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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Theory and Space at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Theory and Space at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Social Theory and Space enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Social Theory and Space programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research-led University and the Department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Geography student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

In the latest Research Assessment Exercise, 95% of Geography research at Swansea was judged to be of international quality, and 60% was regarded as World-leading or internationally excellent.

Facilities

As a student of the Social Theory and Space programme you will have access to:

Computer laboratory with 24 computers providing general IT software and programmes dedicated to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing Computer laboratory with 10 high-performance Linux workstations delivering software tools for advanced GIS and remote sensing applications

Specialist laboratory suites for stable isotope ratio analysis; tree ring analysis; extraction and identification of organic compounds; pollen extraction and analysis; rainfall simulation; tephra analysis; soil and sediment characterisation

In addition, the computing facilities include 15 dual-processor workstations for Earth Observation, a 20-node multiprocessor Beowulf cluster, and the Department’s IBM ‘Blue Ice’ Supercomputer, used mainly for climate and glaciological modelling.

Research

All academic staff in Geography are active researchers and the department has a thriving research culture and a strong postgraduate community.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that Geography at Swansea University is ranked joint 9th in the UK for research impact and 11th in the UK for research environment.

Research groups include:

Environmental Dynamics

Glaciology

Global Environmental Modelling and Earth Observation

Migration, Boundaries and Identity

Social Theory and Urban Space



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Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Read more
Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Our radical approach cuts across traditional boundaries, fostering dialogue between different schools and disciplines, and we are one of the few universities in the world that bridges the divide between the two great traditions of Analytic and Continental philosophy.

Our MA Philosophy will provide you with a rigorous grounding in modern and contemporary European philosophy. We have leading expertise in critical theory, phenomenology, German Idealism, nineteenth Century German philosophy, aesthetics, existentialism, contemporary French philosophy, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and medical humanities.

You study modules of your choice, develop your research, writing, and employability skills through an intensive Writing Workshop, and prepare an MA dissertation in your chosen area of research.

Our department is widely regarded as among the very best in the UK, having been recognised as one of the top 10 UK universities for research excellence (REF 2014), and being placed in the top 10 in The Guardian University Guide in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

As an alternative to our more flexible MA Philosophy, you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

MA Philosophy (Continental Philosophy Pathway)
All of our academic staff work on Continental Philosophy, including classical German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), Frankfurt School Critical Theory (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), nineteenth-century philosophy (Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche), and phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). On this pathway you choose from a range of specified topics in these areas, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Continental Philosophy.

MA Philosophy (Critical Social Theory Pathway)
We are the leading centre for Critical Social Theory in the UK with five members of academic staff working on the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), contemporary French thought (Derrida, Foucault, Rancière) and issues in Critical Social Theory, such as activist political theory, theory of recognition, aesthetics and politics, deliberative democracy, and the moral limits of markets. On this pathway you study modules on the Frankfurt School and Contemporary Critical Theory, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Critical Social Theory.

MA Philosophy (Philosophy and Art History Pathway)
Drawing on the collaborative and interdisciplinary approach of the School, our new Philosophy and Art History pathway enables students to get a thorough grounding in philosophical aesthetics. You explore issues in aesthetics and their bearing on other areas of philosophy (such as critical theory or existentialism) and Art History (such as aesthetic practices and curating), and profit from the wide-ranging expertise of our staff in both disciplines. On this pathway you study modules on Philosophy/Aesthetics and Art History (dealing, for example, with Art & Politics, Art, Architecture and Urbanism, or Art, Science & Knowledge), in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Philosophy and Art History.

Our expert staff

Our courses are taught by world-class academics, and over three quarters of our research is rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), which puts us fifth in the UK for research outputs.

Our open-minded and enthusiastic staff have an exceptionally broad range of research interests, so whatever questions in philosophy catch hold of your imagination, there is certain to be someone you can approach to find out more.

Recent projects and publications include:
-Béatrice Han-Pile and Dan Watts’ major new research project, The Ethics of Powerlessness: the Theological Virtues Today
-The Essex Autonomy Project, a major interdisciplinary project funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council), which aims to investigate the role of autonomous judgment in many aspects of human life
-Peter Dews’ The Idea of Evil, Polity, 2007
-Béatrice Han-Pile, Foucault’s Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical, Stanford University Press, 2002
-Fiona Hughes, Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: A Reader’s Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
-Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgement: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology, Cambridge University Press, 2006
-Irene McMullin’s Time and the Shared World: Heidegger on Social Relations, Northwestern University Press, 2013
-Fabian Freyenhagen’s Adorno’s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Specialist facilities

-Graduate students have access to desk space in the School and many students work there on a daily basis
-A dedicated German-language course for graduate students in philosophy
-Attend our Critical Theory Colloquium
-Attend the Werkstatt, where recent work on phenomenology is presented
-An exciting programme of research seminars, reading groups and mini-courses that help you expand your philosophical knowledge beyond what you learn on your course
-Access a variety of philosophy textbooks and journals in the Albert Sloman Library and in our departmental library

Your future

Many of our philosophy graduates embark on doctoral study after finishing their MA. We offer supervision for PhDs in a range of fields including:
-Continental philosophy
-Critical Social Theory
-History of philosophy
-Applied ethics

Our graduates have also gone into careers in law, the media, local administration, HM Revenue and Customs, and top jobs in the Civil Service.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: Continental Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Critical Social Theory (optional)
-Dissertation: MA Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Philosophy & Art History (optional)
-Phenomenology and Existentialism (optional)
-Kant's Revolution in Philosophy (optional)
-Hegel (optional)
-Contemporary Critical Theory (optional)
-Topics in Continental Philosophy (optional)
-MA Writing Workshop (optional)
-The Frankfurt School (optional)
-Philosophy and Aesthetics (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Foundations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (optional)
-The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law (optional)
-Human Rights and Development (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights. (optional)
-Human Rights for Women (optional)
-Transitional Justice (optional)
-Psycho Analytic Theory (optional)
-Psychoanalytic Methodology (optional)

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This pathway enables you to study social changes at an advanced level. It provides an opportunity for in-depth study of some key dimensions of modern society. Read more
This pathway enables you to study social changes at an advanced level. It provides an opportunity for in-depth study of some key dimensions of modern society. The scope of this pathway is deliberately broad to allow students to study any area of sociology where the department has the expertise to supervise dissertations.

It aims to integrate the consideration of themes in social theory with the study of substantive topics, as well as give a thorough grounding in research methods. There are four elements:

1. Social theory: This course aims to stimulate a critical, globally conscious theoretical reflexivity. Above all, it provides students with the tools for a wide range of social interpretation and analysis, particularly of the contemporary social world.

2. Modern society: This part of the course has a modular structure. Modules consider a series of key dimensions or institutions of modern society with particular emphasis on current changes resulting from the interaction of global forces and national institutions. All of the modules being taught on all of the sociology MPhil pathways are available to students doing this pathway, as well as several other modules on topics such as ‘health and illness’ and ‘globalisation’.

3. Research methods: This includes sessions on philosophical issues in the social sciences; research design; data collection and analysis in relation to quantitative and qualitative methods; reflection on research ethics and practice; library and computer skills. Your dissertation supervisor will advise you on which courses to take.

4. Dissertation: A dissertation on a topic of your choice but broadly related to one of the Modern Society modules. A research supervisor will assist you in refining your research topic, conducting the research and writing the dissertation. A dissertation workshop provides the opportunity to present aspects of your dissertation work and to receive constructively critical feedback from course teachers and fellow students.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsgt

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

- Students typically receive bi-weekly supervisions over 8 weeks
- Modern Society modules 12 hours x 4 modules; Research Methods 12 hours x 2 modules; 72 hours hours per year.
- Social Theory 8 hours hours per year.
- Dissertation workshop 10 hours hours per year.
- Within the Department various journal clubs are offered 8 hours per week.
- Students conduct a critical appraisal as part of the training.
- The Department runs a dissertation workshop in the first term.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Modern Society and Global Transformations) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Definitive Programme Document - http://apss.polyu.edu.hk/files/maspsd_dpd_1617_final.pdf. Read more
Definitive Programme Document - http://apss.polyu.edu.hk/files/maspsd_dpd_1617_final.pdf

Programme Aims

The MA in social Policy and Social Development Programme aims to prepare students to develop the necessary core professional and personal competence required to work in the field of social policy and to engage in professional practices in social development. This involves gaining critical knowledge and skills in analysing and appreciating local and global policy issues and the ability to formulate and assess policy options that ensure effective, appropriate and sustainable outcomes, uphold social justice and improve social well-being. To these ends, the programme is designed to bring together theory and practice that enables participants in the programme to meet challenges in social development ethically and imaginatively.

Special Features

Unlike most other postgraduate programmes in social policy, this MASPSD is designed for those who are either to embark on a career in Social Policy and Social Development or those who are already mid-career practitioners seeking to improve their knowledge about public and non-government sectors specialising in social policy and planning for social development. It is structured to offer rigorous, interdisciplinary and hands-on training across a number of academic, managerial and professional disciplines that prepare participants to transfer knowledge into action to bring about social development, especially through responsible policy analysis, formulation, impact assessment and evaluation.

The programme will provide students with a solid foundation in social policy analysis that can be adapted and applied in many fields of human service provision and practice in social development. Graduates are expected to gain the competence necessary to participate effectively in social policy processes, conduct needs assessments, evaluate policy impacts and develop appropriate and relevant policy options that respond responsibly to new challenges in social development.

Programme Structure

‌•MA : to be eligible for the award, students are required to take 30 credits (6 Required Subjects including the Integrative Project and 4 Elective Subjects).
‌•PgD : Students who have successfully completed 21 credits (5 Required Subjects and 2 Elective Subjects) can exit that programme with a Postgraduate Diploma.
‌•PgC : Students who have successfully completed 12 credits (2 Required Subjects and 2 Elective Subjects) can exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate.

Professional Recognition

Graduates of this programme may apply for membership of the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA).

Core Areas of Study

Required Subjects

‌•Policy Research Method
‌•Social Context and ethics
‌•Social Policy Analysis and Social Accountability
‌•Social Planning and the Policy Process
‌•Theory and Practice of Social Development
‌•Integrative Project


Elective Subjects

‌•Assessing Globalization and Social Development
‌•Managing Information in Social Service Organizations
‌•Organization Theories and Analysis
‌•Comparative Social Policy and Social Development
‌•Contemporary Issues in Social Policy
‌•Digital Technologies and Social Development
‌•Social Impact Assessment
‌•Social Policy and Social Development in China
‌•Social Policy Evaluation

Application Period and Submission of Application

Application period and submission of application
‌•Applicants can obtain the application material and submit online application via [email protected] during Application Period.

Application Period

‌•http://www.polyu.edu.hk/study > Postgraduate Programmes > Select a Programme
‌•Late applications will be considered subject to availability of places.

Submit an Application

‌•http://www.polyu.edu.hk/study

Enquiries

Please contact Mr. Ken WAN at 2766 5784 or e-mail to Ms Angel SHING at for enquiry

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The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice. Read more
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice.

The MSc Social Work is an accelerated programme for applicants who already have a first degree and want to embark on a career in social work; the course will fully prepare you for a professional career in the statutory or voluntary social care field.

This Masters degree runs in close partnership with local social care agencies and local authorities based in inner and outer London boroughs. The course is a combination of a taught and practice curriculum, where you will undertake two fieldwork placements in addition to the College-based teaching over the two years.

We welcome overseas and self-funding students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/socialwork/coursefinder/mscsocialwork.aspx

Why choose this course?

Students have said the following about this course:
- “Lectures are delivered by experienced practitioners and leaders in the Health and Social Care field.”

- “The teaching is of a high standard and lectures are interactive with opportunities for small group activity.”

- “Staff are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and professional.”

- "There is excellent support for mature students, especially those with childcare and family commitments.”

- “I am a final year student and proud to be a postgraduate student at Royal Holloway.”

Department research and industry highlights

Since its inception, the department has developed a reputation for delivering high quality research across a range of areas by engaging with matters of public concern. In the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 45% of the department’s quality profile was ranked 3-4*.

- A team of researchers in the department recently conducted a major study into leadership in health and social care services.

- Two members of staff are currently completing a small-scale study into decision-making in the field of child and family welfare.

- The department hosted the Centre for Trauma and Abuse studies and continues to maintain strong links with this centre.

- The department runs the most successful Graduate Diploma in Child and Family Studies in partnership with 28 London Boroughs and has been designated a Centre of Excellence.

Course content and structure

The MSc in Social Work is a two-year course that runs over two academic years, and is based at Royal Holloway’s Egham campus. The course is full time and students are expected to attend from 9am - 5pm, both in College and while on placement. The course integrates theory, research, policy and practice in social work, and the academic and practice programmes run concurrently.

- Course structure and organisation
In the first year you'll attend College four days a week during the first term. In the second term you are on placement (70 days) from Monday to Thursday and in College on Fridays. The placement continues in the third term. There are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College.

In year two you'll attend College on Mondays and Tuesdays and are on placement (100 days) the rest of the time. Again there are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College. Please see information about placements for more details regarding the practice element of the course.

- First year courses
Practice Learning 1: preparation for practice. .

Social Policy for Social Workers: gain an understanding of social policy issues related to social work.

Human behaviour in the social environment: gain knowledge about psychology in relation to working with service users.

Child observations: develop observation skills that are relevant to social work with all service user groups.

Theories and knowledge for Social Work practice: gain knowledge of theories and approaches used to understand how to work with service users.

Law for Social Work: learn about law relating to working with services users.

- Second year courses
Critical Social Work: issues relating to working with service users and about different service user groups e.g. adult and child safeguarding, assessments, working with asylum seekers, substance misuse, working with resistant service users.

Choose one of three optional seminars depending on your area of interest: mental health, child and family welfare or vulnerable adults.

Practice Learning 2 - critical reflection: students explore and reflect upon their practice in seminar groups.

Research methods: Students learn about research methods in preparation for their dissertation.

Understanding and working in organisations: learn about the legal obligations, structures and cultures within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice.

- Support
Students are provided with one to one support from: Academic Tutors, who'll support you throughout the course; Placement tutors and Practice Educators; Dissertation Supervisors in the second year.

Royal Holloway provides range of wider services that support students including the Educational Support Office, Student Financial Advisor, Counselling Services, Students’ Union and Careers Service.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge of:
- sociology, psychology, social policy and law and their application to social work practice

- the contribution and application of social research to social work theories and practice

- the range of statutory, voluntary and private welfare organisations within social work agencies and in health, housing and educational environments

- the range of theories and methods needed for effective social work practice

- the social and individual origins of a typical range of problems presented to social care agencies

- values and ethics relevant to social work practice

- the significance of inequalities and difference in working with organisations and social service users

- the significance of cultural diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with organisations and social service users.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations, presentations and a dissertation. Students are also required to successfully complete one 70-day and one 100-day practice-learning placement.

Employability & career opportunities

The MSc in Social Work qualifies graduates for careers in statutory and voluntary social work. Qualified social workers can continue their professional/academic development through taught post-qualifying programmes or research opportunities within the department. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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This Masters in Social Policy and Social Research Methods is particularly significant if you are currently working in local authorities or the voluntary sector. Read more
This Masters in Social Policy and Social Research Methods is particularly significant if you are currently working in local authorities or the voluntary sector. The skills you learn will progress your career in social welfare policy development, delivery or research. Or it is also relevant if you are thinking of starting a career related to social policy in the public, voluntary or private sectors.
The focus of this course is on contemporary substantive issues in social policy development and delivery, and social policy research methods. You'll develop your theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues related to policy-making, social welfare delivery, equality and social justice, and research methods.

You'll gain an advanced understanding of national and international factors influencing policy development and implementation. The changing relationship between the State, voluntary sector and private sector in terms of social welfare delivery. You'll also explore how ideas of equality, diversity, justice and human rights shape institutions and the programmes they offer.

You'll engage with recent research linked to changing family forms and how family policy impacts on children and families. You'll be equipped to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics then analyse and present the material such research generates.

The course fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilise your research knowledge and research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of social policy and broader social science research professions.

Flexible modes of study

You can choose between three modes lasting one, two or three years allowing you to study whilst maintaining other life commitments.

Modules

Social policy analysis
The voluntary sector and the state: protagonist or partner
Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
Approaches to social change: equality, social justice and human rights
Family policy
Data analytic techniques for social scientists
Dissertation

Teaching and learning

Modules are assessed by coursework. There are different kinds of writing required which include: a critical reading log, a self-reflective essay, a methodological critique of a research article, a research proposal, extended essays, an evaluation of social change and a dissertation.

Modules are supported by Moodle, the LSBU virtual learning environment where most course reading will be made available. The classroom is envisaged as a core learning environment where you can discuss new ideas but also to think how they can be applied to previous or current work or voluntary experiences. Attendance is crucial for building your knowledge and skills. You'll be making use of computer laboratories in order to develop your use of a range of programmes that can be used to analyse quantitative and qualitative methods.

Timetable

Full-time:
Eight or nine hours of scheduled teaching per week with an additional 25 hours of independent study.

Part-time:
Three hours of scheduled teaching per week with an additional six hours of independent study per module.

Placements

If you are not already working in an environment which is linked to social welfare you'll be encouraged to undertake voluntary work which will give you useful experience alongside the degree. In addition it may become used as a location where you can undertake primary research for your master's dissertation. The Employability team at LSBU can help students find voluntary placements.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in areas linked to social policy and social welfare. You'll be able to access work in the statutory, commercial or voluntary sectors and operating at central, and local government levels, for example, local government; MORI, NSPCC and DEMOS. The acquisition of specific social policy and research methods knowledge will also enhance your career opportunities if you are currently working in the field in social policy development and delivery or in undertaking social policy related research. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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As an MSc Social Psychology student you will learn theories, methods, and empirical findings in the field of social psychology, which are relevant to current social issues. Read more

As an MSc Social Psychology student you will learn theories, methods, and empirical findings in the field of social psychology, which are relevant to current social issues.

These include: prejudice and discrimination; the relationship between moral judgement and emotions; the study of how individuals and groups interact to construct and maintain identities; and how these are related to social change and influence in contexts such as family systems and romantic dyads.

The programme aims to provide you with an awareness of the historical and philosophical background of social psychology, an in-depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches and research findings, and the ability to conduct quantitative and qualitative research in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Funding

Occasionally, students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship, negotiated by individual students.

This would involve students undertaking research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company. In practice, though, most students are self-funded.

Social psychology research

The social psychologists at the University of Surrey have an international reputation in research and teaching. Students on the MSc in Social Psychology are encouraged to participate in the School of Psychology’s ongoing activities, particularly research seminars.

The social psychologists at Surrey have undertaken research for the EU, UK research councils, government departments and agencies, industry and commerce, and the charitable sector. They have attracted a large number of research projects to the School, including:

  • Social and behavioural consequences of AIDS/HIV (ESRC)
  • Cross-national studies of the social and psychological determinants of pro-environmental attitudes and behaviours (EU)
  • The 16–19 initiative project on the political and economic socialisation of 16–19 year olds (ESRC)
  • Monitoring and modelling consumer perceptions of food-related risks (MAFF)

Educational aims of the programme

  • To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct social psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
  • To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
  • To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of social psychological theories and empirical findings
  • To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of social domains
  • To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to social psychology
  • Of the practical applications and action implications of social psychological theories and empirical findings
  • Of the principles of research design
  • Of quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
  • Of ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • To critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to social psychology
  • To critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of social psychological theories and research methods in addressing social problems
  • To evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of social domains
  • To design, conduct and evaluate social psychological research
  • To apply insights from social psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills

  • Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
  • Apply problem solving techniques to social and psychological topics effectively
  • Use effective learning strategies
  • Analyse and interpret social psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate theories and methods in relation to social psychology by oral and written means
  • Use information technology effectively
  • Manage own personal development

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The MSc in Social Work is intended to provide a programme of postgraduate study in social work leading to registration with the Scottish Social Services Council. Read more
The MSc in Social Work is intended to provide a programme of postgraduate study in social work leading to registration with the Scottish Social Services Council.

In the first two semesters students are orientated towards the programme design and philosophy; introduced to practice learning and core social work skills; given a grounding in the legal framework of social work practice; and given the opportunity to develop and test out their learning skills in preparation for the remainder of the programme. The remaining time on the programme will be structured according to individual student's needs and available learning opportunities. Students will be given full opportunity to learn in and about diverse practice settings and with a range of client groups.

Learning will build around a series of assessment tasks, which will enable students to make direct connections between the various knowledge and skills components of social work practice in real practice contexts.

Why study Social Work at Dundee?

The MSc in Social Work is delivered within the School of Education, Social Work and Community Education. This reflects the multi-disciplinary context in which social work operates as a profession.

The aims of the programme are to equip our graduates to:
Work with individuals, families, groups, organisations and communities
Function as an agent of change
Work for social justice
Act with a strong professional identity
Practise as accountable and autonomous professionals
Operate with confidence within their sphere of competence
Identify the need for and plan on-going professional development for themselves and their colleagues
Function competently in multi-disciplinary teams and settings
Practise in partnership with service users and carers
Demonstrate competence in all key roles of the Standards in Social Work Education

Carers and Users Group

The social work discipline has one of the longest standing and most innovative Carers and Users groups connected to the programme.

This will provide you with crucial perspectives and experiences of service users and carers in the delivery and development of the programme.An example of this is the award winning 'Community Care and the Caring Experience' module which offers you a unique opportunity to develop a relationship with a career in order to examine and reflect upon the experience of caring and being cared for.

What's so good about Social Work at Dundee?

Research-led teaching:
"The strength of your department and teaching really is something very special. I have studied at the University before, but I have never experienced such commitment and passion in one group of people, and I feel truly privileged to have been a part of it."
Rebecca Laing - MSc in Social Work Student 2013

Professional accreditation:
The MSc in Social Work is professionally accredited by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

Practice learning opportunities

The programme has links with a broad range of excellent agencies across the statutory, voluntary and private sectors. This provides students with exceptional practice learning opportunities.

Due to the geographical location of the University, you will be able to take advantage of practice learning opportunities across a range of locations including Dundee, Perth, Fife, Angus and Edinburgh. This adds a depth and richness to the opportunities available and broadens the networks that students can establish during their time on the programme.

Who should study this course?

This programme is intended for students who wish to qualify and register as a social worker with the Scottish Social Services Council and who wish to study on an innovative and engaging Master's level programme.

"There isn't a 'typical' undergraduate degree and work experience path that leads to the MSc in Social Work and so students bring a diverse range of knowledge and experience. What this means for me as a tutor is the opportunity to work with a diverse range of students and help them realise their academic and inter-personal potential."
Ann Hodson – Lecturer in Social Work, 2014

How you will be taught

The programme combines periods of campus based learning and practice learning within social work related agencies. The programme is built on adult learning principles and you will be encouraged to make links with the experience, knowledge and skills that you bring to the programme. Students are expected to be able to be self-directed in their learning whilst benefitting from the support and contributions of academic staff, professional partners and service users and carers.

The curriculum is delivered through a range of teaching and learning methods including:
Taught inputs for academic staff and practitioners
Problem solving and research tasks individually and in groups
Practice learning opportunities in a diverse range of social work related workplaces.
Tutor and peer support
Skills based role-play
Service user and carer perspectives

"We are able through our partnership with the MSc in Social Work programme, not only to be involved, but importantly, to influence how you will be prepared with the knowledge, and skills, to recognise and deliver the services we all need."
John Dow (Carers and Users Group, 2014)

What you will study

The MSc programme is designed around 7 assessment-based modules:
Professional Decision Making - A (module 1a)
Community Care and the Caring Experience (module 2)
Integrated Social Work Practice – A (module 5a)
Professional Development of Self, Peers & Colleagues (module 4)
Professional Decision Making – B (module 1b)
Evaluating and Contributing to Policy Development (module 3)
Integrated Social Work Practice – B (module 5b)

How you will be assessed

The programme is assessed through essay based tasks. The emphasis is on the links between theory and practice and all assessments locate knowledge within practice contexts.

Careers

The MSc in Social Work provides graduates with the professionally required social work qualification and opens up employment opportunities across a broad range of social work roles in the statutory, voluntary and private sectors. The qualification is generic and equips graduates to work across the broad range of service user groups and practice contexts.

"Absolutely delighted that *all* of my MSc Social Work tutor group have got jobs!"
Jon Bolton, course tutor, 2012

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Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective. Read more
Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective.

Your studies will provide a broad level of understanding by exposing you to the variety of ways in which our subjects are approached in diverse contexts, and there will be a particular focus on the global south, and on recognising how responses to social issues have developed.

There will also be an emphasis on issues which have an international dimension, such as human rights and social justice, trafficking and other forms of exploitation.

[Why choose this course?]]

• Study, compare and evaluate different welfare regimes and indigenous responses to human need within a framework of equality and social justice
• Explore the ethical aspects of your subject including attention to power and anti-discriminatory practice
• Develop a comprehensive and critical understanding of the knowledge, theoretical and ethical underpinnings and approaches to international social work and social development in diverse global contexts
• Gain an in-depth knowledge and critical appreciation of research models and methods, and acquire a high level of skill in evaluating and undertaking research while working within a robust ethical framework
• Benefit from a programme that will give you the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings, for example working for NGOs, governments or voluntary organisations.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/international-social-work-and-social-development#about

Course detail

This course offers global perspectives, theoretical foundations, ethics and practice skills equipping social work and social development professionals to respond effectively in diverse country contexts and make global-local connections. It aims to enable students to develop cultural competence and the ability to work effectively in different global contexts.

You will develop critical thinking, enquiry and evaluation in response to human need encouraging reflectiveness, increasing self-awareness and questioning of models of practice. You will also develop team working skills as be exposed to multi-disciplinary and culturally diverse working, both through collaboration with other students and observing practice in community-based projects.

The course aims to equip students with the skills to carry out research and to understand the implications of research for practice. It also provides the opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge of a specialist subject of your own choosing.

The practice skills element of the course enables students to apply theory to practice and to develop the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings; for example working for NGOs, government or voluntary organisations.

Modules

• International Social Work and Social Development
• Comparative Social Work and Cultural Competence - Approaches, Policy and Practice
• Models and Methods of Social Investigation
• Human Rights, Advocacy and Social Justice
• Complexities of Forced Migration: Human Displacement, Trafficking and Refuge
• Humanitarian Aid, Non-governmental Organisations and Social Work in Disasters
• Gender in International Social Work and Social Development
• International Relations - Globalization
• Practice Skills Workshops – Project Management, Training and Development, Evaluation and Communication Skills
• Dissertation

Assessment

The assessment methods include:
• Case studies
• Reflective accounts of student experience
• Individual and group presentations
• Design of a training package
• Analysis of qualitative and/or quantitative data
• The dissertation allows you to undertake a research project and communicate knowledge, findings and recommendations

Careers

There is growing demand in both developed and developing countries for the skills of social work and social development professionals. A wide range of job opportunities is available in both the statutory and non-statutory sectors, these include specialist roles in NGOs and various humanitarian organisations.

Job titles for typical successful Masters students include: Social Development Worker, Child Protection Worker, Community Worker, Animateur, Project Worker, Women’s Worker, Gender based Violence Specialist, Advocacy Worker. Roles in policy and research in the public, private and NGO sector are also open to graduates.

Further study options include PhD or the Professional Doctorate for Home/EU Students.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The Social Work MA programme aims to educate and train individuals to be reflective, research-minded practitioners who are able to work critically and professionally and in accordance with the principle of anti-oppressive practice. Read more

About the course

The Social Work MA programme aims to educate and train individuals to be reflective, research-minded practitioners who are able to work critically and professionally and in accordance with the principle of anti-oppressive practice.
Graduates who successfully complete this programme are eligible to apply for Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration.

The professional and academic elements are closely integrated throughout the programme. There are 170 placement days, with the working week divided between time in placement and time in the University.

Aims

This MA Social Work degree programme aims to provide high quality post graduate social work education and training to equip students with comprehensive pre-entry skills to work in any agency employing social workers in the United Kingdom.

Although the statutory sector is the major employer, increasingly social workers are being recruited into voluntary and private sectors in a variety of service provision roles including community-based, residential or day care services in the UK and abroad.

The programme seeks to encourage the personal responsibility of students to function as independent learners and to develop a critical and reflective appreciation of the role of social work in society.

The curriculum provides teaching in both academic and practice elements, which are fully integrated at Brunel University London. It is designed to ensure that learning occurs in an incremental way, with learning outcomes that develop across levels enabling students to demonstrate progression in professional knowledge, skills and values through two years of study.

Specifically, the programme aims to:

- Prepare students for critical and reflective professional practice according to the HCPC’s approval standards of education
- Equip students to practise ethical, innovative and effective social work practice that actively promotes social justice in a diverse society
- Integrate learning in academic and practice elements of the programme so that students have a holistic understanding of social work in variety of professional contexts
- Enable students to identify, understand and critically appraise evidence and research which can inform social work practice
- Enable graduates to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council and apply for membership with the British Association of Social Workers (BASW).

Course Content

Compulsory Modules (year 1)

The Foundations of Social Work Practice
Social Work Theories and Perspectives
Life-span Behaviour and Development
Legal Frameworks for Social Justice
Social Policy and Sociology
Professional Skills Development I
Practice Learning I
Approaches to Research

Compulsory Modules (year 2)

Assessment and the Management of Risk and Complexity
Effective Practice with Domestic Violence, Mental Health and Substance Misuse
What Works in Social Work
Professional Skills Development II
Practice Learning II (100 days)
Dissertation

Year 2 Pathways (choose one)

Social Work with Children and Families
Main topics: working with children in need and child protection; theory, research, law, policy and practice; inter-professional workshops on the impact of parental problems including parental substance misuse and domestic violence; critical review of inter-agency and inter-disciplinary practice through serious case reviews; children looked after and leaving care and service user voices; theory and research specific to social work practice with children and families; risk analysis and risk management; the centrality of relation based practice in direct work and communication with children and young people; the family court system and skills in analysing and presenting case material.

Social Work with Adults
Main topics: the development of community-based care and support and integrated adult health and social care including ideological underpinnings and contemporary issues in policy and adult social work practice; person-centred and care management approaches to community-based adult social work practice; and adult practice specialisms.

Note: As this programme may involve regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email

Work Placements

Brunel University London has an excellent placement team that takes care to match students to appropriate children and families and adult social work placements within the London area. Placement providers have been consistently positive about their experience supervising post-graduate students and have frequently hired students back into permanent posts after they have completed their degree.

Teaching

A wide range of teaching methods are used in the MA Social Work programme including lectures, seminars, workshops, coupled with individual tutorials and group tutorials to ensure large group learning is translated in a more discursive way. Assessments include essays, exams and presentations and students are expected to complete a total of 180 credits of assessed academic work along with a 60 credit dissertation.

Special Features

The programme is transitionally approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.
Students enjoy first-rate facilities in the new Mary Seacole Building.

We are one of the leading providers of university-based social work and social policy research in London and have attracted funding from, amongst other sources, the ESRC, the AHRC, Nuffield Foundation, the Rowntree Trust, the European Union, the Department for Education and Skills and the NHS.

Students benefit from close links with social care providers in local government and in the voluntary sector.

Service users and carers are crucial to our work, and our BEEC (Brunel Experts by Experience Committee) enables them to be involved at all stages of the MA, from interview to assessment.

Recent groundbreaking research into personalisation, service user involvement, Family Drug and Alcohol Courts, young onset dementia and youth and religion, amongst other areas, feed into our taught programmes, making them highly relevant and up-to-date. Our academics include the authors of best selling books on citizenship, community care and child protection.

Anti-oppressive practice has been at the core of our education and training philosophy for some years and this emphasis is evident in the teaching of this programme.

Brunel University has a long history of securing a range of quality placements across London and surrounding areas. We have substantial experience in working across the statutory and independent sector and have strong partnership links.

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Focusing on applying social marketing principles to the key health, environmental and civic issues in contemporary society, the Social Marketing PGCert will give you the skills and confidence to plan and manage social marketing campaigns. Read more
Focusing on applying social marketing principles to the key health, environmental and civic issues in contemporary society, the Social Marketing PGCert will give you the skills and confidence to plan and manage social marketing campaigns.

This course will appeal to graduates who are looking for a career that contributes something positive or beneficial for society, or experienced professionals interested in accrediting existing social marketing skills.

The Social Marketing postgraduate certificate will develop your ability to:

• plan behavioural change programmes based on an understanding of what moves and motivates people
• apply social marketing theory and concepts to practical behavioural problems
• demonstrate a critical analysis of social marketing strategy, both in practice and policy making settings
• show competence in social marketing planning techniques and the application of behaviour theory to live projects
• apply commercial marketing and other management tools to behaviour change programmes.

This flexible course is designed to fit around your personal and professional commitments. You can choose to start in November (subject to numbers) or May.

Course structure

The course is designed to fit around your personal and professional commitments, with start dates throughout the year. You may determine the length of the course, which can vary between six months and four years, depending on your individual circumstances.

You take a Social Marketing module over four consecutive days, with additional supervision and assessment time. On completion of this module you can choose to follow one of two routes:

• the modules route
• the work-based route.

You will have the opportunity to discuss the best combination of modules and projects with your tutor.

You need 60 credits to achieve the Social Marketing PGCert. The compulsory Social Marketing module is worth 20 credits; you can earn the other 40 credits either through two 20-credit modules or a work-based project.

You can take modules one at a time. For example, you could pay for one 20-credit module, then pay for another one at a later date until you have earned the 60 credits necessary for the PGCert award.

1. Modules route

This route allows you to choose two modules in addition to the compulsory Social Marketing module.

Each module is taught in weekly blocks, not including supervision and assessment time.

Modules:

Meeting the Challenges: Public Health
Research Methods for Critical Appraisal
Behavioural Economics
The Dynamic Public Service Environment
Service Planning and Commissioning
Sustainable Joint Working
Marketing for the Not-for-Profit Sector

2. Work-based project route

The work-based project can be completed at a pace that suits you and your employer (between six months and four years). It is based around your own professional interests and carried out under the supervision of the course team.

Should you decide to take this route, you will be required to produce a coherent account of an applied social marketing initiative.

The project provides an opportunity to create strategies to overcome the barriers that social marketing professionals face when creating complex behaviour change programmes.

You will be expected to:

• identify a social marketing problem of your choice (in consultation with tutors)
• explore relevant social marketing/behaviour change models to provide insight into an audience in relation to the particular issue
• analyse the primary and secondary data, with reference to social marketing theory and literature
• draw sound conclusions from your investigation
• identify realistic and feasible social marketing recommendations, such as the development of a behavioural intervention or a review of the way a public service is provided.

Who is this course for?

This course is suitable for graduates wanting to develop social marketing skills, as well as experienced professionals interested in accrediting existing social marketing skills.

It will be of particular interest to:

• professionals with marketing or business experience interested in working in health or environment sectors
• public health, health promotion, commissioning and environmental professionals who are interested in social marketing and behavioural change
• people working internationally within the disciplines of environment, business and social science
• health and environmental professionals who have completed a basic introduction to social marketing course
• communications professionals working in local authorities and NHS organisations
• non-profit, voluntary and other public sector managers from charities and social enterprises.

Careers and employability

On completion of this course you will have an advanced understanding of social marketing strategy. You will be equipped with the skills and knowledge sought after by employers in national, regional and local government, social marketing consultancies, the NHS and not-for-profit organisations.

The course demonstrates your professional credibility to employers, clients and peers. The government’s recognition of the value of the social marketing means that a large number of relevant roles and vacancies are available in the public sector.

Links with industry:

"Our students engage with industry through work placements, projects and guest speakers. This close link with industry often provides our students with opportunities to get a job. This is what the business school is all about." - Aidan Berry, Director of Brighton Business School

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This two-year programme is designed for people who want to qualify and practice as a professional social worker. Social work is a demanding but highly rewarding profession, which is often in the public spotlight. Read more
This two-year programme is designed for people who want to qualify and practice as a professional social worker.

Social work is a demanding but highly rewarding profession, which is often in the public spotlight. As a qualified social worker you will be able to work with both children and adults, helping them to be safe so that they can cope and take control of their lives again. You will work with them to assess their needs, find what will help them, build their self-confidence and link them to other services. This requires an ability to appraise complex and difficult situations, drawing on social science research, social work theories and methods of intervention. You will need a thorough understanding of social policies and a firm grasp of the legal powers and duties that underpin your practice.

The MSc in Social Work combines university-based learning with two extended periods of supervised practice as a student social worker in a social work agency. Completion of the degree will make you eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council and practise as a qualified professional social worker in a range of areas including statutory, voluntary, private and independent sectors.

You will develop an understanding of the structural and personal factors that lead to disadvantage, oppression and discrimination and learn to apply this understanding to your practice. You will develop skills as a reflective practitioner, appraising relevant evidence, including research, to evaluate your own and others' work, and to contribute to the development of policy and practice.

Programme structure

First Year
Social Work Studies
-Social Work with Children and Young People
-Social Work with Adults
-Mental Health Social Work
-Housing and Homelessness
-Substance Misuse
-Domestic Violence

Applied Social Science and Law
-Human Growth and Development
-Law
-History and Contemporary Context of Social Work
-Organisations and the Professional Task

Foundations of Social Work: The Professional Role
-Critical Thinking Skills
-Professional Values and Ethics
-Social Work Theory and Methods
-Integrative Groups
-Skills based workshops

Practice Learning 1
-Preparation for Practice
-Communication and Interviewing Skills
-Practice Development Groups
-70-day Practice Placement

Second Year
-Social Work Studies 2
-Social Work with Children and Families OR Social Work with Adults
-Mental Health Social Work with Adults
-Child and Adolescent Mental Health
-Community Social Work Practice

Research in Social Work
-Research Methods in Social Work
-Dissertation

Practice Learning 2
-Preparation for Practice
-Practice Development Groups
-100-day practice placement
-ASYE Workshops

Careers

Completion of the degree will make you eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council and practise as a qualified professional social worker.

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Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science. Read more
Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science.

Furthermore, we are home to the Centre for Research in Social Simulation (CRESS) and its world-leading expertise in agent-based modelling.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Interest in simulation has grown rapidly in the social sciences. New methods have been developed to tackle this complexity. This programme will integrate traditional and new methods, to model complexity, evolution and the adaptation of social systems.

These new methods are having an increasing influence on policy research through a growing recognition that many social problems are insufficiently served by traditional policy modelling approaches.

The Masters in Social Science and Complexity will equip you to develop expertise in the methods necessary to tackle complex, policy-relevant, real-world social problems through a combination of traditional and computational social science methods, and with a particular focus on policy relevance.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Data Analysis
-Field Methods
-Computational Modelling
-Theory Model Data
-Modelling the Complex World
-Policy Modelling
-Theory and Method
-Statistical Modelling
-Evaluation Research
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The main aims of the programme are to:
-Provide an appropriate training for students preparing MPhil/PhD theses, or for 
 students going on to employment involving the use of social science and policy research
-Provide training that fully integrates social science, policy modelling and computational methodologies to a high standard
-Provide training resulting in students with high quality analytic, methodological, computational and communication skills

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES
The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Develop skills in tackling real world policy problems with creativity and sound methodological judgment
-Cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research 
questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs and models
-Introduce students to the methodological and epistemological issues surrounding research in the social sciences in general and computational modelling in particular
-Develop skills in programming in NetLogo for the implementation of agent-based models for the modelling of social phenomena
-Develop skills in the acquisition and analysis of social science data
-Make students aware of the range of secondary data available and equip them to evaluate its utility for their research
-Develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and Internet resources
-Develop skills in the use of SPSS, and in the main statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis
-Develop skills in the use of CAQDAS software for the analysis of qualitative data
-Develop skills in writing, in the preparation of a research proposal, in the presentation ofresearch results and in verbal communication
-Help students to prepare their research results for wider dissemination, in the form of seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications, in a form suitable for a range of audiences, including academics, stakeholders, policy makers, professionals, service users and the general public

Knowledge and understanding
-Show advanced knowledge of qualitative, quantitative and computational methodologies in the social science
-Show advanced knowledge of modelling methodologies, model construction and analysis
-Show critical understanding of methodological and epistemological challenges of social science and computer modelling
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the methodological implications of a range of sociological theories and approaches
-Show understanding the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Show advanced knowledge in data collection, analysis and data driven modelling
-Show advanced knowledge of policy relevant social science research and modelling
-Show advanced understanding of the policy process and the role of social science and modelling therein
-Show advanced knowledge of statistical modelling

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Systematically formulate researchable problems; analyse and conceptualise issues; critically appreciate alternative approaches to research; report to a range of audiences
-Conceptual development of Social Science and Complexity models to creatively enhance the understanding of social phenomena
-Integration of qualitative, quantitative and computational data
-Judgement of problem-methodology match
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Develop original insights, questions, analyses and interpretations in respect of research questions
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of traditional and computational techniques employed in sociological research
-Ability to produce well founded, data driven and validated computational models
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Ability to communicate research findings models in social science and policy relevant ways
-Ability to manage independent research

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate complex ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means
-Apply computational modelling methodology to complex social issues in appropriate ways
-Creativity in approaching complex problems and a the ability of communicating and justifying problem solutions
-Apply computing skills for computational modelling, research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Work independently or as part of a team
-Demonstrate experience of a work environment

PLACEMENTS

On the MSc Social Science and Complexity, we offer the opportunity to take a research placement during the Easter vacation. This will provide you with first-hand experience of real-life policy research in action.

Organisations in which placements might be possible are a number of consultancies (e.g. Sandtable), government departments (e.g. Defra) and academic research centres (e.g. Centre for Policy Modelling at Manchester).

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Computational methods and especially computer-based simulations, are becoming increasingly important in academic social science and policy making.

Graduates might find career opportunities in government departments, consultancies, government departments, consultancies, NGOs and academia.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Social Work is a practice based profession which engages people and groups to address complex life challenges and enhance well being. Read more

Overview

Social Work is a practice based profession which engages people and groups to address complex life challenges and enhance well being. The social work discipline is underpinned by theories of social work, social sciences, humanities and practice based knowledge. Our enthusiastic staff group bring a wide variety of experiences from practice and research which include: child rights, gerontology, protection and safeguarding and the value base of social work. We have a long established history of providing social work at Keele and offer an informed and critical approach to knowledge about the social content in which social work is practiced. We offer an excellent range of practice placements and our highly regarded skill based learning is led by social work practitioners and people who use services. Graduates from the MA programmes have consistently demonstrated high rates of progression into relevant employment.

We also offer a Professional Doctorate in Social Work for registered social work practitioners. More information is available at the following link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/pgresearch/

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/socialwork/

Course Aims

The course prepares you at postgraduate level for employment as a professionally qualified social worker and lays the foundation for your continuing professional development. It also provides an academically rigorous education at Masters Level, focusing on critical, research and evaluative skills. In order to qualify, you will be assessed through assessed practice and relevant academic study. After qualification you are eligible to apply for registration to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). For this process all social work students (undergraduate and postgraduate) must be able to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, critical evaluation and practice application of the following:
- Principles, values and ethics, theories, models and methods;

- Legislation and policy/social work services and service users;

- Organisational/service delivery context;

- Practice.

Course Content

This professional qualifying programme continues for two full calendar years (24 months) full-time, starting in September. Teaching methods include seminars, lectures, workshops and skills workshops employing a range of methods. All parts of the course are compulsory. The programme incorporates the following elements:

- 300 Masters Level credits, of which 60 credits are awarded on the basis of a dissertation and 240 credits through taught modules – these are to be passed at Masters Level, with a pass mark of 50%, for the award of MA;

- Assessment in line with the Professional Capabilities Framework for Social Work comprising practice learning of 170 days and practice associated assignments which are to be passed at Masters level;

- The core curriculum content as specified by the College of Social Work;

- Compliance with QAA benchmark statement for social work.

In Year One of the course you must demonstrate your suitability for professional training in order to progress to the next stage of the award. This year will also introduce you to the general principles of social work. Year Two aims to develop analytical, research and evaluation skills integrated with your developing practice, knowledge, skills and values. Each year includes practice learning in a social work setting.

Year One:
Taught Modules

(Assessed at Masters level (credits in brackets) - total 70 Level 4 credits)

- Power and discrimination (10)
- Introduction to legal processes (10)
- Social work theory and methods 1 (10)
- Area of Practice 1: children and families (15)
- Area of Practice 1: adults (social science, law, policy and practice) (15)
- Life course development (10)

Personal and Professional Development
- Taught element (interpersonal skills, preparation for practice learning)
- 100 days practice learning

Year Two:
Taught Modules

(Assessed at Masters level (credits in brackets) - total 50 Level 4 credits)

- Social work theory and methods 2 (10)
- Social work research (10)
- Area of practice 2: children and families (law, disability, mental health, inter-professional working, risk) (15)
- Area of practice 2: adults (law, disability, mental health, interprofessional working, risk) (15)

Dissertation:
15,000 words dissertation (60 Level 4 credits)
Personal and Professional Development

- Taught element (interpersonal skills, preparation for practice learning)
- 100 days practice learning

Teaching & Assessment

You are required to pass all written assignments including essays and case studies, and examinations (year two only), together with a dissertation. You must also reach a satisfactory level of competence in relation to the Standards of Proficiency and Professional Capabilities Framework for Social Work.

A central feature of this approach is the recognition that you are responsible for your own learning.

Teaching Methods:
We recognise that different people learn in different ways and so we use a variety of methods to ensure that you have ample opportunity to develop you knowledge and skills. These methods include: lectures, group discussions, skills workshops, skills rehearsals, seminars, computer-aided learning and information technology, directed study, private study, self-help groups, direct practice, and tutorials.

Additional Costs

- Additional costs for textbooks, inter-library loans, photocopying, printing, and potential overdue library fines.

- DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service) checks: In addition to meeting academic requirements, all offers are conditional on candidates obtaining a satisfactory, enhanced disclosure and barring service check. This procedure is carried out before the start of the course and will incur a charge of £44 (the current cost of a DBS disclosure).

No other additional costs for this postgraduate programme are anticipated.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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