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Masters Degrees (Social Sculpture)

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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Led by Reader in Time-based Media Jordan Baseman, the Sculpture programme establishes a framework that encompasses the material, historical and theoretical conditions of sculpture where students are supported to develop their own practice. Read more

Led by Reader in Time-based Media Jordan Baseman, the Sculpture programme establishes a framework that encompasses the material, historical and theoretical conditions of sculpture where students are supported to develop their own practice.

Sculpture includes object-making, public art and social practices, site and space, performance, sound, film and video: but rather than consider the specific manifestations of sculpture we prefer to think of our position as a methodology from which to progress the production of art.

The Sculpture programme provides a structure that incorporates both individual and group tutorials, as well as a dedicated seminar programme. Critical reviews of student work are conducted consistently throughout the year, at the end of each term and we invite external visitors to contribute to these discussions when they become School-wide. Our students are eager, determined, inquisitive, ambitious – actively defining their own terms in regards to the ideas and actualities of Sculpture.

Sculpture occupies a purpose-built studio space at the RCA’s Battersea campus, alongside the other School of Fine Art programmes. Students have access to all specialist workshops across the College, including wood and metal workshops, spray rooms and our celebrated foundry, in which we facilitate casting with bronze, aluminum and iron. There are project spaces in which students can experiment with larger-scale production and display, as well as the practicalities of documentation. We have high-end computer suites with full 3D modeling facilities, alongside a number of still and moving image workstations. 

The programme offers:

  • associations with a broad constituency of artists, architects, designers and thinkers across the RCA, with the expectation that the wider discourse this community represents should be a dynamic foil to the work and development of all aspiring RCA Sculpture graduates
  • a teaching structure that incorporates individual and group tutorials, crits and seminars
  • a flexible space that can be adapted to various uses; there is also project space available for short bookings for exhibitions, documentation and to realise larger projects
  • a range of technical facilities, including wood and metal workshops, spray rooms and the celebrated Foundry casting in a range of metals including bronze, aluminium and iron, all housed in the Sculpture Building
  • dedicated high end computer room with full 3D modelling suite, retouching and moving image workstations, scanning and colour printing
  • access to college-wide workshop facilities and printmaking and photography digital printing and retouching suites
  • access to the Moving Image Studio
  • national and international exchange and residency opportunities, which have included Paris, Kyoto, Dusseldorf, the Hague and Edinburgh
  • an ongoing programme of off-site events, exhibitions and commissions


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Why choose this course?. The Course aims to. Provide you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment. Read more

Why choose this course?

The Course aims to:

  • Provide you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment.
  • Support you to acquire advanced specialist knowledge and practical experience of working with different contemporary fine art media and its conceptual and theoretical relevance, and importance, including (but not limited to); painting and sculpture, printmaking, conceptual and social practices, intervention, performance, film, video, photography (digital and analogue), sound art, new-media, digital-media and installation.
  • Enable you to develop an advanced level of fine art practice informed directly by a relevant theoretical and contextual framework and independently critically evaluate developments within your individual working practice.
  • Produce informed independent fine art practitioners who can adapt their knowledge, understanding and skills for a variety of professional contexts and enable you to gain advanced knowledge of presentational strategies within contemporary fine art.
  • Build advanced strategies for research through an in-depth exploration of different contemporary methodologies.

This course draws on the School’s considerable research reputation and professional expertise in the areas of painting, photography, performance, film and video, sculpture, installations, public art and print-making. This fascinating programme provides highly focused teaching, alongside a critical lecture series within an intellectually supportive environment.

You will be supported by some of the most dynamic artists and researchers in the School. You get the chance to benefit from field trips and gallery visits. Alongside the development of your creative studio work you will gain an understanding of key aspects of art history and theory, as well as an awareness of the social and institutional context within which artworks exist. On completion of the course, your practical work will be exhibited and publicised in a group MA exhibition.

What happens on the course?

Typical modules include:

  • Studio Practice
  • Theory and Contemporary Practice
  • Audience and Display
  • Studio Practice and its Methodologies
  • Master’s Project in Fine Art

Why Wolverhampton?

The Fine Art Course provides a studio intensive programme supported through theoretical and contextual lecture series, studio based seminar critique and individual tutorials. The ethos of the course is to provide students with the time and space to develop ideas and practice towards the final off-site MA exhibition; this includes the structure of personal research and the development of the critical and/or theoretical emphasis behind your work in order to understand the methodological framework of your working practice.

You will have time to reappraise and analyse previous work, develop new ideas in relation to your practice and it’s theoretical underpinning then consolidate those ideas practically. Finally you will bring those ideas and your work to resolution and focus towards the MA exhibition. The course provides students with the knowledge, ambition and structure in order to proceed towards their future career ambitions. Within the programme you will have the opportunity to develop your awareness of exhibition and the display of your work as well as the audiences for that work. The MA Fine Art course will support you in structuring an advanced independent practice, underpinned by sustained critical engagement. 

What our students think

Matthew Evans MA Fine Art

Matthew Evans completed his MA Fine Art with distinction and has since received several commissions for his innovative new approach; creating bespoke modern-day coat of arms, including a £10k commission for the The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Birmingham. He has also been selectedfor the New Art West Midlands 2013 Exhibition at Birmingham Art Gallery Museum which showcases the best of West Midland’s graduates.

"As a result of studying the MA course I have grown professionally as an artist. By adopting a ‘take a risk’ attitude I have been able to further refine my artistic practice and anchor it within the most critically interesting areas. By embracing the challenge of diversification, and enjoying the critical dialogue embedded within the course, I have resolved a number of sticking points, and identified areas for future development.

I chose to study my MA at the University of Wolverhampton as I felt I needed to breathe new life into my practise and relished the challenge of experiencing a new exciting creative environment. The artistic facilities on offer to students and the glowing reputations of the SAD staff and support technicians also played a key role in my decision.

What particularly impressed me about the course was not only the availability and approachability of the lecturers but the general sense of cohesion felt as a student. As well as extensive access to lecturers, and the intensively taught aspects of the course, there are many MA excursions that are incredibly beneficial.

As a positive side note, my affinity with the University has continued this September, with me becoming the Fine Art Artist in Residence for this year."

Other student comments:

“The MA has greatly expanded my knowledge of Fine Art.”

“I feel that I’m being supported in my work and that the best of my talent is being encouraged.”

“The lecturers are knowledgeable and enthusiastic and I’m grateful for both their input and the input of the other students”.

“I’m confident it’s setting me up with the right skills and knowledge to succeed in a career within the arts”.

“I’m glad that I made the decision to do the MA; it’s been a positive turning point in my life”.



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Media is all around us and pervades our lives. Whether it's online content, television, print journalism, radio or PR, we can now instantly access media from wherever we are in the world. Read more
Media is all around us and pervades our lives. Whether it's online content, television, print journalism, radio or PR, we can now instantly access media from wherever we are in the world.

Media and place are at the heart of your course and we are dedicated to developing your understanding of media in all of its forms. You will explore the different uses of media and its spatial and cultural influences.

You'll enhance your knowledge of fast-evolving issues, including changing audiences, citizen journalism and the relationship between different media.

Our passion for media means we are dedicated to providing a learning environment which meets your interests and aspirations. Whether it's advanced media theory, increasing footfall at a local art gallery orwriting content for a website, your modules, assessments and major project can often be personalised.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/media_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will graduate with the expertise to understand media and different audiences. You will have developed your talents in writing for media, with the awareness to respond to spatial, cultural and technological change. Roles in PR, advertising, marketing, social media, branding, television and radio will be available to you, while starting your own business, PhD research or a career as a university lecturer will also be options.

- Marketing Executive
- Senior Journalist
- Media Planner
- Public Relations Executive

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

There are opportunities to take part in visits to a range of destinations such as Yorkshire Sculpture Park - studying the history of it as a place, changing use of land and community development through culture - and the BBC in Salford, focusing on the relation between the corporation and local area.

At the end of each year you will attend a summer school which is dedicated to helping you consolidate your learning. It is an opportunity to benefit from the expertise of our academics, professional tutors, guest experts and your peers in a more informal setting, discussing and presenting a range of media issues.

Depending on the option modules you choose to specialise in, you may also benefit from access to our video equipment, edit suites and audio software.

Core Modules

Researching Culture
An introduction to key skills invaluable to your study, such as research enterprise, working with sources, interdisciplinary approaches to research, digital literacy and communication.

Understanding Media & Place
Explore the geography of media by studying the relationship between media and place through case studies, particularly from the north of the UK.

Major Project
Tailor your course by undertaking a major project in an area of interest to you. You'll study independently, but have the full support of your tutor when you need it.

Media Passions
Explore passions and fan relationships to media and culture.

Adaptations
Examine adaptation in the broadest sense. Not merely of literature to film, for example, but of stage plays to radio, comics to video games and cover versions of original songs.

Option Modules

European Cities & Culture
Consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Leisure & Cultural Spaces
Examine the importance of leisure and cultural spaces through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Digital Communications Management
Take a look at digital communication technologies and social media to understand the effects on media, business (corporate communication and corporate reputation) and society.

Online Journalism
In a media world that is increasingly reliant on online media platforms, develop your own online work as well as developing awareness of some of the implications presented by electronic and online media for journalists.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Strate School of Design is one of the best Transportation design schools in the world. There is not a single car company without Strate alumni. Read more
Strate School of Design is one of the best Transportation design schools in the world. There is not a single car company without Strate alumni. Strate trains transportation designers for tomorrow, capable of developing a transversal and global vision of all mobility issues with a double exigency in terms of formal and conceptual excellence.

During this 19 months program, students will be trained to become strong professionals thanks to an intensive project- based pedagogy, car manufacturer master classes and partnerships, and a strong emphasis on all representation techniques (2D/3D).

Pedagogy:

1st semester

4 Design projects
Artistic techniques: Perspective, Sculpture, Color, Sketches, Modeling
Software tools: 3D, 2D
Classes: Methodology, Humanities and Social Sciences, Marketing, French
Conferences by Professionals
2nd Semester

3 Design projects
Artistic techniques: Sketches, Modeling
Software tools: 3D, 2D, Video
Classes: Humanities and Social Sciences, Marketing, French
Conferences by Professionals
Beginning of Diploma project: Thesis
3rd Semester

1 Design project
Artistic techniques: Sketches
Diploma project: Thesis, Project
Classes: Humanities and Social Sciences, French
Master Classes
Professionalization: Entrepreneurship, Coaching
4th Semester

Internship

Job opportunities

When you Graduate from Strate in Transportation Design you'll have a wide range of jobs opportunities, such as : Exterior Designer, Interior Designer, Color & Trim designer, Consultant Designer for automotive brands, Design Manager, Equipment Designer

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Modes of Practice. MFA Fine Arts encompasses modes of study and practice ranging from rigorous formal and aesthetic investigations to social and political engagement. Read more

Modes of Practice

MFA Fine Arts encompasses modes of study and practice ranging from rigorous formal and aesthetic investigations to social and political engagement. The two-year, full-time curriculum includes 27 studio, 12 academic, 6 professional practice, and 15 elective credits. Students work independently in their own studios and participate in weekly critiques with an internationally acclaimed faculty of art professionals.

Join the Global Discourse

The program curriculum centers on one-on-one studio visits, group critiques, critical theory seminars, personalized classes, and writing and research for studio practice, as well as professional practices seminars. The Transdisciplinary Seminar reaches into the broader New School community and focuses on a range of topics such as art and feminism, art and science, and art and poetry. Academic classes expose students to global contemporary discourse on art and develop their critical abilities. Students interact with visiting artists of varied practices and cultural orientations. Recent visitors include Shirin Neshat, Paul Pfeiffer, Tehching Hsieh, Kara Walker, Fred Wilson, Mark Dion, and Ann Hamilton. Prominent curators guide students preparing for their thesis exhibitions.

Guided by the belief that artists perform an essential role in society, the MFA in Fine Arts program provides a dynamic, challenging environment in which students develop diverse studio-based practices and pursue interdisciplinary scholarship. Students come from many backgrounds and cultures and work in media including painting, drawing, sculpture, video, performance, digital media, installation, and photography.

This program is part of Parsons' School of Art, Media, and Technology (AMT). Learn about the AMT community to see what students, faculty, and alumni are doing in NYC and around the world. To learn more about the Fine Arts community at Parsons, visit finearts.parsons.edu.

You can request more information here: http://www.newschool.edu/m/parsons-grad?utm_source=find_a_masters&utm_medium=hyperlink_listing&utm_campaign=pm_parsons_grad

Resources for Growth

Parsons’ industry and alumni connections yield abundant opportunities for collaboration and exhibition. Students have recently presented work at the Pulse Art Fair, The Kitchen, and Sydney College of the Arts at the University of Sydney and have held residencies at Skowhegan Institute and Jentel. MFA Fine Arts is housed in Parsons’ School of Art, Media, and Technology (AMT), alongside the Communication Design, Design and Technology, Illustration, and Photography programs. Shared faculty and collaborative projects allow students to explore the connections between art, technology, design, and social critique. Students can also draw on the extensive resources of The New School, a progressive urban university with a tradition of civic engagement and renowned graduate programs in the social sciences, media studies, and urban studies.

Future Opportunities

You graduate prepared for careers in fine art, arts administration, curatorship, museum management, art criticism, and teaching.

You can request more information here: http://www.newschool.edu/m/parsons-grad?utm_source=find_a_masters&utm_medium=hyperlink_listing&utm_campaign=pm_parsons_grad



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Explore the global fashion industry in depth and learn how you can build a career in it, while perfecting your knowledge of design processes, styling, branding, promotion and more. Read more
Explore the global fashion industry in depth and learn how you can build a career in it, while perfecting your knowledge of design processes, styling, branding, promotion and more.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fashion-design

Overview

This dynamic new course will prepare you for the world of contemporary, global fashion design, improving your professional skills, your academic understanding and your industry knowledge.

You’ll develop a comprehensive understanding of the international fashion world, and the business-led factors that influence professional practice.

Our course mixes traditional and experimental fashion design processes with theory and practical work. This will encourage you to think about important issues and future trends in the fashion industry and how you could adapt or improve upon your design, styling, marketing or promotional work. For example, you might explore relationships between your design process, marketing strategy and psychological theories. Or you might look at the connections between mathematics and pattern-cutting; or sustainable design and production processes.

We'll investigate different markets and consumers, too. Having learned more about people's wants and needs, you'll use your insight to create innovative designs, along with branding and promotional strategies.

Throughout the course you'll be working closely with other students. Together, we'll share and debate our ideas and working practices, and learn to critically analyse our work.

Your studies will take place over three trimesters in a single calendar year.

Careers

Our course will equip you with the skills, knowledge and professional understanding you need to work as a fashion designer. You’ll also be well-prepared for related roles, such as styling and promotion, brand and marketing management, PR management/press, fashion production, buying or trend forecasting.

Or you might decide to make use of all these skills by becoming a freelance fashion designer, managing your own brand.

Whatever you decide to do, you’ll benefit from our links with industry professionals, academics and freelancers, who regularly contribute to the course, as well as our careers events including Creative Front Futures and Anglia Ruskin's Big Pitch competition, created for students with an entrepreneurial spirit.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Key Issues in Fashion Design
Fashion Design and Brand
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

We'll measure your progress using a number of assessment methods that reflect the skills you'll need to demonstrate in the fashion industry. These include sketchbooks; reflective journals; technical files; brand, consumer and market research files; collaboration files; brand and promotion packages; portfolio work (visualisation and styling); 3D realisation and collection creation; presentations (audio visual and oral); written reports; your Master's dissertation; and Personal Development Planning (PDP).

Where you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in our two fashion studios with industrial sewing and finishing machines, mannequins and surface textile facilities. We have a large stock of calico and pattern paper available for you to buy.

You’ll also have access to our life drawing and sculpture workshops, printmaking studios, photography labs, computer suites (with Photoshop and Illustrator), and film-making facilities.

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This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas. Read more

This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas.

While on the programme you will continually engage with what it means to practise as an artist today and the position taken by an art-practice in relation to art's complex history and its currency in wider social and cultural processes.

Given the wide international breadth of artists on the programme and the open range of media welcomed in it, a primary concern in discussion is how a particular artist's work and ideas are understood in and across different social, artistic and intellectual contexts.

Our primary emphasis is on how artists look to shift prevalent expectations and whether their work does so – perhaps then transforming what art might be. We place a strong emphasis on student-centred learning, particularly in the studio seminars and personal tutorials based on your art-making, its key concerns and ideas and their mutual interdevelopment. A lecture programme will in addition contribute to your understanding of concerns relating to contemporary art in broader contexts.

The degree has been described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world.

Structure

The programme is divided into two parts:

Year One (Diploma stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late July) or part-time for two years (until late July in both years). This year seeks to establish the core concerns and ambitions of your art.

Year Two (MFA stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late August) or part-time for two years (until late July, and then until late August in the final year). This stage of the programme enables you to address your ambitions for your art with an awareness of how it is situated.

Applicants who are already in possession of 120 grade credits for postgraduate study from another programme are able to apply for direct entry into Year Two of the programme on either a full or part-time basis. You may also take advantage of an exit point at the end of Year One of the programme and graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art.

What you study

This two-stage programme is designed to subject the making of art work, the ideas and concepts involved, and the works of art themselves, to artistic and critical scrutiny. This will include individually directed research to review, consolidate and strengthen your individual position as an artist. Students accepted onto the programme work in media areas including painting, sculpture, printmaking, installation, performance, art writing, textiles, digital media and video. The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred learning – especially on your individual response to the divergent views you will experience in relation to your practice.

Among other qualities, you are expected to: contribute actively in tutorial and seminar discussions; to welcome and encourage sustained analysis of your practice by tutors and fellow students; to understand that the production of contemporary art takes place in a demanding and testing environment; and to take an independent path in developing your practice and its concerns.

Learning on the programme is primarily achieved through an appropriate combination of self-initiated and directed work in studio-practice and Critical Studies. Individual tutorials, seminars, lectures, workshops and research laboratories support this work. All parts of the programme are mandatory for all students. There are no optional modules on the programme. Modules and assessments are structured similarly on both parts of the programme.

Assessment

The three examination elements for both Year One and Year Two are: Collection of Tutorial Reports, Exhibition, and Critical Studies Essay. All three elements must be passed to successfully complete each part of the programme. Each element of examination has both progression and final points of assessment.

Skills & careers

Graduates from the MFA in Fine Art Goldsmiths go on to success in a range of fields. As well as the many internationally reknown artists who have studied at Goldsmiths, others have gone onto become gallerists or curators or have entered the fields of art administration, education and other cultural industries.

The course at Goldsmiths enables you to focus on the development of your own skills and aspirations and to equip you with the resources to succeed in your chosen profession.

See our full MFA art alumni list.



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This course is for people who want to pursue their passion for particular areas of Fine Art, at an advanced level and with professional support. Read more
This course is for people who want to pursue their passion for particular areas of Fine Art, at an advanced level and with professional support.

Course overview

This course is built around your personal interests and aspirations. It allows you to push the boundaries of creativity, within a framework of academic rigour and contextual research.

Given the strong practical element in the course, we invite applicants to share their portfolios and aspirations with us at interview stage. We are eager to explore how to develop each person’s individual interests and passions in Fine Art.

During the course, we encourage you to develop your personal practice through research, critiques, analysis and questioning. We also tackle issues that face Fine Art professionals, from fundraising to self-presentation, as part of boosting your employability.
At Masters level, the specialisms of tutors are an important factor. Sunderland’s research expertise includes painting, printmaking, studio-based drawing and collage, sculpture, collaborative practice, art in architecture, video and digital art.

By the end of the course, you will have prepared and participated in a public exhibition. Your work will form a Masters-level portfolio that excites and impresses potential clients, collaborators and employers.

Graduates from Sunderland have gone on to work throughout the creative industries. A Masters qualification not only opens doors in the workplace but also helps you progress more rapidly once your career is underway.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/fine-art-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
-Fine Art 1 (60 Credits)
-Fine Art 2 (60 Credits)
-Fine Art 3 (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

We organise field trips and visits to galleries and art events throughout the UK. Destinations include cities such as London, Edinburgh and Liverpool. There are also opportunities to visit international venues in places such as New York, Barcelona, Venice and Berlin.

Facilities & location

The facilities at our Priestman Building include state-of-the-art teaching space, generous studio space and a fantastic Arts and Design Library. Facilities include:
-Workshops for wood, metal and printmaking
-Project spaces
-Student gallery
-Digital studio with video, sound editing and screening facilities
-Digital suites with open-access Apple Macs
-Digital sewing and embroidery facilities

Arts and Design Library
Our Arts and Design Library has a specialist collection of over 120,000 books, CD-ROMs, videos, slides and one of the largest electronic information networks in the sector. The experienced library team provide a high-quality service and are sensitive to the requirements and working methods of Arts and Design students.

Journals and research
We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for media and arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles throughout the media and cultural industries, for example as a practitioner, curator or educator. Opportunities could include arts development, public arts projects, community art organisations, social and art therapy support units, galleries and festivals.

Recent Sunderland graduates have also set up their own creative businesses, undertaken commissions and exhibited their work regionally and nationally.

During the course we encourage you to gain industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability. Past placements have included exhibition work in a range of public contexts such as galleries, schools and hospitals.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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This well-connected degree is for those wishing to explore curating and develop curatorial skills in one or more of the following areas. Read more
This well-connected degree is for those wishing to explore curating and develop curatorial skills in one or more of the following areas: fine art, digital media, film, festivals and social history.

Key benefits

You will work at least one day a week with your partner institution to gain experience in a real curatorial setting and develop skills required by industry.

Course detail

You will study alongside an intentionally small and supportive group of students with backgrounds in areas including fine art, sculpture, art history, architecture, 3D design, film studies and history, sharing practice and ideas and providing opportunities to work creatively and collaboratively on group projects.

You will benefit from unique and professional mentoring from a curator in one of our partner museums, galleries or other cultural spaces for the duration of the course, culminating in the delivery of a real-world curatorial project. Our partners are renowned creative and cultural organisations: Arnolfini, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, Encounters Film Festival, M-Shed, Royal West of England Academy, Situations, Spike Island, Watershed, National Museum of Wales, Cardiff and ss Great Britain. A mentor is allocated based on your skills, interests and career aspirations and brings current industry insight and valuable support and guidance.

Through the final live project with your partner institution, you will gain interesting and relevant curatorial experience, sourcing venues, developing audiences, planning, programming and project management whilst developing key contacts.

Structure

The full masters course comprises 180 credits divided into three 60 credits stages: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, and Masters. Students work incrementally through the three stages and must pass all modules at each stage in order to progress to the next.

The course is made up of five modules taught over three semesters (January - December).

Modules

• Curatorial Histories
• Developing Practice and Audiences
• Professional Practice: Curating
• Curating and Project Management
• Final Project: Curating (MA) or Final Project: Curating (MFA)

Format

You are taught through a series of lectures, seminars, practical workshops, master classes and projects. Guest speakers and study visits enhance learning and provide valuable industry insight.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of practical and written work at the end of each module.

Careers / Further study

MA Curating graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions in areas of social history, fine art, museum curating and film programming in various arts, culture and heritage-related organisations. There are also curating and programming opportunities at film festivals both nationally and internationally and options to teach or progress to further PhD study.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree program offers students the opportunity to pursue graduate study in the Departments of Art, New Media, or Theatre and Dramatic Arts. Read more
The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree program offers students the opportunity to pursue graduate study in the Departments of Art, New Media, or Theatre and Dramatic Arts. These majors emphasize a combination of theory and practice relevant to their discipline. Faculty, comprised of artists and scholars, foster an environment of active engagement with material, critical and conceptual investigations in production and performance. The M.F.A. program allows graduate students to concentrate in their chosen disciplines and to synthesize their research into a unique and challenging Thesis Project. Exceptional facilities, integrated technical support, a lively community of arts and culture, and a commitment to academic and creative excellence are integral qualities of the Faculty of Fine Arts.

Course detail

Building on our reputation for excellent undergraduate education in Art Studio (theory and practice) and Art History/Museum Studies, the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Art offers students the opportunity to join a dynamic community of contemporary visual artists, historians, and scholars. As a smaller program with high caliber students, the MFA in Art encompasses material, critical, and conceptual investigations in contemporary art through an exceptional level of interaction with faculty, staff, and visiting artists. The MFA in Art is a two-year, full-time studio program of applied and academic study. The University of Lethbridge is committed to providing competitive financial support to all graduate students.

Located a short drive from Calgary, the United States border, and Canadian Rockies, Lethbridge is a growing city that enjoys a diverse geography of prairie, rolling hills, and an expansive natural river valley area. Lethbridge is home to numerous artist collectives, the Allied Arts Council, Trapdoor artist-run centre, and several contemporary art galleries including the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, Casa, Niche Gallery, Trianon Gallery, Parlour, and the nationally acclaimed Southern Alberta Art Gallery. Several sites for exhibitions are available to graduate students, including in the University of Lethbridge Penny Building, which provides a strong downtown presence.

The University of Lethbridge possesses one of the largest and most accessible art collections in Canada, fostering direct student access to 19th, 20th, and 21st century national and international artwork. A lively and extensive Visiting Speakers in the Arts Program enhances communication with national and international artists, writers, critics, and curators. MFA students are encouraged to augment their studio practice through interactions with our strong Art History/Museum Studies Program, and other graduate programs in the Faculty of Fine Arts (New Media, Music, and Drama). The University’s liberal arts focus offers opportunities to take courses and explore collaborations with the Humanities, Sciences, and Social Sciences.

During the summer months, a unique studio residency is available to graduate students through the University of Lethbridge Gushul Studio Residency Program, located in the Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.

Located in the U of L Centre for the Arts, the Art Department is supported by excellent studio and resourced with a wide range of outstanding technical workshops and digital facilities. Students also have access to an extensive collection of HD and analog cameras, lighting kits, video, and sound equipment.

For more information, including admission requirements and tuition, visit the School of Graduate Studies http://www.uleth.ca/graduatestudies/

Areas of Study

Applications for the upcoming term will have available supervisors in the following areas:

- Drawing
- Installation and Spatial Art
- Painting
- Performance
- Photo Arts (analog and digital)
- Print Media
- Media Arts (sound, video, computer, electronics)
- Sculpture (traditional and experimental fabrication)
- Social Practice

Why study at the University of Lethbridge?

As a graduate student at the University of Lethbridge, you’ll find yourself at the centre of a student-focused environment that nurtures innovation, critical thinking and creativity.

The University of Lethbridge is one of Canada’s top-ranked universities and leading research institutions.

At the foundation of our graduate programs is a multidisciplinary and personalized experience. A collaborative environment is encouraged between faculty and students. This means you have flexibility in decisions regarding the research and learning path you take.

At the U of L, we are committed to helping every one of our students thrive. From aiding with financial support to one-on-one mentorship to individualized career advice, you’ll find support every step of the way.

When you graduate, you will have the confidence you need to succeed in whatever you do, whether that means pursuing further education, teaching in an academic setting or establishing a professional career.

We’re here to help as you find the answers to your questions. As Alberta’s Destination University, the U of L gives you room to think, create and explore, providing a university experience unlike any other.

How to apply

In order to apply, you will need to provide the following documentation:

• Academic Transcripts
• Curriculum Vitae
• Three Letters of Reference
• Letter of Intent
• English Language Proficiency (ELP)

All applications and supporting documents must be provided through the online portal: https://www.uleth.ca/future-student/graduate-studies/apply

Funding

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/award-opportunities

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Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Read more

Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Test out your ideas in a professional environment and gain invaluable experience of exhibiting, curation and collaboration.

Course duration: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Teaching times

Trimesters 1-3: Tuesdays and Wednesdays (full-time); Wednesdays (part-time)

*Please note: In addition, you will be expected to work independently outside taught times for at least the equivalent amount of time.

See the website: http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fine-art

Overview

Our Master’s course will allow you to investigate a range of approaches used in fine art, from painting, sculpture, and printmaking, to more contemporary media such as photography, video, digital media, installation, sound and performance.

You’ll spend much of your time working and researching independently - but you’ll also learn about recent theories, contexts and practices in lectures, seminars and one-to-one tutorials.

We’ll give you the chance to test out your ideas in a professional environment, and to pick up important transferable skills for your career through group and individual presentations and critiques, exhibiting, curation and critical writing.

Here at Cambridge School of Art, you’ll be supported by lecturers who are themselves experienced artists. So as well as having access to artists who are working across many disciplines at the forefront of contemporary art practice, you’ll receive invaluable advice and direction for your future career.

Careers

As well as preparing you for work as a practising artist, you’ll pick up skills and knowledge that will equip you for other roles. Our past students now enjoy careers in further and higher education, museum and gallery management, public arts projects, artist in residence schemes and fellowships opportunities, both in the UK and abroad.

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Fine Art.

Our links with local art organisations, such as Aid & Abet, Changing Spaces, Wysing Arts Centre and Cambridge Artworks, will give you the chance to take part in professional exhibitions, portfolio reviews and live projects.

You’ll also have access to events such as Creative Front Futures, which will give you a taste of the different creative industries, and be able to take part in Fine Art Professional Practice and networking initiatives for both students and alumni.

Our Fine Art Research Unit (FARU) runs fortnightly lectures that will give you a chance to hear contemporary artists and staff talk about their work, and engage in debates about art practice. Recent speakers have included Phillip Allen, Juan Bolivar, Rebecca Fortnum, Danny Rolph, Hayley Newman, Günter Herbst, David Kefford, Cally Spooner, Tim Ellis, Andrew Grassie, Lilah Fowler, Jemima Brown, Caroline Wright and Matthew Derbyshire.

Core modules

Assessment

On most of our core modules, you’ll demonstrate your progress through visual research outcomes supported by a written evaluative statement, except for the Master’s Dissertation where you’ll submit a 6,000-word contextual essay.

Specialist facilities

You’ll have the chance to experiment with many different art forms, making use of our MA studios, printmaking and 3D/sculpture workshops, photography dark rooms, and computer suites for video production and digital imaging. You’ll also have access to three brand new Mac suites with Adobe Creative Suite software, plus high-quality 27-inch monitors.

If you're a full-time student, you'll have an individual studio space to work in. If you're part-time, you'll need your own external studio facility, but may be able to negotiate some temporary on-site space for specific projects. Whether you're full-time or part-time, you'll be based in our MA studios and we'll encourage you to make full use of them both during and outside of formal teaching times. You can also arrange to use the studios on weekday evenings and at weekends during term-time.



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Our Masters in Fine Art or Design offers a comprehensive programme of advanced study in art and design. This supports and mentors you in developing your work in creative, cultural, collaborative and professional contexts. Read more
Our Masters in Fine Art or Design offers a comprehensive programme of advanced study in art and design.

This supports and mentors you in developing your work in creative, cultural, collaborative and professional contexts.

The course enables students to:
• Apply creative practice in a contextual setting, developing flexibility and knowledge within professional creative environments.
• Manage live projects and develop integrated research strategies.
• Work with a variety of stakeholders, networks or community environments.
• Develop a sustainable, individual and professional practice that can be maintained post-graduation.

Visit the website: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/art-and-design/study-options/postgraduate/master-of-fine-art/master-of-design

Course detail

The course offers two distinct pathways to best suit your individual requirements.

Please note: This course is dependent upon a sufficient number of students participating.

Studio Practice

This study option guides you in the development of your personal creative practice, based in a studio environment (on or offsite), which is supported by, and aligned to, subject specialist staff.

Contextual Practice

This study option is tailored towards a more collaborative and contextualised practice, where you can be based offsite but working in a negotiated professional environment and supported by our specialist staff together with an external professional mentor.

Supported specialisms:

• MDes: Ceramics, Jewellery, Product Design, Fashion and Textiles Design, Communication Design, Graphics, Illustration, Photography.

• MFA: Fine Art, Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Contemporary Practice, Public Art, Curatorial Practice, Moving Image, Photography.

Modules

• Studio or Contextual Practice 1
• Research Methods and Critical Enquiry
• Studio or Contextual Practice 2

Full-time Study

In full time mode, you will learn through the development of your own personal individual practice supported by specialist academic staff and technical facilities. You will also learn through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshop sessions. You will work primarily as an individual practitioner but also when required as part of a collaborative team on developing projects, team activities, presentations and discussions.

Studio Practice Pathway students will be sited in a negotiated studio practice environment in relation to their own individual practice.

Contextual Practice Pathway students will be sited in a negotiated professional mentor environment in relation to their own individual practice.

Lectures, seminars and workshop sessions are group activities and held either at Gray’s School of Art or contextually related sites.

Part-time Study

Our part-time delivery mode combines aspects of distance learning and on-campus delivery. You will benefit from the support of the virtual learning environment but also face-to-face tutorials with tutors and attendance at a related number of lectures, seminars and workshop sessions.

Access to our virtual learning environment, CampusMoodle, is also provided giving you access outwith the School to learning materials. Elements of social media are also used in communicating with students.

Careers

This course will enable you to work independently as a creative practitioner as well as within any cultural and creative organisation. Target roles would be artist, designer, curator, exhibition manager, project manager, studio manager, institution director, educator and researcher.

How to apply

To find out how to apply, use the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/applyonline

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

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This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. Read more
This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. You may elect to take a Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics strand.

The MA gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art, and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

The programme is also available at split site between Canterbury and Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/arts/study/postgraduate.html

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices, which draw upon our links with other subjects within the School of Arts and the Faculty of Humanities. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA898 - Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
There is a large and wide-ranging library holding for History & Philosophy of Art, covering the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, aesthetics and contemporary visual communications. There is a substantial stock of periodicals, online access to e-journals and a slide library with well over 100,000 images, covering areas such as contemporary art, visual cultures, garden history and the film still, as well as traditional media. Kent is ideally located for access to galleries in London and on the continent.

In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building located at the centre of the Canterbury campus. The new building is home to the Studio 3 Gallery and a range of teaching and social spaces as well as a dedicated postgraduate centre.

Support
All postgraduate students are offered research skills training and the opportunity to take part in reading groups and research seminars at departmental, school and faculty level. Research students have the added opportunity for funded conference attendance. There is also a dedicated student support office at our Canterbury campus, which can offer support and guidance throughout your studies, in addition to an office in Paris.

In recent years, several members of the History & Philosophy of Art Department, both full-time and part-time, have been awarded University prizes for excellence in student support, curriculum innovation and research-based teaching – an ethos which we seek to extend to the postgraduate community.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: British Journal of Aesthetics; Art History; History of Photography; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and The Philosophical Quarterly.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course aims to. Provide you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment. Read more
This course aims to:

Provide you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment.

Support you to acquire advanced specialist knowledge and practical experience of working with different contemporary fine art media and its conceptualand theoretical relevance, and importance, including (but not limited to); painting and sculpture, printmaking, conceptual and social practices, intervention, performance, film, video, photography (digital and analogue), sound art, new-media, digital-media and installation.

Enable you to develop an advanced level of fine art practice informed directly by a relevant theoretical and contextual framework and independently critically evaluate developments within your individual working practice.

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