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Masters Degrees (Social Movements)

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This Masters will examine when and why humans develop social relations with other individuals or social groups, and the psychological consequences of these social relations. . Read more

This Masters will examine when and why humans develop social relations with other individuals or social groups, and the psychological consequences of these social relations. 

The programme offers a social-developmental psychology training that will advance the careers of anyone who's interested in the people professions – diverse careers related to education, work, health, government and non-profit organisations.

Humans have a fundamental ‘need to belong’ and form relationships. Positive relationships lead to higher well-being, personal development and well-functioning societies, whereas a lack or dysfunctional relationships lead to poor psychological well-being, unhealthy development and conflict or violence within society. 

The programme will teach you about the different psychological approaches to studying social relations in children, adolescents and adults, drawing from different areas of study within psychology (eg social and personality psychology, developmental psychology, educational psychology, clinical psychology, social neuroscience).

These approaches are relevant to anyone interested in understanding social relations between individuals (ie families and friendships) and social groups within a variety of settings (eg schools, the workplace, social movements). The programme will also introduce different strategies aimed at improving social relations between individuals and groups (eg intergroup contact, bullying interventions, mentoring schemes).

Research methods training

The programme will offer ESRC recognised research methods training, which will be useful for students wishing to pursue doctoral training or work in careers where such skills will be appreciated by employers in private and public sectors.

Diverse career opportunities

Given the importance of social relationships for motivation and well-being and given societal issues that arise out of social and racial inequalities and conflicting cultural values, this programme will offer useful insights for diverse careers related to counselling, education, businesses, and government/non-profit organizations. Moreover, you will benefit from conducting research in cosmopolitan London, where diverse socio-cultural groups co-exist in relative harmony.

Modules & structure

The programme is made up of a total of 180 credits, comprised of:

  • four core modules (totalling 105 credits)
  • two core optional module (30 credits)
  • three other optional modules (totalling 45 credits)

Core modules

The following modules are all required: 

  • Critical Issues in the Psychological Study of Social Relations
  • Statistical Methods
  • Research, Design and Analysis
  • Independent Research Project of your choice, supervised by leading experts in the field

Core optional modules

You select two of the following core optional modules which focus on child relationships, adult close relationships, or group relations:

  • Social-Moral Development
  • The Interpersonal Self
  • Social Psychology of Social Problems

For the 2017-2018 academic year, The Interpersonal Self will not be offered, so you will need to take both Social Moral Development and Social Psychology of Social Problems.

Optional modules

Three other optional modules may be selected from a range offered in the Department of Psychology, including the remaining core optional module listed above. Other possible modules include:

  • Addictive Behaviours 
  • Psychology and Education - For 2017-18 academic year this module will not be offered
  • Investigative Forensic Psychology
  • Psychology of the Arts, Aesthetics and Attraction
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods
  • Statistical Data Analysis Project
  • Theoretical Issues in Psychology

The following options are also available to students in this MSc programme from the Institute of Management Studies (IMS). There is a possibility that some of these modules are not available as they may be offered at the same time as one of the Psychology modules above.

  • Organisational Behaviour and Health
  • Leadership and Talent Management 
  • Psychology of Marketing and Advertising 
  • Training, Coaching and Counselling

Skills

The programme will:

  • develop your knowledge and understanding of psychological approaches and common psychological methods for studying social relations in children and adults
  • enable you to develop a thorough knowledge of psychological theories and interventions in relation to improving social relations in a range of social settings
  • equip you with transferable knowledge and skills required to undertake psychological research, including the design, implementation and interpretation of studies and communication of outcomes

Careers

As a graduate of this programme you'll be able to use your knowledge of social relations in the workplace. This will help you advance your career in a wide variety of settings (including clinical, health, educational and work organisations) that involve human relationships, at both the individual and group level.

With the help of the tutors, you'll also be encouraged to work with one or more of the many organisations (private, public, or third sector) available in greater London for your independent research project, which will help you establish a professional network.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Students gain expertise on East Asian contemporary history, politics and societies and learn social science research methods to become area specialists on East Asia. Read more

Students gain expertise on East Asian contemporary history, politics and societies and learn social science research methods to become area specialists on East Asia. East Asian languages are studied as part of the degree to support students’ acquisition of knowledge and Master’s thesis research.

Students in the Programme have good opportunities for student exchange in East Asian universities as well as to receive East Asian study and research scholarships. The Programme provides expertise to enter international public, private and third sector professions. Students also become qualified to apply to PhD programmes and to pursue an academic career.

Academic excellence and experience

The Centre for East Asian Studies specializes in research on contemporary East Asian societies, with special focus on various manifestations of civil societies in China, North and South Korea and Japan. For China, academic staff conducts research, for example, on disaster management, social movements and protest, urban governance, and environmental issues. For South Korea, on popular culture and social movements, as well as on South Korean foreign aid. For North Korea, on social and economic transformation. For Japan, on social movements and civic society.

The research by the academic staff is directly reflected in the Master’s programme: students get up-to-date teaching on topical issues and societal and political developments in East Asian societies. Students also receive individual thesis supervision firmly anchored in the East Asia expertise of the teaching staff.

Master's thesis and topics

Students conduct independent research on their chosen topic and write a Master’s Thesis (40 ECTS). This trains students to apply social science methods, carry out research, analyse research data, present their findings orally and in writing, be engaged in argumentation and debate, and communicate their research findings in accordance with scientific standards.

Examples of thesis topics:

  • Place and belonging – an ethnography of rural migrant children in Beijing
  • Cosmetic surgery and rites of passage in Korean society – a study on cosmetic surgeries after the university entrance exam
  • Remembering the war and aggression: a discourse analysis of Japan’s state apologies and commemoration speeches on August 15th 1995–2015
  • From the Great Famine (1958–1962) to the food waste problem: the role of memory to enhance the awareness in the city of Shanghai
  • Japan’s shining women: young women negotiating the transition to adulthood in Japan
  • South Korean presidents and the alliance with the United States 1998‒2012: a case study of the Free Trade Agreement

Check out the complete list of Master’s theses written by our graduates from the programme’s webpages

An international programme

Students in the Master’s Degree Programme in East Asian Studies have very good study exchange opportunities in the People’s Republic of China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, in the partner universities of the University of Turku.

It is common that students spend one or even two academic terms abroad during their second year in the Programme and also conduct field research for their Master’s thesis during that time.

Students of the Programme also have a chance to study for one year in the Master of China Studies programme at the Zhejiang University in China as part of their Master’s Programme in Turku.

Competence description

In this Master’s Degree Programme, you will gain in-depth knowledge on contemporary East Asian societies.

You will learn:

  • about present developments, debates, social phenomena and competing perspectives in East Asia, and you learn to put them in contemporary historical context
  • East Asian languages as part of your training and become familiar with intercultural communication
  • methods in social science as related to East Asian studies
  • how to carry out independent research through your Master’s thesis project
  • how to analyse research data and communicate your research findings by writing a Master’s thesis
  • communication, computer and organisational skills

Job options

Those graduating from the Master’s Degree Programme in East Asian Studies find employment in public, private and third sector jobs, such as in diplomatic service, international organisations, and companies where knowledge on East Asia and dynamic regions is in demand.

Career in research

Graduates of the Programme are eligible to apply to the doctoral programmes at the University of Turku and other universities in the fields of social sciences and East Asian studies.



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1st in Scotland for social work in The Complete University Guide 2015. Do you want a career that is stimulating, rewarding and makes a positive contribution to society? If so a postgraduate diploma/MSc in social work could be for you. Read more

Introduction

1st in Scotland for social work in The Complete University Guide 2015.
Do you want a career that is stimulating, rewarding and makes a positive contribution to society? If so a postgraduate diploma/MSc in social work could be for you.
At Stirling University social work education is committed to progressive social change through teaching, research and an active involvement with practice. We believe in a social work profession defined not only by its function but also by its values and integrity.
We promote an understanding of social work which is informed by social justice and human rights, a profession that acknowledges the links between 'public issues' and 'private troubles' and seeks to address both. We value social work practice that has prevention at its heart and recognises the importance of collective approaches, actively engaging with and learning from user movements.
On the Postgraduate Diploma/MSc Social Work course at the University of Stirling you will be taught by a team of qualified social workers including world leaders in their research field and academics who continue to work in practice alongside their University role. You will enjoy the benefits of smaller class sizes (23-55) with creative approaches to teaching and assessment as well as detailed feedback on your progress. You will experience contributions to teaching by people who have used social work services and carers and on your practice placements, will be supported and assessed by accredited Practice Teachers and Educators. We will help you qualify as a social worker who is knowledgeable, skilled, analytical and ethical in your approach to working with individuals, families, groups and communities.

Accreditation

Successful completion of this course will mean students are then eligible to be registered, by the Scottish Social Services Council, as a qualified social worker.
The MSc is awarded on satisfactory completion of a dissertation undertaken at the end of the Diploma course. Both degrees are recognised throughout the UK.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Campus based
- Duration: 22 months
- Start date: JanuarySee
- Course Director: Joanne Westwood

Course objectives

This course provides you with an integrated academic and professional course which develops the intellectual and practice skills necessary for professional practice as a social worker.
Recent dissertation titles are: End of life assistance from a social work perspective; The use of communication tools when working with people with dementia: a practitioner perspective; Foster carers' experiences of support; Does employment have an impact upon the social inclusion of people with learning disabilities?

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
Successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc provides the ‘licence to practise’ as a qualified social worker registered with the regulatory council of the country in which they work. The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and for work in community-based teams, hospitals, day and residential centres and voluntary agency projects. In Scotland and Northern Ireland it is also the qualification for social work in prisons and criminal justice teams.
The nature of the work is extremely varied and there is the capacity to move between different work settings throughout your career. Currently, over 80 percent of students find social work jobs within six months of graduating.
The nature of the work is extremely varied and there is the capacity to move between different work settings throughout your career. Currently, over 80 percent of students find social work jobs within six months of graduating.

- Employability
The MSc/PG Dip in Social Work Studies is a professional course which requires students to undertake along with their academic modules, two practice placements. It is in these placements that our students gain experience in direct work with service users and learn essential transferrable skills for their future employment within the social work profession. During the course they also gain experience of presentation skills, research methodology, as well as being taught specific and relevant skills to prepare them for employment in a variety of social work settings.

- Industry connections
We are fortunate to have strong connections with our partner agencies within a 60-mile radius of the University, who contribute to the teaching on the course and who also provide a range of placements across both statutory and voluntary social work services. Examples of these are: the local authorities in Forth Valley, Fife, and Perth & Kinross, and voluntary agencies such as Barnardos and Multi-Cultural Family Base.

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Who We Are. Life is conflict. Life is cooperation. Both define the human condition. Conflict will never be eliminated, nor should it be, because conflict can foster change. Read more

Who We Are

Life is conflict. Life is cooperation. Both define the human condition. Conflict will never be eliminated, nor should it be, because conflict can foster change. But conflict can be approached in ways that do not involve mass killings, assaults on human rights, and oppressive structural violence that creates the appearance of order while people suffer. The newly created Master’s Program (and Bachelor’s/Master’s Program) in Peace and Conflict Studies within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University-Newark offers a unique approach to the issues which will shape our future. Based in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, this program prepares students for further scholarship or employment in three areas: the social bases of peace and conflict, the causes of large-scale violence, and nonviolent social conflict and recovery from violence. Students will also have opportunities for research and practical internships associated with the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, and the International Institute for Peace, whose Directors are faculty members of the Master’s Program. The Center and Institute bring scholars, policy makers, peacemakers, projects, and events to our campus, and connect us to researchers, practitioners, and peacebuilding communities around the world.

What Makes Us Unique

There are many good programs covering peace and conflict issues, but ours is different in two ways. First, the Master’s is based in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and is oriented to the social bases of conflict and cooperation, of war and peace. Social dimensions include topics of migration, economic development, environmental degradation, inequality, education, race, ethnicity, religion, and gender. Beyond the Sociology/Anthropology Core Faculty and courses, the program is very interdisciplinary. Associate faculty, including both Newark and New Brunswick campuses, come from programs and departments of Political Science, Global Affairs, History, English, Criminal Justice, Psychology, Economics, and Religion.

Second, we expect graduates to have dual competence in understanding violent conflict, such as war, genocide, ethnic violence, and terrorism; and in nonviolence, including both nonviolent prosecution of conflict as through social movements and civil resistance, and in moving away from violent struggle toward reconciliation, justice, and sustainable peace.

Our students will be prepared to continue toward a higher degree in the most demanding PhD programs. They also will attain a most valuable competence for employment by any governmental agency, NGO, or business working in areas of high social conflict—the ability to analyze and communicate about complex situations, understanding the interacting factors that lead to nonviolent social movements or to large scale violence, ways to mitigate destructive conflict, and move forward toward sustainable peace.

MA Program Description

Students may be full or part-time. Master’s students will complete 36 credits, and pass a final examination. A full-time student may complete the program in three semesters. Part-time students should complete it within three years, with extension beyond that requiring program approval.

Nine credits of foundations include

  • An introductory seminar from the program’s Core Faculty.
  • Qualitative or quantitative methods.
  • A course in classical or contemporary social theory.

Distribution requirements include

  • One course each from Core Courses (below) in Social Bases of Conflict and Cooperation, Violent Conflict, and Nonviolent Movements and Recovery from Violence.
  • Electives comprise six to fifteen credits, depending on whether the student accrues credit from experiential education in applied contexts, internships, or faculty-supervised independent study. Electives may be filled by approved courses throughout Rutgers University.

Final Graduation Requirements

For graduation, students are required to fulfill one of three final requirements. 1) Three written examinations, one for each of our distribution areas. 2) A final thesis, according to University regulations. 3) Or, an extended research paper. (See Graduation Requirements.)



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USF's M.A. degree in International & Multicultural Education (IME) Program is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within its sociocultural, linguistic, and political contexts around the world. Read more

USF's M.A. degree in International & Multicultural Education (IME) Program is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within its sociocultural, linguistic, and political contexts around the world.

Based on principles of equity, social justice, and human rights, the program critically addresses the realities of education within and beyond the borders of public schooling in the United States and around the world.

Distinctive Features

  • Rich in-class learning experiences with expert faculty blended with opportunities for practical work in schools and community organizations in the Bay Area.
  • Curriculum and pedagogy aimed at addressing inequities based on race, class, gender, sexual identity, religion, and nation.
  • A strong sense of community composed of highly diverse faculty and students who offer personal and scholarly support

Program Details

The MA in International and Multicultural Education is rooted in critical social theory and the practice of critical pedagogy. This program provides a dynamic learning community where students benefit from rigorous scholarship and experience both in the classroom and in the community. We believe that our program equips students with the knowledge and strategies they need to be highly effective social justice teachers, leaders, and practitioners across various learning contexts in the U.S. and abroad.

We interweave theory and practice while utilizing the following lenses to inform our curriculum

  • equity and social justice education
  • intersectionality of race, class, nation, language, gender and sexuality
  • youth culture and resistance
  • human rights and social movements
  • globalization and migration studies
  • community cultural wealth

PROGRAM DELIVERY

The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). See Teaching Weekend dates.

COURSE DETAILS

THE MASTER OF ARTS IN INTERNATIONAL AND MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (IME) CONSISTS OF 30 CREDITS FROM THE FOLLOWING COURSES.

Course descriptions are available in the catalog.

THEORETICAL FOUNDATION COURSES | 9 CREDITS

  • Students select three of the following courses:
  • IME 605 - Re-conceptualizing Multicultural Education (3)
  • IME 612 - Critical Race Theory and Praxis (3)
  • IME 169 - Gender and Globalization (3)
  • IME 621 - Human Rights Education: History, Philosophy and Current Debates
  • IME 639 - Cross-Cultural Literacy

IME CORE COURSES | 15 CREDITS

  • Students select five of the following courses:
  • IME 602 - Linguistic Rights and Bilingual Education (3)
  • IME 603 - Applied Linguistics (3)
  • IME 604 - Global Perspectives on Education and Decolonization (3)
  • IIME 606 - Critical Analysis of Urban Schooling (3)
  • IME 610 - Sociology of Language (3)
  • IME 611 - Language and Culture (3)
  • IME 613 - Emotional Intelligence and Cultural Competency (3)
  • IME 615 - Education for Inclusion (3)
  • IME 616 - Social Movements and Human Rights (3)
  • IME 617 - Tools for Human Rights Practice (3)
  • IME 618 - International Human Rights Law for Educators (3)
  • IME 620 - Human Rights Education: Pedagogy and Praxis (3)
  • IME 624 - African-American Education History in the US (3)
  • IME 625 - Contemporary International Issues (3)
  • IME 628 - Women of Color in Higher Education (3)
  • IME 631 - Research in 1st and 2nd Language Acquisition (3)
  • IME 634 - Assessment/Testing of Second Language Proficiency (3)
  • IME 635 - Latinos and Education (3)
  • IME 636 - Human Rights and Media (3)
  • IME 637 - Critical Pedagogy (3)
  • IME 640 - Immigration and Forced Displacement (3)
  • IME 647 - Technology and Diverse Learners (3)
  • IME 650 - Asian American History and Education (3)
  • IME 668 - Discourse, Pragmatics and Language Teaching (3)
  • IME 676 - Teaching and Learning Through the Arts (3)
  • IME 697 - IME Directed Study (1-3)
  • IME 698 - IME Special Topics (1-3)

MASTER'S THESIS/RESEARCH PROJECT | 3 CREDITS

  • GEDU 603 - Methodology of Educational Research (3)
  • IME 649 - IME MA Thesis/Research Project (3)

Program Learning Outcomes

The International and Multicultural Education Program Learning Outcomes

The goal of each IME program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in three key areas:

  • Conceptual knowledge: including human rights education, urban education, language and literacy education, emotional intelligence and cultural competency.
  • Theoretical knowledge: including critical social theory, critical pedagogy, multicultural theory, critical race theory, feminist critical theory.
  • Application skills: analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills for teaching and research, program/policy development and administration, and local/global social justice/human rights activism.

The International and Multicultural Education Program Student Learning Outcomes

The IME programs are designed to enable students, upon graduation, to:

  • Use theory as a lens for thinking critically about social inequities in local/global contexts.
  • Critically engage with scholarship.
  • Be skillful in applying research-based teaching practices.
  • Work as a transformative professional in schools, universities and communities to bring about social change.
  • Use a wide range of assessment tools for including informal/formal, individual/group, formative/summative instruments.
  • Design, implement, and assess K-12 and post-secondary classroom/community programs focused on human rights, multicultural, and/or language/literacy education


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Course content. Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of development, social justice and sustainability. Read more

Course content

Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of development, social justice and sustainability.

Whether you are a graduate aiming to make a difference in the world, or a professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical thinking, this course is for you.

You will explore the political, economic and social forces that promote and prevent social and environmental justice around the world. These include people’s struggles for wellbeing and sustainability and the visions that inspire them; and the roles of state, society and market actors. Transcending geographical binaries of Global North and South, you will consider areas of complementarity and trade-off between economic development, human wellbeing and environmental sustainability.

This specialist master’s combines skills and knowledge of international development with an in-depth focus on social justice, wellbeing and sustainability. Innovative learning approaches promote investigation of particular cases and issues drawing out connections and contradictions between different actors, analytical perspectives and across global, regional, national, and local scales. The course provides you with the opportunity to apply what you have learned in a placement leading to a work-based project.

You will leave the course with:

  • a critical understanding of concepts and approaches to social and environmental justice, wellbeing and sustainability, and their strengths and limitations
  • practical skills in research, analysis and communication, and an understanding of how these can be applied in working for social justice, wellbeing and sustainability at global and local levels
  • an appreciation of how integrated perspectives can capture the complex interactions between social and ecological systems
  • the ability to explore areas of complementarity and trade-off between economic development, human wellbeing and environmental sustainability
  • rich experience gained from working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

We encourage diversity of intake, in experience, qualifications and interests, to stimulate the richness of experience and learning.

Graduate prospects

This course provides an excellent grounding for careers in social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South. It provides the core skills required in a range of policy, communication, advocacy, research and programmatic roles. These may also be used to support social movements, foster corporate social responsibility, promote social enterprise or advance regulatory activities by government or the third sector.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. It starts in September 2018 and ends in 2019. Induction week starts on 24 September 2018.

Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Social and environmental justice

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Sustainability and wellbeing
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

  • Management of international development
  • Global political economy
  • Humanitarianism
  • International development policy analysis and evaluation
  • Education and international development

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Attendance
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Online assessment
  • Oral assessment
  • Portfolio
  • Practical work
  • Residential
  • Seminar
  • Thesis
  • Work-based placement
  • Written examination
  • Other


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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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Who is it for?. This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. Read more

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:

  • Cognitive Neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language)
  • Clinical Neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents)
  • and Social Neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in Clinical, Social or Cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Check our labs facilities in the Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit (CRNU)the Baby lab, the Autism Research Group (ARG), the Human Memory Research Group, etc. For a full list of facilities visit the Psychology Department.

Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging methods.  We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG)Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We facilitate clinical internships through our specialist research Centre for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) and with the local Mind centre.

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Check out what is going on in our laboratories and at the Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN).

Find our more about our work on our Facebook group.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.



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Understanding journalism is crucial in today’s mediated world. The spread of the Internet, social media and the advent of comparatively cheap communications technology holds out the promise of enabling a more diverse range of actors to shape journalism. Read more
Understanding journalism is crucial in today’s mediated world. The spread of the Internet, social media and the advent of comparatively cheap communications technology holds out the promise of enabling a more diverse range of actors to shape journalism. The forms and practices involved in such journalism could also enable greater inclusivity, supporting a range of progressive aims such as advocacy, peace, development and greater intercultural understanding. At the same time, widespread cost-cutting in mainstream journalism and the speeded-up journalistic practices used to service multiple delivery platforms threaten to further entrench the norms and definitional advantages of the wealthy and powerful because of their greater ability to subsidise journalism through public relations material.

Course detail

You will develop specialist subject knowledge of media industries, media consumption and production, globally. Additionally, you will develop a range of research and analytical tools that will prepare you for a career in media or for PhD level research.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying international journalisms at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective that examines contemporary journalistic representations of the Global South and how they relate to different cultural, political, technological and historical contexts. Therefore this programme springs from a pluralistic critical perspective: seeking to analyse how others represent Southern countries and events and how Southern actors seek to represent themselves. This contrasts strongly with other Journalism MAs taught in the UK, which are usually constrained by the norms and priorities of British professional accreditation bodies.

Our non-Eurocentric approach offers fresh directions to examining the contemporary world and our location in the heart of London with access to global media centres, contributes to a valuable student experience.

Expert at where the world is changing

Our award-winning research spans a wealth of geographical areas and topics, including international political communication; cultural studies, new media and democracy; memory studies and oral history; Islamist movements; social movements and media; transnational movements and communications; development discourses; and digital technologies and development.

Our academics regularly appear in the media of different countries as guests and commentators on various contemporary issues.

Centre for Media Studies

The Centre for Media Studies is unique in the world in its focus on the media and communication landscapes of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. We study the contemporary world and its historical roots, and are committed to upend, theoretically and empirically, the Western-centric orientation that still pervades media studies scholarship. The research of our award-winning faculty spans media in the Arab world, critical theory and cultural studies, transnational news and India and digital technologies in the Global South.

Research underpins our teaching: students receive a rigorous grounding in their chosen MA and are encouraged to take optional courses across the School of Art and the university to build a degree that truly reflects their interests and goals.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/media-studies/programmes/

Teaching

• Classes are taught by research active instructors who focus on different aspects of communication, culture, and society in the Middle East, Asia and Africa

• Excellent teacher:student ratio and personal contact, and excellent student satisfaction rates

• Students study core classes in their chosen MA, and are encouraged to take classes across SOAS to create a unique degree with a regional, topical, or language focus that fits their needs.

Research

Our research spans a wealth of geographical areas (Palestine and the Middle East, India, China, Myanmar, Korea) and topics (international political communication; cultural studies; new media and democracy; memory studies and oral history; Islamist movements; social movements and media; diasporas; ethnic minorities; transnational movements and communications; development discourses; digital technologies and development; digital cultures in the Global South)

Careers

Alumni go onto high profile careers in the media, in NGO and Think Tanks and academic research.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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This course is designed to provide you with the knowledge and expertise to practice Human Resource Management in a multi-national, globalised context. Read more

This course is designed to provide you with the knowledge and expertise to practice Human Resource Management in a multi-national, globalised context.

Overview

The MSc International Human Resource Management is both academically challenging, with input from world-leading academics, and practically focused, giving you the opportunity to develop the confidence, knowledge and skills needed for a successful career in International Human Resource Management.

Central to this is the idea of the international HR manager who combines specialist technical knowledge with a strong understanding of the social, political and ethical context of business in a globalised world.

In this world, in addition to technical expertise in particular HR functions, managers need to understand national differences and how to manage in cross-cultural environments. They need to be aware of how to organise processes and projects across national boundaries. They need to be able to analyse the impact of different national institutional contexts on firm structures, innovation processes and work organisation. They need to be aware of the broader social and environmental consequences of their actions and the way in which national and international structures of soft and hard law impact on their policies and procedures. They need to be sensitive to changing social expectations of the responsibilities of firms and the way in which new internet based technologies make companies more visible and accountable to global social movements as well as more locally based coalitions of citizens and consumers. They need to be able to reflect on how to be an HR manager in such complex contexts, and to adapt creatively and effectively to challenges in a fast-moving environment.

The course will look at the management of people including theories of management and organisation, motivation, groups and team working, internal structures and decision-making processes, and leadership.  The management of the various activities associated with the practice of HRM, namely recruitment and selection, training and development, reward management employment law, equality and diversity will also be examined.

The course will also explore the nature of the organisation, the strategy and structure of multinational firms in different sectors (such as manufacturing, transport and professional services) will be analysed in cross-national settings in order to understand national differences and how to manage in cross-cultural environments.

Distinctive features

  • This programme enables you to acquire specialist knowledge of international human resource management whilst placing that subject knowledge within a wider organisational and contextual framework.
  • You will have the chance to develop a range of specialist skills and knowledge applicable to the organisations (and their context) in which they, as specialists, may operate.
  • Our faculty will encourage you to think critically and be creative in the analysis of assumptions and evidence in the field of international human resource management.
  • You will be part of a community which is committed to delivering social improvement alongside economic development in the world’s first Public Value Business School.
  • You will study at a Business School ranked 1st in the UK for research environment and 6th for research excellence (REF 2014).
  • You will be a student of the only business school in Wales accredited by AACSB international (and one of only 5% worldwide).

Learning and assessment

Our teaching is heavily informed by research and combines academic rigour with practical relevance. Our internationally leading faculty consists of academics who are at the forefront of knowledge within their field. They bring the lessons learnt from their most recent research into the classroom, giving you access to up to date real life examples and scenarios and critical business thinking.

Your teaching and learning resources will be provided and we will be responsive to your needs and views. For your part, you will need to put in the necessary amount of work both during and outside formal teaching sessions, and to make good use of the facilities provided.

Methods of teaching

Most modules involve a mixture of lectures and small group teaching (called classes, seminars, workshops or tutorials). 

In a lecture, the lecturer will mainly be giving an overview of a particular aspect of the module content (as well as opportunities for you to ask questions and be reflective), while in classes and workshops you will have an opportunity to practice techniques, discuss ideas, apply concepts and consolidate your understanding in the topic.

Career prospects

International Human Resource professionals need to have the skills to evaluate new ideas, identify which new practices will have the greatest impact on their organisations and have the confidence to disregard others in an international context. It is a field of management that offers promising careers.

This MSc programme is primarily designed for those interested in the changing nature of human resource management in a globalised world. It will provide a strong basis for a variety of careers and support:

  • Those wishing to enter into international human resource management positions in multinational firms.
  • Those wishing to join small and medium sized enterprises that are linked to global production networks and/or trading in overseas markets.
  • Those interested in working in policy making institutions or in social movements concerned with business and society.

Those wishing to pursue an academic career will also benefit from the programme as the basis to further PhD studies in international human resource management.



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The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you’ll explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies. Read more

The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you’ll explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies.

Core modules will improve your research skills and introduce you to key concepts and issues in social and cultural history. You’ll also choose from a wide range of optional modules, allowing you to focus on societies and periods that interest you.

You could study apartheid in South Africa, communities and castes in India, birth and death in medieval Europe or social movements in the USA. You’ll be able to focus on gender, race and religion as well as other issues that have shaped the lives of individuals and communities.

Taught by expert researchers within the School of History and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute, this programme uses the latest approaches and thinking in social and cultural history to give you an insight into the lives of others.

We have a wealth of resources allowing you to explore topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library and its Special Collections contain a huge number of early printed, archive and manuscript materials including the Liddle Collection on the First and Second World Wars, Leeds Library of Vernacular Culture, manuscript and commonplace books, travel journals and one of the best collections of cookery books and household manuals in the country.

Extensive collections of national, regional and local newspapers from over the years are available on microfilm, as well as cartoons and satirical prints from the British Museum and extensive collections of letters and correspondence. There’s even the Yorkshire Fashion Archive and M&S Archive on campus, allowing you to gain a real insight into popular culture over time.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

From the beginning of the programme you’ll study core modules developing your knowledge and skills in social and cultural history, building your understanding of research methods and exploring central concepts and debates in the subject.

In both semesters, you’ll also have the chance to choose optional modules from a wide range on offer, allowing you to focus on issues, themes and societies that interest you. You could draw on the diverse expertise of our tutors to select modules across Indian, African, American, British and Latin American history.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module.

This programme will equip you with a broad skill set for historical research as well as a good base of subject knowledge. You’ll be able to demonstrate these with your dissertation, which allows you to conduct independent research on a topic of your choice. You’ll submit this by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Social and Cultural) 60 credits
  • Concepts and Debates in Social and Cultural History 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 30 credits
  • Reformation(s): Belief and Culture in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-1845 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Cultural History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Cultural History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.



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SOCIAL PROBLEMS. HOW DO THEY ARISE? AND HOW DO YOU SOLVE THEM?. The radicalisation of Muslim youth is continually in the news and high on the political agenda. Read more

SOCIAL PROBLEMS: HOW DO THEY ARISE? AND HOW DO YOU SOLVE THEM?

The radicalisation of Muslim youth is continually in the news and high on the political agenda. What has scientific research revealed about the causes and background of this issue? How should the government and societal actors handle this trend and which policy is effective? An ageing population leads to increasing healthcare costs. How should care for the elderly be structured in order to make it personal and affordable again? The virtual and physical world are increasingly merging. What role does the internet play in shaping political and social movements' ability to self-organise?

The experts of tomorrow

As society becomes more complex, the demand for experts continues to expand. In the one-year Master’s programme Contemporary Social Problems, you will be trained to become an expert on one important social theme. You choose one contemporary issue in which you will specialise:

  • Crime and Safety
  • Internet, Social Media and Networks
  • Care, Policy and Organisations

You design your own track in this Master’s programme, in which you quickly and rigorously immerse yourself in your specialisation. You will learn about the state-of-the-art in current scholarship. You will become an expert, trained in multidisciplinary thinking. In addition to sociology as your core subject, you will also take courses in the social psychology and social geography of your chosen theme, allowing you to tailor your education to your personal and professional interests.

Theory and practice

In this programme, you will learn to translate theory into practice, by using scientific knowledge to design effective concrete (policy) advice for companies or governmental organisations. You will also learn to present research results to a wider audience.

Labour market

There is a significant focus on your transition to the labour market. You will meet experts working for relevant organisations in the professional field. We will help you find an internship, so that you can gain practical work experience. The practical skills you acquire will be very useful during your internship and in your future career: you will learn more about conducting interviews, communications, time management and designing policy advice. 

Objective of the programme

During this Master’s programme, you will be thoroughly trained to analyse and advise on contemporary social issues. You will develop yourself into an academic professional and an expert on your chosen theme. The boundary between public and private is often transcended, which means that once you complete the Master’s, you can work in both the private and (semi) public sectors. Potential careers include applied researcher in the corporate world, policy advisor at a ministry or municipality, advisor, project coordinator or consultant.



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The Environmental Social Science programme is interdepartmental and benefits from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences. Read more

The Environmental Social Science programme is interdepartmental and benefits from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Social science perspectives are crucial to understanding and solving environmental problems. Human behaviour produces many elements of the ‘natural’ environment, from landscapes to floods and famines. Local and national policies and international agreements regulate the environmental practices of corporations, governments and households. The social sciences have a great deal to contribute to understanding what have become defined as environmental issues, and what measures can most effectively tackle them.

Environmental Social Science draws on contributions from the study of Anthropology, Conservation and Ecology, Law, Social Policy and Sociology.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/13/environmental-social-science

Course structure

This interdisciplinary programme introduces you to social science perspectives on environmental issues. It draws on sociology, politics, social policy, anthropology and law. The dissertation is a chance for you to make a specialised study of a topic that interests you, and we encourage first-hand research. The programme is suitable for graduates with a wide range of first degrees.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Social Science perspectives on environmental issues
  • Ethnobiological knowledge systems 
  • Social and political movements
  • Politics and sociology of the environment

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • Introduce you to the differing perspectives on environmental issues of the various social science disciplines
  • Develop your knowledge and understanding of environmental issues from a social science perspective
  • Acquaint you with the methods and procedures of social scientific investigation
  • Give you a practical introduction to research design so as to enable you to conceive and execute a social scientific research project on an environmental topic, whether as part of further academic work or in the course of non-academic employment with any of a variety of public agencies and private corporations.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of environmental social science is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professional advancement.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers in environmental law, community projects, research, education, advocacy and social policy at both local and central government levels.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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