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Masters Degrees (Social Interaction)

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Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme provides you with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that currently shape social sciences. Read more

Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme provides you with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that currently shape social sciences. It also provides an opportunity to develop specialised research methods skills in social policy in an internationally renowned department for Social Policy research.

The Social Science Research (Social Policy) programme consists of compulsory and optional modules, delivered across four different academic schools within the University, which means you benefit from an interdisciplinary approach to your studies. The academic schools involved are:

  • School of Social, Political, and Geographical Sciences
  • School of Sport, Exercise, and Health Sciences
  • School of Business and Economics
  • School of Science.

On completion of the Social Science Research (Social Policy) programme, you will have met the MSc training requirements for PhD funding from the ESRC, opening up the possibility of securing PhD funding from the ESRC. Further information regarding the future career prospects associated with this programme can be found below.

The modules are taught by leading researchers selected for their expertise in the taught research methods and topics.

What makes this programme different?

The Social Policy courses in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough Universities are consistently rated in the top-15 UK Social Policy courses by national league tables.

The Department of Social Sciences hosts the prestigious Centre for Research in Social Policy (CRSP) which over the past 30 years has developed an international reputation for high quality applied policy research. Most prominently, CRSP is currently involved in the study of the Minimum Income Standard programme.

The School of Social Political and Geographical Sciences is the home to the Centre for Research in Communication and Culture (CRCC). Established in 1991, the centre has since grown to be one of the largest of its kind in the UK. The CRCC’s core topics themes include:

  • Culture, Economy, and Policy
  • Interaction and Discourse
  • Media, Memory, and History
  • Nations, Migrants, and Citizenship
  • Political Communication
  • Social, Political, and Cultural Theory

The programme is in full compliance with the Economic and Social Research Council’s requirements for an MSc in Social Science Research. On completion of the course, you will have met the training requirements for PhD funding from the ESRC, opening up the possibility of securing PhD funding from the ESRC.

Who should study this programme?

  • Individuals wishing to pursue a career in academia
  • Social policy practitioners, who wish to both develop and strengthen their applied research skills
  • Those wishing to conduct research in non-academic public and private sector roles

What you'll study

Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well equipped to progress onto being high level researchers in their chosen field of study.

Modules

Social Science Research (Social Policy) covers a wide range of topics; please visit the website for a full list of modules.



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Interaction Design at Malmö University. We educate designers who can articulate and develop cutting-edge practices in key areas of interaction design. Read more

Interaction Design at Malmö University

We educate designers who can articulate and develop cutting-edge practices in key areas of interaction design: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development. Students approach these genres within a broad context that considers the social, political and ethical consequences of their designs. Our education is studio-based, bringing students into close contact with our design professors.

This is a one-year programme, which is also offered as the first year of a two-year programme providing a more well-rounded combination of design practice and academic research.

Interaction Design: one-year programme

Interaction Design: two-year programme

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.

Practical Design Skills and Academic Research

Interaction design is a rapidly changing discipline, and we maintain the relevance of our education by working with real-world design cases and outside clients that include local industry partners, as well as cultural and civic organisations. Navigating a shifting design landscape also requires the critical mindset of a scholar, and we foster reflective design by teaching research skills and involving students in active research projects.

Internationally Recognised

Our programme was founded in 1998, making it one of the more established programmes of its kind. We focus on areas where our design and research excellence is internationally recognised: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development.

Who are you?

Interaction design requires the fusion of multiple skill sets. We recruit students with different backgrounds – design, media, engineering, the arts, and social sciences – and focus our teaching on creating disciplinary synergy in the concrete design work.

Content

The programme comprises full-time study for one academic year, divided into four courses starting with a studio-based introduction to multidisciplinary collaboration and mainstream interaction design. The next two courses address embodied interaction and collaborative media, two of our signature topics. The final course is a Master’s level graduation project.

Upon graduation, you are eligible for the second year of the two-year Master’s programme to learn more about interaction design research and theory. Read more about the two-year Master’s programme

Teaching Methods

The programme is based on a learning-by-doing pedagogy. This means that we encourage an iterative practice of experimentation and reflection. As teachers, we view ourselves as coaches guiding you in this process.

Studio-based

The programme is studio-based. You will also have access to computer labs, a materials workshop and a prototyping lab for electronics, sensor and microprocessor programming.

Group work in multidisciplinary teams

The primary method of learning is through group work in multidisciplinary teams with classmates and other stakeholders. Abilities to work in teams and with others – including user communities – are important parts of our curriculum, and several projects are organised to practice doing this.

Humanistic approach

With our humanistic approach, you will be practicing qualitative research approaches to support your design of tangible artefacts as well as digital and interactive services, systems and artefacts. We emphasize an understanding of people in their use situations.

Reflective and experimental design thinking and practical doing

Prototyping in the studio and real-world contexts is an integral part of becoming an interaction designer.

To practice reflective and experimental design activity, projects and courses integrate seminars and hands-on workshops introducing students to, among other things, ethnographic fieldwork, visualisation, low- and high-fidelity prototyping, microprocessor programming and video sketching, as well as evaluation of use qualities. All these practices are backed up by literature references and examples.

The thesis project

Your thesis project will be a combination of a design project and reflective writing that will involve communicating and discussing your design work. This is one result of a student's work in Thesis Project I.

Working environments

Students have access to studio space, and we encourage a healthy studio culture. This is where we conduct group-work, seminars, workshops, presentations and discussions. Close by there is a well-equipped materials workshop and a physical prototyping lab for electronics and sensor work. Additionally, we often use the facilities at the MEDEA research centre for final presentations, exhibitions, seminars and programme-meetings.

Career opportunities

Students enter the programme with different kinds of expertise, from art and design to engineering and social sciences. Upon graduation, you will have built a strong understanding of how your particular skills play a role in interaction design and how they combine with other specialities of fellow designers.

Potential positions

Most alumni move on to positions as interaction designers, user experience specialists or usability architects in the ICT, telecom and media industries. For some, this involves fine-tuning the interfaces and interactions of current products to users' needs; other interaction designers work on concept development for future products and services. Yet other alumni find their calling in strategic positions where the role of interaction design is considered in relation to market and business development.

Some interaction designers are also found in the role of change agents in public organisations and NGOs.



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The programme is designed for. - research training; it is not a qualifying programme for those seeking to become social work practitioners. Read more

Overview

The programme is designed for:

- research training; it is not a qualifying programme for those seeking to become social work practitioners
- those developing careers as applied researchers and evaluators in social care
- prospective PhD students in Social Work.

The programme systematically reviews and critically evaluates a range of theories, methodologies and paradigms of research that are relevant to social work, and the application of these to specific areas of social enquiry in which students are specialising. Within an active research community (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) students are supported in identifying, investigating and realising their own research. Students are equipped with the skills to contribute to social work research projects using any of the main methodologies of the social sciences.

The excellence of the research undertaken within the Department of Social & Policy Sciences has been recognised most recently by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011. We were also ranked 2nd in the country in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

- South West Doctoral Training Centre
This MRes is accredited by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC), specifically, as part of the larger South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC). It forms part of the Social Work Discipline-specific Pathway.

The MRes can be taken as a course in its own right, or as part of the 1 + 3 (MRes + PhD) pathway, where successful graduates could proceed onto an MPhil or PhD in the Department of Social & Policy Sciences.

If applying for an MRes + PhD (the 1 + 3 programme) you should indicate on the Application Form, your preferred PhD route.

Progression from the MRes to the MPhil or PhD stage is dependent on achieving an acceptable level of achievement (typically an overall average of 60% on at least the taught component of the MRes).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mres-soci-work/

Programme structure

Core Units

- Short research apprenticeship project (MRes)
- Quantitative methods 1: introduction to quantitative methods
- Ethical issues in research, policy and practice
- Long research apprenticeship project
- Research for social work: values, methods and contexts
- Qualitative methods 1
- Principles & skills of social research
- MRes Dissertation

Optional units

- Quantitative methods 2
- Qualitative methods 2

View Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/sp/sp-proglist-pg.html#H) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of coursework essays, class exercises, projects, oral presentations and examinations.

We also place strong emphasis on developing presentation and discussion/communication skills, which in many units is part of the assessed work.

Careers

The Social & Policy Sciences department is committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their training.

Our graduates generally go on to work in a wide variety of organisations, such as:

- Social research in universities and research institutes, government, business, voluntary organisations and international organisations.
- Public policy analysis at local, national and international levels.
- Public information and campaigning within organisations concerned with wellbeing, sustainability and social justice.

About the department

The Department of Social & Policy Sciences (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/) includes academics from social policy, sociology, social work and international development.

The international excellence of our research (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/) was recognised by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

We are committed to advancing learning and knowledge through teaching and research. Our Department collaborates with a wide range of users at the local, national, European and global levels.

Postgraduate programmes:
We offer a wide range of postgraduate programmes. Our postgraduate teaching strongly reflects our research and our links to policy-makers and development institutions at the national, European and global level.

Our Department also has an active MPhil/PhD research programme. We take great pride in fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

Seminar series:
We run a lively and well attended postgraduate research seminar series. Each of the Research Centres run seminar series and conferences associated with their research activities. The University of Bath also has a Research in the World public lecture series where key national and international academics are invited to speak.

Main areas of research

We are an internationally-recognised research-intensive department with a strong focus on policy and practice and a commitment to contribute to social wellbeing and social justice.

We draw together academic staff with backgrounds in Social Policy, Sociology, Social Work and International Development and work closely with colleagues in Psychology, Economics, and Health.

We also have an active and vibrant community of research students (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) undertaking their own research alongside our academic staff.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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The MRes Social Policy programme is designed for;. - those developing careers as policy analysts or applied researchers in national or international social or public policy organisations or government departments. Read more

Overview

The MRes Social Policy programme is designed for;

- those developing careers as policy analysts or applied researchers in national or international social or public policy organisations or government departments
- prospective PhD students in social or public policy.

The programme combines the academic study of social policy with a comprehensive exploration of research methods. Students develop experience and skills through analysing, comparing and evaluating social and public policies. Within an active research community (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) students are supported in identifying, investigating and realising their own original research. We encourage diversity of intake regarding experience, qualifications and interests to stimulate the mutual experience and learning.

The excellence of the research undertaken within the Department of Social & Policy Sciences has been recognised most recently by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

- South West Doctoral Training Centre
This MRes is accredited by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC), specifically, as part of the larger South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC). It forms part of the Social Policy Discipline-specific Pathway.

The MRes can be taken as a course in its own right, or as part of the 1 + 3 (MRes + PhD) pathway, where successful graduates could proceed onto an MPhil or PhD in the Department of Social & Policy Sciences.

If applying for an MRes + PhD (the 1 + 3 programme) you should indicate on the Application Form, your preferred PhD route.

Progression from the MRes to the MPhil or PhD stage is dependent on achieving an acceptable level of achievement (typically an overall average of 60% on at least the taught component of the MRes).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mres-soci-poli/

Programme structure

Core Units

- Short research apprenticeship project (MRes)
- Quantitative methods 1: introduction to quantitative methods
- Long research apprenticeship project
- Research for policy: concepts, methods and values
- Qualitative methods 1, Principles & skills of social research
- MRes Dissertation

Optional units

- Comparative European social policy
- International family policy
- Globalisation & economic insecurity: social policy challenges
- Comparative research methods
- Quantitative methods 2
- Qualitative methods 2

View Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/sp/sp-proglist-pg.html#FB) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of coursework essays, class exercises, projects, oral presentations and examinations.

We also place strong emphasis on developing presentation and discussion/communication skills, which in many units is part of the assessed work.

Careers

The Social & Policy Sciences department is committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their training.

Our graduates generally go on to work in a wide variety of organisations, such as:

- Social research in universities and research institutes, government, business, voluntary organisations and international organisations.
- Public policy analysis at local, national and international levels.
- Public information and campaigning within organisations concerned with wellbeing, sustainability and social justice.

About the department

The Department of Social & Policy Sciences (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/) includes academics from social policy, sociology, social work and international development.

The international excellence of our research (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/) was recognised by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

We are committed to advancing learning and knowledge through teaching and research. Our Department collaborates with a wide range of users at the local, national, European and global levels.

Postgraduate programmes:
We offer a wide range of postgraduate programmes. Our postgraduate teaching strongly reflects our research and our links to policy-makers and development institutions at the national, European and global level.

Our Department also has an active MPhil/PhD research programme. We take great pride in fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

Seminar series:
We run a lively and well attended postgraduate research seminar series. Each of the Research Centres run seminar series and conferences associated with their research activities. The University of Bath also has a Research in the World public lecture series where key national and international academics are invited to speak.

Main areas of research

We are an internationally-recognised research-intensive department with a strong focus on policy and practice and a commitment to contribute to social wellbeing and social justice.

We draw together academic staff with backgrounds in Social Policy, Sociology, Social Work and International Development and work closely with colleagues in Psychology, Economics, and Health.

We also have an active and vibrant community of research students (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) undertaking their own research alongside our academic staff.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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The MA Communication and International Marketing programme equips students with a critical understanding of communication in contemporary international marketing contexts in order to address the market needs of the international business environment. Read more

The MA Communication and International Marketing programme equips students with a critical understanding of communication in contemporary international marketing contexts in order to address the market needs of the international business environment.

The programme comprises six compulsory modules and two optional modules covering a wide range of disciplines. These offer numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

It is ideal for marketing and communications professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, languages or business disciplines wanting to deepen their insight into marketing across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The overall purpose of the programme is to:

  • Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of communication and marketing communication
  • Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
  • Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area of (Marketing) Communication

In particular, the programme aims to:

  • Develop students’ awareness of the linguistic and cultural differences arising from the (inter)cultural encounter of Anglophone culture(s) with the diverse cultures subject to its influence
  • Sensitize students to linguistic and cultural difference in the construction of everyday and institutional discourse resulting from the increased marketization of private and public services, as well as to the issues and concerns of the rapidly growing media industries
  • Impart the knowledge and skills of communication and marketing necessary to enable students to compete for jobs/research opportunities in fields relevant to their degree (human resource management, advertising, international marketing), as well as PhD opportunities in this area
  • Develop students’ abilities to evaluate and judiciously apply scholarship in Communication

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to-face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of models of consensus-generation, agenda-setting, opinion-formation and communicative interaction
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the issues and concerns involved in strategic communication, in marketing communication and intercultural communication
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and content and methods of the marketing function, both within corporations and as a service industry
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role of marketing with particular reference to international case studies
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation (this would involve the collection, analysis and manipulation of data of diverse kinds from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives, an awareness of the (dis)advantages of each frame and/or method and, consideration of the ethical issues involved in data collection and storage relative to the (sub) cultures examined)

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
  • Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
  • Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills

  • Demonstrate an ability to create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
  • Demonstrate the capacity to evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement marketing communication policies

Key / transferable skills

  • Demonstrate the capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
  • Demonstrate an ability to manage learning self-critically

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. Read more
This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. You will study the process of learning and the use of second languages. The programme allows you to focus your research on your language of choice, for instance Dutch as a second language, but also French, German, Swedish, Chinese, or any other language.
You will approach second language acquisition from many different angles, including psychology, social interaction and language teaching. You will be introduced to the field of linguistics, language acquisition and language teaching theory.
The program focuses especially on Dynamic System Theory, which explains how cultural differences become bodily differences. You will learn about the social, cultural and political processes that play a role in using a language or that may cause the use of a second language to decline. You will explore didactic applications of recent research and theoretical developments, and learn about computer assisted language learning.

Why in Groningen?

The MA Applied Linguistics at the University of Groningen is a unique programme focussing on the processes involved in second language learning, as well as teaching theories. The programme encompasses various fields of study, as learning and using a second language may be approached from many different angles. Students will explore and discuss the factors that relate to second language development, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching, and culture.

In addition to theoretical and teaching paradigms, students will also take classes in the research practices and methodology essential for conducting applied linguistics studies and research. These classes will act as the foundation from which students will be able to conduct their own applied linguistics research in the form of the MA thesis in Semester 2.The MA Applied Linguistics is a truly international programme, welcoming students from all over the world. The classes are taught entirely in English, and students are encouraged to use their own language experiences as the basis for their individual linguistic enquiries and research.Our degree programme is small, which means that students benefit from small, intimate classes and close collaborative relationships with the other students as well as instructors.

Job perspectives

After completing this programme, you can pursue a career in research, or set up language teaching projects. You are also equipped to take positions on the European level that deal with issues of language policy.

Job examples

- Linguist (L2)
- language research
- language education
- language policy
- language testing
- curriculum development
- publishing

Research in Applied Linguistics focuses on the process of learning and using a second language. It covers various fields of study because learning and using a second language can be approached from many different angles, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching and culture.

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This programme can support you in developing your professionalism by enhancing your skills, expanding your knowledge and reflecting on values. Read more

This programme can support you in developing your professionalism by enhancing your skills, expanding your knowledge and reflecting on values.

Do you see yourself moving into a more experienced, advanced or strategic social work role? If so, this programme can support you in developing your professionalism by enhancing your skills, expanding your knowledge and reflecting on values. They offer a whole range of modules designed to further your capabilities in all domains of the PCF, but they focus especially on practice education and professional leadership. In addition, many of the modules are designed to further your knowledge and skills outlined in the Knowledge and Skills Statement for Practice Supervisors of Social Workers in Child and Family Social Work.

Normally, practitioners take individual modules of this programme and apply through the Continuous Professional Development Framework. Please contact the  for more information. If you want to achieve the MA or exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma, and you are supported by your employer to do so, then you should apply to this programme.

The MA in Advanced Social Work: Practice Education is ideal for qualified social workers. If you are a professional from another discipline please go to the MA in Practice Education, which is aimed at other staff working in social welfare roles. Both programmes will enable you to extend and develop your existing competence and prepare for leadership and research in practice education. All modules, except the dissertation, can be taken as standalone MA-level CPD modules.

Modules & structure

Your first two modules will see you providing work-based learning and assessment for a recognised professional award, for example for social work students. You’ll develop the skills and knowledge in supporting and assessing learners. The modules will support you in meeting the requirements of the Practice Educator Professional Standards (PEPS). This allows you to become a practice educator for social work students on their first (PEPS stage 1) and last placement (PEPS stage 2). In your third and fourth modules, you’ll develop your practice education skills through designing, implementing and evaluating a practice learning intervention. If you successfully complete these four modules on one of the MA programmes you can leave at this stage with a Postgraduate Certificate in Practice Education.

In modules five to seven you’ll focus on developing the learning organisation. You’ll extend your skills and knowledge in developing professional leadership with individuals, teams and groups within and across organisations. The modules will focus on coaching, mentoring, supervision and reflective practice. If you are going to work with NQSW as an ASYE mentor and assessor, module five is designed for you. Professional leadership also involves developing the learning organisation through working not only with individuals but also with groups, whole organisations and in interagency practice. The last two modules specifically address these leadership skills and enhance your capabilities in working with teams and groups and in supporting workforce development through reflective practice and learning within and across organisations. If you successfully complete these modules on one of the MA programmes you can leave the programme at this stage with a Postgraduate Diploma.

You’ll complete a dissertation on a topic related to practice education. You’ll develop your strategic leadership in the field through your research, which will normally take the form of an action research project. You may also choose a more conventional dissertation, through which you’ll play a leading role in how the recommendations arising from your literature review could be implemented. Throughout your dissertation, you’ll learn research methodologies, and receive individual supervision and mentoring to help you design your research or literature review.

We also offer CPD modules on interpersonal skills for direct work with adult service users and on the Care Act, including adult safeguarding, which can be taken instead of two of the modules three to six or seven.

The modules have an academic and professional component. They support you in learning from your work, your reading and your interaction with others and by developing practice, skills and values, always aiming to enhance the experience of students, service users and carers you are working with.

Assessment

Assessed by coursework, assignment, reports, case study, dissertation and portfolio. 

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community StudiesSocial Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

  • understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
  • become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
  • change people’s lives through dance, drama and music

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

Find out more about the Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies.

Skills & careers

Our students have been successful in a range of areas, from postgraduate research to employment in local authority children’s services departments, adult services departments, independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as NSPCCFamily ActionMIND.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Understand and link practice and theory across public and social policy. This course is ideal for professionals in organisations that develop or implement social policy and public policy. Read more
Understand and link practice and theory across public and social policy.

Overview

This course is ideal for professionals in organisations that develop or implement social policy and public policy. During your studies you'll develop the skills and knowledge required to influence policy and you'll link public policy theory to concrete examples of social policy.

You'll deepen your understanding of policy-making and explore the interaction between policy-making on local, national and global levels. You'll use evidence to improve social policy practice and develop a range of transferable skills such as critical thinking and designing and conducting research.

By choosing this part-time online course you will be able to combine your study with your career and family. You'll also be studying with one of the top universities in the world, with teaching and support from experienced academics and practitioners. Our Department is ranked 25th in the world, and 4th in the UK (QS World Rankings 2016). All our courses are run directly by us, so you can always count on coherent and strong support from your academic tutors, personal supervisor and our dedicated support team.

You'll study alongside your peers working in similar organisations around the world. You'll be able to actively engage with them and share your ideas, learning and experience as you progress through the course. You'll also be in a position to immediately apply your learning and insight to your work and your organisation.

Course content

This masters course will explore four themes:
-The social policy process: how are social policies made within nation states? What is the role of institutions, interests, ideas and evidence in this governance process?
-Social policy in a globalised world: how do global, international and transnational influences filter through the national policy-making process, and how do they impact on the design and the effectiveness of social policies?
-Social policy, politics and society: why is social policy making a conflicted process? How do social policies shape society and impact on specific social groups?
-Social policy and research: how can social policy be analysed? How can research improve the design and implementation of social policies?
-In your second year you'll start to prepare for your independent dissertation which will allow you to explore an area of particular interest. You'll have support from a dedicated dissertation supervisor.

You can also study for a shorter period of time and graduate with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma.

Modules
To graduate with a masters degree you will need to take 120 credits of taught modules and complete a dissertation worth 60 credits.

You'll study these modules to a schedule. This will allow you to participate online with academics and fellow students from around the world.

Year one: foundation
In your first year you'll study 60 credits with these modules:
-Social Policy Analysis (20 credits)
-Globalisation and Social Policy (20 credits)
-Social Policy: Evidence, Ideas and Institutions (20 credits)

Year two: specialisation and dissertation
In your second year you'll study a combination of taught modules, which will help prepare you for your dissertation:
-Introduction to Research Methods (20 credits)
-Dissertation Workshop Part One (10 credits)
-Dissertation Workshop Part Two (10 credits)

You will also explore an area of particular interest by choosing to study one of these modules:
-Comparative Social Policy (20 credits)
-Housing and Social Justice (20 credits)
-Work, Welfare and Citizenship (20 credits)

Careers

This course is ideal for people working in the public and not-for-profit sectors as well as people working in for-profit organisations that deliver public services. It will allow you to develop the skills required for management in a large and complex organisation. You'll achieve an understanding of public policy so you can analyse and influence policy-making and implementation.

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Support the professional learning of others through leadership in education, supervision and reflective practice. Read more

Support the professional learning of others through leadership in education, supervision and reflective practice

Do you see yourself moving into a more experienced, advanced or strategic professional role? If so, this programme can support you in developing your professionalism by enhancing your skills, expanding your knowledge and reflecting on values. They offer a whole range of modules designed to further your capabilities in all domains of the Social Work Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), but they focus especially on practice education and professional leadership. In addition, many of the modules are designed to further your knowledge and skills outlined in the Knowledge and Skills Statement for Practice Supervisors of Social Workers in Child and Family Social Work.

Normally, practitioners take individual modules of this programme and apply through the Continuous Professional Development Framework. Please contact the  for more information. If you want to achieve the MA or exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma, and you are supported by your employer to do so, then you should apply to this programme.

The MA in Practice Education is ideal for social care professionals other than social work. If you are a qualified social worker please go to MA in Advanced Social Work: Practice Education. Both programmes will enable you to extend and develop your existing competence and prepare for leadership and research in practice education. All modules, except the dissertation, can be taken as standalone MA-level CPD modules.

This programme has been endorsed by TCSW as working to an agreed set of quality criteria and offers provision that meets the CPD learning needs of social workers.  

Modules & structure

Your first two modules will see you providing work-based learning and assessment for a recognised professional award, for example for social work students. You’ll develop the skills and knowledge in supporting and assessing learners. The modules will support you in meeting the requirements of the Practice Educator Professional Standards (PEPS). This allows you to become a practice educator for social work students on their first (PEPS stage 1) and last placement (PEPS stage 2). In your third and fourth modules, you’ll develop your practice education skills through designing, implementing and evaluating a practice learning intervention. If you successfully complete these four modules on one of the MA programmes you can leave at this stage with a Postgraduate Certificate in Practice Education.

In modules five to seven you’ll focus on developing the learning organisation. You’ll extend your skills and knowledge in developing professional leadership with individuals, teams and groups within and across organisations. The modules will focus on coaching, mentoring, supervision and reflective practice. If you are going to work with NQSW as an ASYE mentor and assessor, module five is designed for you. Professional leadership also involves developing the learning organisation through working not only with individuals but also with groups, whole organisations and in interagency practice. The last two modules specifically address these leadership skills and enhance your capabilities in working with teams and groups and in supporting workforce development through reflective practice and learning within and across organisations. If you successfully complete these modules on one of the MA programmes you can leave the programme at this stage with a Postgraduate Diploma.

You’ll then complete a dissertation on a topic related to practice education. You’ll develop your strategic leadership in the field through your research, which will normally take the form of an action research project. You may also choose a more conventional dissertation, through which you’ll play a leading role in how the recommendations arising from your literature review could be implemented. Throughout your dissertation, you’ll learn research methodologies, and receive individual supervision and mentoring to help you design your research or literature review.

We also offer CPD modules on interpersonal skills for direct work with adult service users and on the Care Act, including adult safeguarding, which can be taken instead of two of the modules three to six or seven.

The modules have an academic and professional component. They support you in learning from your work, your reading and your interaction with others and by developing practice, skills and values, always aiming to enhance the experience of students, staff, service users and carers you are working with.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.



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The MRes in Social Anthropology provides training in research methods combined with work on a specific anthropological research project. Read more
The MRes in Social Anthropology provides training in research methods combined with work on a specific anthropological research project. It is a one-year programme of rigorous training in research issues and methods featuring guidance in and production of a substantial research project proposal, plus 15,000-word independently researched dissertation (thesis). The taught portion of the MRes programme is the same as the 9-month PhD pre-fieldwork training programme: students take the same courses in ethnographic methods and social theory, and receive the same close interaction with their supervisor, a senior member of department staff. There is also training in quantitative social science methods.

The course offers critical discussion of students' research projects and provides training in:

- how fieldwork contributes to social scientific knowledge
- how to isolate the theoretical questions that inform particular pieces of ethnography
- how to identify the kinds of empirical evidence necessary to address those questions.

Students are allocated a supervisor and faculty advisor in the same way as those registered for the PhD; and will normally continue with this supervisor throughout their PhD.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssamrsap

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students should have:
(1) developed a deeper general knowledge of the comparative, theoretical and epistemological issues underlying contemporary social anthropological research and, where relevant to proposed doctoral research, developed a deeper knowledge of a specific geographical and/or topical area of anthropology and of the critical debates within it;

(2) developed a knowledge of a range of current methods, methodologies and research findings and a conceptual understanding that enables their proper deployment and evaluation.

(3) where relevant, advanced own plans for field research and undertaken field preparation with reference to (a) overall aims of the course; (b) specific social, ethical and other practical matters relating to their chosen ‘field’.

Format

The taught element of this course consists of these compulsory streams:

- The Pre-fieldwork seminar
- The Ethnographic Methods Course, Parts I (Michaelmas) and II (Lent)
- Statistics for Social Anthropologists (workshop in Michaelmas term)
- The Social Sciences’ Research Methods Centre Course on Basic Statistical Methods, modules on Foundations in Applied Statistics and on Designing Surveys.

Students are also strongly encouraged to attend other optional elements:

- The ‘Experiences from the Field’ seminar, run by writing-up students recently returned from the field.
- Ad hoc sessions in transferable skills or anthropological method, such as journal publication, technologies of research and data management, film-making and research with children.
- The Senior Research Seminar, scheduled for Fridays during term time.. This is the place where the division really gets together, and we usually attract very good speakers from across the UK and overseas.

Students receive written feedback on their three assessed essays and thesis. In addition, students receive termly progress reports online from their supervisor via Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System (CGSRS).

Assessment

A thesis of not more than 15,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding tables, appendices, and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Human, Social and Political Science. An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls may be held at the discretion of the examiners.
The mark awarded for the thesis will comprise 60% of the total.

1. One essay of not more than 4,000 words in length, relating to anthropology and social theory chosen by the candidate from a list of questions announced by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Human, Social and Political Science by the Division of Michaelmas Term.
2. One essay of not more than 4,000 words in length, relating to professional research practice chosen by the candidate from a list of questions announced by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Human, Social and Political Science by the Division of Michaelmas Term.
3. One essay of not more than 4,000 words relating to research methods. This is the individual report on the extended case study prepared for the Ethnographic Methods course. This essay will count for 10% of the total marks for the examination.
Each essay will count for 10% of the total marks.

One “open book” online test for the Foundations in Applied Statistics course and one written assignment for the Designing Surveys course taken via the Social Science Research Methods Centre Survey Methods.

Assessments will be administered on a pass/fail basis as part of the relevant modules and count for 10% of the total.

Continuing

Students continuing to the PhD will undertake 12-18 months of ethnographic fieldwork subject to successful completion of a 7,000 word Research Proposal Portfolio and receiving clearance to proceed to fieldwork from the PhD Committee.

On return to Cambridge, students devote the remainder of their research time to writing their PhD dissertation in close consultation with their supervisor.

Upon return from the field, writing-up students are also expected to attend the following seminars during term-time:

- The PhD Writing-up seminar
- The Senior Research seminar
- The Senior Research Seminar analysis session.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- William Wyse Bursary -

All applicants for the MRes are eligible to apply for the Wyse Bursary for Social Anthropology for which a separate application is required.
http://www.socanth.cam.ac.uk/online-forms/

- ESRC-DTC Studentships (UK or EU nationals only) -

In order to be eligible for an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) award, applicants who do not already hold a ESRC-recognised research training Masters will be registered for this course and not the PhD in the first instance. In addition applicants should submit a brief statement explaining their interest in become a DTC student and how this might benefit their future career. Further information on the DTC is available here: http://esrc-dtc.cshss.cam.ac.uk

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Designing at the forefront of communication technology. The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. Read more
Designing at the forefront of communication technology.

Overview

The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. These advances have created a demand for graduates who understand social and participatory design principles and have the skills to design new interactive technologies.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies provides an innovative mix of social and technical skills. You will gain an understanding of the social, political and economic factors that affect the use of interactive technologies, examining how technology is perceived and employed by the user, and you will develop the skills to design and create usable and accessible devices and applications.

Course content

Understand social media and interactive technologies through the key roles they play in society. Explore topics in human-computer interaction, user-centred design, social and cultural theory and human psychology and learn to apply them to the practical problems of designing interactive pages, devices and systems.

Modules for this social media degree are taught by experts from both the Department of Sociology and the Department of Computer Science.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies includes eight core modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Metrics and Society
-Themes and Issues in Contemporary Sociology
-Research Methods for Interactive Technologies
-User-centred Design for Interactive Technologies

You will develop, design, implement and manage your own original research project, supervised by a member of staff with the relevant experience for your topic. You will analyse the data and produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Examples of previous projects include:
-Accessibility of iPhone/iPad apps
-Democracy and participation in York City
-The use of social networking sites by the older generation
-Social robotics and companionship
-Living with the h-index?
-Investigating immersion in games with inattentional blindness
-Immersion and cognitive effort when playing videogames
-Immersion in audio-only games

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge needed to play a leading role in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. This social media degree also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD level.

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The Masters in Intercultural Communication with International Business combines linguistic studies, cultural studies, international business components and training in research methods. Read more

The Masters in Intercultural Communication with International Business combines linguistic studies, cultural studies, international business components and training in research methods.

You will take six compulsory modules, two optional modules and write a dissertation where you have the opportunity to specialise according to your personal interests. The programme includes numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

The programme is ideal for business professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, English language or business disciplines who would like to deepen their insight into business across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Career prospects

This degree will prepare you for a career in the areas of communication and intercultural consultancy, particularly, though not exclusively, where the use of English is required.

More specifically, the programme will appeal if you are seeking to work in multinational and international business, in particular in the fields of intercultural training, human resource management, and communication and marketing.

It will provide valuable preparation for careers in government overseas agencies and international diplomatic organisations, the voluntary sector, local government community initiatives and business consultancies, as well as in the communication industries.

Many of our graduates go on to find employment in a wide range of international organisations and businesses; others choose to take research degrees in their subject.

Academic support

As a student of the School of Literature and Languages, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of academics. You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

The business component of the programme will also allow you to benefit from the close affiliation with the Surrey Business School, a leading provider of internationally recognised postgraduate vocational management degrees.

The School has strong links with industry and has established a number of high-profile partnerships with multinational organisations. You will be supported by a team of international staff with a wealth of global experience and specialist expertise.

English language support for all

Programmes available to all students include:

  • Oral Skills
  • Academic Listening
  • Contemporary British Society
  • Pronunciation
  • Critical Thinking
  • Legal English
  • Academic Reading and Note-Taking
  • Grammar Revision
  • Essay Writing
  • Essay Writing for Native English Speakers
  • Thesis / Dissertation Writing

Educational aims of the programme

The overall purpose of the programme is to:

  • Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of intercultural communication in contemporary socio-cultural contexts
  • Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
  • Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area of Intercultural Communication

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

Students will be able to demonstrate:

  • A critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to- face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
  • A critical awareness of the issues and concerns involved in mediated and non-mediated intercultural communication
  • A comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
  • A detailed understanding of business organisations, their management challenges, and the changing external environment in which they operate

Intellectual / cognitive skills

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
  • Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
  • Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills

Students will have the skills to:

  • Create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
  • Evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement communication policies

Key / transferable skills

Students will be able to demonstrate:

  • The capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
  • An ability to manage learning self-critically

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Learn more about opportunities that might be available for this particular programme by using our student exchanges search tool.

Professional recognition

Surrey Business School is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) and by the Association of MBAs (AMBA).



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Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. Read more
Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. This course is ideal if you have existing programming skills and want to understand software users and work with them to create positive user experiences. The MRes Interaction Design course will help you stand out from other graduates by providing you with the skills and theoretical understanding needed to create successful products in industry or go on to further postgraduate study in a Interaction Design/User Experience/HCI related research field. There is a vibrant international research community developing new methods and theories that underpin this discipline within the broad field of HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) and more specific Interaction Design (IxD ) and User Experience (UxD) areas.

INDUSTRY LINKS

As part of the course you will have opportunities to work with external partners. At UCLan we work with a range on businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

We aim to provide a challenging and stimulating environment in which you can develop and learn new skills. As an MRes student you will be supported in exploring your full potential through taught modules and an extended project. Teaching is done in small groups with plenty of opportunities for practical work, networking with students and staff, and to get involved with research activities.

Assessment methods will include individual and group assignments, presentation and seminars.

FACILITIES

The course is delivered in the Computing and Technology Building at the City Campus in Preston at which students have access to the latest technology, and can study in a supportive environment. Facilities include a purpose built Human-Computer Interaction Suite which is used for the evaluation of software products.

OPPORTUNITIES

The goal of the course is to guide you, depending on your interests, to either go out into Industry or to progress to an academic research career. We aim to produce Interaction Design practitioners who understand how to create excellent interaction designs for a range of different scenarios.

Placement opportunities are available as an option for students who want to gain some work experience as part of the course.

We also aim to give you a thorough grounding in the Interaction Design research area so you are ready to start a PhD. After completing the MRes there will be opportunities for students to continue to MPhil or PhD study.

Our alumni have gone on to work a range of destinations including UX specialists, the BBC, and Tata.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Interaction Design is a branch of Computing concerned with how users interact with computer systems. This includes the roles of users in analysis, design and evaluation of systems, as well as methods for the system developer to create usable and useful interactive products for people, and extends to consideration of social aspects of computer use. In fact it is often more helpful to regard the computer program and its users as each being a component of a system. Many systems fail because of problems with the user interaction, rather than problems with the underlying code. This is because the human is the most complex component of the system, and the least well understood.

This course is suitable for:
-Those who wish to enter a career in Interaction Design or User Experience Design
-Those who wish to enhance their appeal to employers and stand out from other computing graduates.
-Those who wish to go on to study at PhD level
-Those in employment who wish to use the MRes project to develop a product for their employer and develop personally

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Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. Read more

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. This interdisciplinary degree programme sits at the intersection of engineering, behavioural sciences, and design. It combines academic rigour with practical and professional skills highly valued by employers.

About this degree

Students develop an understanding of the relevance and application of human physical, cognitive, social, and affective knowledge to the design of interactive systems. They learn to analyse and test user performance, preferences and experience in relation to human-centred interactive systems. Students will be able to characterise and apply a range of human-computer interaction and user-centred design styles.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two compulsory 30-credit core modules, four 15-credit optional modules and a 60-credit research project.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible up to three years is offered) consisting of two compulsory 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit optional modules.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time three months or flexible up to two years is offered. This consists of one 30-credit core module and 30 credits of optional modules.

Core modules

  • Interaction Science
  • Interaction Design

Optional modules

  • Accessibility and Assistive Technologies
  • Affective Interaction
  • Future Interfaces
  • Human Factors for Digital Health
  • Persuasive Games
  • Physical Computing and Prototyping
  • Socio-technical Systems
  • User-Centred Data Visualization

Dissertation/report

The MSc project gives you the opportunity to conduct research in the area of human-computer interaction under the supervision of a member of UCLIC staff. A broad range of topics and questions are offered and you will work closely with your supervisor in selecting and carrying out your project. Many former projects have contributed to publications at leading international conferences, such as the ACM SIGCHI conference.

Teaching and learning

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework is varied and includes design portfolios, presentations, videos, reflective reports, and online peer learning tasks as well as more traditional academic essays.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Human-Computer Interaction MSc

Careers

Our graduates are employed by technology multinationals, start-ups, government agencies, consultancies and in academia. They take up roles such as User Experience (UX) Researchers, Interaction Designers, Usability Specialists and Information Architects. Many progress to senior roles within a few years of graduation.

Employability

This degree is highly regarded by our colleagues in industry. Along with developing HCI research skills, the programme allows students to demonstrate skills in presenting, writing and collaboration that are valued by employers. We have a large network of alumni working in London and across the world. Many of them are involved with our industry speaker series and careers events, and they regularly send opportunities to our jobs mailing list for recent graduates.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is taught by the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), a world leading Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction, working collaboratively with industry and the research community. UCLIC, and before it the UCL Ergonomics Unit, have provided training in this field for over thirty years. We have excellent links with industry partners, offer students a weekly industry speaker series and run visits to consultancies and field sites.

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Assessments are varied and include design portfolios, presentations, videos and reflective reports as well as academic essays and exams.

The MSc research project allows students to undertake cutting-edge research in human-computer interaction. Many former projects have been published and presented at leading international conferences.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Our Global Health & Social Justice course is a unique study pathway that combines the study of social science and anthropology with philosophy. Read more

Our Global Health & Social Justice course is a unique study pathway that combines the study of social science and anthropology with philosophy. Covering topics such as inequalities in preventable mortality, disease, disability and access to medical care across countries, it will help you to develop advanced skills in the critical analysis and possible solutions for global health inequalities.

 Key benefits

  • You will learn to think critically and independently about fundamental issues in Global Health & Social Justice and the interaction between them.
  • Opportunities to study central issues in global health including health measurements, global institutions and governance, social determinants of health, global health ethics, philanthrocapitalism, evidence-based medicine, and health economics.
  • Internationally recognised faculty from across disciplines, including global public health, sociology, anthropology, geography, gerontology, philosophy and political science.
  • Interdepartmental study course offers a diverse and exciting range of research options.

Description

The Global Health & Social Justice course will provide you with a demanding study pathway covering dynamic topics within global health. You will explore major issues and debates, as well as develop the capacity for critically assessing the scientific research and practices aiming to address global health inequalities. You with also cover the fundamental aspects relating to philosophical debates about social justice and health equity.

The course offers you flexibility with the choice to study either full or part-time. You will explore a range of required modules such as Designing Quantitative and Qualitative Research, Foundations in Global Health and Social Medicine, Critical Global Health and also Global Health Ethics, plus a range of further required and optional modules depending on your choice of pathways.

Course purpose

The MSc in Global Health & Social Justice is ideal for anyone wishing to develop a rigorous understanding of the dynamic field of global health; it is suitable for health professionals, policy makers, philanthropists, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organizations, and potential PhD students and academics.

It provides access to the major issues and debates in global health, develops capacity for critically assessing the scientific research and practices aiming to address global health inequalities. It also grounds students in the philosophical debates about social justice and health equity. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, and you will typically have 15 hours of this per 15-credit module over a 10 week term. We also expect you to undertake 135 hours of independent study for each module. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

The department assesses students on a combination of essays, written examinations, oral presentations and the dissertation. The nature of assessment varies by module.

Career prospects

Graduates from this course have gone on to the following destintations:

  • heathcare consultant
  • internal medicine physician
  • research worker
  • specialist registrar (old age psychiatry)


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