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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in War and Society is a unique degree that explores the most spectacular of historic events.

Key Features of MA in War and Society

War has been a catalyst for violent change throughout human history. It inflicts terrible suffering and degradation and yet evokes great bravery.

What is War? A simple, meaningful definition is not easily achieved. Simple explanations are insufficient. War needs to be analysed in political, social, cultural, technological, historical, military and media contexts.

War and Society is a collaborative, interdisciplinary MA Degree programme that utilises the range of research expertise in the College of Arts and Humanities.

The full-time War and Society course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study is available.

War and Society Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to war and society.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of study of war and society.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the course in War and Society typically include:

• War, Identity and Society

• War, Thecnology and Culture

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Critical Security

• Venice and the Sea

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Ghosts of the Confederacy

• State of Africa

• The Army in the Roman Empire

• Fascism and Culture

• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in War and Society from a history, politics, media or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to war and society.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for war and society graduates. MA in War and Society degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as military organisations; diplomatic corps; the foreign office; humanitarian organisations; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions and the civil service.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Political and Cultural Studies (PCS) boasts a dynamic research environment with a committed staff all of whom are research-active in the field of War and Society. Academic members of staff within War and Society have a very considerable range of research interests on which we offer supervision for research degrees.

Key Features of MA by Research in War and Society

An MA by Research in War and Society gives you the chance to pursue a major research project based around your own passions and interests in War and Society, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia. It will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing in War and Society and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

Typically, as a War and Society research student you will work closely with your supervisors, meeting them regularly, in many instances fortnightly, in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

Students enrolled on the MA by Research in War and Society are required to attend skills and training courses at College and University level. You may also be expected to give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and attend the postgraduate conference of the College of Arts and Humanities which is held in October.

The MA by Research in War and Society is ideal for those who want:

- an MA qualification in areas where taught programmes are not offered;

- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in War and Society for which staff in PCS can provide supervision. It is a good idea to enter into discussions about your research project in War and Society with the Department's Director of Postgraduate Research, Professor Roland Axtmann (), before drawing up an initial proposal and starting the application process.

Departmental Research Expertise

At any one time, the department has over forty research students who work together with their supervisors on their projects. Staff can offer their expertise to research students in the field of War and Society.



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The Civil Society, NGO and Non-profit Studies PDip/MA provides you with an advanced understanding of social science debates, theories and concepts relevant to organised civil society. Read more

The Civil Society, NGO and Non-profit Studies PDip/MA provides you with an advanced understanding of social science debates, theories and concepts relevant to organised civil society.

Course detail

Strengthening the profile and capacity of civil society is now seen as a top priority by political commentators, social scientists and policy-makers all over the world. There has never been a greater need to develop a critical yet constructive understanding of the actions, behaviours and institutions that populate the space between states and markets, ranging from local voluntary associations to national social enterprises and transnational charities.

This programme draws deeply on the unique combination of scholarly and practical knowledge of the third sector, social movements and philanthropy situated in the School. You develop an in-depth understanding of the evolution of the meanings of civil society across time and space and the role its organisations and institutions play in political, social and economic life.

Programme aims

Teaching imparts country-specific as well as cross-national and transnational empirical and theoretical knowledge of the historical and contemporary challenges faced by these organisations.

You are also engaged in analysing how third sector organisations relate to ongoing social, political and economic transformations. In particular, your capacity to think sympathetically, but critically, about third sector contributions to policy through welfare systems and in other public policy arenas is developed.

Through the successful completion of this programme you will gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • Foundational social science conceptualisations of civil society and their applicability to the modern world and its problems
  • Contemporary theories and ideologies of OCS and associated institutions and practices in a global age
  • Comparative and multi-level approaches to organised civil society
  • The impact of globalisation, shifts in governance, and a range of related ongoing processes of political and economic change for OCS
  • Leading public policy developments in Europe and across the world as these apply to civil society
  • The relationship of international actors to national social policy systems
  • Researching design and methodologies for studies of civil society
  • The use of qualitative and quantitative research methods and their critical application in the scholarly literature and in policy papers.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Design of social research 
  • The idea of civil society 
  • Organised civil society and the third sector 
  • The family, parenting culture and parenting policy
  • Governing science, technology and society in the 21st Century
  • The art and science of fundraising
  • The sociology of risk
  • Foundations of sociology
  • Comparative social policy
  • Sociology of health, illness and medicine
  • Social change and political order

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/113/civil-society-ngo-and-nonprofit-studies#structure

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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The impact of Christianity on society can be felt around the world - in international politics, economy, arts and cultural ideologies. Read more
The impact of Christianity on society can be felt around the world - in international politics, economy, arts and cultural ideologies. The opposite is true as well. Christianity and society thus mutually shape and guide each other, with implications for the lives of people everywhere in the world.

In this Master's program you will study this complex interaction from both sides: how Christianity influences society and how society has an effect on the tenets, organization and practices of Christianity.

The program is taught cooperatively by Christian theologians, sociologists, economists, law specialists and philosophers from different Tilburg University Schools.

Christianity and Society

Are you fascinated by religion and by Christianity in particular? Have you ever wondered what the impact of Christianity is on society, or how society influences Christianity? Would you like to study this topic in depth with students from around the world? Then Christianity and Society is the program for you!

Learn how Christianity influences law, politics, economics, modern art, science, and world religions:
In this program you will learn how Christianity influences law, politics, economics, modern art, science, and world religions. At the same time, you will study the effects that society has on the history, sociology and theology of the Christian faith. In this way, Christianity and society mutually shape and guide each other, with implications for the lives of people everywhere in the world.

You will benefit from:
•expert knowledge of highly qualified lecturers, 75 percent of whom are full professors;
•a multidisciplinary program taught by theologians, sociologists, economists, law specialists and philosophers;
•small classes (on average 5-10 students), allowing for individual attention and personal contact with fellow students and teachers; and
•an international classroom with students from various countries, religions and academic backgrounds, ensuring a lively and balanced dialogue.

You will become adept at:
•high-level philosophical questioning and debating;
•analyzing and reflecting on current theological and societal issues;
•understanding and solving problems in multidisciplinary contexts;
•writing clear academic papers and presenting them to an audience; and
•working in a self-directed and independent way.

After graduation

Upon graduation, you will be an expert on the relations between Christianity and society in multiple fields of study. You will be able to use your expertise in advisory or management roles in religious organizations and churches, in government organizations and in NGOs. You will also be able to apply your academic knowledge in the fields of media, politics and economic relations.

Low tuition fees and all academic disciplines are eligible
•Students from all academic disciplines or backgrounds can apply for this Master’s program, provided that you have successfully completed your Bachelor's degree at an accredited research university.
•Students who do not hold a Bachelor’s degree from a research university can apply for a six-month Pre-Master’s program taught in English.
•Christianity and Society has lower tuition fees than other Master’s programs at Tilburg University. Moreover, scholarships are available to enable students from all economic backgrounds to participate in this graduate program.

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The International Master's in Economy, State and Society is a unique, innovative, dynamic yet firmly established postgraduate programme offered by a consortium of leading European universities. Read more
The International Master's in Economy, State and Society is a unique, innovative, dynamic yet firmly established postgraduate programme offered by a consortium of leading European universities. It leads to the award of a highly prestigious double degree.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/economy-state-society-nation-history-international-ma

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016
Scholarship applicants:
Close: 27 March 2016
Fees note: Fee quoted in Euros

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Good
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The programme combines rigorous research methods training, discipline based and area studies training and intensive language tuition. Students develop cultural and linguistic knowledge of Eastern and Western Europe, and acquire the skills to identify and critically analyse key factors shaping the economies, states and societies of the expanding European region.

Students take modules to a total value of 120 ECTS, with 60 ECTS taken in year one at UCL and 60 ECTS taken in year two at their chosen institution.

- Core Modules
Language Course
Interrogating Boundaries Workshop
Historical Methods and Approaches OR Theories of Social and Political Research
Understanding and Analysing Data
Comparative Analysis in Social-Political Research
Contemporary Cultural Studies
Literary and Cultural Theory
Qualitative Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods

- Options
A selection of thematic SSEES modules from the relevant track

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in their second year, which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 20,000–25,000 words.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and research supervision. Assessment is by written examination, coursework and dissertation; language courses involve an oral examination.

Funding

For funding opportunities please visit the IMESS website http://www.imess.eu/
IMESS Scholarships for Home/EU and Overseas applicants are available. Further information can be found on the IMESS website (http://www.imess.eu).
Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme (CSSS)
Value: Full fees, flights, stipend, and other allowances (1 year)
Eligibility: Overseas students
Criteria: Based on both academic merit and financial need

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates of this programme are qualified to progress to doctoral research in the European area; others may advance to careers in governmental or international organisations, and may specialise in finance, commerce, analysis or consultancy. Others still may seek a career in diplomacy, or in journalism, or in non-governmental organisations. Indeed, the scope of IMESS is broad and so too, correspondingly, are the post-IMESS possibilities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
- Lecturer, Vilnius University (2011)
- Management Trainee, Maersk (2011)
- Administration Assistant, New Zealand Embassy (2012)
- Researcher, The Work Foundation (2011)
- Development Officer, Vidre (2011)

- Employability
Graduates of the programme have taken leadership positions in distinguished private and public sector organisations (including in the IMF, EBRD, Risk Control, banks and financial institutions, diplomacy and media, civil service, self-employment) and many have also continued on into doctoral studies Read some of our student testimonials here. Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The International Master's in Economy, State and Society is fast becoming the programme of choice for students with a serious interest in the economies, states and societies of the wider European region.

Students benefit from an integrated study programme, with the first year spent at UCL SSEES and the second at one of the partner universities in the Czech Republic (Prague), Estonia (Tartu), Finland (Helsinki), Poland (Kraków) and Serbia (Belgrade).

Our nationally unequalled specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policy-makers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

Student / staff ratios › 70 staff › 200 taught students › 80 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
This programme is designed to attract and challenge the brightest European Union and international students as well as professionals wishing to retrain to acquire European expertise and meet the challenges of the changing global environment. Evidence of English language ability is essential but there are no other language pre-requisites.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Economy, State and Society at graduate level
- why you want to study Economy, State and Society at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your personal, academic and professional background meets the demands of a challenging and truly international academic environment
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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Art, Media and Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies. The Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society focuses on the transformations that cultural products undergo as a result of digitalization and globalization. Read more
Art, Media and Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies.

The Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society focuses on the transformations that cultural products undergo as a result of digitalization and globalization. In this program you will analyze how digital cultural products and artefacts critically reflect societal issues, such as the financial crisis, the rise of populism or the ‘tyranny of intimacy’ of social media. Furthermore, you will investigate the public impact of activities carried out by a range of different authors and artists. You will use theories and analytical tools to understand what is at stake here. Central questions are: How can art reshape the public sphere? What are new dimensions of information in the current public sphere?

As a student of Art, Media and Society, you take an interdisciplinary approach to media and art in the modern digital and culturally diverse society, and find yourself at the interface between culture, media, aesthetics and politics.

In this Master’s program, you study digital cultural products and artefacts in contemporary society: phenomena of high and mass culture as well as fashion and advertising, narrative forms of expression such as journalism and personal blogging, as well as literature and visual art focusing on varied purposes: to articulate human rights, to challenge neoliberal development, and to forge alternative local and transnational solidarities. You investigate how information circulates in various contexts, what the social, political and ethical implications are of cultural products, and how roles of producing and consuming these products are negotiated.

In addition, you study theories about the way cultural products and artefacts are experienced and responded to. You practice and further develop your ability to communicate your knowledge and to define, formulate, develop and implement projects. The purpose of the Master’s specialization in Art, Media and Society is to educate professionals with clear profiles.

Career Perspective Art, Media and Society

Art, media and society prepares you for a career in today’s global, digital and cultural diverse society. An average of 80 % of our students finds a job within a year after graduating. Our alumni work in the (online) media sector, in education, as programmer of film, theater, festival or debate. The third unit of the Master’s program is especially focused on developing the specific role of the cultural scholar in society.

The program prepares you for a job in the cultural sector, or the media sector, in which you have to organize, analyze, interpret, write and present.

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This master's programme was started in response to the growing salience of the interaction of society, law and religion in our multi-religious and yet highly secularised global world. Read more

This master's programme was started in response to the growing salience of the interaction of society, law and religion in our multi-religious and yet highly secularised global world.

The Master of Society, Law and Religion provides a unique introduction to the strategic area of society, law and religion and brings you in contact with outstanding international experts in the field.

What is the 'Master of Society, Law and Religion' all about?

The programme aims at enabling students to gain a solid and critical knowledge on key issues such as the place of religion in the public sphere, the debate on secularism, the role of the State vis-à-vis religion, church and relationships, human rights and religion, European and international law and religion, and domestic and international politics of religious freedom. Taught at the Faculty of Canon Law, the programme is particularly sensitive to the autonomy of religions, religious self-government, and religious laws.

While all students receive a basic training in the law of the Roman Catholic Church, the programme embraces all religions and faith communities, and includes classes in Jewish, Islamic, Orthodox, Anglican and Protestant law. African and Asian religions and customs are also investigated, as far as their relation to law and society is concerned.

The programme can be taken as a self-standing programme or as a gateway to the Master of Canon Law. This initial master's program can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis. In order to facilitate students wishing combine education with employment or social engagement, the programme allows for distance learning and spreading of examinations. The large choice of subjects from different faculties enables students to tailor their educational experience, to their interests, needs and projects.

Is this the right programme for me?

The Master of Society, Law and Religion suits students who are genuinely interested in the interaction of society, law and religion and who are willing to engage critically with the issues at stake. Any background in the area of law, social sciences and religious studies is fit for the purpose, provided that the student is ready to cope with the various methodologies and languages.

Thanks to extensive course offerings in the area of Roman Catholic canon law, the programme also suits those students preparing to enter the Master of Canon Law programme with the aim of achieving the canonical degree 'Iuris Canonici Licentiatus' (JCL).

Objectives

Main goal of the programme is to develop the acquired basic skills in the Bachelor of Law, the Bachelor of Theology or another programme in view of a specialized exploration of the area 'Society, Law and Religion'. The student obtains a basic knowledge on the legal system of the Roman Catholic Church and the other christian churches. He gets acquainted with legal sources and obtains the required skills to interpret the rules incorporated in the Codex Iuris Canonici (CIC). The student is initiated in the complex interaction between social structures and secular law on one side, and the legal structures of the Church at the other side. Research, consultancy and communication skills as well as other social elements are stimulated. The student is able to develop a sound research strategy, and to present an accurate synthesis of existing knowledge and a well-argued personal and critical reflection. He is able to present a well-considered research question, to develop a research plan, and to select relevant sources. Those who selected optional courses in canon law are allowed to start in the programme 'Master of Canon Law'.

Career perspectives

Religion is increasingly acknowledged as a crucial factor in areas such as politics and the economy, social and corporate management, culture, employment, education, health care, international cooperation, and conflict resolution.

Candidates for positions in these areas, in the private or public sector, as well as those already employed, will benefit from gaining a topical knowledge in the field.

Graduates can further develop their education at the Faculty of Canon Law through by moving on to the Master in Canon Law or the doctoral programme in Society, Law and Religion.



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. This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

Specialist resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History of Health, Medicine and Society) 60 credits
  • Approaches to the History of Health and Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, project reports and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a diverse range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level. Your knowledge and skills will appeal to a wide range of employers, including in the charitable, education, healthcare, and heritage sectors .

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



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This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society.

Taught by leading researchers in the field, this programme covers key issues and concepts such as: media and social media; consumerism; audiences; representation; globalisation; migration and place; tourism; creative work and material culture. Through its grounding in sociological approaches to the study of culture and media, a concern with questions of power, inequality and identity will be threaded through the course, enabling you to think critically about the relationship between gender, class, race and ethnicity, and the cultural realm.

In addition to developing a specialist knowledge in the field, you will also acquire key transferable skills in research, communication, analytical skills, self-management and group working, which will open up a range of career pathways within the media and creative industries and beyond.

Highlights

  • Benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication.
  • Gain specialist knowledge in the areas of consumerism, media and social media, globalisation, representation and more.
  • Tailor the programme according to your interests with optional modules which cover PR, journalism, identity, cultural history and reality TV.
  • Develop transferable skills including in research, analysis, group work and communication.
  • Prepare for careers in PR, communications and media policy, social and digital media, media market, audience research and others.

Course content

Compulsory modules on Researching Society and Culture, Understanding Society and Culture, and Sociology of Media and Culture, will provide a solid grounding in key sociological theories for the study of society, culture and media, and methodological debates and approaches.

In addition to the core compulsory modules, you will have the opportunity to choose from a range of optional modules delivered by the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to tailor the programme to pursue your specialist interests.

The final dissertation project will allow you to design, develop and implement your own critical research enquiry into an aspect of culture and media.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits
  • Sociology of Media and Culture 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Media & Culture) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Journalism Practice and Policy 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Throughout the course you will be exposed to a variety of teaching methods including guest lectures, seminars, presentations, group work, blended learning and independent critical enquiry.

Assessment

Assessment will include a series of short quizzes, a group project, an essay and dissertation.

Career opportunities

The combined nature of the programme will equip you with key transferable skills and the specialist knowledge required to pursue a career in sociology or media and culture. The national and international growth of the media and creative industries has sparked greater demand for graduates who possess advanced skills and knowledge in the field, opening opportunities in communications and media policy, PR, social and digital media, media markets and audience research or other cultural and creative industries.

Additionally, the sociology element of the programme will allow you to apply your knowledge and skills in fields such as education, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities. The programme also provides a basis for progression onto a PhD in sociology and media studies, and a strong grounding for an interdisciplinary PhD.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This course offers you a unique opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the interweaving of digital media and society from a sociological perspective. Read more

About the course

This course offers you a unique opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the interweaving of digital media and society from a sociological perspective.

Where your masters can take you

Our graduates are academics, researchers and health and social care professionals. Others become managers or administrators in the public and private sectors.

How we teach

Our teaching is rigorous and research-led. We encourage you to think critically, to learn research techniques and develop transferable skills. We also help you to develop the personal attributes that will make you highly employable. The department is a friendly place, where staff and postgraduates work together as colleagues.

Our interdisciplinary approach brings together sociologists, social policy analysts, social workers and social anthropologists. Our empirical research is internationally recognised. We make significant contributions to policy debates.

Course content

Drawing upon staff expertise in digital media and digital society, this programme will give you a grounding in four aspects of digital media, allowing you to specialise in a specific area, or develop your understanding of all of the following: Theorising digital society; Digital practices; Digital methods; Digital research.

As a student within the Faculty of Social Sciences, you will also benefit from the research and training activities of both the University’s Sheffield Methods Institute and the faculty-wide Digital Society Network, the latter of which brings together interdisciplinary researchers engaged in research at the cutting-edge of society-technology interactions.

Core modules

These include: Researching Digital Society, Digital Practices, Digital Methods, Qualitative OR Statistical Methods.

Examples of optional modules

These can include: Social Media, Data and Society, Researching Social Media, Information, Governance and Ethics, Online Journalism Studies, Media , State and Society in China, The Sociology of Surveillance, What It Means to Be Human.

Teaching and assessment

Assessment varies across modules and will include a combination of coursework (essays, portfolio and practical work). Formal examination may be required for some optional modules. Students are also expected to complete a dissertation-length project equivalent to 15,000 words in length.

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Our Big Data in Culture & Society MA recognises the growing importance of Big Data in contemporary society and addresses the theory and practice of Big Data from an arts and humanities perspective. . Read more

Our Big Data in Culture & Society MA recognises the growing importance of Big Data in contemporary society and addresses the theory and practice of Big Data from an arts and humanities perspective. 

What is Big Data? Beyond the unprecedentedly large data sets that can be analysed to reveal patterns, trends, and associations, it is increasingly about our everyday lives. In short, it is about how the data we generate is transforming social, cultural, political and economic processes as well as the generation of knowledge.

This course is likely to appeal to a broad range of students across the Arts and Humanities from Sociology to Political Science to English to Business and beyond. It will attract forward-thinking students interested in emerging trends who recognise that data scientists and analysts require collaborators with domain specialisation and critical insights.

  • Taught by scholars working at the leading edge of digital studies and Big Data.
  • Offers a lively mix of theory and practical work.
  • Equips students with skills that are highly attractive to employers in our digital age.
  • Provides a series of workshops with data scientists and analysts to learn collaborative practices and applications in social media and cultural analytics, mobile platforms, and data visualisation.
  • Is at the forefront of digital developments - Big Data is transforming society, politics, the economy and culture and impacting work
  • Offers innovative interdisciplinary methods of study crossing technological and cultural perspectives
  • Links Big Data to Culture, Law & Ethics, Geography, Public Health, and Social Life
  • Located in a highly ranked department - the Digital Humanities department was ranked first in the UK for research power (2014 Research Excellence Framework)

Description

This Big Data in Culture & Society MA offers you the opportunity to develop your knowledge and understanding of the role of Big Data in culture and society. It will enable you to analyse Big Data across social, political and economic areas. In addition to the required content we cover, you will have the opportunity to pursue your own academic interests through our optional modules and to undertake an internship and a group project module.

By bringing together domain knowledge and technical skills and approaching these from an Arts and Humanities perspective, the course will help you develop highly valued employment skills and expertise for careers in Big Data.

The course will provide you with:

  • Knowledge and understanding of the effects of Big Data on contemporary society.
  • Critical and theoretical approaches to the analysis of Big Data.
  • Knowledge of the historical antecedents of Big Data.
  • Understanding of the innovative methods for generating new knowledge through the use and analysis of Big Data.
  • Understanding of Big Data in relation to the broader study of digital culture, the digital humanities and traditional humanities disciplines.
  • Understanding of appropriate personal and professional conduct in the context of digital culture as an emerging discipline. 

Course purpose

The MA Big Data in Culture and Society offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of the role of Big Data in culture and society. It enables them to analyse Big Data across social, political and economic areas and provides them with a background for pursuing careers in Big Data by bringing together domain knowledge and technical skills. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars across the year. We expect you to undertake around 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we’ll provide you with 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We’ll expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We assess our modules entirely through coursework. This will comprise a mixture of essays, project work, and workshop reports, depending on the modules you choose.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Career prospects

Our graduates will follow a broad range of career paths. The skills you develop are likely to be particularly transferable to work in social media management, analytics & website management, CRM management, digital advertising, metrics management, market research, marketing and across cultural industries.



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Program Description. Please note this programme is only open for applications for those wishing to start year one of the three year programme in September 2018, with the view to having entry for Professional Accountants available for academic year 2019/20. Read more

Program Description

Please note this programme is only open for applications for those wishing to start year one of the three year programme in September 2018, with the view to having entry for Professional Accountants available for academic year 2019/20.

A fully online, part-time, flexible programme which focuses on the wider, non-technical, aspects of accounting which have a broader impact on organisations and society.

The programme content and method of delivery will prove attractive to both professional accountants, and other non-professional accountant applicants, who are unable to commit to a full-time on-campus programme.

Professionally qualified accountants will gain exemption from year one of this three year distance learning programme.

This MSc looks at how accounting, the accounting profession and various calculative practices impact on the management and governance of organisations, cultural formations, and the definition of economic and social relationships.

Through the School’s Centre for Accounting and Society (CAS) an established research tradition in the area of interdisciplinary studies of accounting has been established and this programme draws upon this tradition, and on exceptionally strong relationships with professional and accounting bodies.

This new MSc will focus on the three strands: Accounting, Culture and Society, The Accounting Profession, and Communication, Governance and Control.

Online learning

Course resources and learning materials for students to achieve the learning outcomes of the programme will be delivered to participants by the following means:

  • Weekly study plan to include topic overview, learning objectives, required reading and listening, self-assessment material and assignments to be completed
  • Recorded lectures and tutorials available to course participants on the Blackboard Learn Virtual learning Environment (VLE).
  • Real-time virtual classes through the VLE
  • Online Discussion Forums via the VLE
  • Access to online electronic resources of the University of Edinburgh Library:
  • University of Edinburgh Business School Seminar Series recorded for delivery via the VLE
  • Selected electronic textbook resources

Program Structure

This is a three year fully online programme which is assessed by a mix of online assignments together with case studies and essays.

Professionally qualified accountants are exempt from year one which consists of three technical accounting courses as a foundation for years two and three.

Five courses in each of the years two and three are then taken in the specific area of Accounting and Society and a final project is completed in the final semester of year three.

Learning Outcomes

The programme is intended to further knowledge and skills in a number of ways:

  • Develop a high level of competence in using various online tools and resources together with enhanced independent learning and time-management skills.
  • Ability to analyse and assess ethical, political, cultural, governance and social responsibility issues and their impact on organisations and society overall.
  • Analysis of existing practice in organisations in the areas of Accounting and Society with a view to recommending change.
  • Further develop cross-cultural and inter-personal communication skills sensitive to diversity in people and cultures through sharing knowledge.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental principles and concepts of Accounting and Auditing together with ability to apply tools and techniques in these areas. (For students not already holding a professional accounting qualification and required to take Year One of the programme).

Career Opportunities

This online distance learning MSc programme enables you to study part-time for an internationally recognised degree, wherever you are in the world, while maintaining busy professional and personal commitments.

Because of its breadth, this Masters will advance or prepare you for a variety of career paths within the areas of accounting, financial management, auditing, governance, regulation, and management consulting amongst others. There is scope for careers development opportunities within both the private and public sectors.

The programme is aimed at both professional accountants and other non-professionally qualified applicants from diverse backgrounds who may already have careers in practice and industry but who wish to gain an additional MSc qualification to advance their existing career opportunities and to study accounting in the broader context which includes the organisational, social, historical, cultural and technical aspects.

The three technical accounting courses in year one of the programme may also serve as a basis for the professional exams of a number of accounting bodies, should students wish to take those exams in the future, and it is possible that exemptions may be negotiated by students on an individual basis.

Our programme is promoted as a professional and personal development opportunity by the Chartered Accountants Worldwide whose members include the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Scotland (ICAS), The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) among others.



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The International MA in Economy, State and Society is a unique, innovative, dynamic yet firmly established postgraduate programme offered by a consortium of leading European universities. Read more
The International MA in Economy, State and Society is a unique, innovative, dynamic yet firmly established postgraduate programme offered by a consortium of leading European universities. It leads to the award of a highly prestigious double degree.

Degree information

The programme combines rigorous research methods training, discipline-based and area studies training, and intensive language tuition. Students develop cultural and linguistic knowledge of Eastern and Western Europe, and acquire the skills to identify and critically analyse key factors shaping the economies, states and societies of the expanding European region.

Students take modules to a total value of 120 ECTS, with 60 ECTS taken in year one at UCL and 60 ECTS taken in year two at their chosen institution.

Core modules
-Historical Methods and Approaches OR Political Sociology
-Understanding and Analysing Data OR Quantitative Methods
-Comparative Analysis in Social-Political Research
-Literary and Cultural Theory
-Contemporary Cultural Studies
-Qualitative Methods
-Advanced Quantitative Methods

Optional modules
-A selection of thematic SSEES modules from the relevant track

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in their second year, which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 20,000–25,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and research supervision. Assessment is by written examination, coursework and dissertation; language courses involve an oral examination.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are qualified to progress to doctoral research in the European area; others may advance to careers in governmental or international organisations, and may specialise in finance, commerce, analysis or consultancy. Others still may seek a career in diplomacy, or in journalism, or in non-governmental organisations. Indeed, the scope of IMESS is broad and so too, correspondingly, are the post-IMESS possibilities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PR Assistant, Aspectus
-PhD in Literature and Cultural Research, Tartu Ülikool (University of Tartu)
-Trainee Political Analyst, Embassy of Finland
-Programme Officer, Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung/Foundation
-Campaign Co-Ordinator, London First

Employability
Graduates of the programme have taken leadership positions in distinguished private and public sector organisations including in the IMF, European Bank for Reconstruction & Development, risk control, banks and financial institutions, diplomacy, media, and civil service, and many have also continued on into doctoral studies. Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This degree is fast becoming the programme of choice for students with a serious interest in the economies, states and societies of the wider European region.

Students benefit from an integrated study programme, with the first year spent at UCL SSEES and the second at one of the partner universities in the Czech Republic (Prague), Estonia (Tartu), Finland (Helsinki), Poland (Kraków) and Serbia (Belgrade).

Our unparalleled specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policymakers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more

This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture. 

Graduates of this coursewill have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

 Key Benefits

  • Develop an understanding of the role and impact of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.
  • Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.
  • Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.
  • Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Description

On this Digital Culture & Society MA programme you will focus on how technology and culture are connected in today’s society. We broadly interpret this to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. We aim to develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

  • The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
  • The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically how these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
  • The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
  • How digital technologies are shaping today’s society, including social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
  • The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
  • The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

Course purpose

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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Programme description. This exciting MSc gives you the breadth and background to bridge disciplinary divides and tackle the environmental issues that face us all. Read more

Programme description

This exciting MSc gives you the breadth and background to bridge disciplinary divides and tackle the environmental issues that face us all.

This programme provides up-to-date knowledge of the contemporary issues and debates on the relationships between the environment, nature, culture and society.

This interdisciplinary programme draws on expertise from across the University, especially from geography, philosophy, theology, science, technology studies and development studies, providing a unique critical perspective.

You will develop the research skills and abilities to assess the importance and implications of geographical, philosophical and other theoretical debates which shape environmental policy and practice.

Our graduates are equipped to think critically, to generate new knowledge related to the environment, and to use this knowledge effectively to address urgent environmental challenges.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

This programme consists of six taught courses, including four option courses, studied over two semesters. In addition, students undertake an individual dissertation project.

Compulsory courses typically will be:

  • Values and the Environment
  • Political Ecology
  • Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses. We particularly recommend:

  • Archives: History, Geography, Politics
  • Culture, Ethics & Environment
  • Encountering Cities
  • Ethics in a Technological Society
  • Foundations in Ecological Economics
  • Foundations of the Bioeconomy
  • Global Environment: Key Issues
  • Research Design in Human Geography
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • Understanding Environment and Development
  • Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
  • Distributed GIS
  • International Development in a Changing World
  • Key Concepts in Global Social Change
  • Soil Protection and Management
  • Principles of GIS
  • Principles of GIS for Archaeologists
  • Society and Development
  • Ecology, Ethics and Spirit
  • Marine Systems and Policies
  • Climate Change, Justice and Responsibility
  • Global Environmental Politics
  • Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
  • Methodological Debates in Human Geography
  • Urban Development
  • Biobusiness
  • Case Studies in Sustainable Development
  • Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Forests and Environment
  • Global Environment and Society
  • ICT for Development
  • Interpreting Development: Institutions and Practices
  • Land Use/Environmental Interactions
  • Man and the Natural World in the Enlightenment
  • Management of Sustainable Development
  • Sustainability of Food Production

Courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change.

Career opportunities

Graduates have pursued careers in environmental policy, conservation, animal welfare, NGOs (environmental charities and development organisations), public consultation and PhD research.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.



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