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Masters Degrees (Social Movement)

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This programme provides you with a broad understanding of the theories and practices of dance movement therapy necessary for safe and effective clinical work, and enables you to practise as a dance movement therapist. Read more

This programme provides you with a broad understanding of the theories and practices of dance movement therapy necessary for safe and effective clinical work, and enables you to practise as a dance movement therapist.

This programme is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy.

Your learning will be underpinned by the principles and practices of psychodynamic psychotherapy within the social, political and multicultural context of mental health care and educational settings. Study is informed by contemporary dance practice, Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and somatic bodywork.

Through theoretical studies, movement observation studies, dance practice workshops, clinical work and experiential learning, you integrate cognitive understanding and practical experience with a developing awareness of self and other.

The nature of the therapeutic relationship is explored in depth through movement and dance and you have the opportunity to put your learning into practice through at least 90 days of supervised placements. This gives you the opportunity to relate your practical experience to your theoretical studies.

You'll be encouraged to develop your own dance/movement practice and to situate your work in relation to your development as a therapist, to contemporary dance and movement practice. You're required to be in personal therapy throughout the programme.

On graduation you are eligible to become a registered professional member of the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK).

Modules & structure

The MA in Dance Movement Psychotherapy programme is made up of 240 credits and provides you with a broad understanding of the theories and practices of Dance Movement Psychotherapy necessary for safe and effective clinical work as a Dance Movement Psychotherapist.

It aims to enhance your self-knowledge and interpersonal relationships and to promote your psychodynamic understanding of individuals, groups and society; working with questions of difference, equality and diversity.

Your learning is underpinned by the principles and practices of psychodynamic psychotherapy within the social, political and multicultural context of mental health care and educational settings, and informed by contemporary dance practice and Laban Movement Analysis (LMA). On successful completion of the MA you will be able to apply to the Association of Dance Movement Psychotherapists UK for registration.

Modules

Assessment 

Assessed by coursework, film, portfolio, case study, dissertation, log and reports

Placements

During their training students will gain clinical experience in both child and adult placement settings. Please visit the website for more information.

Skills

Key employability skills developed on the course include: 

  • Personal development planning
  • Creativity
  • Initiative
  • Adaptability
  • Reflective processes
  • Tolerance for stress
  • Practical and Professional elements
  • Listening
  • Interpersonal sensitivity
  • Organisational sensitivity
  • Questioning
  • Teamwork
  • Written communication 

Careers 

Examples of places that DMP MA graduates are currently working:

  • Mainstream, special and therapeutic schools.
  • Pupil referral units
  • Organisations for adoption and fostering
  • Children and adults in not-for-profit organisations
  • Drugs intervention team
  • Addictions service
  • Dance for Parkinsons
  • Prisons
  • Community, creative and therapeutic dance for children and adults
  • Dance therapy and mindfulness based approaches
  • Honorary DMP contract – NHS Trust
  • Sessional DMP work for C.I.C ‘Dance and Dementia’.
  • Creative Therapist, NHS Foundation Trust, CAMHS Specialist Intervention Team
  • Lecturing (e.g. UEL on use of the body in the counselling/therapy relationship
  • PhD study

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Why study at Roehampton. Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK).
  • Benefit from our established network of psychotherapists and gain work experience within a supervised clinical placement in a range of settings. 
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.
  • The only institution in Europe to offer training in all of the arts and play therapies, including dramatherapy, art and dance movement psychotherapy, music and play therapy.

Course summary

This course is designed for people who have prior dance experience and professional or volunteering experience with people in need, and would like to practise as a dance movement psychotherapist.

Dance movement psychotherapy is a relational process in which a client and therapist engage in an empathetic creative process using body movement and dance to assist the integration of emotional, cognitive, physical, social and spiritual aspects of self. We believe that focusing on the creative potential of individuals in a relationship creates a sound ethical basis for psychotherapeutic work.

You will be taught by leading experts who will equip you with the skills, experience, and confidence to work as a dance movement psychotherapist. All graduating students are eligible to apply for registration with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK). Graduates often create their own positions; facilitating dance movement psychotherapy sessions within settings including: social services; special needs; schools; psychiatry; probationary and rehabilitation units; forensic psychiatry.

The course offers opportunities for you to explore and expand movement preferences, ways of interacting with others, belief systems, prejudices and values. Emphasis is placed on development of your own style as a dance movement psychotherapist. You also have the opportunity to perform and exhibit your ongoing work in a yearly Arts Therapies exhibition.

The MA in DMP benefits from cutting edge research conducted through the Centre for Arts Therapies Research (CATR) and this feeds directly into teaching. The programme ethos emphasises a critical consideration of different descriptions and explanations of bodies, human systems and therapeutic practices in different places and times. In the context of an individual student's experiences, beliefs, values and different 'cultures', our teaching actively promotes a participatory ethic, self-reflexive practices and the ability for critical reflection on: creative processes, intersubjectivity and the construction of social and power differentials, in learning and in psychotherapy.

Content

The uniquely interdisciplinary MA course in Dance Movement Psychotherapy integrates theoretical, experiential and clinical learning, preparing students to practice as dance movement psychotherapists. Cutting edge research cascades into teaching emphasising the social, biological and psychological construction of the moving body and meaning-making. Students are encouraged to develop a self-reflexive practice and the ability for critical reflection on creative processes.

Key areas of study include Contemporary DMP and psychotherapeutic theories, Feminist embodied reflexivity, clinical placement and supervision (for one-two days a week), dance movement improvisation skills and interventions, embodied performance practice, experiential anatomy for clinical practice, human development, movement and growth, Laban Movement Analysis and video observation.

Embodied practice and working with attention to the art of dance is placed at the centre of the programme. Drawing from Feminist, Psychoanalytical, Phenomenological and Systemic frameworks, the training emphasises the creative role of curiosity and a 'not knowing' position, a respect for difference, and appreciation of the effects that mutual influences have in all relationships.

Modules

Here are examples of modules:

  • Creative Processes: Reflexive Movement Improvisation
  • Theoretical Approaches in Dance Movement Psychotherapy
  • Psychopathology: Alternative World Views

Career options

Graduates can enter a variety of roles including: NHS clinical practice within in and out patient services, community services, prison services, special needs schools, performing arts contexts, drug rehabilitation, in social services with immigrants and asylum seekers, in shelters with women who have suffered domestic abuse, dementia services, learning disabilities services, child and adolescent mental health services.

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There is rapidly increasing recognition of the positive impact that art therapies have on people’s health especially within the areas of mental health and dementia. Read more
There is rapidly increasing recognition of the positive impact that art therapies have on people’s health especially within the areas of mental health and dementia. Dance Movement Psychotherapy (DMP) is effective across a very wide range of populations of every age, ability, ethnicity and culture. Requests for trained and experienced professionals in Dance Movement Psychotherapy (DMP) are increasing.

This MA in Dance Movement Psychotherapy provides graduates with a route to a qualification, licence to practice and registration as a Dance Movement Psychotherapist with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK).

Visit the website:

Course detail

The award of an MA in Dance Movement Psychotherapy is consistent in its structure and content with the requirements of the Masters Framework for qualification in Health and Social Care, and is a Dance Movement Psychotherapy specific programme.

This MA gives you the opportunity to build on your previous educational studies through a challenging educational and practice experience. It combines applied theoretical concepts with practice placements, during which you'll gain knowledge and skills for practice. You'll progress through the Masters towards an award in stages.

If you exit at Year 1 or 2 you will not be eligible for registration with the ADMP UK as a Dance Movement Therapist; however you may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma in Dance Movement: The Therapeutic Process.

Suitability

This MA programme is aimed at graduates from dance and other related creative arts or from education, counselling, social and health based trainings and/or practice.

It is for anyone who is already working in a related field and recognises that dance movement psychotherapy can make a significant contribution to enhancing lives. It is also for experienced practitioners who may not have trained at first degree level but who have a sound working knowledge in therapeutic creative arts.

Stage 1: Postgraduate Certificate in Dance Movement

Three Modules (60 credits):
• Orientation to Dance Movement Psychotherapy (20 credits)
• The Moving Body in Dance Movement Psychotherapy (20 credits)
• The Moving Body: Observations and Interventions (20 credits)
• Practice Portfolio

Stage 2: Postgraduate Diploma in Dance Movement Psychotherapy

Three Modules (60 credits):
• Developing Professional Practice as a Dance Movement Therapist (20 credits)
• Developmental Psychology: Internal and External Influences on Health and Wellbeing (20 credits)
• Research Approaches and Methods (20 credits)

Stage 3: MA Dance Movement Psychotherapy

Two modules (60 credits):
• Demonstrating Professional Practice as a Dance Movement Psychotherapist (Practice Portfolio) (20 credits)
• Research Dissertation (40 credits).

Format

The course is taught with a mixture of experientially based learning, seminars and lectures.

Theoretical content is delivered on Mondays from 9am – 6pm, with students attending a second day per week for their clinical placement at Dance Voice in the first year.

In the second year students continue to attend one day per week at Dance Voice and will research and set up their own off-site placements, which typically are two per week.

The third year has a ten week taught component, and then focuses on independent research and study towards completion of the MA in Dance Movement Psychotherapy.

The course is underpinned by tutor contact throughout and has a supportive approach. Independent study is typically ten hours per week in year 1 and 3, increasing in year 3 for the research dissertation.

Assessment

The course is assessed with a mix of practical and written assignments for theory, and placement reports from internal and external supervisors for practice. There are no formal written exams, but there are a number of assessed practical presentations in Years 1 and 2. Each module carries 20 credits, except the dissertation, which carries 40 credits.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The MSc in Management in Health and Social Care welcomes UK, EU and international applicants who want to study health and social care management and leadership at an advanced level. Read more
The MSc in Management in Health and Social Care welcomes UK, EU and international applicants who want to study health and social care management and leadership at an advanced level.

This programme is exclusively focused on developing your insight, understanding and leadership of the complex and changing health and social care environment. It gives you knowledge and perspective of the wider care system that can help you further your managerial career.

This course will help you to manage effectively and lead with confidence. It provides you with strategic insight, business acumen and a sound understanding of operational delivery and leading systems change. You will gain the skills needed for leading innovation, collaboration and partnership that bring about tangible results to the delivery of care.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/management-in-health-and-social-care/

Course length

Full-time: MSc: 12 months, PGDip: 12 months
Part-time: MSc: up to 3 years, PGDip: 12-18 months, PGCert: 12 months

Why choose this course?

- You will gain a whole system perspective on health and social care management, with teaching that combines rigorous academic theory and practical application.

- You will strengthen your career options through the programme's focus on professional development and practical application.

- You will develop strategic insight, knowledge and understanding of health and social care organisations and economies that will equip you to lead these organisations in the 21st century.

- Through the extensive and close links with practice areas across a diverse range of health and social care settings, both within the UK and through our Erasmus programme, you will be able to explore different approaches to care and gain new insight into the global issues, challenges and opportunities within the sector.

- You will learn within a multi- and inter-professional environment that offers excellent opportunities for shared learning.

- We are committed to supporting your learning needs by providing flexible and accessible approaches to our teaching by providing highly flexible continuing professional development (CPD) study opportunities with part-time, full-time and mixed modality options (including opportunities for blended and distance learning).

- In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, our postgraduate students have access to the world-renowned Bodleian Library, the Bodleian Law Library and the Radcliffe Science Library.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of innovative learning and teaching methods - for example seminars, learning sets as well as blended and online learning. Study for each single module taken will amount to 200 hours over the semester, delivered in morning and afternoon face-to-face sessions and in online learning activities which students access offsite at convenient times. Our philosophy is to promote management and leadership competency through better understanding of the self, the organisation and the working environment.

We also aim to help make a difference to your organisation through the application of learning and evidence-based management to your work. Therefore assignments use real workplace issues to add value and maximise benefits to your professional role.

The course is designed to be flexible, enabling you to tailor your learning so that you can cover topics suited to your own professional development needs:

Accredited courses
- Traditional Study
- Intensive Study

Non-accredited CPD courses
- Managing Health and Social Care data
- Optimising Systems for Better Outcomes in Health and Social Care
- Practical Approaches to Service Innovation and Improvement
- Project Management in Health and Social Care
- Quality Improvement in Health and Social Care
- Supervision in Health and Social Care

Specialist facilities

We put the student at the heart of everything we do and are fully committed to each individual achieving their potential. We offer a broad range of student support schemes to facilitate learning and development. Academic Advisers give you both academic and personal support.

How this course helps you develop

Successful completion of the course will equip you to deal with the challenges of an ever changing and complex health and social care environment; you will learn theory to give you the big picture and critical thinking to apply it in practice.

Our philosophy is to promote management and leadership competency through better understanding of the self, the organisation and the working environment. The whole systems approach, the emphasis on applying theory to practice combined with personal development focus should enable you to become competent and confident managers and leaders locally, nationally or internationally.

We also aim to help make a difference to your organisation through the application of learning and evidence-based management to your work. Therefore assignments use real workplace issues to add value and maximise benefits to your professional role.

Careers

The qualifications associated with the course will be of value in consolidating your existing leadership role and/or contributing to your career development.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our academic staff have a significant record of research and publications on the topics of management and leadership. Furthermore the Professional Education and Leadership course team have research and publication interests in the fields of coaching and mentoring, and inter-professional and work-based learning. The currency of the course is also assured by the lecturers' close involvement in the health and social care sector and their movement between that sector and education.

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Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years. Read more
Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years.

You will have the opportunity to explore a range of social and cultural developments in the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world. Throughout your study, you will work in small groups or individually, guided by your expert teaching team. Their historical research in areas such as urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement, is of an international standing and will feed into your learning.

Our teaching will give you the platform to reflect on historical interpretations of the past and conduct your own independent historical research.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/socialhistory_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will develop a range of transferable skills valued by employers in areas such as teaching, local government, administration, management, the civil service, marketing, public relations and the non-profit sector. Your course will also provide you with an excellent grounding should you want to pursue further postgraduate study.

- Teacher
- Historical Researcher
- Lecturer
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will work in small groups or individually with research-active historians throughout your period of study. Our history team has strengths in many areas and you will benefit from their expertise in urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement history.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
This is an introduction to research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history through the theme of war. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how World War Two has been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

Underworlds: Representations of Crime, Police & the Criminal c.1700 to c.1945
You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Sexuality, Gender & Popular Culture in Britain 1918-1970
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

Organised Crime in the Modern World: Global Criminal Cultures
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

European Cities: Making Urban Landscapes & Cultures since c.1945
You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration, 1768-1996
This is an opportunity to consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs and ethnographic studies. You will learn how travel, tourism and exploration has evolved - influenced by innovations in transport, health and media, public tastes, colonial policies and racial attitudes.

A Cultural Revolution? The Sixties in Comparative Perspective
Focusing on cultural, social and political elements of the 'long 1960s' (1958-1975), you will study a wide variety of political movements, social changes and cultural forms - such as music, film, TV, theatre and literature - looking at the United States, Britain and Western Europe, and the wider world.

Dissertation
You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources.You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMPUK), so you'll become a fully registered dance movement therapist with the ADMPUK. Read more

Why choose this course:

• This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMPUK), so you'll become a fully registered dance movement therapist with the ADMPUK

• You'll develop the skills you need to support the health and well-being of vulnerable people, so it's a really rewarding course to choose

• This course will give you dance movement psychotherapy training and a licence to practice, as well as giving you an academic qualification at masters level

• We will support you during your placement to make sure that you're ready for your career in dance movement psychotherapy when you graduate

• You will be given the opportunity to undertake CPD training in Zero Balancing body work. This concerns the cultivation of sensitivity to the structure and energy of the body.

About the course:

The programme gives you solid experience of clinical dance movement therapy practice, supervision and work in education, as well as further closed group work. The main emphasis is on your work in a clinical environment and using creative skills to explore self-expression. You will be allocated a personal tutor who'll be responsible for monitoring your overall progress. As well as taught components, you'll be required to engage in personal therapy as this is a requirement for professional registration. This is a private arrangement and the cost is not included in the fees. Individual or group therapy is acceptable.

This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK, so you can be confident that you'll be learning the most up to date thinking on dance movement psychotherapy.

During the course you'll build up your experience of clinical dance movement therapy, and use your creative skills to explore self-expression.

It's important to understand the history of dance movement psychotherapy from the early pioneers through to the current thinking. You'll cover concepts such as the theory and practice of the art form and the importance of improvisation, creativity and play. You'll also use and reflect on psychotherapeutic theory, while considering the implications for placement and practice. Because anatomy and physiology are essential to your understanding of movement and its relevance for psychotherapy, you'll also explore this during the course.

We've excellent facilities including our new dance studio, and have close links with Déda, the Derby dance centre.

You'll be allocated a personal tutor who will be responsible for monitoring your overall progress. As well as the taught components, you'll need to take part in personal therapy throughout the course, which can be individual or group therapy, because this is a requirement for professional registration as a dance movement psychotherapist.

You'll need to undertake health screening at the start of the course to monitor your fitness to practice.

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Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. Read more
Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. We provide high quality supervision and teaching, and you will benefit from the friendly and supportive atmosphere in the Department, as evidenced by student feedback available on our website.

This MSc course will equip you with knowledge of cutting-edge developments and issues in applied social psychology, as well as an array of analytical, methodological and communication skills, important for those progressing to a PhD as well as for those looking for jobs in applied settings in commercial and governmental organizations.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/psychology/coursefinder/mscappliedsocialpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- Our Department ranks among the best in the UK for research (rating in the top ten in the UK in the 2014 REF) and teaching (highest rating ‘excellent’ for teaching quality).

- You will develop an enhanced understanding of the subject area through an exciting mix of seminars, lectures and research conveyed by our friendly and accessible staff, who are all involved in cutting edge research.

- You will benefit from high quality lectures that combine theory, research, and application, providing you with insight into topical issues and the latest research in applied social psychology.

- Some of the lectures are delivered by applied psychologists in the field, providing you with insights into the real jobs that await our graduates.

- You will have the opportunity to complete an innovative research project under the supervision of a leading academic in the relevant field.

Department research and industry highlights

Example research projects of our academic staff:
- Wrath of God: Religious primes and punishment.
- Can values reduce prejudice against Muslims even when national identification is high?
- Monetary donations following humanitarian disasters.
- Recalling and recognizing faces of other-races: A behavioural and eye movement study.

Example relations with the industry:
- Laureus Sport for Good Foundation; developing an assessment tool on well-being of youth.
- Relations with care homes helping patients with Multiple Sclerosis.
- Hospitals for a clinical trial test and intervention to help people with back pain.

Course content and structure

You will study seven core units, including the Social Research Project:

Core course units:
Psychology in Applied Settings
In this unit you will:
- develop an enhanced understanding of the link between research and practice

- be equipped with research skills relevant to research in applied settings and implementation of research findings in the practice of psychologists

- participate in specialist seminars on applied psychology topics such as forensic and educational psychology

- take part in interactive discussions of all relevant issues guided by the tutor taking any given session.

- Multicultural Existence
This unit will introduce you to the social psychology of multicultural existence and familiarise you with existing theories and current research on this topic. You will be trained to apply your knowledge to the analysis of real-life examples of multicultural existence.

- Adjustment and Well-Being
This course will introduce you to theory, empirical findings, and applications regarding adjustment and well-being (happiness and self-fulfillment).

- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
You will explore many of the key research techniques that are used in social, health, and developmental research. You will develop an advanced understanding of current techniques within these areas and how to employ these techniques, and be able to evaluate and critique them.

- Social Research Project
You will be provided with the possibility to carry out an original piece of research on a topic of your interest within the broad area of applied and social psychology. You will be given the necessary support during the conception, conduct and writing up of your research

- Topics in Psychological Science
The aim of the unit is to stimulate an interest in topical research findings from a wide range of research areas relevant to psychology. You will develop the skills of presentation, evaluation, interpretation and discussion of original research findings.

- Statistics for Research
You will be provided with an overview and basic understanding of advanced statistical methods used in psychology and neuroscience research, including hands-on experience applying these methods to specific problems. The unit will provide a methodological foundation if you wish to pursue research in disciplines allied to the MSc course.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge of social psychology and its application
- strong research skills in social and applied psychology
- experience in transferable skills that are highly sought after in the job market, such as oral presentations, oral and written communication, and project planning.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, different types of presentations, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different psychology-related areas, including careers in human relations and organizational psychology. Our graduates are currently working for organizations such as community associations, NGO’s, organizational psychology firms, and consultancy firms. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice. Read more

This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice.

If you’re a service provider, practitioner or policy maker who wants to bring theory and practice together, or you’re planning a career in the field of disability, you’ll explore a range of disability-related issues from theoretical and practical perspectives.

Our refreshed core modules allow you to explore the frontiers of research in this rapidly developing field, and focus on social policy for disabled people in education, benefits, housing, transport, employment, health and social support services, as well as recent developments in social research on disability. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on the topics that best suit your own interests or career plans, from care to disability and development via research training or race and ethnicity studies.

Research insight

Taught by academics from the Centre for Disability Studies, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment where tutors’ teaching is informed by their own cutting-edge research.

The interdisciplinary Centre for Disability Studies is at the forefront of international research in the field, using social model approaches that recognise disability as a form of institutional discrimination and social exclusion, rather than a product of physical difference between individuals. You’ll benefit from the expertise of researchers from diverse backgrounds, drawing on the experiences and issues raised by the disabled people’s movement.

Course content

In Semester 1 you’ll take a core module examining recent debates and developments in social research on disability. You’ll critically assess positivist, interpretative and ‘emancipatory’ methodologies and the data collection and analysis strategies that come with them, and consider the emergence of the ‘social model’ of disability.

You’ll apply these perspectives to contemporary social policy in Semester 2, as you explore topics such as disability benefits, self-help, public amenities like housing, transport and public buildings, education, employment and social support services.

In addition, you’ll gain specialist knowledge when you select from a range of optional modules. You could pursue further training in quantitative and qualitative research methods, or study topics such as special educational needs. You’ll also focus on a specific topic when you complete your dissertation – an individual piece of research that allows you to showcase the knowledge and skills you’ve gained.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Social Policy, Politics and Disabled People 30 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Disability) 60 credits
  • Debates on Disability Theory and Research 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Special Educational Needs: Inclusive Curriculum 30 credits
  • International Human Rights and Disabled People 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use various teaching methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials in core modules. Optional modules may also include methods such as practical classes, workshops or online learning. Independent study is also crucial to this programme, allowing you to shape your own research questions, prepare for taught sessions and build research and analytical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods are likely to vary, depending on the optional modules you choose. Most of our taught modules are assessed through written work such as essays and book and literature reviews.

Career opportunities

There is a growing demand for students with a comprehensive knowledge of disability issues in all areas of social life.

In particular, there are many career opportunities in health and social support services, education, human resources, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities.

There are also excellent career openings in social research and universities – you’ll be well prepared for further research at PhD level.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Your programme of study. As a social anthropologist you gain understanding in the cultural life of a wide range of social activities across communities and society. Read more

Your programme of study

As a social anthropologist you gain understanding in the cultural life of a wide range of social activities across communities and society. Many alumni have gone to work in a range of top universities in the world and in other organisations including governments and museums, and the programme allows you to take a range of skills with you to these organisations, public sector, third sector and to PhD level where you could lecture, research and publish your own findings.

The MRes in Social Anthropology, Ethnology and Cultural History (SAnECH) is the principal gateway programme for carrying out doctoral-level anthropological research at the University of Aberdeen, as well as a stand-alone Masters programme in its own right. Combining taught skills courses with lively and innovative seminar forums for staff and students, this programme will allow you to develop both your research goals and the means to achieve them. The Anthropology group at Aberdeen provide world class research expertise that combines a genuinely global focus with an established track record of research on Scotland and the Circumpolar North.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Research in Social Anthropology
  • Optional Courses
  • The Museum Idea
  • Supervised Reading
  • Research Skills in Anthropology
  • Understanding People and Environment
  • More Than Human
  • Anthropological Theory for MSc
  • Materials, Technology and Power in the Andean Region

Semester 2

  • Scottish Training and Anthropological Research
  • Research in Social Anthropology

Optional

  • Reading Environment Ethnography
  • Morality and Belief in Islam
  • Supervised Reading
  • Research Design and Practice in Anthropology
  • Culture and Society in Latin America
  • Roads: Mobility, Movement, Migration

Semester 3

  • Dissertation in Social Anthropology

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by staff who specialist in Anthropology from regions such as Canada, Central Asian Republics, Iceland and more
  • We support you throughout your studies
  • We have one of the highest research scores in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Months Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs 

 



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Sussex is a world leader in the anthropological study of economic life – one of the most dynamic and fast-growing areas within anthropology. Read more
Sussex is a world leader in the anthropological study of economic life – one of the most dynamic and fast-growing areas within anthropology.

This course helps you to develop a critical understanding of:
-Equality and inequality
-Labour in the global economy
-The impacts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and social enterprise
-Precarious employment and post-industrialisation
-Petty capitalism and informal trade
-The marketisation of poverty
-Financialisation and microfinance
-New social movements for social and economic justice (including the Occupy movement and mass public protests by ‘the 99%’)

This MA is for you if you want to deepen your existing knowledge of anthropology but it also offers professional training if you’re new to the field.

How will I study?

You take modules and options and have the opportunity to take a research placement.

Modules are assessed via term papers, concept notes, book reviews, essays and case studies. You also write a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Sussex is a world leader in the anthropological study of economic life – one of the most dynamic and fast-growing areas of the discipline. We have particular research expertise in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Europe, but also cover the Caribbean, Latin America, South-East Asia and China.

Our faculty and students are members of:
-Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies
-Centre for World Environmental History
-Sussex Centre for Cultural Studies
-Centre for Cultures of Reproduction, Health and Technologies
-Africa Centre
-Asia Centre
-Sussex Centre for Migration Research
-Sussex Centre for Photography and Visual Culture
-Centre for Security and Conflict Research Centre for Global Political Economy
-Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence

Careers

This MA is ideal for you if you are working in, or planning to work in:
-International development (including fair trade and social enterprise)
-Socially responsible business
-The charity sector
-Trade unions or labour rights organisations
-Activist movements for social and economic justice nationally or internationally

This MA is also excellent preparation for a PhD in Anthropology.

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The Master program International Health & Social Management prepares its students for the requirements of a future-oriented field of work where an understanding of the links between health care and social organizations – charitable and profit-oriented, public and private, national and international – is essential. Read more
The Master program International Health & Social Management prepares its students for the requirements of a future-oriented field of work where an understanding of the links between health care and social organizations – charitable and profit-oriented, public and private, national and international – is essential. The medium-term outlook for graduates of the 2-year Master program is administrative and upper-level management positions in the health care sector, in the social and public sector and related fields.

Due to the changing health care environment, the demand for qualified persons in this sector is constantly rising. Across the European Union, health and social systems and related policies are becoming more interconnected than ever before, with more movement of people, citizens, patients and professionals. This increased interconnectedness raises many policy issues, including quality and access in cross-border services, information requirements for citizens, patients, health professionals and policy-makers, the scope for cooperation in the health and social arena, and how to reconcile national policies with European obligations in general.

The Master program International Health & Social Management is interconnected with the study offer of the European Master in Health Economiecs and Management.

Please notice also our innovative double degree option in cooperation with the University of Economics in Prague.

Contents

The full-time Master program International Health & Social Management comprises 4 semesters of 15 weeks each and starts every winter semester. Graduates of the program are conferred the academic degree “Master of Arts in Business”. Lectures are held in English. Attendance is generally mandatory for all lectures. Students have the option to spend the 3rd semester or earn a double degree at a partner university abroad; the lectures attended there will be counted towards the required credit units. The Master program has been accredited by both the European Health Management Association EHMA and the Foundation for International Business Administration Accreditation FIBAA.

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The School of Health & Social Care welcomes enquiries and applications from those interested in full or part-time study for MPhil or PhD degrees in health, nursing, social work and psychology or counselling. Read more
The School of Health & Social Care welcomes enquiries and applications from those interested in full or part-time study for MPhil or PhD degrees in health, nursing, social work and psychology or counselling.

The Department focuses on applied social science, including sociology, social policy and psychology. We have a large and growing PhD programme. Students' progress is supported by a supervisory team and dedicated programme leader, and monitored by committees within the Department and the university.

Students may wish to undertake a study which falls within the Department's current portfolio of research, which includes: organisation and delivery of health and social care; primary care and public health; education and training of health and social care professionals; learning, development and well-being; sexual health; mental health and well-being; substance misuse; inter-personal violence; brain, action and movement; and counselling and development.

Applicants must identify an area of research that they wish to pursue and submit an outline proposal of approximately 1,500 words with their application form.

In the first two terms applicants are required to take courses in qualitative and quantitative methods as well as critical appraisal of the literature, unless they have recently completed courses in these areas that are of a similar standard. Part-time students are expected to devote a minimum of 12 hours per week to their postgraduate work.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/hsc

What you'll study

Recent research project topics include:

- The subjective experience and effects of chronic life-threatening illness in childhood

- The memory performance in younger and older adults during single-and-dual task conditions

- The influence of family functioning on the development of aggressive behaviour in pre-school

- Cultural rites and rituals associated with pregnancy and childbirth in different cultural groups in London

- An investigation of the knowledge of safe drinking levels in the general population as well as their attitudes towards public health information and advice

- Socio-historical perspectives of young fatherhood: exploration of social change on the Isle of Sheppey

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through their research thesis.

Career options

Graduates from this programme can pursue careers in teaching in further and higher education, as well as research and other opportunities in both public and private sectors.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme. Read more

Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme

If this degree were a film we’d be watching the beginning and the end. We think, like Walter Benjamin, that it’s in these moments – in their inception and their obsolescence – that you see the utopian possibilities of a form or social movement. 

The questions we ask

Are we in the midst of a beginning? What can we learn now from visual culture’s past? What’s happening to our bodies when we play a video game? What are the gestures involved in everyday life? How do our bodies relate to technology?

These are the kinds of topics we analyse on this MA. We want to go beyond the borders of a traditional film studies degree so we go back to the beginning of film history to explore what it meant to fashion yourself in an image, or for a society to see itself in an image. Then we explore how images gain meaning now, and where they’re going next. 

The processes we use

We’re interested in the evolution of the image, but also image culture. As photographs and films constitute more and more of our communication, we encourage students to try to put their thought into audio-visual form for some modules. 

For the MA’s Media Arts Pathway, you can make your own piece of work and submit it as part of the final project, the dissertation. Production values are not the focus for us. We’re interested in what you do with an idea.

The approach we take

We think learning is about trying to get hold of something you don’t know yet; wrestling with ideas you’re unsure of so as to work critically and imaginatively across multiple media forms. While we do look at films, we also investigate such things as contemporary gallery work, the city’s screens, computer and phone interactivity to reconsider our relationship to images.

We study our heritage of image taking and making not just to discover how that relationship has changed over time, but also to find jumping off points for own experimentation and try to create something new. 

As part of the University of London you also have the chance to explore one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other universities. Find out more on the Screen Studies Group website.

Modules & structure

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway

The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway

The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

  • two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
  • option modules to the value of 60 credits
  • a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

Our graduates go on to work in areas such as programming and curating, film and video distribution, and film and television criticism, but many also create their own careers. Twenty per cent of our graduates pursue PhD degrees. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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The Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute (HCRI) at The University of Manchester is proud to collaborate with the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) to deliver this world-class,online Postgraduate Diploma in Global Health. Read more

The Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute (HCRI) at The University of Manchester is proud to collaborate with the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) to deliver this world-class,online Postgraduate Diploma in Global Health. Working closely with IFRC we have been able to incorporate their rich source of practical insights into the course content thus providing students with real life case studies from one of the world's largest social movement.

This online course has been developed for people working in the humanitarian sector or for those wishing to enter this field. It enables students to obtain the highest quality postgraduate education whilst maintaining full time employment anywhere in the world. It offer a practical means of study and an inclusive approach which mirrors the reality of interventions within a humanitarian context. All credits earned by students will be transferrable to other academic institutions.

The programme covers issues related to the worldwide improvement of health, the reduction of disparities, and protection against global threats that disregard national borders and is unique in bringing together the study of emergency medicine, disaster management, community health, anthropology and sociology of health and illness in an online format. As such it offers both a practical means of study and an inclusive approach which mirrors the reality of health interventions within a humanitarian context.

Students will have access to leading multi-disciplinary academics and practitioners including Dr Brauman and Professor Tony Redmond OBE (Deputy Director of HCRI) who has led medical teams to sudden onset disasters, complex emergencies, and conflicts for over twenty five years. Tony is also Director of the UK International Emergency Trauma Register which aims to improve training and accountability of those who respond to large scale emergencies overseas.

Aims

On completion of the course students should be able to show a critical understanding of:

1. Key issues and debates related to the practices of global health programming. Students will show familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of policies at international and national levels.

2. The range of social science topics which influence global health (including political, historical, anthropological understandings). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.

3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of global health, including economics, governance structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGOs and other civil institutions.

4. An understanding of local approaches to global health, including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with `bottom up' approaches.

5. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferrable skills through both independent and group-based work

Special features

This course will incorporate these perspectives in a unique on-line curriculum . Students will be able to engage fully with the programme content, and with their peers, via lectures, discussion boards, group work, online chat, question and answer sessions with the tutor, and through the provision of peer to peer feedback and assessment.

The online MSc in Global Health has been created in collaboration with the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and comprises:

  •    Online Postgraduate Certificate in Global Health
  •    Online Postgraduate Diploma in Global Health
  •    Online Masters dissertation in Global Health (conversion to MSc in Global Health)

These online courses have been developed for people working in the humanitarian sector or for those wishing to enter this field. They enable students to obtain the highest quality postgraduate education whilst maintaining full time employment anywhere in the world.

Teaching and learning

The programme will begin with an on-line induction session that explains how the course will progress and how students can fully engage with the curriculum and the online classroom environment. It will set out the key contacts and what each student can expect. Academic & pastoral support will be offered on-line with each student having a personal tutor who will be responsible for monitoring their progression through the programme. A dedicated programme administrator will be responsible for dealing with day to day enquiries.

The course lasts for 12 months in total with each of the 4 modules comprising 8 weeks of teaching followed by 1 week of assessment. Students will complete each module in turn before progressing to the next. The format is designed to be adaptable to the needs of professional students and provides opportunity for reflection between modules.

The programme has been designed to recreate a classroom learning environment in an online format. Students will be able to engage fully with the programme content, and with their peers, via lectures, discussion boards, group work, online chat, question and answer sessions with the tutor, and through the provision of peer to peer feedback and assessment.

Coursework and assessment

All assessment will take place online. Each of the 4 modules will conclude with a selection of various multiple choice and prose-based assessments. Students will also receive feedback and guidance throughout the programme which will enable them to progress and develop their confidence and analytical skills.

Course content for year 1

The curriculum will comprise 4 x 15 credit modules as detailed below.

Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience This module will offer an introduction to public and global health, risk assessments and management, epidemiology, population ageing, the determinants of child survival, and pandemics.

Health Systems and Markets This module will look at the social determinants of health, the work of civil society organisations, the interfaces between states and economies, organisational change, health financing, urban health, rural access, food security, agriculture, and eradication programming.

Community Approaches to Health This module will examine issues of psycho-social care, behaviour change, aging, micro-insurance, advocacy, holistic health, HIV, nutrition, breast feeding, hygiene promotion and immunisation.

Ethics, Human Rights and Health This module will consider the role of gender, health inequalities, dignity, legal frameworks, rights based approaches to health, reproductive rights, Millennium development goals 4, 5, and 6, child rights, and accessing illegal drug users and commercial sex workers.



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This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. Read more
This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. There are four core substantive modules on political and economic sociology that students are expected to attend, taught by Dr. Manali Desai, Dr. Hazem Kandil, Prof. Lawrence King, and Dr. Jeff Miley.

Other substantive modules may also have an economic sociology component, and these would complement the core modules well. In addition, all students must attend the module on comparative historical research methods taught by Dr. Miley as well as one other methods module to be decided in consultation with their supervisor.

Students have the option of doing one of their coursework essays on a topic taught on any sociology MPhil module (for instance, media, culture, globalisation or reproduction); all of the rest of the coursework essays and the dissertation (based on original research) must relate to the political and economic sociology options.

Topics to be covered include: the Marxist critique of capitalism; Weber’s theory of legitimacy; the transition from feudalism to capitalism; the emergence of the modern state; theories of the capitalist state; class structure and class formation under capitalism; the rise of democracy and dictatorship; theories of revolution; the rise of the welfare state; social movement theory; theories of imperialism; theories of development and underdevelopment; gender and ethnicity in post-colonial states; nationalisms; war and militarism, and state violence and genocide.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssomppes

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Political and Economic Sociology) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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