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Masters Degrees (Social Medicine)

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This intensive MSc programme runs over two academic years and is for graduates from any discipline wishing to train and qualify as social workers. Read more
This intensive MSc programme runs over two academic years and is for graduates from any discipline wishing to train and qualify as social workers.

Through a combination of academic and professional modules, you will focus on both the social science knowledge base of social work, and on developing your practice-relevant knowledge, skills and values through 200 days of practical learning.

Taught by qualified social workers with a range of practice specialisms and research interests, this course offers exciting opportunities to learn alongside students from related professional disciplines including occupational therapy, teaching, nursing and medicine, mirroring the interprofessional nature of social work practice.

Users of social work services, carers and experienced practitioners are also actively involved in the course and the delivery of teaching sessions.

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council, as the regulatory body for social workers and other health professionals. You will address the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Workers throughout the course, alongside the College of Social Work's Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF).

Course structure

In line with the guidance of the College of Social Work, students undertake 200 days of practical learning across the course. This involves 30 days of developing practice skills within the university, a 70-day placement in year 1 and a 100-day placement in year 2.

Learning in practice is supported by periods of study at the university, directed study (with a range of learning materials) and small-group practice tutorials. The course reflects the interprofessional nature of social work, with opportunities for shared learning experiences with education, nursing, medical and occupational therapy students.

Areas of study

Year 1 introduces core skills, theories and approaches for social work practice in its interprofessional context and fosters a critical understanding of key law, policy and human growth across the lifespan.

Year 2 focuses on more complex and accountable practice together with the development of more specialised skills and knowledge. There is also a focus on research in social work and the critical use of evidence to underpin own practice.

Modules:

Reflective Social Work Practice 1
Lifespan Development: Social and Psychological Contexts
Legal and Policy Contexts of Decision-Making in Social Work
Practice Learning 1
Research in Social Work: The Dissertation
Reflective Social Work Practice 2
Decision-making in Assessment, Risk and Protection
Contemporary Social Work Practice
Practice Learning 2

Careers and employability

Social work is a rewarding career for those committed to improving the life opportunities and wellbeing of others, whilst promoting rights and social justice.

Registered social workers generally have little trouble finding employment. There are many relevant vacancies advertised locally and nationally, and there continues to be a demand for social workers both in established posts and with agencies who provide temporary staff to statutory organisations.

Social workers can specialise in many different areas, including working with children, youth offending, family centres, older people, disabled people, mental health services, homeless people, asylum seekers and refugees, and substance misuse.

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. This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

Specialist resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History of Health, Medicine and Society) 60 credits
  • Approaches to the History of Health and Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Health, Medicine and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, project reports and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a diverse range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level. Your knowledge and skills will appeal to a wide range of employers, including in the charitable, education, healthcare, and heritage sectors .

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



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Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. Read more

Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. In a globalised and interdependent world, these issues can only be understood from an international perspective which accounts for these common pressures and processes, but which also recognises and engages with the diversity of national traditions and institutions for delivering welfare.

The International Social Policy programme takes a policy analytic approach to provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy. You learn about the common features of social policy arrangements internationally and the variety and differences that characterise welfare across the countries and regions of the world. Drawing on the research-based expertise available at SSPSSR which relates to countries ranging from China, South Korea and Singapore in South East Asia to the UK, Germany and Sweden in Western Europe, you are equipped to understand how national and global forces interact to shape trajectories of welfare system development.

The programme enables you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring enduring cross cutting themes in social policy, including the prioritisation of equality and capabilities, as well as to drill down to how and why policy unfolds in key welfare fields. You develop policy analytic skills in relation to such areas as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, and children & family related policy. You acquire expertise in the use of primary and secondary data collection in areas pertaining to all these aspects of social policy, and are thus equipped to think critically about the development of social welfare systems in a global age across the full range of national contexts and policy situations.

Course structure

We place considerable emphasis on structured, interactive seminars with a high degree of student participation. You also join the staff/graduate seminars which allow MA and research students to become involved in a professional research culture.

The programme gives you a clear and confident grasp of social policy in developed and developing countries. You gain an advanced understanding of the relevant debates, theories and concepts of international issues alongside skills in research design and data collection.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Design of social research
  • Key issues in comparative social policy
  • Comparative social policy
  • Organised civil society and the third sector
  • The family, parenting culture and parenting policy
  • Governing science, technology and society in the 21st Century
  • Foundations of sociology
  • Politics and sociology of the environment
  • Sociology of health, illness and medicine
  • Quantitative data analysis
  • Terrorism and modern society

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/118/international-social-policy#structure

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy
  • impart country-specific as well as cross-national empirical and theoretical knowledge of current challenges and processes of transformation of welfare systems
  • enable you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring specific policy fields such as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, poverty and social exclusion, urban development, and family policy
  • develop your skills in research design and data collection in areas pertaining to social policy
  • familiarise you with using primary and secondary data to develop cutting-edge research in the field of international social policy.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy. Read more
The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy.

About the programme

The MSc provides you with applied and transferable social science research skills to better understand the complexities of society, the role of multiple organisations (‘actors’) in governance systems, and disciplinespecific expertise.

The programme is interdisciplinary and employability is a major theme of the MSc subject pathways so as to equip you with key applied skills for the graduate job market. Intensive workshops are delivered primarily by academic experts, with input from practitioners and non-academic specialists.

You can study for the MSc in Applied Social Science, by choosing optional modules across pathways, or opt for a specialist named degree, as follows:

- Applied Psychology:
Gives you the skills to research and examine human behaviour in various social settings i.e. education, healthcare and the workplace.

- Civil Society and Public Affairs:
Provides you with an advanced understanding of the relationship between civil society, the institutions of multi-level governance and the policymaking environment.

- Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
Gain the skills and understanding of criminal justice and youth violence to research and navigate the causes of crime and strategies for tackling criminal activity.

- Global Social Work and Social Policy:
Provides social workers, community workers and voluntary sector workers with opportunities to engage with the most innovative social work and social policy throughout the world.

Your learning

You will study core and specialist modules. Core modules include:
• Social Research Today
• Contemporary Social Issues
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

Students of the generic Applied Social Science course can also study three specialist electives.
For students studying for the various named degrees, specialist modules offered include:

Applied Psychology:
• Psychology Applied to Public Health
• Psychology in the Workplace
• Psychology Applied to Education

Civil Society and Public Affairs:
• Theories of State and Civil Society
• Politics, Power and Civil Society
• Policy and Practice

Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
• Philosophy of Crime and Justice
• Policing; Youth Violence
• Policy and Practice

Global Social Work and Social Policy:
• Comparative Social Policy
• Social Work in a Global Context; Migration and Human Rights
• Policy and Practice

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates find careers in various specialist roles particularly related to research, campaigning and advocacy across public, private, voluntary and charity sectors. Part-time students may already be working in roles related to the specialist study areas and use the MSc for career advancement.

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

Note: This named degree will only run in 2016 if MSc Policy Analysis and Global Governance is not validated for 2016 entry.

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The Medicine, Health & Public Policy study course examines the political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of contemporary trends in medicine, biosciences and health. Read more

The Medicine, Health & Public Policy study course examines the political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of contemporary trends in medicine, biosciences and health. The multidisciplinary nature of the course creates an ideal study pathway for health professionals, graduates and policy-makers to gain an understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society.

Key benefits

  • Internationally recognised faculty, who have trained across a range of disciplines from sociology, anthropology, geography, gerontology, socio-legal studies and political science to psychology, bioethics, philosophy, biology and medicine.
  • Covers a broad range of substantive topics and offers a wide selection of specialist options addressing critical social and ethical concerns.
  • You will learn to think analytically and independently about key issues and develop essential skills to support critical policy and qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  • Interdepartmental study course offers a varied and exciting range of research options.
  • Opportunities to join a thriving research community, to participate with active researchers in a range of extra-curricular events such as reading groups and roundtable discussions.

Description

The Medicine, Health and Public Policy course offers you flexibility with the choice to study either full or part-time. You will gain in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the policy implications of developments in health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives.

The course is made up of optional and required modules totalling 180 credits to complete the course, 60 credits will come from a dissertation of around 10,000 - 12,000 words.

If you are studying full-time you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete; Part-time MSc students will be expected to take The Politics of Health & Medicine, Critical Policy Research and one optional module in year one, with the remaining required modules taken in year two.

Course purpose

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations, and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research within socio-ethical studies of health, medicine and public policy, and provides a firm grounding in the knowledge, analytical techniques and research methods used within advanced social research. In doing so, it equips students with a set of skills and understandings that are necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, and you will typically have 15 hours of this per module over a 10 week term. We also expect you to undertake 135 hours of independent study for each module. For your Dissertation, we will provide three 2-hour workshops and sixteen 30-minutes supervisory sessions to complement your 591 hours of independent study. Typically, 1 credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

The department assesses students on a combination of essays, written examinations, oral presentations and the dissertation. The nature of assessment varies by module. The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect.

Career prospects

The MSc in Medicine, Health & Public Policy is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research within socio-ethical studies of health, medicine and public policy, and provides a firm grounding in the knowledge, analytical techniques and research methods used within advanced social research. In doing so, it equips students with a set of skills and understandings that are necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.



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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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The PGCert in Research Methods for Social Science & Health is a unique study pathway that provides professionals, practitioners and researchers with advanced understanding and skills for the practical application of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Read more

The PGCert in Research Methods for Social Science & Health is a unique study pathway that provides professionals, practitioners and researchers with advanced understanding and skills for the practical application of quantitative and qualitative research methods. It provides an excellent foundation for understanding, conducting and using social science research in policy, medicine and healthcare. In addition, it enables students to develop a critical understanding of research methods, supplying them with the skills to commission or undertake their own original research.

Key benefits:

  • Taught by an internationally recognised Faculty, providing students with first hand exposure to advanced research methods across a wide range of disciplines in health and the social sciences, covering epidemiology, sociology, demography, anthropology and gerontology.
  • Interdisciplinary approach covering compulsory and optional modules on applied quantitative and qualitative research methods.
  • Integrates social science with King’s leadingn health schools and their internationally recognised excellence in biomedical and health research and training.
  • Situated in the heart of London, providing unrivalled opportunities to engage with the worlds of policymaking, non-governmental agencies and biomedical research.
  • Provides an open and supportive learning environment, fostering independent and critical learning and research.

Description

The PGCert in Research Methods for Social Science & Health offers you flexibility with the choice to study either full- or part-time. Taught by an internationally recognised Faculty, it will provide you with in-depth training in interdisciplinary research methods. You will gain advanced knowledge and skills in research design, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods for research in health, public services and the social sciences.

This course is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations, and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of research methods in the social and health sciences. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research methods in the social sciences applied to health, medicine and public policy. It equips students with the analytical skills they require to carry out their own research, or to commission research in the fields of health and medicine from a social science perspective. Graduates from this course will be able to work on areas that require knowledge of research methods, including many areas of health policy, governmental and non-governmental agencies, and academic and applied research at universities and research institutions.

 A rich departmental programme of guest speakers, research seminars, workshops, reading groups and visiting researchers enhances students’ learning experience. Alumni consistently comment on how the department has prepared them to embark on new careers or advance their existing positions by providing them with the skills and expertise to evaluate, conduct and commission research. 

Prior training in quantitative or qualitative methods is not required. The course can be studied over six months on a full-time basis, or over 18 months part-time.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Per 15 credit module you can typically expect to have 15 hours worth of lectures, seminars and feedback, and 135 hours worth of self-study. 

Typically, 1 credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment 

The department assesses students on a combination of reports, workbooks and problem set. The nature of assessment varies by module and may include examinations.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

Career prospects

Our postgraduate students have gone on to pursue a range of careers including consultant positions in medicine and psychiatry, work as specialist health care practitioners, positions in Government and the public sector, policy positions in public and voluntary organisations, analytical posts, and research and academic posts in universities around the world. Many of our past graduates now work in strategic positions in medicine, social care and policy, or within central or local government, voluntary organisations, or non-governmental organisations. We collaborate closely with the Careers & Employability Office at King’s to enhance the employability of our students, and we organise targeted Careers sessions with guest-speakers from relevant fields.



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The overall aims of the programme are to. - provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;. Read more
The overall aims of the programme are to:

- provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;
- develop and create a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine able to pursue and develop their roles in a rapidly-changing and challenging environment of genomic medicine;
- prepare healthcare professionals for the adoption of genomic technologies and the increasing use of genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care, and with the required knowledge, skills and capability to have a positive personal impact on the work of others;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with an understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities relevant to genomic medicine;
- encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based clinical practice informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge of genomic medicine;
- develop students' intellectual, practical and transferable skills related to genomic medicine;
encourage critical thinking related to genomic medicine;
- conduct systematic research relevant to their professional practice.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvmgmpgnm

Learning Outcomes

The over-arching learning outcomes are:

- Knowledge and understanding -

- To enhance the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine relevant to their present and future roles.
- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of genomic medicine informed by research in a rapidly-changing integrated clinical and research environment.
- To enable deployment of new knowledge in their clinical practice, and to have a positive personal impact on the work of others in their clinical team and wider service.
- To develop an understanding of genomic technologies and to be able to use genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway.
- To develop students’ knowledge so that they have the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care.
- To update and extend students’ understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities.
- To demonstrate knowledge, abilities and skills to engage in focused, professionally-relevant, independent learning, and through the production of a dissertation.

- Skills and other attributes -

- The skills necessary to locate, read, interpret and analyse primary and secondary sources of material enabling the development of a conceptual and theoretical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine.
- Skills to evaluate current scholarship and research critically and to place this knowledge within the context of their own situation and practice as clinical leaders.
- The ability to formulate a research topic relevant to their clinical context, to collect and analyse primary and/or secondary sources of data, and to undertake professionally relevant research.
- The facility to communicate the results of their ideas, research and its conclusions in a written form acceptable as a work of scholarship potentially publishable in a professional or academic journal.

Format

The MPhil comprises either:

- eight modules, plus a research project and associated dissertation of 10-12,000 words, or
- ten modules, plus a literature-based research project and associated dissertation of 5-6,000 words.

Students must complete seven Core Modules and one/three further modules chosen from a range of Option Modules, with additional between-module reflection, study and assignment work.

The modules are structured as follows:

- Core Module 1: An introduction to human genetics and genomics
- Core Module 2: Omics techniques and the application to genomic medicine
- Core Module 3: Genomics of common and rare disease
- Core Module 4: Molecular pathology of cancer and application in cancer diagnosis, screening, and treatment
- Core Module 5: Application of genomics to infectious disease
- Core Module 6: Pharmacogenetics and stratified healthcare
- Core Module 7: Bioinformatics, interpretation, and data quality assurance in genome analysis

Option modules will be selected from the following list. Not all options may be offered every year.

- Option Module 1: Ethical, Legal and Social Implications in applied genomics (ELSI) **
- Option Module 2: Counselling skills for genomics
- Option Module 3: Professional and research skills
- Option Module 4: Advanced Bioinformatics – from genomes to systems
- Option Module 5: Epigenetics and epigenomics
- Option Module 6: Expanding the content of the MPhil in genomic medicine with a workplace-based module

Each core module will involve around 30 hours of contact time, including lectures, group work and online teaching.

Placements

The research project element of the course may be undertaken in a number of scientific institutions, within and without the University. This may include the University's School of Clinical Medicine, the School of Biological Sciences, the European Bioinformatics Institute, Welcome Trust Sanger Institute and, subject to approval, other suitable research institutions.

Assessment

Students must submit a dissertation of 5-6,000 words or 10-12,000 words, depending on the options selected. This will be worth 1/6th or 1/3rd of the overall mark for the course, respectively.

For each of the taught modules, students must complete summative assignments of 2500-3500 words or equivalent (except where other methods of module assessment are indicated in individual module descriptions)

Each student is allocated a named supervisor, who will meet regularly with the student to discuss progress and provide feedback and support as required. Written supervision reports are accessed via the online supervision system. Students are given feedback on the assessments conducted at the end of each module.

All students will meet with the programme director on a termly basis to discuss progress and to provide their feedback on the course.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding is available from Health Education England to pay course fees for NHS employees wishing to apply for this course. Prospective students wishing to apply for HEE funding should refer to the application process published by HEE at http://www.genomicseducation.hee.nhs.uk/msc-funding-info/and ensure that access to this funding is approved before applying for the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MRes Health and Social Care (MRes HSC) programme will equip students with an in-depth understanding and knowledge and skills in a range of theoretical underpinnings and research methods relevant to applied research in a range of contemporary health and social care contexts. Read more
The MRes Health and Social Care (MRes HSC) programme will equip students with an in-depth understanding and knowledge and skills in a range of theoretical underpinnings and research methods relevant to applied research in a range of contemporary health and social care contexts.

The MRes HSC is for students who wish to pursue a variety of careers in health and/or social care where research is a core component. The majority of modules within the programme are shared with other students undertaking MSc and MPhil/PhD study.
The course is delivered mainly online but is complemented by two compulsory four-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools, and one mid-semester study day in both semester 1 and 2.

Aims

The aims of the course are to:
-Enable students to further develop systematic, in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the nature, purposes, methods and application of research relevant to health and social care practice at an individual and/or organisational level
-Contribute to building capacity and capability for research and evidence based practice by equipping students with in-depth knowledge and essential skills to critically appraise, apply, design and undertake high-quality research in a range of health and social care settings
-Enhance the quality and evidence base for health and social care research, practice and service development through the provision of robust research training in a stimulating, challenging and supportive learning environment that draws on outstanding resources and expertise in research and practice
-Promote lifelong learning in students, and enhance their opportunities to pursue a variety of research careers and/or further research training which support and advance clinical and health and social care knowledge, research and practice
-Equip students with key transferable skills in critical reasoning and reflection, effective communication, team and multi-disciplinary working, use of IT/health informatics and logical and systematic approaches to problem-solving and decision-making

Special features

The MRes HSC programme has a unique interdisciplinary focus drawing on the expertise of nationally and internationally renowned lecturers and practitioners from many different fields including nursing, midwifery, social work, speech and language therapy, physiotherapy, audiology, psychology and medicine.

Managed primarily through the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, the programme is also delivered by and benefits from strong collaborations across the Faculty, NHS and Social Care including the School of Psychological Sciences (SPS), the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Institute of Population Health.

The delivery of the programme within the context of outstanding multi-professional research expertise, well established partnerships with the NHS and Social Care, excellent teaching and learning and high student support, means that students undertaking the programme can be assured of an excellent research education and training and an award of which they can be proud.

Teaching and learning

The programme is primarily delivered online to maximise access and increase flexibility. A variety of summative assessment methods are utilised which enable the integration of theory and practice and build on continuous formative assessment exercises which are part of each module with a variety of interactive, stimulating on-line exercises with regular self-assessment and feedback being a key feature.

Online components of the programme are complemented by opportunities for face-face learning and networking between students, programme and research staff through two 4-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools and 2 mid-semester study days.

Career opportunities

The MRes HSC is for health and social care professionals and others who seek a research career or require research training as a constituent part of their current or future roles, and for researchers who desire a sound health and social care orientated research training.

The programme provides a comprehensive education and training in health and social care research as an excellent foundation for students who wish to go forward to study for a PhD.

Associated organisations

-School of Psychological Sciences
-Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC)
-Institute of Population Health

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Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. Read more
Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. The Chinese word for acupuncture is zhenjiu; literally needle and moxibustion. It originated In China around three thousand years ago and soon spread to other countries in Asia such as Japan and Korea. Acupuncture is now widely used around the world.

This course provides a strong foundation in the theory and application of acupuncture, as well as extensive clinical experience and a grounding in Chinese language and culture. Over the four year course, you'll also gain a thorough understanding of western bio-medical sciences and the skills to be a reflective and professional practitioner. Research will play an important role in the future development of the profession of acupuncture and this programme is designed to equip you with excellent research skills.

Modules covering Chinese medicine, language and culture will be taught by experienced lecturers from China. You'll benefit from this wealth of clinical experience and extensive knowledge of the various traditions and historical developments in Chinese medicine. You'll also learn from practitioners based in the UK to gain a more complete picture and understanding of the skills required to be a professional acupuncturist in the West.

Clinical experience is central to understanding and good practice of acupuncture. You'll train throughout the course at our teaching clinic. You'll also undertake an extended clinical placement in a Chinese hospital and study at our partner institution the Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine.

All this combined will help you to develop the skills to be a reflective and professional acupuncturist.

Modules

Year 1

Chinese medicine 1: basic principles
Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care
Tuina and Jingluo 1
Clinic 1: observation 1
Chinese language 1
Biomedicine 1: anatomy and physiology
History of Chinese medicine
Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care

Year 2

Tuina and Jingluo 2
Clinic 2: observation 1
Biomedicine 2: pathophysiology and pharmacology
Sociology of health
Chinese language 2
Chinese medicine 2: pattern differentiation
Running a practice

Year 3

Expertise, evidence and research: Informing clinical practice
Clinic 3: Patient management 1
Chinese medicine 3: integration
Biomedicine 3: diagnosis and treatment
Research in health and social care

Year 4
Clinic 4: Patient management 2 Dissertation

Option 1: China trip

Chinese hospital placement
Chinese language 3

Option 2: Remain in the UK

Chinese Medicine 4: Plurality and classics
Chinese language 3

Timetable

The course is delivered mostly on weekends and evenings, with clinic attendance on weekdays.

Professional links

This course is accredited by the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB). BAAB accredits courses on behalf of the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC).

This course is run in partnership with London South Bank University, the Confucius Institute at LSBU, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine and Harbin Normal University. All students on the course are eligible to apply for scholarships through the Confucius Institute to undertake studies in Chinese medicine and language in China.

Career progression

This course will enable you to work as a professional acupuncturist, and many recent graduates from this course have gone onto be professional clinical practitioners in acupuncture.

As a graduate from this course, you will be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The PgDip and MSc Evidence-based Medicine (Anaesthesia, Perioperative Medicine and Pain) programmes provide a modular postgraduate education to meet your needs. Read more

The PgDip and MSc Evidence-based Medicine (Anaesthesia, Perioperative Medicine and Pain) programmes provide a modular postgraduate education to meet your needs. The programmes offer specialty training within this area and will enhance your career progression towards a consultant post.

Course details

The programmes are flexible and modular, covering a range of subject matters relevant to anaesthesia, perioperative medicine and pain. Credits from the component modules can be combined to provide a postgraduate certificate, diploma or master’s-level qualification. You study the central aspects of evidence-based medicine and research, and how to apply these to your anaesthesia, perioperative medicine and pain practice to enhance the quality of your individual clinical practice and broader service delivery. You share a number of modules with other master’s-level programmes giving you many opportunities to mix with other students and share academic and professional experiences. The emphasis is on integrating theory and clinical practice in a multi-professional working and learning environment.

You develop an ability to understand how evidence is generated, retrieved, evaluated and importantly, employed in practice. The programmes enhance inter-professional learning and direct the focus of learning toward evidence based clinical decision making and quality improvement to enhance service delivery. This is in line with the Government’s policy visions to develop evidence based, quality improvement driven professional practice.The programmes offer a structured and logical progression to learning, with a firm link to your anaesthesia, perioperative medicine and pain practice. As the majority of students are employed in specialty training posts we use a flexible approach to programme delivery.

What you study

Course structure

Core modules

  • Designing Research Projects
  • Evidence-based Practice
  • Practical Statistics
  • Quality Improvement in Evidence-based Anaesthesia, Perioperative Medicine and Pain
  • Research Project Management

MSc only

  • Dissertation

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

Where you study

Main campus for attending students, at home for distance learners.

How you learn

The learning and teaching strategy is as flexible as possible. You can choose to study by attending classes, by distance learning or flexible learning (a combination of attendance and distance learning). 

For attending students, learning and teaching methods include key lectures, seminars involving group discussions and structured learning activities, practical computer lab classes and tutorial support.

For distance learners our virtual learning environment provides you with interactive structured learning materials such as written learning materials, narrated PowerPoint presentations, and structured learning materials and activities. Alongside this you can access a range of forums – discussion boards, wikis and blogs to support your discussion with module tutors and other students. Tutorial support is provided by email, phone or Skype. 

If you are a flexible learner you can use these two approaches flexibly throughout each module depending on your personal needs and work commitments. Our learning and teaching strategy, and opportunities for feedback for flexible learners includes aspects of the attendance and distance learning strategies.

How you are assessed

We use a variety of assessment strategies. Formative assessment supports your learning in some modules. Each module is summatively assessed through a written report, seen exam, data analysis project, research proposal, quality improvement proposal, critical commentary and – for the MSc only – a dissertation.

Employability

These programmes offer a structured and logical progression to learning with a firm link to your specialist area of practice. Most graduates are employed in specialty training posts and these programmes can support your career progression to consultant level.



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Created for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Read more

Created for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Students undertake a preparatory year of English language and undergraduate modules in the subject area before embarking on Master's level modules in their second year.

Course detail

Through this programme, you learn to apply theories and methods of comparative social policy in specific fields such as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, poverty and social exclusion, urban development and family policy. You learn advanced research techniques and gain the capacity to critically appraise the development of social welfare systems in a global age.

Purpose

You will learn to think critically, analyse data and present key findings as well as developing key transferrable skills including time management, team work, research and analytic methods, problem-solving and IT skills. Teaching is student-centred through a combination of taught classes, lectures, seminars, group work and independent study.

You will gain exceptional skills in advanced research methodologies, learning the techniques and approaches that social researchers use to organise, structure and interpret data. You will learn about the process of research and how the analysis and presentation of evidence is influenced and can be influential in social policy. You will become adept at using and understanding a range of frameworks and methodologies and will be able to assess the most appropriate to use in a given scenario. You will use these skills to look at the ways in which different countries organise social policy and welfare systems.

Format

As well as taking core modules, you choose from a range of optional modules; typical modules may include:

  • Comparative social policy
  • Design of social research
  • Key issues in comparative social policy
  • Sociologists of health, illness and medicine
  • Poverty, inequality and social security
  • Social and political movements
  • Race, difference and belonging

Careers

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/index.html

English language learning

Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) which you can access throughout your degree https://www.kent.ac.uk/international-pathways/



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Whether you want to get ahead in your career faster, or improve your knowledge, a Monash postgraduate degree can give you a distinct advantage. Read more
Whether you want to get ahead in your career faster, or improve your knowledge, a Monash postgraduate degree can give you a distinct advantage.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/social-work-qualifying-3969?domestic=true

Overview

The Master of Social Work (Qualifying) curriculum meets AASW requirements and builds on Monash Social Work areas of strength, especially in gender studies, sustainability, child wellbeing and health. The degree includes considerable emphasis on community engagement and leadership, and provides opportunities to work with organisations to complete projects and research. The Master of Social Work (Qualifying) is a coursework degree with theoretical, skills development and supervised professional practice units. The course provides opportunities for group-based research and integration of theory and practice. Theoretical content builds on knowledge acquired by graduates in previous higher education, while social work skills components and professional practice units introduce students to contemporary social work practice.

Career opportunities

Our graduates have an excellent record in gaining employment. Social work has been identified as one of the fastest growing professions and it provides a wide range of employment opportunities. For example, Monash graduates find work as family counsellors, child protection workers and school counsellors. They work in hospitals and community health centres, mental health services and palliative care programs. They work in youth services, neighbourhood houses and in services for migrants and refugees. They work with youth and adult offenders, and with people who have drug and alcohol problems. They also work in community development, in policy development and in management in human service organisations.

Professional recognition (Australian)

The areas covered in the curriculum meet Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) accreditation requirements, including 1000 hours of supervised professional practice. The fieldwork program is well-developed and makes use of extensive partnership arrangements.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/medicine

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

The Faculty is also home to a number of leading medical and biomedical research institutes and groups, and has contributed to advances in many crucial areas: in vitro fertilisation, obesity research, drug design, cardiovascular physiology, functional genomics, infectious diseases, inflammation, psychology, neurosciences and mental health.

Notwithstanding the relatively short history of our University, the Faculty is ranked in the top 50 in the world for its expertise in life sciences and biomedicine by the Times Higher Education and QS World University 2012 benchmarks.

Courses offered by the Faculty include medicine, nursing, radiography and medical imaging, nutrition and dietetics,emergency health studies, biomedical sciences, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and social work. A range of research and coursework postgraduate programs is also offered.

The Faculty takes pride in delivering outstanding education in all courses, in opening students to the possibilities offered by newly discovered knowledge, and in providing a nurturing and caring environment.

Further details may be found at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/about.html

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/social-work-qualifying-3969?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Our Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) programme is internationally renowned for providing high quality distance learning exclusively to doctors. Read more
Our Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) programme is internationally renowned for providing high quality distance learning exclusively to doctors. The programme is designed to provide relevant knowledge for doctors involved, or wishing to be involved, in the full or part-time management of recreational and elite athletes. By studying this programme you will develop practical skills that can be applied to both primary and specialist care.

The highly interactive, flexible, online learning and hands-on clinical teaching provide you with expert knowledge and skills, while also enabling you to remain in practice.

Programme features:
- Flexible and online, allowing you to study alongside your clinical practice.
- Recognised by the Faculty of Sport & Exercise Medicine (FSEM) (http://www.fsem.co.uk/).
- You will become part of an international online community of SEM specialists.
- A problem-solving and reflective approach to sport and exercise medicine.
- Benefit from a reduced membership rate to the British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine (BASEM) (http://www.basem.co.uk/) for the first year.

View a video about this programme (http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/postgraduate/)

Programme structure

This is a flexible programme. The Diploma can be completed in two years, but students have the option of taking up to four years. The MSc can be completed in 3.5 years: again, students have the option of taking up to 5 years.

The following events take place on the University of Bath campus:
- Induction Event (two days) – Year One (September)
- Sports Science Residential Week - Year One (January)
- Clinical Residential Week - Year Two (June)
- OSCE (Examination Event) (1 day) – Year Two (June or October)

Years one and two (Diploma):
- Sport & Exercise Medicine in Practice 1 - 6 Credits (ongoing throughout Diploma)
- Sport & Exercise Medicine in Practice 2 - 6 Credits (ongoing throughout Diploma)
- Sports Doctor - 6 Credits (3 month unit)
- Exercise Physiology - 6 Credits (3 month unit)
- Functional Anatomy and Sporting Movement Analysis - 12 credits (6 month unit)
- Sports Injuries & Rehabilitation - 12 credits (6 month unit)
- Psychology of Sport and Exercise - 6 Credits (3 month unit)
- Exercise for Health - 6 Credits (3 month unit)

Year three (MSc):
- Research Project Design
- Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Project

View summary table (http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/images/sem-programme-structure.jpg) or Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/hl/hl-proglist-pg.html#F) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

The majority of the content of the programme is delivered online to allow you to engage in flexible study alongside your clinical practice. To complement the online teaching there is a face-to-face induction event at the University and residential teaching weeks in the first and second years of the programme. Reflective, practice-based elements are provided through professional experiential learning and online virtual workshops.

Methods of assessment

You will be assessed through written assignments and case studies, a portfolio of clinical experience, the OSCE Examination and a Dissertation. Each unit is assessed individually.

Assignments are delivered online and must also be submitted online. The formative assessment includes moderated online discussions, self-assessment questions and online multiple choice tests.

Summative assessment will vary between units but will typically include some of the following:

Compilation of portfolio of evidence [SEM in Practice]
OSCE examination [SEM in Practice]
Maintaining a reflective practitioner portfolio [SEM in Practice]
Essays
Case studies
Short answer questions
Recorded consultations

- Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL):
If you have a previous qualification, or undertaken postgraduate units from another institution, you may be eligible to transfer credit for this prior learning.

Depending on the programme of study, you can gain APL for up to 50% of the total credits required (this credit must have been obtained within the previous five years).

- Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL)
You may also apply for APEL by submitting a portfolio of evidence, demonstrating that you have successfully achieved the learning outcomes for the specific unit(s) you seek exemption from.

We recommend you discuss this with the Director of Studies first to ensure this is suitable, as creating your portfolio can be very time consuming.

We will not permit exemptions of fractional units, and so the minimum threshold for the applications of APEL procedures will be a single, free standing unit (including three credit units). The maximum threshold for exemption will normally be 50% of the total credits required for a programme of study, for example, a 45-credit exemption towards a 90-credit Masters degree.

About the department

The School for Health was established within the University of Bath in 2003, to centralise the high profile research and teaching in the health-related disciplines already taking place throughout the university, so creating a single entity through which links with the health sector at national and international level can be channelled, co-ordinated and developed.

In 2010 the School joined the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences and became the Department for Health, providing excellent opportunities for academic teaching and research collaborations with other departments, such as Psychology and Social & Policy Sciences. The Department's postgraduate teaching and research programmes now form part of the Faculty's new Graduate School, also launched in 2010, providing postgraduate students with dedicated support and a strong community in which to base their studies - whether on campus or by distance learning.

In keeping with government initiatives surrounding population health and more general public concerns, the Department divides its activities between two main pillars: Healthcare and Population Health – one focuses on the NHS, healthcare and health services research and the other focuses on population health, healthy living, sport & physical activity and tobacco control; each of these groups, in turn, contain both teaching programmes and research activities. Furthermore, there is a bridging spine between both pillars and which houses the Professional Doctorate in Health, Research in Health Practice and the administrative, finance, learning & teaching development, marketing and support activities of the Department.

The Department’s aims are:

- To develop a research portfolio that is both of the highest academic standard and has applications in the real world
- To build on external links with the public services and other bodies concerned with health and society
- To innovate design and delivery of healthcare services
- To change corporate approaches to healthy organisations
- To support government reform of health and social care provision
- To identify and facilitate opportunities for academic collaboration and new developments.

The Department's postgraduate taught programmes combine academic excellence with flexible and innovative design and delivery; our postgraduate portfolio is distinguished by the provision of a number of Professional Masters and a Professional Doctorate programme designed to be studied part-time by learners working in a wide range of healthcare roles from all around the world. All our postgraduate courses are taught online and this has proved to be one of our unique selling points, with students able to continue within their practice area or working environment whilst gaining a further qualification.

The Department is renowned for its exemplary attention to educational design, integrating knowledge with research evidence and resulting in programmes which are highly relevant to contemporary practice; in addition, the Department boasts some of the most innovative and successful approaches to online and part-time education, recognised through a number of awards.

At all levels, learning and teaching in the Department provides a strong focus on high quality education for real world situations and produces graduates with skills and knowledge relevant to professional roles and in high demand from employers.

Teaching programmes on offer within the Department include:

- Sport & Exercise Medicine, the world renowned flexible masters programme exclusively for doctors
- Sports Physiotherapy, a specialist programme designed by physiotherapists for physiotherapists
- Research in Health Practice, a programme launched in 2008 aimed at health and social care professionals interested in conducting their own research
- The innovative Professional Doctorate in Health which focuses on both Population Health and Healthcare within the Department, providing a doctoral level programme to develop expert practitioners and researchers in practice.

Facilities, equipment, other resources
Sport and exercise science and medical science laboratories. Close links with the English Institute of Sport and the Department of Sports Development and Recreation.

International and industrial links
There are current links with primary care trusts, strategic health authorities, the two hospitals in Bath and colleagues in industry. The Department works closely with esteemed international academic institutions, and individual health practitioners, in order to meet the regional, national and global challenges facing health and social care.

Careers information
Postgraduate research students gain a wealth of experience to assist them with their next step and are offered personal career advice at the University. The Department has an established research training skills programme for all research students. The taught programmes enable students to extend their health and social care career pathways and to build important networks for further professional opportunities.

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. Read more
The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. The program fulfills these objectives by educating a leadership corps of health professionals and scholars from the humanities and social sciences who will imbue patient care and professional education with the skills and values of narrative understanding.
Health care and the illness experience are marked by uneasy and costly divides: between those in need who can access care and those who cannot, between health care professionals and patients, and between and among health care professionals themselves. Narrative medicine is an interdisciplinary field that challenges those divisions and seeks to bridge those divides. It addresses the need of patients and caregivers to voice their experience, to be heard and to be valued, and it acknowledges the power of narrative to change the way care is given and received.

Program structure

The Narrative Medicine graduate degree requires 38 points to complete. Those studying full-time can complete the program in one academic year plus the following summer, and for a few students, in one academic year. Students electing to study on a part-time basis can complete the degree in two years. The part-time option is designed to accommodate the professional obligations of students who are employed. This is a rigorous and concentrated program that demands a serious commitment of time and energy. Students are expected to devote significant time to completing reading assignments, class assignments, and term projects outside of class.
Degree requirements include the five Core Courses in Narrative Medicine (22 points) and the Research Methodology course (4 points), which is required for all students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research. The remaining 12 to 16 points may include any combination of (1) additional Topics in Narrative Medicine courses; (2) elective courses chosen from other departments (up to six points: note that many graduate courses in other departments are three points each); Independent Study (one to four points) and/or (4) a Capstone (two to four points).
The core curriculum of this pioneering M.S. in Narrative Medicine combines intensive exposure to narrative writing and close reading skills, literary and philosophical analysis, and experiential work, with the opportunity to apply this learning in clinical and educational settings. Core courses provide the conceptual grounding for work in narrative medicine, and introduce the direct practice of teaching narrative competence to others. Students combine core curriculum work with more focused study of important and current topics in the field. Focused seminars draw on the resources of more than one discipline. Courses rotate to reflect the current concerns, methodologies, and analytic approaches of narrative scholars and practitioners. To allow students to individualize their professional education in narrative medicine, they may choose electives from among a wide range of offerings at the University, with advice and approval of the faculty adviser. Electives enable students to gain knowledge in academic disciplines they wish to pursue (e.g., medical anthropology) or in subject areas of special professional interest (e.g. aging).The optional Capstone Project offers a wide range of opportunities for supervised or mentored work: a clinical placement, a program development and/or evaluation project, a scholarly thesis, or a writing project. It may combine independent work with a summer intensive workshop, such as the Columbia University Oral History summer workshop or an intensive writing workshop. The requirement can also be satisfied by clinical practicums that may include teaching, witnessing, or serving as a teaching assistant.

For more information on the courses please visit the website: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/courses

Research Methodology

All students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research, are required to take our Research Methods in Narrative Medicine course

Funding and Financial Resources

We want to make sure that the cost of your continuing education and professional studies do not stand in the way of your goals.
Most students at the School of Professional Studies use a combination of savings, scholarships, loans, outside grants, sponsors, or employer tuition benefits to cover the cost of attendance. However you choose to finance your education, consider it an investment in your future, and know that we, in conjunction with the Office of Student Financial Planning, are here to help and advise you along the way.

You can find more information on the funding available here: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/tuition-and-financing/financial-resources

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