policy/application-admission/

Funding

Information on funding and scholarships can be found at the following webpage: https://www.wu.ac.at/en/students/my-degree-program/masters-student-guide/grants-and-scholarships/

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This programme develops your knowledge and understanding of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of law and legal phenomena. Read more
This programme develops your knowledge and understanding of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of law and legal phenomena. It provides a sound research training for students wishing to proceed to a PhD or a career in socio-legal research through the study of different research methodologies across the social sciences and law. You will pursue independent, in-depth study in socio-legal studies, engaging in lively debates in a thriving research culture across social sciences and law.

A range of units is offered, suitable for graduates from any discipline who have an interest in the way law works (or fails to work) in society. Methods of assessment may include essays, presentations and/or written examinations, depending on the optional subject(s) chosen, together with the dissertation.

Programme structure

Core units
Three units in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies:
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences

Two units in the Law School:
-Advanced Legal and Socio-legal Research Methods
-Social and Legal Theory

Optional units
You will take optional subjects up to a value of 30 credit points, chosen from across most of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Law and beyond. Units designed especially for the MSc offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies are usually worth 20 credit points each. Units in the Law School are taken along alongside LLM students, and are each worth 30 credit points.

Dissertation
The dissertation accounts for 60 credit points. It should build on the optional units and develop the approaches taken in the core units. You will be expected to demonstrate an ability to:
-Frame a research question and use an appropriate methodology in response to that question.
-Organise discussion and select material pertinent to the topic.
-Show appropriate higher-level knowledge and understanding of the background context.

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This Master's degree teaches you why people embrace or reject spatial changes. You will be trained as a technician who seeks optimal quality of life in association with the people involved. Read more
This Master's degree teaches you why people embrace or reject spatial changes. You will be trained as a technician who seeks optimal quality of life in association with the people involved.

During the Master's programme in Socio-Spatial Planning, you will study spatial issues. You will not only focus on planning urban areas, the environment and traffic, but also on the social aspects of change.

You will study the role of various parties involved in the environment, such as the government and civilians. You will learn to analyse spatial issues, formulate strategies and evaluate the consequences. You will also learn to make policy and supervise projects.

Apart from the compulsory subjects, you can choose some elective courses. You will finish your programme by writing a thesis.

Job perspectives

Socio-spatial planners often work for the government. They design environmental policy. Consultancies, housing associations and developers also hire planners. You may also pursue a scientific career at a university.

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This programme offers an advanced introduction to the study of Law with a specific emphasis on socio-legal methodology. It provides you with an excellent preparation for doctoral study in the area of socio-legal research, serving as a qualification in its own right and a platform for PhD study. Read more
This programme offers an advanced introduction to the study of Law with a specific emphasis on socio-legal methodology. It provides you with an excellent preparation for doctoral study in the area of socio-legal research, serving as a qualification in its own right and a platform for PhD study.

Why this programme

◾There is a strong emphasis on research training. You are introduced to legal research methodologies, the ethics of legal research, key traditions of legal inquiry and basic concepts of legal thought.
◾You are also given a solid grounding in qualitative and quantitative research methodologies.
◾You will benefit from our excellent facilities including the dedicated School of Law library; our main University library also contains our extensive collection of legal materials and official publications and is a European Documentation Centre.
◾We have a very vibrant mooting programme and a dedicated Moot Courtroom. We have an outstanding record of success and you can participate in internal, national and international mooting competitions.
◾We organise a series of lectures featuring talks from highly successful judges and lawyers.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course, followed by a dissertation on a specialised topic.

Core courses
◾Advanced legal methods 2: Jurisprudence of concepts
◾Advanced qualitative methods OR Advanced statistics: Issues and methods
◾Applied legal methods 1A: Legal research methodologies OR Advanced legal methods 1B: Traditions of legal enquiry
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Social science statistics 1

Optional courses
◾Fundamentals of international law
◾Globalisation, law and human rights
◾United Nations law.

Career prospects

The programme provides you with an excellent foundation for an academic career in this field.

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Socio-cultural studies attracts people with social science backgrounds who wish to work on interdisciplinary topics, and also those from an arts or humanities background who want to gain skills and experience in social research. Read more

Research profile

Socio-cultural studies attracts people with social science backgrounds who wish to work on interdisciplinary topics, and also those from an arts or humanities background who want to gain skills and experience in social research.

Our PhD students can apply to the Arts & Humanities Research Council and some have already been successful in applications for doctoral research funding to the AHRC.

The MSc by Research in Socio-Cultural Studies may be taken as a stand-alone, one-year course or as a stepping stone to the PhD. It offers training in a range of qualitative methods.

Indicative courses include:

Documents of Life
Research Design
Data Analysis
Sources & Approaches for Historical Research
Research Methods in Literatures, Languages & Cultures
Research Design in Geography
Explanation & Understanding in Social & Political Research
Contemporary Social Theory
Ethical & Political Issues in Social & Political Research

The dissertation element of the degree can take the form of either a small piece of independent research or a detailed proposal for a PhD.

Training and support

You will work with a supervisor on an original research dissertation and participate in advanced sociology research-training workshops, work-in-progress seminars and a writing workshop.

The Graduate School provides a suite of research training courses for social science students across the University. We are developing an exciting package of flexible, web-based training courses as well as training in innovative methods addressing topics such as visual sociology, in line with the increased emphasis on ongoing training throughout your doctoral studies.

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Explore the relationship between crime and the law, from the criminal justice system and issues with reoffenders, to crime in the media and the glamorisation of drugs. Read more
Explore the relationship between crime and the law, from the criminal justice system and issues with reoffenders, to crime in the media and the glamorisation of drugs.

Our MSc Criminology and Socio-Legal Research forms part of our ESRC Doctoral Training Centre accreditation and combines training in current debates in criminology with an introduction to legal theory and legal methods. It provides a good basis if you wish to conduct criminological research with a socio-legal dimension.

On this course you investigate topics including:
-Philosophy of law and jurisprudence
-Ripping, remixing, and viral culture
-Surveillance and punishment
-The English legal system
-Methods of social control

This course should also interest you if you are without a background in law, as we make good use of legal materials, in addressing our sociological and criminological research questions.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Legal Research and the English Legal System
-Approaches to Legal Theory
-Sociological Research Design
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)

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The MRes in Socio-Cultural Studies of Sport and Exercise is an advanced postgraduate degree which can either be taken as a stand-alone qualification or as progression route into doctoral research. Read more
The MRes in Socio-Cultural Studies of Sport and Exercise is an advanced postgraduate degree which can either be taken as a stand-alone qualification or as progression route into doctoral research.

The Programme aims to prepare students:
• for doctoral level study;
• to engage in a career in socio-cultural research in a HE or industrial context;
• to meet the global need for highly trained individuals who can make informed decisions on future research directions;
• to think independently and develop a critical approach to the analysis of data and interpretation of published research.

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Our research students benefit immensely from a vibrant research community, a supportive environment and many opportunities to engage critically with academic research and contemporary issues. Read more
Our research students benefit immensely from a vibrant research community, a supportive environment and many opportunities to engage critically with academic research and contemporary issues. They are immersed in a research culture which situates legal studies in its historical, social and economic context.

The Law School has an active and supportive student community, with excellent dedicated postgraduate facilities. Students are usually allocated two supervisors, who give guidance about the nature of the research, the standard of work required, and about the relevant literature and sources that should be consulted. Students and supervisors meet monthly, ensuring consistent and continuous support during the length of the degree.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/144/socio-legal-studies

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

We welcome applications for research degrees in a wide range of areas. We recommend you contact the School informally before applying, and you should accompany your application with a brief (two to four-page) outline of the research project you envisage and your intended methodology. You may find it helpful to discuss your project informally with an appropriate member of staff (contact details are on our website) or with the Director of Postgraduate Research.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSc (Kinesiology) program commenced in 2005. In its short history, 10 master’s students have continued on to doctoral programs. Read more
The MSc (Kinesiology) program commenced in 2005. In its short history, 10 master’s students have continued on to doctoral programs. Graduate students have authored or co-authored approximately 20 peer-reviewed articles in that period. The laboratories are well equipped with 3 EMG acquisition systems, 2 metabolic carts, hypoxic air generator, force platform, muscle stimulation unit, immersion tank, accelerometers, lumbar motion monitor, and a variety of strain gauges among other equipment.

Memorial conferred its first degree in Master of Physical Education (MPE) in 1975. Beginning September 2008, the MPE program may be completed entirely online via distance education. The MPE program provides professional training to leaders in the fields of physical education, sport, and recreation. While some students concentrate in the areas of administration, curriculum, and supervision in physical education, others opt for studies in related professional areas. These areas include parks and recreation, sport and leisure administration and management, and sport science.

Students completing their MPE can focus on administration, curriculum, or supervision, while those completing their MSc can focus on exercise and work physiology, biomechanics/ergonomics, sport psychology, and socio-cultural studies of physical activity and health. Seven new courses have been introduced that reflect the present issues in the physical education curriculum. Graduates have moved on to a variety of professions and include university professors, lawyers, engineers, administrators, and teachers. Many graduate students have also gone on to pursue doctoral studies in a number of exciting fields. Graduate programs are offered in both full-time and part-time formats, with a number of different options available to students.

The MSc (Kin) program involves courses and a thesis, and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

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Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level. 

Socio-legal studies pathway:

The School of Law and Politics has a well established reputation for outstanding research across the range of legal studies which makes a vital contribution to scholarship and the development of the law. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework recognised the School as a leading legal research institution, with most activity classed as world-leading or internationally excellent.

This pathway builds on our long established reputation for scholarship in the area of socio-legal studies is focused on the newly established Centre for Law and Society and the Journal of Law and Society which the School founded and has hosted for almost 40 years. It is enriched by extensive collaboration with the Department of Politics and International Relations, as well as other Schools in the University and beyond.  

Structure

• PGDip:

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-pgdip

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-pgdip-part-time

• MSc:

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in three years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module. In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. You will choose your dissertation topic in agreement with your supervisor.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-msc-part-time

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Career Prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.
It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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The MRes Criminology will provide you with the expertise and skills necessary to undertake and evaluate socio-legal and criminal justice research. Read more
The MRes Criminology will provide you with the expertise and skills necessary to undertake and evaluate socio-legal and criminal justice research.

Combining core research skills with specialist criminology and criminal justice teaching from research-active staff, this course will encourage you to critically examine the theoretical foundations that underpin applied criminological research.

You will develop a critical understanding of research methods and their application as well as specialist knowledge of the issues within contemporary criminological and criminal justice debates.

The dissertation component of this course will enable you to study an area of your interest in-depth, under the supervision of one of interdisciplinary team of sociological, legal and psychological experts.

Aims

-Meet national and regional demands for new research and policy oriented competencies in criminology or socio-legal studies
-Provide advanced, systematic and critical knowledge of research methods and theoretical arguments in criminology or socio-legal studies which are at the forefront of the subject area in the context of an vibrant research context
-Offer a course integrating a grounding in research methodology with understanding of the implications for policy
-Offer students the opportunity for developing their understanding of the key theoretical and epistemological debates within the subject area and to assist them to engage in theoretical debates at an advanced postgraduate level
-Provide a formal, comprehensive, multi-disciplinary training for students in research methodology and transferable employment related skills
-Prepare students for PhD level research careers in academic life or as professionals in government and voluntary agencies
-Contribute to the national need for skilled social science researchers in criminological, socio-legal and related matters
-Train students to appreciate the relationship between research on the one hand and the implementation and operation of policy and practice in the implementation of justice
-Provide graduates with the tools for further research/study in criminology and/or socio-legal studies

Special features

This acclaimed course has ESRC recognition as a Foundation Course for Research Training and is an essential step if you wish to progress onto doctoral studies or pursue a career in research in the public or voluntary sectors.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team of experts using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Career opportunities

The degree is designed to appeal to recent graduates looking to work for local/central government, the criminal justice agencies e.g. as a criminal intelligence analyst within the police; probation, voluntary sector and NGOs, pressure groups and think-tanks -such as The Howard League Reform Trust, as well as for a private sector.

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Global socio-ecological problems call for multidisciplinary solutions that transcend the usual boundaries of science and decision-making. Read more
Global socio-ecological problems call for multidisciplinary solutions that transcend the usual boundaries of science and decision-making. The Environmental Change and Global Sustainability (ECGS) Master’s programme trains you in wide-ranging interdisciplinary thinking skills and provides you with the ability to:
-Study environmental and sustainability issues in your respective fields of expertise.
-Solve problems of socio-ecological sustainability in cooperation with various social actors.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

ECGS is a truly multidisciplinary Master’s programme. It covers an introductory Core Module common to all students, followed by two distinct study lines.

The introductory Core Module focuses on the methodologies of environmental and sustainability science as well as the interactions between science and society. The Core Module also offers a pool of optional methodological studies, providing you with the necessary research tools to tackle socio-ecological challenges.

If your orientation is in natural sciences, the Environmental Change study line can provide you with an understanding of the functioning of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and can give guidance toward their sustainable use.

If your interests are more in the social sciences and humanities, on the other hand, the Global Sustainability study line provides an understanding of the socio-cultural underpinnings of global sustainability challenges so that you can help to develop solutions that take social and environmental justice into consideration.

Selection of the Major

You can apply for one of the two study lines in the ECGS Master’s programme: the Environmental Change study line or the Global Sustainability study line. You can refine your expertise in your chosen study line by choosing from study modules related to your specialised field of science or from interdisciplinary phenomenon-based modules.

Environmental Change modules are offered in, for example, the following research fields: aquatic sciences, soil and earth sciences, environmental ecology, environmental biotechnology and agroecology. Global Sustainability modules include themes such as environmental and natural resource economy, environmental policy, development studies, public and social policy, consumer research, forest policy and economics, and development geography. ECGS also offers a variety of modules integrating both natural and social scientific perspectives including phenomenon-based modules on the Baltic Sea and the Arctic as well as a variety of interdisciplinary fields such as climate change, food and consumption systems, urban studies and socio-ecological systems studies.

As an international applicant, you will be assessed and accepted for the Master’s program based on the scientific relevance of your bachelor’s degree and your success in previous studies.

Programme Structure

You will graduate with a Master’s degree in Science (M.Sc.) or Social Sciences (M.Soc.Sc.). Your Master’s degree (120 credits, ECTS) will consist of the following studies:
-Advanced studies, 60 credits, including your Master’s thesis (30 credits)
-Other studies, 60 credits, including 30 credits of Core Module studies and 30 credits of elective science specific studies from either ECGS modules or other relevant Master’s programs.

Career Prospects

The interdisciplinary ECGS Master’s program provides you with a unique education which is widely applicable for a future career path. Upon graduating from ECGS you will have sufficient expertise in environmental sciences, sustainability sciences and environmental policy to act as a specialist in the public, private and third sectors, and you will have gained essential skills to undertake a career in sustainable business and communication. The Master’s program prepares you to advance to doctoral level studies and thereafter positions in environment-related research. ECGS has a multidisciplinary learning community with faculty from a wide range of sciences, accommodating students in a multicultural network with excellent career prospects.

Internationalization

The ECGS Master’s program, taught in English, trains you to tackle environmental challenges which transcend national borders. The faculty encourage international interaction and the programme promotes a vibrant multicultural atmosphere. You can also include a student exchange in your Master’s level studies.

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The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the ESRC for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

This MSc has been designed to run concurrently with the MSc Applied Social Research, a long-standing course in Applied Social Science that is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the standards of their Research Training Guidelines. The objectives are to:
- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Criminology) comprises six compulsory taught core modules and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-legal Studies; Criminological Perspectives; and Criminalisation, Social Control and Human Rights.
In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original criminological or socio-legal research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- Explaining Crime through Narrative
- Nurses Perceptions of Workplace Violence and Aggression within an A&E Department
- Policing a Democracy
- The Effect of Anti-Terror Legislation on Liberty

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was 'Internationally Excellent' with the top 10 percent of that judged to be 'World-leading'.

Career opportunities

90.5% of Stirling students are in employment or further study six months after graduation.

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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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