• University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Northampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
University College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of Leicester Featured Masters Courses
University of Manchester Featured Masters Courses
"social" AND "exclusion"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Social Exclusion)

We have 64 Masters Degrees (Social Exclusion)

  • "social" AND "exclusion" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 64
Order by 
This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. Read more

This unique programme is aimed at international and UK students with an interest in international social work, community development, and comparative social policy. The programme examines advanced knowledge about the theory and practice of social work and community development in an international context. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of global social issues (such as social exclusion, poverty, environmental degradation, and disasters) and relate this knowledge to developments in their own country. You will be equipped with the skills to engage in research and to apply research findings effectively in practice. The programme includes a two-week field-based learning opportunity in a social work or community work agency. The dissertation provides space for you to carry out research on an aspect of social or community work in the UK. 

Durham University is a world leader in international social work and community development research, theory, and practice. Our social work team has edited the prestigious International Social Work journal and works closely with social work’s key international organisations - , the International Association of Schools of Social Work, .the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), and the International Council of Social Welfare (ICSW). Its Programme Director also represents social work at the UNFCCC and other UN bodies.

Course structure 

You will study in a small group of international students, and also alongside UK students on postgraduate social work and research degree programmes. This will give you plenty of opportunities to share knowledge and experience in addition to your learning through lectures, presentations and seminars.

The MA consists of five core modules, designed to give you an understanding of social work as it is practiced in the UK, and a thorough grounding in research methods and their application. You will also choose two specialist modules according to your particular professional interests. Finally, you will undertake a research project and write a dissertation. To achieve the Master's degree, you must accumulate a total of 180 credits, as listed below.

Core Modules

International Social Work (30 credits)

  • International social work: Debates and controversies.
  • The history of international social work.
  • International institutions and social work theories and practices.
  • Legislative underpinnings to international social work
  • Internationalised Social problems 

Social Work: Context and Practice (30 credits)

  • Contemporary social work and social welfare in a diverse society
  • Construction of social problems
  • Ethical frameworks for social practice
  • Contemporary social work theories and practice.

Community Development and Organising (15 credits)

  • Critical analysis of communities
  • Origins, history, and theoretical approaches to community development
  • Contemporary forms of community development practice
  • Community and public policy.

Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

  • Uses of research in social welfare policy and practice
  • Approaches to social research
  • Ethical issues in research
  • Literature reviewing, sampling, data collection and analysis methods.

Field Based Learning (15 credits)

  • Social work practice
  • Comparative theory/practice approaches
  • Social and community work organisations
  • Practice based pedagogies

Note students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Optional Modules

These are subject to staff availability. In previous years, typical modules offered were:

Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

  • Youth policy in the UK
  • Origins, development, and theoretical underpinnings of youth work
  • Critical overview of contemporary youth work practice Key forms of intervention.

Management in Community Settings (30 credits)

  • Critical analysis of a range of perspectives which have informed the management oforganisations in community settings, including those relating to:
  • Development of understanding in effectively managing and developing these organisations in the current context to increase their effectiveness in achieving their aims in ways that are consistent with professional values
  • Personnel management
  • Physical resource management
  • Financial management
  • Strategic management
  • Change management.

Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)

  • Relationship between theory and empirical research in evaluation
  • Defining and measuring outcomes
  • Case study analysis
  • Poster presentation and participatory evaluation.

Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)

  • Spreadsheets and data analysis
  • Populations, sample data and sampling distributions
  • Point estimates and confidence intervals
  • Significance tests, cress-tabulations, and Chi-Square tests
  • Correlation and linear regression.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Sampling and sample design, questionnaire design
  • Numerical taxonomy and cluster analysis in practice
  • Methods for representing complex systems.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

  • Introduction to theory and research practice in qualitative methods
  • Ethnography and grounded theory
  • Group discussions
  • Data analysis and management processes.

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice.

Crime, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)



Read less
Do you want a career which can change people’s lives? With the focus on social welfare and social policy issues in the local, national and international context, our course will give you the skills and understanding to really make a difference. Read more
Do you want a career which can change people’s lives? With the focus on social welfare and social policy issues in the local, national and international context, our course will give you the skills and understanding to really make a difference.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-social-welfare-and-social-policy

How does globalisation impact on social welfare provision and planning in different countries? Do issues like poverty and social exclusion, street living and migration need to be culturally and locally specific, or could there be global solutions? You’ll explore these and many other issues in our MSc which will prepare you for a career in social welfare and policy. The emphasis is on comparative and global analysis, exploring social welfare and planning responses to issues such as street children, criminal justice and social welfare in areas of political conflict. You’ll have the chance to build and expand on skills relating to policy making, social sciences, leadership and strategies of change. An understanding of comparative and global welfare policies is important for national and international organisations. Therefore, our course is a positive step towards a career in a national and international context, working within the area of social welfare and policy.

Careers

Career possibilities once you’ve graduated are likely to be in the fields of community development social policy, social welfare, youth work, education, higher education, consultancy or policy making in local, regional and international governmental and non-governmental bodies. You’ll also be prepared to carry out further research and study towards a PhD.

- Links with industry and professional recognition
Our Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education works in collaboration with a number of universities from across Europe on the International Doctoral Studies in Social Work (INDOSOW) project. This is the first European Doctoral Programme of its kind and offers the opportunity to take part in an international interdisciplinary study of social work, welfare systems and social policies. For further information about the INDOSOW project visit: http://www.indosow.net.

Core modules

Globalisation, Social Welfare & Social Policy
Comparative Social Policy & Social Welfare
Research Studies
Major Project

Optional modules:
Global Leadership
Collaborative Practice for Integrated Care
Essential Issues in Public Health Policy

You will choose one optional module from the above list. Modules are subject to change.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed in a range of ways to examine the development of your skills throughout our course, leading to the submission of your Major Project bringing together aspects of learning from earlier modules. Assessment strategies include essays, reports, case studies and debates; there are no exams in this course. You’ll have plenty of group workshop and individual supervised support for your Major Project.

Special features

The course leader is a specialist in research and teaching within an international context.

Our students come from across the globe including Bangladesh, Columbia, Ghana, India, Kenya and the UK. Each of our students brings their individual experience in areas as varied as international relations, psychology, social work, social policy, sociology and economics. With lively classroom debates at the top of our agenda, you can be sure that each topic is discussed from multiple perspectives.

Read less
Social work, both in the UK and internationally, has been defined as a profession that ‘promotes social change, problem solving in human relationships and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance social justice.’ Accordingly, social work takes a variety of forms and engages with a broad range of individuals, groups and communities. Read more
Social work, both in the UK and internationally, has been defined as a profession that ‘promotes social change, problem solving in human relationships and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance social justice.’ Accordingly, social work takes a variety of forms and engages with a broad range of individuals, groups and communities. The scope of social work research is equally broad and requires researchers to be aware of, and able to engage with a variety of disciplines in a range of settings, often working alongside those with different ideas of what social work and social work research are and what each is intended to achieve.

Social work research, in other words, does not simply concern the work of social workers. It may also be concerned, for example, with programmes of community development in the context of poverty or interventions to tackle domestic violence and programmes for young offenders. It may focus on the needs of a particular group, for example children with disabilities or people with severe and long term mental illness, whether or not they receive social work services. It may draw on theories and research methods from any of the social sciences, including economics, law and philosophy.

This programme is designed to build on the links between research and practice in a range of settings in developing the particular skills and capacities needed by practice-based professionals and postgraduate students interested in carrying out social work and social care research.

This programme does not include practical training in social work and does not lead to a professional qualification in social work. If you want to study for a qualification in social work practice, please see the MSc in Social Work: http://www.bris.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/ssl/msc-social-work/

Programme structure

The programme is delivered through a combination of intensive block teaching and weekly delivery so as to be most accessible to postgraduate students, busy policy professionals and practitioners. The delivery of units on the programme is designed to allow students to accumulate credits flexibly and organise the patterns of attendance to suit their own needs and circumstances.

The structure for the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma consists of four core and two optional units. A dissertation of 10-15,000 words is required for the MSc. The Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for the successful completion of three units (two of which must be core units).

Core units
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Further Qualitative Methods

Optional units - You then choose two of the following units which allow you to develop specialist knowledge of the application of research methods to key areas of social work and social policy.
-Further Quantitative Methods
-Domestic Violence: Research, Policy and Activism*
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion*
-Health and Social Care Research*
-Researching Child and Family Welfare*
-Economics of Public Policy
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods

*These units are offered in alternate years. To see the full programme and unit description, please check the programme catalogue: http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/RouteStructure.jsa?byCohort=N&ayrCode=17%2F18&programmeCode=9SPOL001T

Careers

The programme stresses the development of social work and social research and analysis methods, as well as substantive knowledge. In addition to careers in academia, this programme prepares students for careers as social work and care researchers and analysts, research commissioners and managers in public or private agencies or organisations, both in the UK and internationally.

Read less
The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Read more

The Durham MSW is a 21 month programme engaging students with the knowledge, skills and values that underpin social work practice with individuals, groups and communities. Academic study is complemented by two practice placements with different service user groups. Practice experience of statutory interventions with children and families or ‘vulnerable adults’ is complemented by opportunities for innovative practice in the voluntary and independent sectors in areas such as family justice, homelessness, substance use, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, community interventions and self-advocacy. With strong involvement of service users, carers and practice partners throughout the programme, the MSW provides strong foundations for practice in any field of social work.

Local and global perspectives 

Our approach to social work education reflects the connections between individuals, their families and communities. We offer you a broad foundation for social work practice underpinned by the global definition of social work and emphasise the connections between local and global issues in social work. Shared learning alongside postgraduate students studying International Social Work and Community Development, and Community and Youth Work, provides valuable opportunities for the exchange of ideas and experiences.

Excellent employment prospects  

There is very strong demand for Durham MSW graduates by employers in local authorities and non-government organisations regionally, nationally and internationally. Durham MSW graduates have been able to transfer their registration to other countries including Australia, Canada, Scotland and the USA. 

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1 

  • Social Work in Practice (40 credits): Understanding perspectives of service users and carers; social exclusion; social policy and law for social work 
  • Social Work in Context (40 credits): Human growth and development through the life course, disability and mental health; social work theories and methods; working in organisations
  • Professional and Personal Development (30 credits): Principles, values and ethics; critical thinking and evidence-based practice; skills development; Interprofessional working 
  • Social Work Practice 1 (50 credits): 70-day practice placement in a partner agency.

Year 2

  • Research in Social Work (45 credits): Research and evaluation design and methods; ethical issues in social welfare research; dissertation
  • Advanced Social Work (30 credits): Advanced application of theories and methods; critical analysis of social work policy; protection and empowerment of vulnerable children, young people and adults
  • Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits): 100-day practice placement. 

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full-time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There are approximately 12 weeks of vacation, including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice, and undertake a research dissertation.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods is used including essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, you will undergo a practical assessment of your communication skills in readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by critically reflective accounts of work with individuals, groups or communities and by your practice educator who provides regular supervision and observes your practice. You are also expected to seek, and reflect on, feedback from service users and professional colleagues. Research in Social Work is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements

Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.



Read less
A professional training course and academic award equipping students with essential knowledge and skills to enter a competitive jobs market. Read more
A professional training course and academic award equipping students with essential knowledge and skills to enter a competitive jobs market.

Course overview

This is an approved two-year postgraduate qualification that leads towards professional registration as a social worker.

To register as a social worker, you will need a qualification that is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). This Masters has been approved by the HCPC and endorsed by the College of Social Work so you can be sure that successful completion of the course will mean that you meet professional standards of proficiency.

Our course combines both practice and theory. We organise two main placements for you, the first of 70 days and the second of 100 days. There is in-depth preparation before the placements and you will be assigned a practice educator on placement who will provide on-going supervision as you work with people with a range of needs including those who are experiencing crisis or social exclusion.

We have an excellent partnership with employers across public/voluntary and private sectors to provide high quality placements – as endorsed by The College of Social Work.

Theory-based taught modules include ‘The Social Work Context’, ‘Theories and Models for Social Work Practice’ and ‘Critical Perspectives in Social Work Practice’. The Masters dissertation is an excellent opportunity to explore a specific issue in social work.
The University of Sunderland has been offering professional qualifications in social work since 1997 and we have built up strong relationships with employers, service users and carers. These relationships are an essential foundation for our rigorous training in how to make a difference to people’s lives through professional social work.

Practitioners provide a wide range of teaching input and support in both years of the programme, which enables students to gain a good understanding of how theory relates to practice.

Upon successful completion of the programme you will be eligible to apply to register with the HCPC as a newly qualified social worker.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with placements and research. You can negotiate the topic of the dissertation to fit your personal interests and our supervisory expertise.
-The Social Work Context
-Theories and Models for Social Work Practice
-Preparing for Practice
-Practice Placement 1
-Critical Perspectives in Social Work Practice
-Social Work Research and Dissertation
-Practice Placement 2

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars and workshops with a strong emphasis on individual participation and discussion. During the first semester you will develop a Practice Skills Portfolio that helps you to reflect and make the best use of supervision.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.
Assessment methods include assignments, written coursework, presentations and workbooks/portfolios.

Facilities & location

Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. Thanks to a major renovation programme, the Priestman Building provides state-of-the-art teaching space and resources as part of a vibrant and outward-looking learning environment. Some of your skills learning will take place in the communication skills labs which have full recording and playback facilities. We also have a ‘mock’ courtroom which offers the opportunity to develop skills in this setting.

University Library Services
We have thousands of books and e-books on social science topics, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Project Muse, which provides over 180 full-text humanities and social sciences journals
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles

IT Provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in The David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

92.5% of our 2013/14 graduates were in work or further study six months after graduating (source: Destination of Higher Education Leavers Survey 2014).

The social work profession can be very emotionally rewarding since you will be in a position to make a difference to people’s lives, providing them with support and enabling them to lead the fullest lives possible.

The programme comes from a foundation of over 30 years established experience in social work education and training and has an excellent relationship with local employers.

Opportunities are available in the statutory, independent and voluntary sectors. During the course of your career it will be possible to move between sectors as well as to transfer from one specialism (such as working with children) to another (such as working with people with mental health issues). Promotion can lead to roles such as team leader, as well as very senior roles within the social services departments of local authorities.

Your Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

Read less
Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. Read more

Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. In a globalised and interdependent world, these issues can only be understood from an international perspective which accounts for these common pressures and processes, but which also recognises and engages with the diversity of national traditions and institutions for delivering welfare.

The International Social Policy programme takes a policy analytic approach to provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy. You learn about the common features of social policy arrangements internationally and the variety and differences that characterise welfare across the countries and regions of the world. Drawing on the research-based expertise available at SSPSSR which relates to countries ranging from China, South Korea and Singapore in South East Asia to the UK, Germany and Sweden in Western Europe, you are equipped to understand how national and global forces interact to shape trajectories of welfare system development.

The programme enables you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring enduring cross cutting themes in social policy, including the prioritisation of equality and capabilities, as well as to drill down to how and why policy unfolds in key welfare fields. You develop policy analytic skills in relation to such areas as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, and children & family related policy. You acquire expertise in the use of primary and secondary data collection in areas pertaining to all these aspects of social policy, and are thus equipped to think critically about the development of social welfare systems in a global age across the full range of national contexts and policy situations.

Course structure

We place considerable emphasis on structured, interactive seminars with a high degree of student participation. You also join the staff/graduate seminars which allow MA and research students to become involved in a professional research culture.

The programme gives you a clear and confident grasp of social policy in developed and developing countries. You gain an advanced understanding of the relevant debates, theories and concepts of international issues alongside skills in research design and data collection.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Design of social research
  • Key issues in comparative social policy
  • Comparative social policy
  • Organised civil society and the third sector
  • The family, parenting culture and parenting policy
  • Governing science, technology and society in the 21st Century
  • Foundations of sociology
  • Politics and sociology of the environment
  • Sociology of health, illness and medicine
  • Quantitative data analysis
  • Terrorism and modern society

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/118/international-social-policy#structure

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy
  • impart country-specific as well as cross-national empirical and theoretical knowledge of current challenges and processes of transformation of welfare systems
  • enable you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring specific policy fields such as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, poverty and social exclusion, urban development, and family policy
  • develop your skills in research design and data collection in areas pertaining to social policy
  • familiarise you with using primary and secondary data to develop cutting-edge research in the field of international social policy.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



Read less
Do you ever wonder why mothers are more likely than fathers to work part-time and care for their children? Or why some countries oblige unemployment benefit… Read more

Do you ever wonder why mothers are more likely than fathers to work part-time and care for their children? Or why some countries oblige unemployment benefit recipients to follow strict activation requirements while others do not? Maybe you’ve thought about what the expected and real-life benefits and challenges of the decentralization of care are? Or how societies are changing as a result of increasing cultural diversity and social inequality?

If you are interested in studying such issues, this one-year Master's programme is for you. You will develop knowledge about interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives on social policy and interventions, which will help you gain in-depth insight into the methodology and skills needed to research social policy and intervention issues in the domain of health and wellbeing, in particular related to work, care and participation. More specifically, you will look into problems such as:

  • Combining work and care
  • (Youth) unemployment
  • Social and cultural diversity
  • Social inequality and exclusion
  • Social care and participation

You will also study people's strategies for dealing with social risks, including:

  • Life-long learning
  • Labour market mobility
  • Social entrepreneurship
  • Innovative care networks
  • Multicultural collaborative efforts
  • Cultural diversity and integration
  • Neighborhood initiatives

This will be done by combining knowledge from the behavioural and social sciences.

Research-led teaching

The academic staff in our faculty participate in a wide variety of research projects into the problems that are central to this Master's programme, including themes as diverse as:

  • Social justice and social wellbeing
  • Capabilities for combining work and care
  • Youth and parenting in risk societies
  • Social innovation in social care
  • Social influence in health behaviours
  • Social diversity, health and wellbeing
  • Interethnic relations, cultural diversity and integration
  • Health communication and health promotion

International programme

Our Master’s programme is truly an international programme, in both its teaching and its orientation. Many of the problems focused on in this Master's programme have a strong European or global dimension, such as: ageing and care, migration and ethnic relationships, individualization and solidarity, gender and sexual diversity, and social environments and health. The same goes for the policy and intervention approaches that are used to tackle these issues. You will find that this international perspective is a key feature of the programme. You will learn to take this international perspective in a global teaching environment, with staff and students from the Netherlands, Europe and beyond.

Interdisciplinary

In addition to its international, comparative perspective, the programme is also characterized by its interdisciplinary and multi-method approach. This international, interdisciplinary and multi-method focus also applies to the research you will undertake for your master’s thesis, as well as in the exploration of professional practices. In your research, you will draw on a combination of scientific perspectives from the behavioural and social sciences, in particular psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology. In exploring professional practices, you will also draw on a combination of scientific perspectives, through a focus on social policies, mostly informed by social science, and interventions, mostly grounded in behavioural sciences.

Programme objective

This Master's programme is intended to enable you to become an academic professional. As a graduate of the Social Policy and Public Health programme, you will be able to study social problems from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. You will also have acquired the professional and academic skills necessary to design, implement, and evaluate social policies and interventions. These skills will allow you to pursue a career as a social scientist, working with government agencies, social service organizations, civil society organizations, or private sector companies.



Read less
Created for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Read more

Created for international students who wish to familiarise themselves with academic learning in the UK before undertaking rigorous study in their chosen subject. Students undertake a preparatory year of English language and undergraduate modules in the subject area before embarking on Master's level modules in their second year.

Course detail

Through this programme, you learn to apply theories and methods of comparative social policy in specific fields such as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, poverty and social exclusion, urban development and family policy. You learn advanced research techniques and gain the capacity to critically appraise the development of social welfare systems in a global age.

Purpose

You will learn to think critically, analyse data and present key findings as well as developing key transferrable skills including time management, team work, research and analytic methods, problem-solving and IT skills. Teaching is student-centred through a combination of taught classes, lectures, seminars, group work and independent study.

You will gain exceptional skills in advanced research methodologies, learning the techniques and approaches that social researchers use to organise, structure and interpret data. You will learn about the process of research and how the analysis and presentation of evidence is influenced and can be influential in social policy. You will become adept at using and understanding a range of frameworks and methodologies and will be able to assess the most appropriate to use in a given scenario. You will use these skills to look at the ways in which different countries organise social policy and welfare systems.

Format

As well as taking core modules, you choose from a range of optional modules; typical modules may include:

  • Comparative social policy
  • Design of social research
  • Key issues in comparative social policy
  • Sociologists of health, illness and medicine
  • Poverty, inequality and social security
  • Social and political movements
  • Race, difference and belonging

Careers

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/index.html

English language learning

Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) which you can access throughout your degree https://www.kent.ac.uk/international-pathways/



Read less
What is public policy? Who are the key actors and which institutions are involved? Who is it shaped by and how does it have an impact on an economic, social and cultural environment that is increasingly globalised?. Read more
What is public policy? Who are the key actors and which institutions are involved? Who is it shaped by and how does it have an impact on an economic, social and cultural environment that is increasingly globalised?

This programme investigates the international public policy environment in terms of global political economy and the impact of business, voluntary sector and public policy agents in the field of multi-level governance. The programme encompasses both a theoretical understanding of the policy process and models of appraisal with a practical orientation to evaluating research evidence.

As well as considering generic policy concerns, the programme gives you an opportunity to choose from a range of substantive policy issues. These include: the economics of public policy; poverty and social exclusion; penal policy; cities, housing and public policy; health and public policy; migration, asylum; and sustainability. All the programme units consider policy in an international and comparative context.

Programme structure

Core units
-Governance, Institutions and the Global Political Economy
-Informing and Evaluating Policy: Research Methods and Analysis
-Power Politics and the Policy Process
-Public Management and Organisations.

Optional units - Optional units can vary, but may include:
-The Economics of Public Policy
-Gender and Violence: International and Global Perspectives
-An International Analysis of Poverty and Social Exclusion
-Social Policy and Social Change in East Asia
-Critical Policy Studies and the Internationalisation of Public Policy
-The State of Labour
-International Analysis of crime, harm and justice
-Environmental policy and social justice
-Migration, asylum and human rights
-EU and global perspectives
-Social Policy and Social Change in East Asia
-Public Policy for a complex and uncertain world

Dissertation
You must complete a dissertation of 15,000 words. The dissertation accounts for 60 credit points. You begin work in late April and must submit by September.

Careers

Graduates from our MSc in Public Policy frequently work in roles that focus on strategy, policy development and implementation or policy research. Potential employers include local or central government departments; national or international non-governmental organisations; and international institutions, such as the European Union and the United Nations.

Read less
Effective social work demands a strong bond and understanding between professionals of different disciplines so that users of social work services receive the best possible care. Read more
Effective social work demands a strong bond and understanding between professionals of different disciplines so that users of social work services receive the best possible care. This Masters degree combines perspectives from social care, health, education and other relevant disciplines to ensure you can work effectively in the multi-disciplinary environment of today’s social work.

The programme emphasises effective practice and the practical relevance of theory in practice learning placements. You will have the opportunity to benefit from the knowledge and experience of a range of academics, practitioners, employers, policy makers, service users and carers who have backgrounds in social care, social work, health education and other cognate disciplines.

If you are a graduate from a relevant discipline, who is able to recognise the perspective of service users, their families and carers, and who can demonstrate a clear commitment to becoming a social worker, then this Masters degree is for you. Upon successful completion of the course, you will gain eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a qualified social worker.

What will I study?

The programme is underpinned by the national requirements for social work education and training as agreed by the Health and Care Professions Council and The College of Social Work. The degree therefore requires you to demonstrate an understanding of, for example: Human growth, development, mental health and disability; Assessment, planning, intervention and review; Communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs; Social work law and policy; Partnership-working and information-sharing across professional disciplines and agencies; Safeguarding; Working with conflict.

In Year 1, you will examine the historical and contemporary functions of social work in society and consider the legal and social policy frameworks within social work practice. You will be introduced to a range of sociological and psychological theories and social policies in order to understand some of the social problems and issues faced by individuals, families and communities in contemporary society. The concepts of social inclusion and exclusion will also be considered. Upon the successful completion of an assessment exercise, designed to ensure that you are fully prepared for direct practice, you will undertake a practice placement.

Year 2 is designed to develop your competency to practice in specialist social work contexts. It will also enhance your research skills. You will adopt a global perspective on social work and focus on issues such as race, diversity and equality. A second practice placement will be undertaken and you will complete a period of independent research, culminating in the submission of a dissertation.

How will I study?

Academic-based learning will be delivered through lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshops.

You will spend 170 days in practice learning placements supported by 30 days of assessed social work practice skills across the programme. These placements are organised and monitored by the University. You will undertake supervised and assessed work whilst on placement, all of which will contribute to the outcome of your degree.

How will I be assessed?

The programme is assessed through a combination of essays, presentations, text analysis, group work, portfolios, carers’ assessments, video/audio diaries, role plays and examinations. Practice learning will also be assessed, using a range of techniques.

Who will be teaching me?

You can expect input from staff with expertise and knowledge of a range of health and social services settings, together with high quality and emergent research profiles. Contributors to the programme also include people who have direct experience of services, expert practitioners, magistrates, politicians, senior managers and policy makers.

What are my career prospects?

A Masters degree in Social Work is your entry to a range of career opportunities in working with children, adults and communities. You will be able to work within the statutory, voluntary, private and charitable sectors.

Upon successful completion of the programme, you will gain eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Read less
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?. Read more
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northumbria University is a dynamic course that offers a flexible mode of study. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of the key themes, issues and political debates concerning crime, crime control and criminal and social justice in the UK and globally.

Learn from an exciting, vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who are high quality teachers and internationally renowned experts within their subject. All of the Criminology staff team have doctorates or extensive professional experience in the Criminology/criminal justice sector.

Equipped with excellent practical, communication, and transferable skills you will be well placed for a range of roles including drug action teams, law enforcement, research, community safety, local authority, voluntary and charitable sectors.

This course has several different available start dates and study options - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtfscj6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscj6/

Learn From The Best

You will learn from a vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who will provide you with an outstanding learning experience, support and engagement in a research rich environment.

The academic team includes 16 criminology-specific academics with extensive research and engagement with the criminal justice system who bring their real-life experience to their teaching.

Nearly all criminology staff have received funding from leading research institutions and organisations such as Economic and Social Research Council, and they often work in partnership with state and third sector organisations such as Youth Offending Teams and homelessness charities.

They play leading roles in professional associations such as the British Society of Criminology and the Academy of the Social Sciences and serve on the editorial boards of leading disciplinary journals.

The department also has excellent international links within Europe, America and Australia where members of the staff team have been Visiting Fellows and Professors.

Teaching And Assessment

You will learn about research methods and their relevance to the global study of criminology, giving you the relevant skills to conduct your own research and engage with contemporary debates. These debates will be covered in the areas of global penal policy, international policing and security, and social exclusion.

All modules are compulsory, but assessment topics and dissertation allow you to concentrate on your own areas of interest as you develop your knowledge of theory, methods and practical topics.

Your learning combines formal input and practical exercises and discussion, allowing you to develop your ideas through interaction with academic staff and your peers.

Your dissertation is an independent and innovative piece of work, which is designed to demonstrate your skills in researching, collecting evidence, and organising that evidence. Working independently, with the support of a tutor, you’ll find your own sources and evaluate their helpfulness to your study topic.

Module Overview
CR7001 - Research Methods for Global Criminology (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7002 - Comparative Penal Policy (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7003 - International Crime, Policing and Security (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7004 - Social Exclusion and Victimisation in a Global Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

We want to make sure that you can conduct your studies to the best of your abilities, so we’ll always do our best to ensure that you know exactly what is expected of you.

The academic team will help you develop the skills required to plan, manage and review your learning, and support you if you have any issues. A central principle of this system is to help you develop a well-honed ability to work independently upon graduation.

You will be given a dedicated dissertation supervisor with relevant subject expertise and you’ll also have a guidance tutor who will provide support for your personal and academic development.

As you progress, the links between taught elements and your own independent learning will be explained at regular intervals, giving you every opportunity to achieve your full potential.

Research-Rich Learning

According to the UK’s most recent research excellence framework, the criminologists on this course are producing research outputs of international quality within world-leading peer reviewed journals such as Criminology, British Journal of Criminology, Theoretical Criminology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Policing and Society, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, and the Howard Journal of Criminal Justice.

Research is embedded throughout your course at all stages. You will be introduced to research methods to equip you with all the relevant skills you’ll need throughout your studies and beyond.

The Advanced Study Skills module introduces higher level reading, writing and research skills to help support you through the course. Whatever your previous background this module will provide you with important skills to succeed with your studies and to boost subsequent career prospects.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice focuses on embedding skills to prepare you for a career in a crime related area or for further doctoral study.

You will write traditional essays and develop skills sought by employers through real-world assessments including debate logs, a critical literature review, a portfolio, a research bid and a dissertation.

The department has close links with a range of relevant agencies, including the Prison Service, law enforcement agencies and the voluntary sector, and these close networks will further enhance your learning experience throughout the course.

You will also have access to tailored career guidance in 1-to-1 and CV skills sessions with the Northumbria Careers team.

Your Future

On graduating, you will have developed advanced written and oral communication skills and the ability to apply Criminological concepts to a wide range of practical issues.

You will be able to demonstrate research skills which are valuable in many professions and show that you are someone who can apply independent critical thinking and judgement.

Previous students are enjoying successful careers in the criminal justice and community justice sectors, drug action teams, law enforcement agencies, voluntary and charitable sectors, crime analysis, research, local government, community safety, youth justice and the prison system. You also have the opportunity to continue your academic studies at PhD level.

Read less
This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice. Read more

This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice.

If you’re a service provider, practitioner or policy maker who wants to bring theory and practice together, or you’re planning a career in the field of disability, you’ll explore a range of disability-related issues from theoretical and practical perspectives.

Our refreshed core modules allow you to explore the frontiers of research in this rapidly developing field, and focus on social policy for disabled people in education, benefits, housing, transport, employment, health and social support services, as well as recent developments in social research on disability. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on the topics that best suit your own interests or career plans, from care to disability and development via research training or race and ethnicity studies.

Research insight

Taught by academics from the Centre for Disability Studies, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment where tutors’ teaching is informed by their own cutting-edge research.

The interdisciplinary Centre for Disability Studies is at the forefront of international research in the field, using social model approaches that recognise disability as a form of institutional discrimination and social exclusion, rather than a product of physical difference between individuals. You’ll benefit from the expertise of researchers from diverse backgrounds, drawing on the experiences and issues raised by the disabled people’s movement.

Course content

In Semester 1 you’ll take a core module examining recent debates and developments in social research on disability. You’ll critically assess positivist, interpretative and ‘emancipatory’ methodologies and the data collection and analysis strategies that come with them, and consider the emergence of the ‘social model’ of disability.

You’ll apply these perspectives to contemporary social policy in Semester 2, as you explore topics such as disability benefits, self-help, public amenities like housing, transport and public buildings, education, employment and social support services.

In addition, you’ll gain specialist knowledge when you select from a range of optional modules. You could pursue further training in quantitative and qualitative research methods, or study topics such as special educational needs. You’ll also focus on a specific topic when you complete your dissertation – an individual piece of research that allows you to showcase the knowledge and skills you’ve gained.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Social Policy, Politics and Disabled People 30 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Disability) 60 credits
  • Debates on Disability Theory and Research 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Special Educational Needs: Inclusive Curriculum 30 credits
  • International Human Rights and Disabled People 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use various teaching methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials in core modules. Optional modules may also include methods such as practical classes, workshops or online learning. Independent study is also crucial to this programme, allowing you to shape your own research questions, prepare for taught sessions and build research and analytical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods are likely to vary, depending on the optional modules you choose. Most of our taught modules are assessed through written work such as essays and book and literature reviews.

Career opportunities

There is a growing demand for students with a comprehensive knowledge of disability issues in all areas of social life.

In particular, there are many career opportunities in health and social support services, education, human resources, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities.

There are also excellent career openings in social research and universities – you’ll be well prepared for further research at PhD level.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Postgraduate research in the School of Social and Political Sciences is informed by the expertise of our team of academics, who have long-standing links to industry, government, research organisations and the voluntary sector. Read more
Postgraduate research in the School of Social and Political Sciences is informed by the expertise of our team of academics, who have long-standing links to industry, government, research organisations and the voluntary sector.

Opportunities for research are available across a range of topics in social and political sciences. Current research projects include the politics of anti-social behaviour, quality physical education, transforming higher education, new social movements in the Middle East, support for people with HIV/AIDS, the 1984/5 miners’ strike, gender and violence, the Gambling Act 2005, and democracy and human rights in Africa.

You can benefit from a structured programme of training which aims to develop the research competencies and professional practice skills that can enhance both your postgraduate study and future career. There are opportunities for collaborative working across disciplines and you will be supported in applying for funding, attending conferences and publishing your work.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Examples of current research projects include:
-Collaborative Governance
-The Case of Mass Transportation in Lagos and London
-Steiner Education
-Machiavelli and New Labour
-Public Houses in Rural Communities
-The Politics of Anti-Social Behaviour
-Rural Community Engagement
-Preventive Diplomacy
-Quality Physical Education
-The Learning Motivation of Older People.

How You Study

Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations in the 1940's, the politics of direct action, war crimes, refugees and asylum seekers, Syrian politics, international relations in the Maghreb, the social exclusion of older people and the policing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gendered people.

The School aims to provide considerable support to enable you to become an independent researcher. Students are required to follow a structured pattern of activity during which their progress can be monitored and encouraged. Throughout their studies students are allocated two supervisors and the emphasis is on providing whatever training students require. Students are asked to contribute to the department's research seminar series, are able to apply for funding to attend conferences and are encouraged to publish their work, including in the department's Social Research Paper series and in journals.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

This programme may help to develop the high-level research skills and knowledge required to establish careers in fields related to your research. Some graduates may pursue roles in research, government, the criminal justice system, local authorities and other public services, as well as academia.

Read less
The active Social Policy research base in the School of Social and Political Sciences ensures that staff who teach on this programme are involved in current Social Policy debates and that students are made aware of new developments and issues in the area. Read more
The active Social Policy research base in the School of Social and Political Sciences ensures that staff who teach on this programme are involved in current Social Policy debates and that students are made aware of new developments and issues in the area. Each research student is supported by research training.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Staff have expertise for postgraduate supervision in the following:
-Community Care
-Housing and Urban Regeneration
-Poverty and Social Exclusion
-Social Divisions (especially gender, race, disability, sexuality and age)
-The Policy Process
-Family Policy
-Comparative Politics.

How You Study

Research students normally have two internal supervisors with specialist knowledge of Social Policy areas. They have regular meetings with them for advice, monitoring and other support and where appropriate, additional advisors may also be utilised. As a research student, you have the chance to contribute to the School’s internal seminar series and may also be involved in teaching.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to successfully defend that thesis to your examiners.

Career and Personal Development

Graduates may pursue positions as researchers or academics in institutes of higher education. Others may choose to use the experience for personal development and go on to careers in related sectors.

Read less
This Master's offers a comprehensive overview of social development, combining academic and theoretical perspectives with more practical and policy-focused approaches. Read more
This Master's offers a comprehensive overview of social development, combining academic and theoretical perspectives with more practical and policy-focused approaches.

Key themes include vulnerability and social exclusion, poverty, gender relations and mainstreaming, and social analysis. We pay particular attention to issues such as social equality, education, migration, health provision and policy, the implications of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the role of civil society.

In the last two decades it has become apparent that development goes far beyond economic growth and encompasses broader human and social dimensions. The emerging paradigm is now influencing the agendas of major international development agencies, including the World Bank, UNDP, the EU, and the UK Department for International Development (DFID), as well as other bilateral donors.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X