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The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researcher. Read more
The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researcher.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of topics in one of the sub-disciplines of anthropology (biological, social or material culture). They are prepared for advanced level research through a general training in social science research methods and specialised research training in broad-based anthropological research methods and techniques.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (105 credits).

Core modules:
-Research Methods and Skills
-Ethnographic Area: Critical Literature Review

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Anthropology of China
-Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
-Anthropology of Socialist and Post-Socialist Societies
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Ecology of Human Groups
-Evolution of Human Brain, Cognition and Language
-History and Aesthetics of Documentary
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Medical Anthropology
-Medical Anthropology and Primary Care
-Palaeoanthropology
-Population and Development
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
-Primate Socioecology
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Employment
-Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report
All MRes students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 17,000 words (inclusive of notes).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, video, and film and web-based courses. Assessment is through coursework, unseen and take-home examination, laboratory books, posters and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Students usually conduct fieldwork over the summer after the end of the third term. The research carried out will inform the final dissertation.

Careers

With the completion of the MRes, we expect students to be highly competent professionals, who will either continue to the MPhil/PhD level or who will be well equipped to apply their knowledge of social science methodologies and methods and their specific anthropological expertise in a range of settings.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Independent Consultant, Conferencia Inter Americana de Segundad Social
-Secondary School Teaching Assistant, Longsands Academy
-Anthropology, LSE (The London School of Economics and Political
-Anthropology, University College London (UCL)
-PhD Anthropology, University of Oxford

Employability
The MRes enhances the profile of students who already have a strong background in anthropology by training them in professional skills, statistics and various other social science methods. Exposure to positivist social science methodologies makes graduate attractive candidates for positions in NGOs or work in applied social science. Emphasis on research design and data collection through field research prepares graduates to be independent researchers. The general social science orientation of the degree qualifies students to apply for research positions on grants in various disciplines, and it opens the way to doctoral study in anthropology and other social science subjects.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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Our Business and Management MPhil and PhD programmes aim to develop rigorous scholars who can advance both academic knowledge and business practice. Read more

Course overview

Our Business and Management MPhil and PhD programmes aim to develop rigorous scholars who can advance both academic knowledge and business practice. The programmes are designed to equip you with the skills necessary to succeed in a knowledge-intensive environment and to open greater depth to your professional and personal life.

Our research is organised into 15 research centres and groups. Each of these involves externally funded research, international collaboration and the active involvement of doctoral students. A brief outline of some of the disciplines is outlined below.

Human resource management, work and employment

Members of the group have a wide range of research interests in the field of human resource management (HRM), organisational studies and management history. Currently, there are particular interests in the field of international political economy as well as in new patterns of work and organisation, public sector management, gender and industrial relations. Staff members engage in individual research and collaborate with others at universities across the UK and abroad.

Specific areas of research expertise include: business elites and corporate governance in France and the UK, entrepreneurial philanthropy, the International Labor Organisation (ILO) and the ‘decent work’ agenda, the harmonisation of international aid
critical perspectives on international business, post socialist transition, migration and trans-nationalism, public service mergers and multi-agency working in the public sector, new working patterns in mental health services, gender and work, the application of Foucauldian and governmentality perspectives to HRM and management – especially to developments in public services in the UK
graduate careers, industrial relations and trade union renewal, human resource management and performance, employee voice and representation, the micro political economy of work, particularly inter-organisational structures and social networks, aging societies, older workers and the world of work, embodied and aesthetic labour.

[[Marketing, operations and systems ]]

Our research group activities broadly cover the areas of innovation, enterprise and entrepreneurship, and policy. We have particular interests in the development and pursuit of entrepreneurial opportunities within and outside existing organisations and on the way in which emerging technology trends are interacting with new businesses, management and policy models.

Specific areas of research expertise include: corporate entrepreneurship, E-Business, E-Government and E-Learning, entrepreneurial opportunities and new venture emergence, information systems and social informatics, innovation management and policy, knowledge management and organisational learning, technology and organisation

Operations

Specific areas of research expertise in this group include: lean operations (both manufacturing and service sectors, particularly health), manufacturing planning, scheduling including optimisation in stochastic environments, layout optimisation, group technology (applied to design and manufacturing processes), computer aided production management systems, modelling, analysis and optimisation of manufacturing systems, manufacturing and business strategy

Strategy, organisations and society

This group uses social theory to explore strategic and organisational issues. Grounded in the critical/interpretative tradition, the group has a specific expertise in issues of power, discourse and change.

Specific areas of research expertise include: strategy and politics, business elites, corporate philanthropy, discourse analysis and the global financial crisis, changes in the media, organisational change, mega-projects, strategy and discourse analysis.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For detailed information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/business-management-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/business-management-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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One of the University’s larger modern language subject areas, German has earned its place as a significant centre for research, with half of our research ranked as internationally excellent or world leading in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

One of the University’s larger modern language subject areas, German has earned its place as a significant centre for research, with half of our research ranked as internationally excellent or world leading in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

The size of our graduate school means we are able to support a broad range of German and Austrian cultural and literary research themes, from the medieval period to the present.

Current interests include:

18th century and Romanticism studies
censorship studies
contemporary German literature
cultural and political studies and literary theory
gender studies
German and Austrian Jewish literature
identity studies
literature and culture of the German/Austrian fin-de-siècle
literature and culture of the Weimar Republic and the National Socialist era
migrant literature in German
palaeography and Medieval textual studies
post-Holocaust literature
post-war West and East German literary and cultural studies
the Medieval German epic
theatre and performance studies
travel writing
Turkish-German literature

Training and support

We promote the connection between language and culture through a number of extracurricular programmes, both formal and informal.

You will have the opportunity to take part in our annual play, which is commonly a collaborative effort with a noted German author or playwright.

We organise regular film nights, followed by Stammtisch, and gallery visits are also offered.

We maintain close links with the Scottish arm of the Goethe Institut and the Edinburgh German Circle, which both provide opportunities to make contacts and socialise with the city’s sizeable German community.

Facilities

Testament to our breadth of research expertise and lively graduate school community, our RAE ranking also reflects world-class resources (such as our well-stocked libraries and the expansive Karin McPherson collection of GDR writing) and commitment to publishing, most notably through our production of the esteemed Edinburgh German Yearbook.

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Our MA brings together social theory, political theory and philosophy. You learn about the history of social and political thought, and study political and social movements. Read more
Our MA brings together social theory, political theory and philosophy. You learn about the history of social and political thought, and study political and social movements. Our course covers both historical traditions and contemporary developments.

Our research strengths include:
-Social theory (especially Marxism, Hegel, hermeneutics and critical theory)
-Recent democratic, socialist and environmentalist thought and practice
-The history of political, social and economic thought
-The philosophy of social science and the sociology of knowledge
-Contemporary political philosophy
-Cosmopolitanism

How will I study?

There are core modules taught in the autumn term, and in the spring term you choose from a list of options.

The largest assessed element in the MA is the 15,000-word dissertation. In addition, the core modules and options are assessed by 5,000-word term papers.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Many of our graduates have gone on to have successful careers in:
-Law
-The media
-Non-governmental organisations
-Government and administration
-Teaching

Others have gone on to research degrees. Over the last 30 years, a substantial number of leading academics in the UK and elsewhere have graduated from the course. Among our alumni we count professors of sociology, philosophy and politics, working at universities in the UK and beyond.

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The Master in Financial and Managerial Accounting is the first study export of the IMB. It is offered at two universities in Vietnam and primarily designed for Vietnamese Bachelor graduates who would like to study for a post-graduate degree awarded by a renowned German university. Read more
The Master in Financial and Managerial Accounting is the first study export of the IMB. It is offered at two universities in Vietnam and primarily designed for Vietnamese Bachelor graduates who would like to study for a post-graduate degree awarded by a renowned German university. The programme takes an international approach to combining theory and practice in providing broad business administration skills focused on international financial reporting standards as well as on managerial accounting.

Profile

In a technical sense, accounting provides a conceptual framework for preparing financial statements and accounts. The issues which arise in accounting are related to the difficulty of establishing a true and fair value of an enterprise and its assets, the moral basis of disclosure and discretion and the standards and laws required to satisfy the political needs of investors, employees, suppliers and other stakeholders in taking decisions broadly related to the economy. In this sense, accounting is a concept - and yet it is more than this. It is also a decisive part of a mechanism and a crucially important instrument in establishing and maintaining a market-based transaction system.

Accounting measures the heartbeat of the economy!

The Master in Financial and Managerial Accounting takes an international approach to combining theory and practice in providing broad business administration skills focused on international financial reporting standards as well as on managerial accounting.

It concentrates on the role of information in a market economy, and especially its importance in developing sound financial systems. To achieve the goal of skills and expertise on the level of the individual stakeholder, the FAMA Masters Programme curriculum and content not only provide core knowledge on external and internal information systems, but also addresses some key integrative multi-disciplinary aspects. In addition, the programme includes a broad selection of electives on various aspects of management, ethics, law and politics to meet the specific knowledge needs beyond pure accounting.”

In line with the developing cooperation between the Federal Republic of Germany and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, the programme is jointly offered by the IMB Institute of Management Berlin and two Vietnamese universities.

The Master in Financial and Managerial Accounting is primarily designed for graduates from Vietnam who have completed a career-oriented first degree (BA or BSc) and would like to study for a post-graduate degree awarded by a renowned German university.

It prepares students for positions as accounting and controlling specialists or executive managers in consulting or auditing firms or in international companies.

Content

The Master programme is basically divided into two parts:

1st study term (11 months): Foundation Course
2nd study term (13 months): Specialisation and Master’s Thesis
The Foundation Course enables students to extend their knowledge acquired during their undergraduate studies to develop further expertise in Financial and Managerial Accounting and related subjects. In addition, a range of additional courses are provided by the electives and tutorials.

The specialisation builds on the Foundation Course to provide the specialised skills to meet the challenges in the chosen career sector. A case study / research project enables students to apply their new theoretical knowledge in practice. In addition to the completion of the specialisation modules, this study term is scheduled for completing the degree by submitting the Master’s Thesis and defending it in an oral exam. This Master programme is taught entirely in English.

Full curriculum can be found here:
http://www.mba-berlin.de/en/master-programmes/ma-financial-and-managerial-accounting/content/

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The MA Education. International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. Read more
The MA Education: International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. The programme is particularly relevant to students from developed and developing countries who plan to work in professional, management, and education roles in both national education systems and internationally.

The programme situates the study of international education within a complex and changing world where education and education professionals are called upon to play equally complex and challenging roles in promoting economic growth and competition, while at the same time supporting the development of sustainable and cohesive societies and promoting equity and social justice.

Course structure

The course is structured over three trimesters and totals 180 credits (90 ECTS). It is available in campus-based mode, low-residency mode or online-only. You can start in September or February and will study for 60 credits per trimester. In your first trimester you will study the MA Education core module Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) plus your award core module (30 credits). In the second trimester you will study the core module Social Science Research (30 credits), plus two 15-credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award. If you take the low residency option, the face-to-face teaching of all modules will take place during two 2-week intensive blocks (typically in September and February).

Modules

Trimester 1
In your first trimester you will study two compulsory core modules totalling 60 credits.
Core Module:
Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) explores how education can be understood in a complex and globalised world where it is seen by many governments as a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn how to question the policies and organisations involved in defining the purposes, content and outcomes of education.
Award Core Module:
International Education and Globalisation (30 credits) looks at education within a global context and deals with issues such the role of international organisations, anti-globalisation critiques, cultural hegemony and the political economy of education within the global knowledge economy.
Trimester 2
In your second trimester you will study one compulsory core module, and two 15 credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. This will total 60 credits.
Compulsory Core Module:
Social Science Research (30 credits) sets educational research within the broader context of the social sciences and introduces a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and methods from which you can select the most appropriate for your dissertation.
Elective Modules:
Education and Development (option 15 credits) considers the relationship between education and international economic, social and human development. It focuses on patterns of international investment in education, key aspects of the discourses of education policy and key challenges to ensuring a quality education for all in both developed and developing countries.
Education, Conflict and Peace (option 15 credits) looks at the role of education in violent conflict before moving on to consider humanitarian and development initiatives to deliver education in conflict and emergencies. It explores issues of gender, displacement, children’s experience of conflict, and educational policy for peace and citizenship.
International Higher Education (shared option 15 credits) develops understanding of contemporary international higher education. Specific aspects of policy (widening participation; research, creativity and innovation; New Public Management) are explored through case studies of international Higher Education reform and management.
Trimester 3
In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award.
Dissertation (60 credits) enables you to study and research an aspect of education theory, policy or practice in depth, guided by an expert to arrive at your own synthesis of a topic to take forward into your career.

Teaching methods

For the campus-based mode of study, some lectures and seminars will take place during the day, whilst others may be in the evening or at weekends. For low-residency students the teaching will be concentrated into two 2-week blocks (typically around 6 hours per day). The course also makes extensive use of online teaching, particularly for the low-residency and online only modes. This will include a combination of individual and shared learning using the Bath Spa University virtual learning environment.

Staff / Tutors

-Dr Peter Jones: Senior Lecturer in International and Global Education: Peter has an extensive research and teaching background in International and Comparative Education. His research has addressed the role of the European Union in developing education policy for Higher Education, Early School Leaving and the Knowledge Economy. He is interested in Education in Post-Socialist and Transition Countries as well as the role of the EU in Central Asia.

-Dr. Julia Paulson: Lecturer in Education Studies: Julia’s research interests are in education and conflict and in education and development. She has worked on these issues with NGOs in Latin America, West Africa, the UK and Canada. She has also worked as an education consultant for international organisations like UNICEF, UNESCO and the World Bank. She has published on education and reconciliation, transitional justice, teaching about violent conflict and education in emergencies. She is editor of Education and Reconciliation published by Bloomsbury in 2012 and she completed her doctoral research at the University of Oxford on the role of Peru’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in educational reform in 2011.

Course assessment

There are no written exams on this course; each module is assessed through coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15-credit module or 5,000 words for a 30-credit module. For some modules assessment may be by verbal presentation or online activity. The dissertation is 15,000 – 20,000 words and focuses on an area agreed with a specialist tutor.

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This transdisciplinary programme supports a range of research topics in visual and urban cultural studies, with an interest in place, identity and memory… Read more

Research profile

This transdisciplinary programme supports a range of research topics in visual and urban cultural studies, with an interest in place, identity and memory; cultural translation and semiotic landscapes; materiality of writing and graffiti; photography, visual knowledges and curatorial practices; multimodality in representation of research; critical writing and critical pedagogies; cultural heritage of eastern Europe; and the post-socialist city.

The MSc by Research programme enables you to study cultural phenomena, practices and texts at an advanced level, critically engaging with theories and methodologies of transdisciplinary cultural research. The programme encourages enquiry into visual and urban cultures, visual knowledges and spatial practices, forms and practices of representation, and methodological innovation in cultural analysis.

You are required to complete two courses selected in discussion with your supervisor and providing methodological and theoretical grounding for your research project, and a 20,000-word dissertation based on independent research.

Students’ research projects benefit from academic collaborations across architecture and history of art in ECA, and from co-supervision with staff in sociology, comparative literature, Canadian studies, Chinese cultural studies, social history and religious studies. Students also benefit from our collaborative exchanges and contacts with local and international research networks, cultural and heritage institutions and archives.

Training and support

All of our research students benefit from ECA’s interdisciplinary approach and all are assigned two research supervisors. Your second supervisor may be from another discipline within ECA, or from somewhere else within the College of Humanities & Social Science or elsewhere within the University, according to the expertise required. On occasion more than two supervisors will be assigned, particularly where the degree brings together multiple disciplines.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study History at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study History at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA by Research in History is a research degree pursued over one year full-time or two years part-time. Students on the History research programme undertake research under the supervision of History staff, and produce a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge and understanding of some aspect of the past.

Key Features of the MA by Research in History

The expertise of the Department of History and Classics spans from the ancient cultures and languages of ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome to the history of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century Europe. The research of our staff and postgraduates is integral to the life of the Department of History and Classics, and it means that Swansea is a dynamic, exciting, and stimulating place to study.

History and Classics is part of the Research Institute for the Arts and Humanities (RIAH: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/), which organises a large number of seminars, conferences, and other research activities. There are also a number of research groups which act as focal points for staff and postgraduates, including: the Richard Burton Centre for the Study of Wales, Centre for Ancient Narrative Literature (KYKNOS), Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO), and the Centre for research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS).

As a student of the History research programme you have access to skills and training programmes offered by the College of Arts and Humanities and the University.

The MA by Research in History is ideal for those who would like to do an initial research degree, either as a stand-alone culmination to their studies or with a view to further, subsequent research, e.g. in form of a PhD. Research proposals are invited on any topic in medieval, early modern, or modern history for which staff can provide supervision.

For informal enquiries regarding the MA by research in History programme please contact: Dr Fritz-Gregor Herrmann ().

Research Interests

Research interests in the Department of History and Classics include:

Medieval History

• The Anglo-Norman ‘Realm’ and the Angevin Empire
• Capetian France, especially the monarchy, aristocracy, and religious orders
• The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade
• Charters and the documentary records of medieval France and England
• The Mediterranean world, especially the Crusades, later medieval Italian society and politics, and the Italian Renaissance, including art history
• England and Wales in the central and late Middle Ages, including the aristocracy and gentry, the Welsh Marches, urban history, law and crime, women and the law, religious belief and practice, and education and literacy
• Gender and the life cycle in late medieval Europe
• Medieval frontier societies and borderlands, and concepts of frontiers from the late Roman Empire to the present day

Early Modern History

• Most aspects of British history between 1500 and 1800, especially religious, scientific, cultural and gender history
• The history of health and medicine in early modern Britain
• History of Disabilities
• The Portuguese Empire
• The Reformation and Counter-Reformation
• Science, intellectual life, collecting and museums in early modern Europe
• The social history of early modern sex and marriage
• Crime and witchcraft
• The Enlightenment, republicanism and international relations in the eighteenth century

Modern History

• Most aspects of Welsh history, especially industrial society
• The cultural, intellectual and urban history of nineteenth-century and twentieth-century Britain
• Modern international history
• The United States since 1750, in particular slavery, the South and the Civil War
• The economic and imperial history of Britain in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries
• Emigration and urbanisation in the British Isles between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries
• The political history of the UK since 1800
• Military and society in Europe between 1750 and 1815
• Austrian and German history in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries
• Austrian, German and Central European history, especially in the fields of urban, labour and post-1945 history
• Modern economic history
• Quantitative aspects of British economic growth from the sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries
• Anti-capitalist and socialist political economy
• Policing and police forces in twentieth-century Europe
• Italian fascism
• Allied Occupation of Italy
• Contemporary French and Italian social an d cultural history
• Memory studies and oral history of twentieth-century Europe
• History of protest and activism in the 1960s and 1970s

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The master History of Architecture and Town Planning (Healthy Cities, new Perspectives on History and Theory of Architecture and Town Planning) explores the evolution of cities, villages and landscapes in Europe within the framework of changing geopolitical conditions at the global scale. Read more
The master History of Architecture and Town Planning (Healthy Cities, new Perspectives on History and Theory of Architecture and Town Planning) explores the evolution of cities, villages and landscapes in Europe within the framework of changing geopolitical conditions at the global scale.

Are you interested how architecture and urbanism can improve our conditions, and how they contribute to public health? Wish to gain knowledge about the global dimension of architectural and urban theories and practices? Starting with a profound historical overview, this Master prepares students for an active role in debates and policy making processes involved in the renaissance of the European city. It analyzes physical and spatial phenomena as historical documents conveying the motives underlying their continuous changes, as instruments to pursue specific policies, and as works of art. Starting with the Enlightenment, and paying attention to issues related to public health, the program investigates tensions between global and local, gaps between formal and informal, the post-socialist condition in former Eastern Europe, and architectural and urban strategies aiming at sustainable living conditions and their historical precursors. Part of the courses is provided by the Thomassen a Thuessink Chair, a joint venture of Groningen University Medical Center, the University of Groningen and Delft University of Technology; the chair focuses on the public health dimension of urban interventions.

Job perspectives

The master opens a myriad of career opportunities, in the Netherlands and abroad, as has been proved over the years. For instance:
- jobs in the field of urban history and consultancy for municipal agencies and scientific institutions
- jobs for private or public architectural and urban platforms
- jobs in the field of journalism and public relations
- the master prepares students for a scientific career
- jobs as advisors for healthcare institutions

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The MPhil in Social Anthropology is an 11 month taught Masters degree and can be taken as a freestanding qualification or as a route to the PhD. Read more
The MPhil in Social Anthropology is an 11 month taught Masters degree and can be taken as a freestanding qualification or as a route to the PhD. It is a demanding course that enables you to reach a high level of specialist knowledge in social anthropology within a short time and, subject to performance, equips you to undertake a research degree.

Problems in anthropological theory, interpretation, comparison and analysis are addressed in relation to particular ethnographies and substantive debates in the anthropological literature. Through critical reflection on a range of anthropological theories, and through practice in the application of those theories to bodies of ethnographic data, students acquire a thorough and intensive grounding in a range of styles of social anthropological analysis.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssampsap

Course detail

The principal fields of anthropological analysis are covered in two courses in General Anthropology; one optional course in specialised learning, and a non-assessed course in theory and methods:

1. Production and Reproduction (Paper 1)
2. Systems of Power and Knowledge (Paper 2)
3. Optional Papers (Paper 3)
4. Theory, Methods and Enquiry in Social Anthropology (non-assessed Paper).

Divided into two strands (1) interdisciplinary perspectives and (2) professional process, the optional papers reflect the current research interests of Social Anthropology staff, and they vary from year to year. By way of example only, in 2015-2016, the Division offers the following options:

Interdisciplinary Perspectives:

- Science and Society
- The Anthropology of Post-Socialist Societies
- Anthropology of Visual and Media Culture.

Professional Process:

- Social Anthropology and Museums (Paper 3e)
- Medical Anthropology (Paper 3f).

Format

Teaching for the MPhil is via introductory sessions, seminars, lectures and individual supervision. It is centred around four seminars (Kinship, Politics, Economics and Religion) that constitute the principal teaching of the General Anthropology. Those who are pursuing one of the professional options are expected to attend and take part in the above core seminars as well.

In addition to the seminars, the Division requires all MPhil students to attend the Part IIA lecturers for Papers SAN2, SAN3, and SAN4, plus one other Optional Paper to be chosen by the student during the first week of Michaelmas Term. Students are not expected to confine themselves exclusively to these lectures, but are encouraged to attend any lectures they find interesting. The Division also offers a separate research methodology course.

Each student will be supervised by a member of staff who can provide general guidance throughout the course. Students will meet their respective supervisors fortnightly and they will be expected to write essays. Supervisions provide an opportunity for them to discuss these essays and to raise wider questions on a one-to-one basis.

Placements

Students following the optional paper Social Anthropology and Museums are required to undertake four to six weeks practical work experience. Typically this requirement is fulfilled by the preparation of annual student exhibitions at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, although other museum work or an external placement may be arranged in consultation with the course coordinator and the student’s supervisor.

Assessment

Each student is expected to write a total of 6-8 essays for supervision in Michaelmas and Lent. The supervisor usually makes written comments on the essays and discusses them in supervision sessions.

A student is also expected to write one set essay and one dissertation over the year on which they will receive written feedback from the assessors. Students may use their supervision time to seek advice from their supervisors.

Supervisors submit online progress reports at the end of each term via Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System (CGSRS).

Continuing

Continuation to the MRes or PhD is subject to the following:

- acceptance of an application for continuation by the PhD Committee;
- a mark of at least 70% in the MPhil is normally required for continuation to the PhD.

Applicants intending to continue to the MRes/PhD programme should state so in their statement of purpose, however acceptance for the MPhil does not guarantee that you will be accepted for continuation.

Funding Opportunities

All applicants are eligible to apply for the Wyse Bursary for Social Anthropology. A separate application must be made for this via the following link:
http://www.socanth.cam.ac.uk/online-forms/

UK and EU nationals should note that applicants for the MPhil are not eligible for ESRC or Cambridge European Scholarship funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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