• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
"social" AND "exclusion"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Social Exclusion)

We have 63 Masters Degrees (Social Exclusion)

  • "social" AND "exclusion" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 63
Order by 
Do you ever wonder why mothers are more likely than fathers to work part-time and care for their children? Or why some countries oblige unemployment benefit… Read more

Do you ever wonder why mothers are more likely than fathers to work part-time and care for their children? Or why some countries oblige unemployment benefit recipients to follow strict activation requirements while others do not? Maybe you’ve thought about what the expected and real-life benefits and challenges of the decentralization of care are? Or how societies are changing as a result of increasing cultural diversity and social inequality?

If you are interested in studying such issues, this one-year Master's programme is for you. You will develop knowledge about interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives on social policy and interventions, which will help you gain in-depth insight into the methodology and skills needed to research social policy and intervention issues in the domain of health and wellbeing, in particular related to work, care and participation. More specifically, you will look into problems such as:

  • Combining work and care
  • (Youth) unemployment
  • Social and cultural diversity
  • Social inequality and exclusion
  • Social care and participation

You will also study people's strategies for dealing with social risks, including:

  • Life-long learning
  • Labour market mobility
  • Social entrepreneurship
  • Innovative care networks
  • Multicultural collaborative efforts
  • Cultural diversity and integration
  • Neighborhood initiatives

This will be done by combining knowledge from the behavioural and social sciences.

Research-led teaching

The academic staff in our faculty participate in a wide variety of research projects into the problems that are central to this Master's programme, including themes as diverse as:

  • Social justice and social wellbeing
  • Capabilities for combining work and care
  • Youth and parenting in risk societies
  • Social innovation in social care
  • Social influence in health behaviours
  • Social diversity, health and wellbeing
  • Interethnic relations, cultural diversity and integration
  • Health communication and health promotion

International programme

Our Master’s programme is truly an international programme, in both its teaching and its orientation. Many of the problems focused on in this Master's programme have a strong European or global dimension, such as: ageing and care, migration and ethnic relationships, individualization and solidarity, gender and sexual diversity, and social environments and health. The same goes for the policy and intervention approaches that are used to tackle these issues. You will find that this international perspective is a key feature of the programme. You will learn to take this international perspective in a global teaching environment, with staff and students from the Netherlands, Europe and beyond.


In addition to its international, comparative perspective, the programme is also characterized by its interdisciplinary and multi-method approach. This international, interdisciplinary and multi-method focus also applies to the research you will undertake for your master’s thesis, as well as in the exploration of professional practices. In your research, you will draw on a combination of scientific perspectives from the behavioural and social sciences, in particular psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology. In exploring professional practices, you will also draw on a combination of scientific perspectives, through a focus on social policies, mostly informed by social science, and interventions, mostly grounded in behavioural sciences.

Programme objective

This Master's programme is intended to enable you to become an academic professional. As a graduate of the Social Policy and Public Health programme, you will be able to study social problems from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. You will also have acquired the professional and academic skills necessary to design, implement, and evaluate social policies and interventions. These skills will allow you to pursue a career as a social scientist, working with government agencies, social service organizations, civil society organizations, or private sector companies.

Read less
Effective social work demands a strong bond and understanding between professionals of different disciplines so that users of social work services receive the best possible care. Read more
Effective social work demands a strong bond and understanding between professionals of different disciplines so that users of social work services receive the best possible care. This Masters degree combines perspectives from social care, health, education and other relevant disciplines to ensure you can work effectively in the multi-disciplinary environment of today’s social work.

The programme emphasises effective practice and the practical relevance of theory in practice learning placements. You will have the opportunity to benefit from the knowledge and experience of a range of academics, practitioners, employers, policy makers, service users and carers who have backgrounds in social care, social work, health education and other cognate disciplines.

If you are a graduate from a relevant discipline, who is able to recognise the perspective of service users, their families and carers, and who can demonstrate a clear commitment to becoming a social worker, then this Masters degree is for you. Upon successful completion of the course, you will gain eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a qualified social worker.

What will I study?

The programme is underpinned by the national requirements for social work education and training as agreed by the Health and Care Professions Council and The College of Social Work. The degree therefore requires you to demonstrate an understanding of, for example: Human growth, development, mental health and disability; Assessment, planning, intervention and review; Communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs; Social work law and policy; Partnership-working and information-sharing across professional disciplines and agencies; Safeguarding; Working with conflict.

In Year 1, you will examine the historical and contemporary functions of social work in society and consider the legal and social policy frameworks within social work practice. You will be introduced to a range of sociological and psychological theories and social policies in order to understand some of the social problems and issues faced by individuals, families and communities in contemporary society. The concepts of social inclusion and exclusion will also be considered. Upon the successful completion of an assessment exercise, designed to ensure that you are fully prepared for direct practice, you will undertake a practice placement.

Year 2 is designed to develop your competency to practice in specialist social work contexts. It will also enhance your research skills. You will adopt a global perspective on social work and focus on issues such as race, diversity and equality. A second practice placement will be undertaken and you will complete a period of independent research, culminating in the submission of a dissertation.

How will I study?

Academic-based learning will be delivered through lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshops.

You will spend 170 days in practice learning placements supported by 30 days of assessed social work practice skills across the programme. These placements are organised and monitored by the University. You will undertake supervised and assessed work whilst on placement, all of which will contribute to the outcome of your degree.

How will I be assessed?

The programme is assessed through a combination of essays, presentations, text analysis, group work, portfolios, carers’ assessments, video/audio diaries, role plays and examinations. Practice learning will also be assessed, using a range of techniques.

Who will be teaching me?

You can expect input from staff with expertise and knowledge of a range of health and social services settings, together with high quality and emergent research profiles. Contributors to the programme also include people who have direct experience of services, expert practitioners, magistrates, politicians, senior managers and policy makers.

What are my career prospects?

A Masters degree in Social Work is your entry to a range of career opportunities in working with children, adults and communities. You will be able to work within the statutory, voluntary, private and charitable sectors.

Upon successful completion of the programme, you will gain eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Read less
Make a change in the world. Social policy makers weave the fabric of our society. And with the Master of Social policy program, you can examine key developments in social policy through a global lens, with a strong emphasis on social justice and the ability to influence policy. Read more

Make a change in the world. Social policy makers weave the fabric of our society. And with the Master of Social policy program, you can examine key developments in social policy through a global lens, with a strong emphasis on social justice and the ability to influence policy.

As a social policy maker, you can meld the needs of citizens with the roles of government and not‐for‐profit service agencies in contentious fields like employment, income support, education, health and climate change.

The Master of Social Policy enables you to understand the respective roles of government, private and not‐for‐profit sectors in meeting the needs of citizens. Understand and critique the key developments in social policy through a global lens, aiming to find ethically sustainable solutions, while considering the competing factors of social policy and the economy.


People with an interest in analysing key areas of contemporary social policy, including governance, inclusion and exclusion, social capital, and globalisation. You can engage with the social dimensions of social policy – race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, disability and age – and understand social policy as a contested process. Apply your research skills to a range of organisational contexts and explore real world experiences through the School’s partnership with the Brotherhood of St Laurence social research team. You can also activate your knowledge through an Executive Internship placement over two semesters.


The Master of Social Policy develops you professional knowledge and prepares you for work in fields including:

  • Community, state and national government
  • Policy design
  • Social administration and welfare work
  • Policy analysis
  • Management.

Read less
What is public policy? Who are the key actors and which institutions are involved? Who is it shaped by and how does it have an impact on an economic, social and cultural environment that is increasingly globalised?. Read more
What is public policy? Who are the key actors and which institutions are involved? Who is it shaped by and how does it have an impact on an economic, social and cultural environment that is increasingly globalised?

This programme investigates the international public policy environment in terms of global political economy and the impact of business, voluntary sector and public policy agents in the field of multi-level governance. The programme encompasses both a theoretical understanding of the policy process and models of appraisal with a practical orientation to evaluating research evidence.

As well as considering generic policy concerns, the programme gives you an opportunity to choose from a range of substantive policy issues. These include: the economics of public policy; poverty and social exclusion; penal policy; cities, housing and public policy; health and public policy; migration, asylum; and sustainability. All the programme units consider policy in an international and comparative context.

Programme structure

Core units
-Governance, Institutions and the Global Political Economy
-Informing and Evaluating Policy: Research Methods and Analysis
-Power Politics and the Policy Process
-Public Management and Organisations.

Optional units - Optional units can vary, but may include:
-The Economics of Public Policy
-Gender and Violence: International and Global Perspectives
-An International Analysis of Poverty and Social Exclusion
-Social Policy and Social Change in East Asia
-Critical Policy Studies and the Internationalisation of Public Policy
-The State of Labour
-International Analysis of crime, harm and justice
-Environmental policy and social justice
-Migration, asylum and human rights
-EU and global perspectives
-Social Policy and Social Change in East Asia
-Public Policy for a complex and uncertain world

You must complete a dissertation of 15,000 words. The dissertation accounts for 60 credit points. You begin work in late April and must submit by September.


Graduates from our MSc in Public Policy frequently work in roles that focus on strategy, policy development and implementation or policy research. Potential employers include local or central government departments; national or international non-governmental organisations; and international institutions, such as the European Union and the United Nations.

Read less
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?. Read more
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northumbria University is a dynamic course that offers a flexible mode of study. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of the key themes, issues and political debates concerning crime, crime control and criminal and social justice in the UK and globally.

Learn from an exciting, vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who are high quality teachers and internationally renowned experts within their subject. All of the Criminology staff team have doctorates or extensive professional experience in the Criminology/criminal justice sector.

Equipped with excellent practical, communication, and transferable skills you will be well placed for a range of roles including drug action teams, law enforcement, research, community safety, local authority, voluntary and charitable sectors.

This course has several different available start dates and study options - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtfscj6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscj6/

Learn From The Best

You will learn from a vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who will provide you with an outstanding learning experience, support and engagement in a research rich environment.

The academic team includes 16 criminology-specific academics with extensive research and engagement with the criminal justice system who bring their real-life experience to their teaching.

Nearly all criminology staff have received funding from leading research institutions and organisations such as Economic and Social Research Council, and they often work in partnership with state and third sector organisations such as Youth Offending Teams and homelessness charities.

They play leading roles in professional associations such as the British Society of Criminology and the Academy of the Social Sciences and serve on the editorial boards of leading disciplinary journals.

The department also has excellent international links within Europe, America and Australia where members of the staff team have been Visiting Fellows and Professors.

Teaching And Assessment

You will learn about research methods and their relevance to the global study of criminology, giving you the relevant skills to conduct your own research and engage with contemporary debates. These debates will be covered in the areas of global penal policy, international policing and security, and social exclusion.

All modules are compulsory, but assessment topics and dissertation allow you to concentrate on your own areas of interest as you develop your knowledge of theory, methods and practical topics.

Your learning combines formal input and practical exercises and discussion, allowing you to develop your ideas through interaction with academic staff and your peers.

Your dissertation is an independent and innovative piece of work, which is designed to demonstrate your skills in researching, collecting evidence, and organising that evidence. Working independently, with the support of a tutor, you’ll find your own sources and evaluate their helpfulness to your study topic.

Module Overview
CR7001 - Research Methods for Global Criminology (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7002 - Comparative Penal Policy (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7003 - International Crime, Policing and Security (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7004 - Social Exclusion and Victimisation in a Global Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

We want to make sure that you can conduct your studies to the best of your abilities, so we’ll always do our best to ensure that you know exactly what is expected of you.

The academic team will help you develop the skills required to plan, manage and review your learning, and support you if you have any issues. A central principle of this system is to help you develop a well-honed ability to work independently upon graduation.

You will be given a dedicated dissertation supervisor with relevant subject expertise and you’ll also have a guidance tutor who will provide support for your personal and academic development.

As you progress, the links between taught elements and your own independent learning will be explained at regular intervals, giving you every opportunity to achieve your full potential.

Research-Rich Learning

According to the UK’s most recent research excellence framework, the criminologists on this course are producing research outputs of international quality within world-leading peer reviewed journals such as Criminology, British Journal of Criminology, Theoretical Criminology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Policing and Society, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, and the Howard Journal of Criminal Justice.

Research is embedded throughout your course at all stages. You will be introduced to research methods to equip you with all the relevant skills you’ll need throughout your studies and beyond.

The Advanced Study Skills module introduces higher level reading, writing and research skills to help support you through the course. Whatever your previous background this module will provide you with important skills to succeed with your studies and to boost subsequent career prospects.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice focuses on embedding skills to prepare you for a career in a crime related area or for further doctoral study.

You will write traditional essays and develop skills sought by employers through real-world assessments including debate logs, a critical literature review, a portfolio, a research bid and a dissertation.

The department has close links with a range of relevant agencies, including the Prison Service, law enforcement agencies and the voluntary sector, and these close networks will further enhance your learning experience throughout the course.

You will also have access to tailored career guidance in 1-to-1 and CV skills sessions with the Northumbria Careers team.

Your Future

On graduating, you will have developed advanced written and oral communication skills and the ability to apply Criminological concepts to a wide range of practical issues.

You will be able to demonstrate research skills which are valuable in many professions and show that you are someone who can apply independent critical thinking and judgement.

Previous students are enjoying successful careers in the criminal justice and community justice sectors, drug action teams, law enforcement agencies, voluntary and charitable sectors, crime analysis, research, local government, community safety, youth justice and the prison system. You also have the opportunity to continue your academic studies at PhD level.

Read less
This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create. Read more

This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create.

Our aim is to prepare students to be collaborative, responsive, imaginative, politically engaged and culturally aware artist practitioners. The course is aimed at newly-emerging practitioners with a background in theatre, education, activism or social change, as well as at more established practitioners who want to reflect, refresh and develop their skills. We actively encourage the sharing of skills and expertise among our multi-national group of students. We prioritise applicants with some experience in the arts, education, activism or social care, and it is rare that we take applicants directly from their first degree.

Together we explore the ways in which theatre and performance is created by diverse groups of people in a variety of community, social and educational settings: in schools or on the streets, in children’s homes and elderly care, in conflict zones, conferences, crèches and youth clubs, pupil referral units and prisons, women’s refuges and refugee centres, hospitals and hostels – anywhere groups of people meet and interact.

What is applied theatre?

Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of exciting worldwide performance forms concerned with personal and social change.

The term embracestheatre of the oppressed, community theatre, theatre-in-education, drama in education, theatre for development, prison theatre, intercultural arts, intergenerational arts, theatre in museums, archives and heritage sites, story-telling, reminiscence theatre, conflict resolution. The work often moves across art forms. This is not a definitive list, as it is a field that is dynamic and changing.

The MA considers case studies from the UK and from across the globe. Central to this investigation are: questions of identity; representation; discrimination; health; equality; human rights; opportunity; access; social inclusion/exclusion; participation; ethics; evaluation and documentation; aesthetics and the role of the artist.

Placement and partnerships

The course is structured so that practice and theory constantly respond to one another, through practical classes and seminars. All students undertake a placement in a recognised host organisation where you'll work with experienced practitioners, and learn from the inside how participatory arts organisations function.

We have active partnerships with many companies, and the majority of the tutors, including the convenor, are active artists, with a variety of arts practices in performance, community and social settings.

Modules & structure

Practical workshops

In the autumn term we look at the roots of Applied Theatre in Education, in Social and Political Change, and in Community. Classes include work with Geese Theatre on their use of mask in Prisons, Drama and Theatre in Education techniques with Gail Babb of Talawa Theatre, intergenerational arts practices with Convenor Sue Mayo, and the use of Drama to explore Domestic Violence, with Tender. Throughout this term students are also engaged in skills-sharing sessions in order to pool their knowledge and expertise. 

In the Spring Term Tutor Raj Bhari, from Talk for Change, leads a module on creative approaches to Community Cohesion, Conflict Resolution, and the artist as activist. We have a short festival of art forms, with classes in song, puppetry and dance- and a residency shared with students of the MA in performance making, working across modules with artists of distinction from within the Goldsmith’s staff and beyond.

Throughout the practical sessions we work with students to develop their facilitation, devising,- project planning and management skills with attention to issues such as group dynamics; power and leadership; inclusion; accessibility; equality; conflict; intercultural practice; safe space and the ethics of touch.

In the summer term students design and lead a weekend of workshops for a public audience.

Histories, Theories and Contexts seminars

This contextual strand enables us consider the thinking behind our embodied knowledge. Through a series of seminars, we consider: the development of applied methods from political theatre; radical and celebratory arts; drama and theatre-in-education; community theatre; prison theatre; therapeutic creative practices and the legacy of Augusto Boal. We study the growing body of writing on applied theatre and its practitioners, and theatre theory. We consider local and international case studies; we read, discuss, watch videos and experience live performances.

Complementary Contextual lectures

Students also choose a lecture based Option module from one of the other exciting MA programmes. Previous modules have included, African Theatre, Performance Praxis, Radical Performance, and The Reflecxtive Practitioner. Our students can also take a specialist applied module led by Danny Braverman, on Disability Theatre, examining the scope and radical nature of disability theatre.


The Convenor, Sue Mayo, supports students to locate and develop a placement in a recognised host organisation. On the placement students further the skills they have practiced on the programme, whilst dealing with the challenges of a professional context. Placement hosts include London Bubble, Magic Me, Resonate. Greenwich & Lewisham Young People's Theatre, Talawa Theatre, Pan-arts, Crisis, Ovalhouse, Green Shoes Arts, The Young Vic, MIND, CEN8, Lewisham Youth Theatre and Spare Tyre.

Professional development

As part of our commitment to student’s employability, we offer up to five workshops covering various areas directly relevant to workplaces where drama may be applied; for example: planning and managing projects, child protection and working with vulnerable adults, ethics, evaluation, setting up a theatre company or working as an independent artist.


The MA Applied Theatre has five points of assessment:

  • a 6,000-word essay based on material covered in Term 1
  • a 6,000-word reflective portfolio on the placement
  • a 12,000-word research project/dissertation

These assessments count towards 80% of the final mark.

The remaining 20% is derived from assessment of the two shared complementary/contextual modules, which include Disability Theatre, Performance Praxis, African Theatre, Musical Theatre and Cultural Theory.

Read less
Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this. Read more
Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this.

The ICT for Development (ICT4D) specialism is a strand within the established and highly successful MSc Practising Sustainable Development. It is offered jointly by the Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) Group and the UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway, University of London.

This ICT4D Masters strand takes a global perspective on sustainable development and the role of ICTs; placed at the interface of research and practice, it is designed for those who want to launch or further their careers as development practitioners or scholars. It combines cutting-edge teaching on ICT4D with rigorous training in the broader field of sustainable development, to provide a well-rounded perspective on current and future development challenges. This degree extends knowledge, develops key skills and optimises career prospects.

The course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Master’s degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscpgdippsdict4d.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This is an intellectually exciting and inspiring course, drawing on both physical and social sciences, which attracts a diverse, international group of students.

- Our teaching staff are leading international experts and have wide experience in different developing regions and economies in transition, including Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, East Asia and South-East Asia.

- You will benefit from small group learning and an intense but friendly atmosphere, and will receive individual mentoring and career advice from our staff (both from your personal tutor and a dissertation supervisor).

- You will receive an internationally renowned University of London degree, giving you a solid foundation for a career in the field of development and/or environment.

- The course will provide you with training in the skills needed to research and assess ICT for development. These include research design, project development, geographic information systems, remote sensing, participatory methods, project analysis and evaluation.

Department research and industry highlights

The UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway is an interdisciplinary centre involving staff in Geography, Management, Computer Science and Earth Sciences. One of the world leaders in its field, with 17 affiliated staff and 18 PhD students, it is a vibrant research community embedded in both the College and the international ICT4D Collective of ICT4D practitioners. It has excellent links with NGOs, businesses and international organisations. Friendly and diverse, it is an exciting place to study and network with other ICT4D experts.

The Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) group consists of over 20 research-active staff, 35 PhD students and 50 Master’s students on four MSc programmes. We are committed to conducting collaborative research which seeks to understand and contribute to addressing problems of social inequality, environmental destruction and injustice. The breadth of its members’ research places it in an ideal position to contribute to theoretical and policy debates on key challenges facing Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean today.

Course content and structure

The course is divided into three compulsory elements; theory, policy and practice; research training; and a dissertation. Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Sustainability, Development and Governance
This course will equip students with a detailed understanding of the development of sustainable development as a discourse. Students will explore key sustainability issues such as climate change, globalisation, and human responses with an emphasis on the emergence of environmental governance as a means to pursue sustainability.

Technology and Development
This course provides you with an introduction to the role of technology in development, focusing particularly on mobile phone and computer technologies. The course combines an understanding of key theoretical debates and how technologies have been applied in diverse sectors such as health and education. The course also includes training in the use of GIS (geographical information systems) within a development context.

This course gives you the opportunity to develop deeper understandings of cutting-edge applications of ICT4D research and practice. Topics covered include environmental change and Green ICT, open development and subversive forms of technology use, and logics of inclusion and exclusion in ICT programmes. You will also examine project planning, monitoring and evaluation in the field of ICT4D.

Participatory Research
This course combines detailed understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of participatory research and methods with practical experience of using different participatory research techniques. These include participatory diagramming, participatory video and participatory environmental monitoring.

Research Training
You will be provided with training in a range of methods to enable you to plan, carry out and complete a piece of research. There are three modules in this element:
- Social Research Methods Training - provides a range of social science methods for field research and analysis.
- Quantitative Methods for Graduates - provides basic statistical concepts and procedures used in empirical research.
- Development and Environment Research Training - provides guidance for planning, developing and undertaking research in a development and environment context.

Dissertation (MSc only)
The dissertation is of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, on a topic of your choice which has been approved by the supervisor. It requires both secondary and primary research, and the demonstration of originality in integrating theoretical and practical research methods in tackling a particular problem. You will be encouraged to carry out your dissertation in collaboration with an organisation in the field of development and environment.

Community Volunteer Project
You will undertake an independent volunteer project which will give you practical experience in gaining sustainability related work experience in a non-for profit organisation. The project will enhance your employability whilst and provide an opportunity to gain practical experience of third sector organisational objectives, cultures and practices.

Elective course units:
Sustainability, Development and Society
You will develop a detailed understanding of key social / environmental relationships incorporating contemporary issues in the geographies of sustainability. These will include 'risk society', sustainable cities, and the impacts of corporate sector activities on the environment. You will also understand the challenges to sustainable development at household and community levels, with a focus on community-based approaches to sustainable development.

Business Ethics and Enterprise
The aim of the course is to equip students with the moral frameworks and critical abilities necessary to understand the role of business in society from an ethical perspective. The course will cover different types of business including large publicly traded multinationals, small and medium sized enterprises, social enterprises and family firms. Students will be expected to understand the different issues in these organizational types and to articulate moral arguments from a range of different perspectives.

International Sustainability Management
This course provides participants with an understanding of how Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) informs sustainability management issues in large, transnational organisations. It will focus on issues such as consumption and sustainability as dichotomised between the apparently incompatible tensions of economic and environmental interests.

Other courses Geopolitics and Security / PIR / Management / Computer Science

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an understanding at an advanced level of the relationships between, and complexities of, social, economic, political and environmental aspects of sustainable development and ICT4D

- an understanding at an advanced level of how the key issues in sustainable development theory and ICT4D influence policy and impact on practice

- the ability to critically analyse complex or contradictory areas of knowledge in aspects of sustainable development.


Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Past students of the MSc Practising Sustainable Development are now employed by international development and/or environment agencies, national government in their countries, national programmes and implementing agencies, higher education institutions, consultancies, private sector businesses, social enterprises and NGOs; as environmental and development policy-makers, managers, workers, activists, teachers and researchers. Many of our alumni are also currently undertaking doctoral programmes in the UK and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Read more

The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Academic study is complemented by two practice placements with different service user groups. Practice experience of statutory interventions with children and families or ‘vulnerable adults’ is complemented by opportunities for innovative practice in the voluntary and independent sectors in areas such as family justice, homelessness, substance use, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, community interventions and self-advocacy. With strong involvement of service users, carers and practice partners throughout the programme, the MSW provides strong foundations for practice in any field of social work.

Local and global perspectives 

Our approach to social work education reflects the connections between individuals, their families and communities. We offer you a broad foundation for social work practice underpinned by the global definition of social work and emphasise the connections between local and global issues in social work. Shared learning alongside postgraduate students studying International Social Work and Community Development, and Community and Youth Work, provides valuable opportunities for the exchange of ideas and experiences.

Excellent employment prospects  

There is very strong demand for Durham MSW graduates by employers in local authorities and non-government organisations regionally, nationally and internationally. Durham MSW graduates have been able to transfer their registration to other countries including Australia, Canada, Scotland and the USA. 

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1 

  • Social Work in Practice (40 credits): Understanding perspectives of service users and carers; social exclusion; social policy and law for social work 
  • Social Work in Context (40 credits): Human growth and development through the life course, disability and mental health; social work theories and methods; working in organisations
  • Professional and Personal Development (30 credits): Principles, values and ethics; critical thinking and evidence-based practice; skills development; Interprofessional working 
  • Social Work Practice 1 (50 credits): 70-day practice placement in a partner agency.

Year 2

  • Research in Social Work (45 credits): Research and evaluation design and methods; ethical issues in social welfare research; dissertation
  • Advanced Social Work (30 credits): Advanced application of theories and methods; critical analysis of social work policy; protection and empowerment of vulnerable children, young people and adults
  • Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits): 100-day practice placement. 

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full-time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There are approximately 12 weeks of vacation, including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice, and undertake a research dissertation.


A range of assessment methods is used including essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, you will undergo a practical assessment of your communication skills in readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by critically reflective accounts of work with individuals, groups or communities and by your practice educator who provides regular supervision and observes your practice. You are also expected to seek, and reflect on, feedback from service users and professional colleagues. Research in Social Work is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements

Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.

Read less
This degree incorporates a number of topics including concepts used in gender analysis of development, social justice, gender and power, poverty and inequality, and gendered approaches to social and human development such as capabilities, social exclusion and human rights, and violence, religion and identities. Read more
This degree incorporates a number of topics including concepts used in gender analysis of development, social justice, gender and power, poverty and inequality, and gendered approaches to social and human development such as capabilities, social exclusion and human rights, and violence, religion and identities.

We offer a broad training integrating theory and development policy experience which is both sectoral (eg education; land and property; credit and finance; rural livelihoods; sustainable development, environment and conservation; HIV/AIDS) and cross-cutting (eg migration, and male gender identities and masculinities in development).

Our graduates are employed in the World Bank, the UK DFID, and other bilateral aid agencies, and in large international NGOs like Oxfam as well as in developing country government departments and as academics.

Read less
This Master's offers a comprehensive overview of social development, combining academic and theoretical perspectives with more practical and policy-focused approaches. Read more
This Master's offers a comprehensive overview of social development, combining academic and theoretical perspectives with more practical and policy-focused approaches.

Key themes include vulnerability and social exclusion, poverty, gender relations and mainstreaming, and social analysis. We pay particular attention to issues such as social equality, education, migration, health provision and policy, the implications of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the role of civil society.

In the last two decades it has become apparent that development goes far beyond economic growth and encompasses broader human and social dimensions. The emerging paradigm is now influencing the agendas of major international development agencies, including the World Bank, UNDP, the EU, and the UK Department for International Development (DFID), as well as other bilateral donors.

Read less
Why study at Roehampton. All modules are taught in the evening. Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • All modules are taught in the evening
  • Choose a specialist pathway in either Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives
  • Tailor the programme to your own needs and interests
  • Gain the Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing accredited by the British Psychological Society (optional) as part of the programme or as a stand-alone module

Course summary

The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Our programme is founded upon a commitment to forms of education which enable the participation, learning and development of all.

Students studying on the programme engage with aspects of theory, policy and practice relevant to international and local contexts. With its international profile, this programme brings together teachers and other professionals working directly with children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages, as well as policy-makers and managers in areas of SEN and Inclusive Education.

On the MA Special Educational Needs, students choose between two distinct pathways, Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives, which reflect different theoretical traditions and approaches to practice, provision and policy within the field of special educational needs, disability and inclusion. Both pathways are relevant to mainstream and special education contexts.

The Inclusive Perspectives pathway emphasises the application of inclusive and person-centred values and critical educational analysis. Concepts and theories such as person-centred education; participation and ‘voice’; the social model of disability and difference; and human rights and equalities are used to consider educational practice, provision, policy and systems relating to pupils experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

The Psychological Perspectives pathway emphasises the use and application of psychological theories. Concepts and theories of cognition, educational testing, and social and emotional development are central in developing psychologically informed understandings of children and young people experiencing difficulties in educational settings. 

Students greatly benefit from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of other course members, from a diverse range of contexts and backgrounds. The combination of their own experiences, insights gained from others on the course and the theoretical resources offered by learning within the modules, enables students to deepen their understanding of, and to be able to challenge, the barriers that hinder the learning, development and participation of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages.

The teaching provided on modules is informed by active research and scholarship in the field of Inclusive Education and SEN practice and policy. All lecturers leading modules on the programme have high level specialist qualifications, teaching and leadership experience in the field of Education, SEN and Inclusive Education.


All students complete a common module which takes a broad view of key perspectives and issues in SEN, it also introduces the psychological and inclusive perspectives. From here, students undertake specialist modules within the programme, depending on their chosen pathway.

Inclusive Perspectives Pathway content: Students critically explore the issues involved in children’s behaviour using sociological approaches. You will reflect on your own and society's beliefs about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ behaviour, which often relate to medical and psychological foundations of schools’ policies and practices. The social pedagogical approach is also explored as a basis for inclusive teaching and learning. A critical analysis of instrumentalist/functionalist approaches to teaching is developed with a view to enhancing holistic development and the participation of pupils as a means of addressing barriers to the inclusivity of the classroom. 

Psychological Perspectives Pathway content: On this route students engage with the idea that socially and emotionally well-adjusted students perform better at school, whilst social and emotional aspects of learning have become marginalised in a highly competitive education system. The use of psychometric testing is covered, with an exploration of its appropriate uses (students can gain a Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing, accredited by the British Psychological Society, from successfully undertaking this module). 

Optional modules are available to students on both pathways which focus on Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty and on Autism in Education. Students also have an option, instead of taking a taught optional module, to take a (non-taught) Independent Study module to learn about a specific issue relevant to their pathway and interests, which is not taught about in the programme.

The final module is an independent research-based enquiry (either a Dissertation or Practice-Based Research Project), which is founded upon the pathway perspective chosen, but is also subject to the student’s choice of topic.


Required modules for both routes

  • Perspectives in SEN and Inclusion
  • Undertaking Social and Educational Research
  • Dissertation OR 
  • Practice-based Research Project

Inclusive Perspectives

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality

Psychological Perspectives

  • Assessment and Intervention in Education
  • Social and Emotional Dimensions of Learning

Optional modules 

  • Behaviour, Inclusion and Exclusion in Education
  • Teaching, Learning and Social Pedagogy: working with difference, difficulty and individuality
  • Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty
  • Autism: Principles, Practices and Perspectives
  • Assessment and Intervention in Education

Career options

The Programme supports and enables:

  • Careers in professional practice and leadership: teaching, advisory work, SEN coordination, inclusion management, support assistance.
  • Careers in policy-making, implementation and development of inclusion and SEN provision.
  • Careers in research and developing the inclusion and SEN workforce in further and higher education.

Email Now

Read less
Researchers, research managers and policy advisers, as well as service planners, are all faced with a growing need for top-quality research that is timely and relevant. Read more
Researchers, research managers and policy advisers, as well as service planners, are all faced with a growing need for top-quality research that is timely and relevant. This programme builds on the links between research and policy in developing the particular skills and capacities needed by policy-oriented researchers, professionals and postgraduate students interested in carrying out public policy, social policy and social welfare research. We believe this is vital if researchers are to maximise the impact of their work in addressing real issues of concern to policy-makers and decision-takers.

The programme provides core research training in philosophy and research design in the social sciences, along with introductions to and further approaches in quantitative and qualitative methods in the social sciences. It also offers elective courses in areas of the school's particular research expertise, namely child and family welfare, gender and violence, health and social care, poverty and social exclusion, and policy-oriented evaluation.

We recognise that students will be joining with relevant - albeit varied - experience. Therefore, there will be opportunities for you to draw on your own experiences as researchers, managers and policy advisers and to share these with other participants on the programme. Those who have recently embarked on a career in policy research, or who hope to do so, will find the programme offers a unique combination of academic rigour, up-to-date policy content and relevant skills development.

Programme structure

The programme is delivered through a combination of intensive block teaching and weekly delivery so as to be most accessible to postgraduate students, busy policy professionals and practitioners. The delivery of units on the programme is designed to allow students to accumulate credits flexibly and organise the patterns of attendance to suit their own needs and circumstances.

The MSc and PG Diploma consist of four core units and two optional units. A dissertation of 10-15,000 words is required for the MSc. The PG Certificate is awarded to students who successfully complete three units, two of which must be mandatory units.

Core units
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Qualitative Research methods in the Social Sciences
-Further Quantitative Methods

Optional units
-Further Qualitative Methods
-Domestic Violence: Research; Policy and Activism
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Inclusion
-Economics of Public Policy
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods


The programme stresses the development of policy research and analysis methods, as well as substantive knowledge. In addition to careers in academia, this program prepares students for careers as policy researchers and analysts, research commissioners and managers in public or private agencies or organisations, both in the UK and overseas.

Read less
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Cultural political economy

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

Read less
This course offers a flexible, yet coherent, programme of study, with a professional qualification in youth and community development work upon graduation, which enables successful graduates to practice as a qualified health/youth and community development worker in the UK. Read more
This course offers a flexible, yet coherent, programme of study, with a professional qualification in youth and community development work upon graduation, which enables successful graduates to practice as a qualified health/youth and community development worker in the UK.

Both MA programmes are suitable for staff in local authorities, the NHS, voluntary and third sector who use group work, informal learning and activity, outreach and community work especially those working with young people and adults often labelled as hard to reach.
•Youth and community staff are engaged in professional practice, research, consultancy and teaching
•Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency (NYA) and recognised by the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC). Also endorsed by England Standards Board for Community Development Work
•An opportunity to study at an advanced academic and professional level
•High quality practice-related modules enabling practitioners and clients to achieve planned change through the process of education, development and practice-orientated research
•Develops innovative, progressive practitioners who reflectively engage with concepts and practices of social justice and equality

The course consists of four core modules, one core field placement module, and three specialist modules taken from a list of some 11 modules. You may then seek to exit with a PG Dip, or remain on the course to complete your dissertation for an MA. All core modules and most option modules are launched during one of two block teaching weeks held each year (usually in October and February). Attendance at launch days is compulsory.

These are supported by a wide variety of written material, individual and corporate tasks. You are required to engage in a number of online seminars in each module. You are required to identify a supervisor who will primarily support your field practice, but may also provide a dialogue partner to discuss wider issues arising from the course. You will complete a minimum of 592 hours of field practice, of which 442 hours will be based in your own workplace and 150 hours must be outside of your employing agency.

Core Modules include: •Issues of Health and Well-being; •Theory and Practice of Youth Work; •Theory and Practice of Community Development; •Health and Social Research Methods 1; •Field Practice; •Management of Services and People .

Specialist modules include: Designing, Delivering and Assessing Learning; Supervision in Youth and Community Development; Social Exclusion, Disaffection and Youth Work; Faith and Community Development; Global Issues in Youth and Community Development; Mental Health; Peer Health Learning; Managing Race and Diversity; The Negotiated Module; Anti-Oppressive Practice; Young People, Active Citizenship and Participation.

Read less
This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice. Read more

This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice.

If you’re a service provider, practitioner or policy maker who wants to bring theory and practice together, or you’re planning a career in the field of disability, you’ll explore a range of disability-related issues from theoretical and practical perspectives.

Our refreshed core modules allow you to explore the frontiers of research in this rapidly developing field, and focus on social policy for disabled people in education, benefits, housing, transport, employment, health and social support services, as well as recent developments in social research on disability. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on the topics that best suit your own interests or career plans, from care to disability and development via research training or race and ethnicity studies.

Research insight

Taught by academics from the Centre for Disability Studies, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment where tutors’ teaching is informed by their own cutting-edge research.

The interdisciplinary Centre for Disability Studies is at the forefront of international research in the field, using social model approaches that recognise disability as a form of institutional discrimination and social exclusion, rather than a product of physical difference between individuals. You’ll benefit from the expertise of researchers from diverse backgrounds, drawing on the experiences and issues raised by the disabled people’s movement.

Course content

In Semester 1 you’ll take a core module examining recent debates and developments in social research on disability. You’ll critically assess positivist, interpretative and ‘emancipatory’ methodologies and the data collection and analysis strategies that come with them, and consider the emergence of the ‘social model’ of disability.

You’ll apply these perspectives to contemporary social policy in Semester 2, as you explore topics such as disability benefits, self-help, public amenities like housing, transport and public buildings, education, employment and social support services.

In addition, you’ll gain specialist knowledge when you select from a range of optional modules. You could pursue further training in quantitative and qualitative research methods, or study topics such as special educational needs. You’ll also focus on a specific topic when you complete your dissertation – an individual piece of research that allows you to showcase the knowledge and skills you’ve gained.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Social Policy, Politics and Disabled People 30 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Disability) 60 credits
  • Debates on Disability Theory and Research 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Special Educational Needs: Inclusive Curriculum 30 credits
  • International Human Rights and Disabled People 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use various teaching methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials in core modules. Optional modules may also include methods such as practical classes, workshops or online learning. Independent study is also crucial to this programme, allowing you to shape your own research questions, prepare for taught sessions and build research and analytical skills.


Assessment methods are likely to vary, depending on the optional modules you choose. Most of our taught modules are assessed through written work such as essays and book and literature reviews.

Career opportunities

There is a growing demand for students with a comprehensive knowledge of disability issues in all areas of social life.

In particular, there are many career opportunities in health and social support services, education, human resources, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities.

There are also excellent career openings in social research and universities – you’ll be well prepared for further research at PhD level.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page

Cookie Policy    X