• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Northampton Featured Masters Courses
London Metropolitan University Featured Masters Courses
University of Dundee Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bath Featured Masters Courses
"social" AND "economy"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Social Economy)

We have 871 Masters Degrees (Social Economy)

  • "social" AND "economy" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 871
Order by 
Social Media, Culture and Society MA offers a flexible, interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. Read more

Social Media, Culture and Society MA offers a flexible, interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. It will benefit those seeking to develop their understanding of contemporary communication and its societal, political, regulatory, industrial and cultural contexts.

Social Media, Culture and Society MA provides students with the opportunity to focus at postgraduate level on:

  • Studying the ways in which social media and the internet shape and are shaped by social, economic, political, technological and cultural factors, in order to equip students to become critical research-oriented social media experts.
  • Developing reflective and critical insights into how social media and the internet are used in multiple contexts in society, and into which roles social media can play in various forms of organisations that are situated in these societal contexts. The aim is that students are equipped to become reflective and critical social media practitioners.
  • Gaining in-depth knowledge and understanding of the major debates about the social and cultural roles of social media and the internet.
  • Acquiring advanced knowledge and understanding of the key categories, theories, approaches and models of social media's and the internet's roles in and impacts on society and human practices.
  • Obtaining advanced insights into practical activity and practice-based work that relate to how social media and the internet work and which implications they have for social and cultural practices.

This Master's is organised in the environment of the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) and its Centre for Social Media Research. CAMRI is a world-leading research centre that studies the role of media and communication in society. It has become known as the Westminster school of critical media and communication research. The analysis of social media, culture and society is one of its research specialisms. In the most recent UK government research audit, the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), 42.2% of CAMRI’s research was classified as world-leading and 37.5% as internationally excellent, which makes it one of Britain’s four leading media and communication research institutions. 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. 

In semester one, students must select two elective modules from the two thematic groups below (any combination of modules is applicable): 

  • Theory and Global Political Economy of Media and Communication 
  • Media Politics, Regulation and Business Strategies. 

In semester two, students must select two elective modules from two thematic groups below (any combination of modules is applicable): 

  • Media Politics, Regulation and Business Strategies 
  • Media, Culture and Everyday Life. 

More information on modules and groups to which they belong to can be found below.

Core modules (semester one)

Option modules (Semester One)

Core modules (Semester Two)

Optional modules (Semester Two)

Career path

The Social Media, Culture and Society MA will benefit those seeking to develop their understanding of contemporary communication and its social, political and cultural contexts. This degree will be of particular interest to those who plan to work in the creative industries, as well as those already working in this field. Social Media, Culture and Society MA will also be of interest to students working in non-profit sectors, including NGOs and advocacy groups. The degree will help those seeking a competitive edge in a careers market that values high-level skills in communication, research and critical thinking.

The course also provides an excellent preparation for those wishing to continue their studies to PhD level. Around 10% of graduates of the course are now undertaking PhDs. Others work in the social media start-up scene in London, or work as journalists and in a range of industries and non-profit sectors.



Read less
Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme provides you with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that currently shape social sciences. Read more

Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme provides you with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that currently shape social sciences. It also provides an opportunity to develop specialised research methods skills in social policy in an internationally renowned department for Social Policy research.

The Social Science Research (Social Policy) programme consists of compulsory and optional modules, delivered across four different academic schools within the University, which means you benefit from an interdisciplinary approach to your studies. The academic schools involved are:

  • School of Social, Political, and Geographical Sciences
  • School of Sport, Exercise, and Health Sciences
  • School of Business and Economics
  • School of Science.

On completion of the Social Science Research (Social Policy) programme, you will have met the MSc training requirements for PhD funding from the ESRC, opening up the possibility of securing PhD funding from the ESRC. Further information regarding the future career prospects associated with this programme can be found below.

The modules are taught by leading researchers selected for their expertise in the taught research methods and topics.

What makes this programme different?

The Social Policy courses in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough Universities are consistently rated in the top-15 UK Social Policy courses by national league tables.

The Department of Social Sciences hosts the prestigious Centre for Research in Social Policy (CRSP) which over the past 30 years has developed an international reputation for high quality applied policy research. Most prominently, CRSP is currently involved in the study of the Minimum Income Standard programme.

The School of Social Political and Geographical Sciences is the home to the Centre for Research in Communication and Culture (CRCC). Established in 1991, the centre has since grown to be one of the largest of its kind in the UK. The CRCC’s core topics themes include:

  • Culture, Economy, and Policy
  • Interaction and Discourse
  • Media, Memory, and History
  • Nations, Migrants, and Citizenship
  • Political Communication
  • Social, Political, and Cultural Theory

The programme is in full compliance with the Economic and Social Research Council’s requirements for an MSc in Social Science Research. On completion of the course, you will have met the training requirements for PhD funding from the ESRC, opening up the possibility of securing PhD funding from the ESRC.

Who should study this programme?

  • Individuals wishing to pursue a career in academia
  • Social policy practitioners, who wish to both develop and strengthen their applied research skills
  • Those wishing to conduct research in non-academic public and private sector roles

What you'll study

Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well equipped to progress onto being high level researchers in their chosen field of study.

Modules

Social Science Research (Social Policy) covers a wide range of topics; please visit the website for a full list of modules.



Read less
There is a growth in the number of entrepreneurs starting businesses with social and environmental purposes. This exciting MA will enable you to develop a critical understanding of and practical insights into modes of social enterprise. Read more

There is a growth in the number of entrepreneurs starting businesses with social and environmental purposes. This exciting MA will enable you to develop a critical understanding of and practical insights into modes of social enterprise.

There is an urgent need for talented individuals who can design novel solutions to our most profound societal challenges.

This international MA provides practical and sociological tools to individuals motivated to develop alternative economic practices and frameworks to meet such challenges. These might include (but are not limited to) social enterprises, collaborative innovation networks, hubs, digital platforms, support intermediaries and/or policy proposals.

Benefitting from the MA’s timely educational content as well as from its firm roots in London’s rich networks, our students go on to become thought leaders in the burgeoning social innovation field, advancing it in a creative fashion from their chosen angle. Past graduates have gone on to create their own social enterprises or to work for prestigious organisations such as the Yunus Institute and Social Enterprise UK, while some have elected to carry out advanced research into social innovation.

This MA is ideal for:

  • Current social entrepreneurs hoping to develop their expertise further (roughly 25% of our students from the UK and EU study part-time while working in the field)
  • Undergraduates aspiring to become social innovators and changemakers
  • Intrapreneurs interested in organisational transformation within the creative sector or any other sector of interest
  • Support organisation/infrastructure architects and policy makers (including those who wish to advance the field of social innovation in their cities/areas/countries)
  • Those interested in becoming analysts and knowledge experts in this field (including academic researchers with PhDs)

The MA in more detail

The MA in Social Entrepreneurship is one of the few graduate programmes in the world dedicated entirely to the study of the fast-moving field of social entrepreneurship and innovation.

It will equip you with a strong understanding of foundational theories of entrepreneurship, innovation, social problems and policy (with organisational sociology as the base discipline) while supplying practical tools in relation to entrepreneurial modelling and SROI.

There is also a marked emphasis on creativity, which means that you will have considerable scope to choose the precise topics you wish to tackle and the approaches you wish to apply. Teaching on the course is interactive and seminar-driven rather than based on the traditional model of long lectures and limited discussions.

What you study

The programme will introduce you to key concepts in the historical development of social enterprise and innovation and to its changing role in society and the economy. Seminars and talks will be given by social entrepreneurs, as well as leading professionals.

You'll learn innovative approaches to developing an enterprise, and gain confidence in revenue generation and financial modelling. 

A significant amount of the learning is delivered through group projects and activities. This is designed to develop your individual communication skills and teamwork.

The programme consists of five core modules:

  • Theories of Creative, Cultural and Social Entrepreneurship
  • Entrepreneurial Modelling
  • Social Entrepreneurship: Policy and Frameworks
  • Social Return On Investment: Principles and Practice
  • Research or Project-Based Master’s Dissertation

In addition to these main modules, we also regularly invite external experts from intermediaries such as UnLtd and other educational institutions such as the University of Oxford to ensure our students get access to a wide range of cutting-edge topics in the field. Social and alternative finance is among the key areas examined in such guest lectures; social innovation cases from particular country-contexts such as, for example, South Korea, Japan and Colombia also feature frequently.

We are occasionally able to provide additional training in related fields (such as accounting) in the form of short-term workshops to strengthen our students’ educational experience at Goldsmiths and at the University of London. We also encourage you to become members of various social entrepreneurship/collaboration hubs around London for learning and networking purposes.

A non-business school programme

The MA in Social Entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths is quite unlike traditional business/management-driven courses in the field: on the one hand, it allows scope for a far deeper examination of the theoretical and practical foundations of social innovation; on the other, it provides unique access to an expanding learning community (formed by our students and our wider, growing network) engaged in real-time research.

Equally important is the fact that students are consciously encouraged to, and supported with, forming their professional public profiles, through things like:

  • blogging (eg via The Golden Angle blog that students founded in 2013-2014)
  • public speaking
  • interactive research projects
  • developing your own social enterprise

Because our students possess diverse, highly relevant knowledge that they have accumulated prior to coming to Goldsmiths, real efforts are made to integrate this knowledge and experience into the collective learning processes.

One relevant tool that we employ here is an interactive peer-review process that we employ to raise the quality of student output, which means that often student essays (not just dissertations) are of publishable quality. Furthermore, we take full advantage of our location within London’s bustling community of social innovation by engaging with leading intermediaries, practitioners and (junior as well as senior) thought leaders.

Skills

The skills you'll develop throughout the MA include: entrepreneurial knowledge and skills; a critical understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of social entrepreneurship; the ability to critically examine the conditions required for innovation and entrepreneurship to make a strong impact on societal problems; the ability to apply entrepreneurial approaches to projects; effective business and communication skills.

Careers

It is intended that students completing this programme will seek employment primarily in two areas.

Firstly: self-employed in their own social enterprise or a member of a team of an SME developing from an existing or new practice.

Secondly: within government or NGO organisations concerned with developing the infrastructure and environment for new social enterprises to flourish.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



Read less
Our Masters degree in Social Policy is designed to develop students’ critical knowledge and understanding of social policy. Read more
Our Masters degree in Social Policy is designed to develop students’ critical knowledge and understanding of social policy. Together with active researchers you will be led through the key contemporary debates in social policy as well as learning how to develop and carry out your own social policy-focused research projects.

Our Master’s has a strong focus on critical and radical approaches to the study of social policy both here in the UK and from a global perspective. In particular the course is concerned with how social policies can reinforce and reproduce marginalisation and oppression in society for groups such as women, deprived communities, ethnic minorities, migrants, disabled people and older people. Concurrently, nevertheless, the program will also analyse how various social policies have been the result of resistance to dominant economic structures and should therefore also be conceptualised as key institutions formalising the rights of the same groups which social policies often oppress. Social policy is also a deeply political subject and as consequence our program explores the theoretical links between the economy and transformations in welfare systems.

With our strong focus on research methods, however, our course also enables students to develop the central skills required to analyse, understand and critically evaluate any social policy issue. Not only do we encourage students to understand policies comparatively, we also provide a significant amount of research training which covers the key philosophical issues and traditions in social science complimented by significant instruction on the uses and strengths of the range of methods and methodological approaches (i.e. quantitative and qualitative data analysis, focus groups, ethnography and so on).

Drawing on our vibrant and developing research culture we offer contemporary and relevant degree programme, drawing expertise from our interest in current social policy trends in Britain, Europe and globally. Studying for a Master’s in Social Policy is guaranteed to be an intellectually engaging experience which will allow students to develop the skills required for many relevant career pathways.

Curriculum

The programme consists of four modules and a dissertation (final research project) totalling 180 credits. Assessment methods will vary and may include academic essays, reports, presentations and examinations, research proposals and a research dissertation.

Advanced Social Theory (30 credits) – You will engage with, evaluate and critically analyse a range of social theory ranging in scope from classical social theory to post-modern approaches.

Advanced Studies in Social Research (30 credits)-You will understand the methodological principles and practices that underpin independent research at Master’s level. You will examine the research process, including design, data collection and analysis, interpretation and presentation.

Transformations in the UK welfare state (30 credits) – This part of the course explores the key issues in social policy in the UK in a contemporary perspective. Notably we will explore the relationship between social policies and the wider political economy, unpicking and critically analysing recent changes in social policy such as privatisation, marketization and austerity. The course will analyse these changes in the welfare state in relation to poverty, class, ‘race’, gender, ageing, sexuality and disability.

Comparative Social Policy and Globalisation (30 credits) – This part of the course will concentrate on developing an international perspective on social policy. The module has two main aims. Firstly, to comparatively analyse different welfare states across the world and, secondly, to explore social policy in relation to globalisation and global capitalism.

Dissertation/Research Project (60 credits) – The focus of the research project will be on an issue of relevance to the study of social policy. The study can involve the collection of primary data or a literature-based dissertation.

Read less
This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Read more

This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Participants engage in a critical analysis of the theory and practice of social development alongside gaining the skills required to be a reflective social development practitioner.

About this degree

The programme objectives are to give participants a solid grounding in social analysis skills and perspectives, rooted in social theory around identity, inequality, and social change processes. Students learn how development interventions can best support the citizenship claims of diverse groups of women and men, and girls and boys living in the Global South, and consider the role of the social development practitioner in this endeavour.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (totalling 30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (full-time nine months) is offered, comprising three core modules (90 credits) and one or two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules

All three of the following:

  • Social Policy and Citizenship
  • Social Diversity, Inequality, and Poverty
  • Social Development in Practice

Optional modules

One or two optional modules, totalling 30 credits, usually including the following, among others:

  • NGOs and Social Transformation
  • Communication, Technologies and Social Power
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Participatory Processes: Building for Development
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I and II
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • Political Economy of Development: Land, Food and Agriculture
  • Political Economy of Development: Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
  • Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
  • The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • Managing the City Economy
  • An Introduction to Public Economics and Public Policy

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project related to the main themes of the programme, culminating in a dissertation report of 10,000 words (60 credits). Topics may be chosen to enhance career development or for their inherent interest.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical classroom exercises, and fieldwork within the UK and abroad. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations, and a dissertation report as well as an assessment of practical work, including the international fieldwork group report.

Fieldwork

The programme incorporates group fieldwork in London and in a selected country of the Global South.

The cost of flights, visas, necessary vaccinations, accommodation, and fieldwork-related travel and facilitations costs, are incorporated within the programme fees. Meals and other expenditure must be covered by the student.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Development Practice MSc

Funding

Candidates for the MSc in Social Development Practice may be eligible for the Swarovski Foundation scholarship. Details of this scholarship will be published on The Bartlett Development Planning Unit website in autumn 2017.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's programme are likely to find employment as officers for local and international NGOs, as officers for international organisations, as officers in local or national government departments and as consultants. Some graduates pursue an academic career, either through doctoral studies or through teaching and research in a number of prestigious universities.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Institutional Capacity Building Programme Professional, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
  • Project Officer, Korea Development Bank
  • Corporate Responsibility Manager, Odebrecht
  • Development Consultant, World Bank Group

Employability

Graduates of this programme are able to link theory to practice, critically reflect, and negotiate complex social relations as well as facilitate social processes in a context of diversity - all key transferable skills in the job market. Graduates have secured jobs in a variety of sectors and countries and built fulfilling careers in social development.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme introduces students to critical, analytical and practical skills that will be of use in their future careers, whether as academics, social development practitioners or advocates for the need to place the 'social' at the centre of development. Students have an opportunity to critically examine relevant bodies of knowledge, current debates and field experience in primarily urban contexts, and to consider the challenges of making development policy, planning and practice more socially responsive.

Students on this MSc benefit from the strong practical component, which includes fieldwork assignments in London and an international field trip to a city in the Global South. This trip provides the opportunity to develop practical skills, use tools for participatory action research, and reflect on the roles and responsibilities of social development practitioners.

The practice-based components of the programme also provide students with the opportunity to network with organisations and professionals working in the social development sector. In a complementary series of careers sessions, students can network with Development Planning Unit alumni and partners who are working in relevant fields.



Read less
Social business is a cause driven business, which aims to impact on people or the planet, rather than for the accumulation of profits to shareholders or investors. Read more

Social business is a cause driven business, which aims to impact on people or the planet, rather than for the accumulation of profits to shareholders or investors. While the benefits of a socially enterprising world are well documented, every social business journey is unique, and the impact of microfinance is still emerging.

Evolving this practice further, the MSc Social Business and Microfinance from Glasgow Caledonian University shares its home with the Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health - GCU's world-leading research centre - and is delivered by the award-winning Glasgow School for Business and Society*.

With an increased thirst for solving the world's social problems, global businesses are looking for the right mix of critical, intellectually curious and entrepreneurial scholars and practitioners who are armed with the knowledge and mindset needed to tackle some of the world's most pressing problems.

*winner of 4 QS Stars for Business

What you will study

As a student of the MSc in Social Business and Microfinance, you'll be a part of one of the first global communities of its kind. You will not only analyse the symptoms of our social problems, but also work to uncover sustainable solutions.

The international appeal of this programme ensures knowledge transfer, interactivity and group activities on an international scale and is designed to generate this wide array of knowledge and skills that are translatable into the global workplace.

You will be skilled in effectively communicating issues relating to Social Business and Microfinance by participating in guest lectures from practitioners from Scotland, the rest of the UK and the EU.

Module Information

  • Ethics, Governance and Responsible Leadership
  • Global Social Entrepreneurship
  • Human rights, Gender and Development
  • Microfinance: Theory and Practice
  • Applied Professional Practice
  • Applied Social Marketing
  • Project Management
  • Social Business and the Social Economy
  • Masters Research Project


Read less
The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to life-enhancing and sustaining experiences such as education, health care, housing, income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings, and the care associated with the loss of autonomy and independence. Read more

Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to life-enhancing and sustaining experiences such as education, health care, housing, income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings, and the care associated with the loss of autonomy and independence. UCLan's MA Social Policy postgraduate degree will be of benefit to professionals working in the world of social welfare, to graduates in Social Policy or a related discipline, and to the interested citizen. There are core modules in poverty and social inequality; comparative social policy and social change; social theory and social policy; the making of social policy; introduction to social research. Newly-introduced modules include a work placement module: social policy in practice, with an alternative choice of a reflecting on policy and practice module for those students already in work who may wish to focus analysis on their current professional role.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students will be taught in a combination of lecture, seminar and workshop settings. The research module makes extensive use of eLearn. Full-time students will normally have six hours per week class contact time (3 taught modules per semester), whilst part-time students will normally have between two to four hours per week class contact time (One-two modules per semester, depending on the student's chosen programme of study). Students also receive additional tutorial support in negotiation with their personal tutor.

The course employs a variety of assessment methods including essays, seminar presentations, data analysis and a 15000 word dissertation that is the biggest single component (worth three modules) of the MA target award. There are no examinations. All forms of assessment have been designed to test the extent to which learning outcomes have been achieved.

There is also a dissertation (triple module) on a topic of the student’s choice. The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and supervised self-directed study. It is assessed through coursework and a dissertation. There are no examinations.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to that range of life enhancing and life sustaining experiences, whose distribution lies at the heart of welfare states. These include education, health care, housing, and income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings and the care associated with the experience of contingencies which lead to a loss of independence and autonomy. There can be little doubt that social policy issues are now at the centre of political debate in Britain and much of the rest of the industrialised world.

The New Labour government of 1997-2010 made the ‘modernisation’ of these services and the improvement in the quality of users' experiences the test by which it wishes to be judged: in what directions has the new Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition taken social policy since the defeat of New Labour?

The MA Social Policy is a modular course that offers the opportunity to engage in a discussion of some of the most important issues of a world characterised by profound cultural, demographic, economic, political and technological change. It will be of relevance and benefit to professionals who work in one or other sector of the mixed economy of welfare, to graduates in Social Policy or a related discipline such as Economics, Health Studies, History, Philosophy, Politics and Sociology, and to the interested citizen.

The course aims to:

-Provide an intellectually challenging range of modules that focus on a number of the most important theoretical perspectives at the "cutting edge" of the subject

-Apply an advanced critical perspective to social policy issues relevant to your professional and/or academic situation

-Encourage you to develop a framework of knowledge, critical understanding and analytical skills that can be used as a basis for both professional and personal development.



Read less
Who is it for?. The Global Political Economy MA will help you broaden your understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and its socio-political relationships. Read more

Who is it for?

The Global Political Economy MA will help you broaden your understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and its socio-political relationships. The course is designed for inquisitive students that want to develop a cutting-edge perspective on global economic and financial relations, inter-state competition, mechanisms of global governance and processes of transformation and change.

You don’t need any formal economics education for this course. Students come from a wide range of subject fields, including Politics, Law, Business Studies, Media Studies, the Humanities and more.

From global inequality and tax evasion to financial regulation and financial crises, the expertise that you develop on this advanced MA will enable you to pursue a wide range of rewarding career options in the public and private sectors.

Objectives

The Global Political Economy MA will help you:

  • Get an advanced specialist education in the field of global political economy.
  • Develop your analytical skills and the ability to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between markets, governments, transnational actors and networks in the setting of the globalising economy.
  • Acquire an advanced conceptualisation of the problems of global capitalism in the
  • 21st century.
  • Critically examine rapid economic change and its socio-political roots in the contemporary world.
  • Analyse and articulate your analysis of complex issues and debates to a high level.
  • Prepare for a diverse range of careers and develop contextual knowledge that will be applicable for life-long learning in a rapidly changing economic environment.

Teaching and learning

You will benefit from our internationally renowned expertise in the field of global political economy, exemplified by:

  • The leading academic staff who deliver the course.
  • The vibrant research culture at the City Political Economy Research Centre.
  • City’s central London location.

The MA in Global Political Economy is taught by internationally renowned, world-leading scholars in the field, including the next-generation of academics engaged in cutting-edge research. As a result, City boasts one of the UK’s best teams in the critical study of global finance.

Our staff includes Ronen Palan, Anastasia Nesvetailova, Stefano Pagliari, Amin Samman and Sandy Brian Hager amongst others.

Student activities

In many modules, you will be encouraged to give presentations. We use group discussions, brain-storming, role-play and mini-roundtables on thematic issues in addition to conventional teaching techniques.

As an MA student, you are also invited to attend PhD workshops organised by doctoral students in the Department.

Assessment

All modules are assessed through a written essay of 4,500 words.

In addition to coursework, you must complete a final MA dissertation of 15,000 words based on your independent research. The dissertation is worth one-third of the overall MA mark. The Global Political Economy MA dissertation is grounded in a specialised stream of the Research Design module (IPM111). During the module, you will receive specialised training in research methodology, tailored for your dissertation in the field of global political economy.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits in total.

The course consists of core modules on the history of global capitalism and contending approaches from across the political economy traditions. You will then develop specialist knowledge through elective modules, which cover issues such as economic and financial crises, international organisations and economic diplomacy, poverty and inequality, regionalisation and globalisation, states and sovereignty, and the rise of new economic powers.

You will take two core modules and a range of electives. Core modules are typically taught as a weekly one-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial, and optional modules as a weekly two-hour seminar session.

Teaching is supported by a personal tutorial and supervision system, as well as organised seminar series with outside speakers, both professional and academic.

Core modules

Elective modules

You choose 60 credits from:

Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:

  • Understanding Security in the Twenty-First Century (15 credits)
  • Development and World Politics (15 credits)
  • Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
  • The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
  • Global Governance (15 credits)
  • International Politics and the Middle East (15 credits)
  • Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
  • Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-Making (30 credits)
  • Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
  • Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
  • Religion in Global Politics (15 credits

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:

  • International Law and the Global Economy (30 credits)
  • International Tax Law (30 credits)
  • International Trade Law(30 credits)
  • Money Laundering Law (30 credits)
  • International Investment Law (30 credits)
  • International Banking Law (30 credits)

In Term 3 you will complete your dissertation project.

Career prospects

This specialised MA degree will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need to enter a range of careers related to the global political economy. It enables graduates both with and without prior knowledge of economics to engage competently and confidently with economic and financial developments and pursue professional careers in the public and private sectors, including:

  • Finance and banking.
  • Transnational corporations.
  • Civil service and international diplomacy.
  • The media.
  • Development agencies.

Should you want to take your academic studies further, the MA also provides you with a solid foundation to pursue doctoral research in politics and political economy.

International Politics Careers Day

During your MA year you are encouraged to attend the Department's International Politics Careers Day which explores career opportunities and provides:

  • Talks by speakers within the field (including City alumni). Previous speakers have included staff from the Department for International Development, the Ministry of Justice, UNESCO, the EU Commission and the UN Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO).
  • Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
  • CV and application advice, and volunteering drop-in sessions with career professionals.


Read less
You want a course that draws on a long and highly distinguished tradition of political economy at The University of Manchester. You are interested in a unique, cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy. Read more
  • You want a course that draws on a long and highly distinguished tradition of political economy at The University of Manchester
  • You are interested in a unique, cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy
  • You would like to pursue your own particular interests in political economy through one of four distinct pathways

The MA in Political Economy programme at Manchester University offers a cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy. The MA is housed in the Centre for the Study of Political Economy, which brings together the world-class research strengths in the field of political economy at Manchester University. The programme is taught from members across the Faculty of Humanities in the School of Social Sciences, the School of Environment and Development, and the Alliance Manchester Business School.

Each student will pursue their particular interests in political economy through one of four pathways:

  • Theoretical Political Economy
  • Political Economy of Society, Space and Environment
  • Political Economy of Finance, Business and Work
  • Political Economy of Development.

Each pathway offers courses drawn from across the different disciplines in the schools, offering the student a unique exposure to the full breadth of the field of political economy. The research route is an ESRC recognised 1 + 3 programme which offers training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods that prepare students for doctoral research.

  • Course Director: Professor John O'Neill
  • Email: John.F.O

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Course unit details

All students take a core module, Theoretical Approaches to Political Economy , which provides a thorough grounding in both classical and contemporary theories of political economy and introduces the basic concepts of the discipline. The student will also take at least one core module from their chosen pathway together with one other optional module from that pathway. The research route provides a foundation in research skills for students intending to go on to undertake a PhD in the area of political economy, or seeking employment requiring advanced research skills in the public, private or voluntary sector. Students will complete compulsory core research training units in Quantitative Research Methods , Qualitative Research , Philosophy of Politics and Dissertation Research Design . Taught units comprise two thirds of the programme. The remainder of the programme consists of a 12000-15000 word dissertation on a substantial issue in political economy.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
The Political Economy of the Middle East MA is an interdisciplinary course that introduces students to political economy from a wide range of academic disciplines. Read more

The Political Economy of the Middle East MA is an interdisciplinary course that introduces students to political economy from a wide range of academic disciplines. The course has a strong emphasis on helping students think critically, creatively and effectively about promoting social justice, equality, democracy, sustainability and social change through political economy.

Key benefits

  • Unique in combining the study of political economy and Middle Eastern studies.
  • Enables you to analyse the political economy of the Middle East from a variety of different perspectives.
  • Provides a strong intellectual and methodological foundation for further research.
  • Develop your communication skills by presenting and disseminating research in written and oral forms, to classmates, tutors, and the wider academic community.
  • Vibrant research community, designated as a Centre of Excellence in Middle Eastern Studies.

Description

Issues of Political Economy in the Middle East are currently at the forefront of global media, policy and public discourses and there is a wide range of both governmental and nongovernmental organizations that will be looking for individuals with strong training in the area. The MA course Political Economy of the Middle East uses the Middle East as a vital arena to think through broader issues of the political economy and development, and conversely uses political economy as a substantive area of empirical and theoretical work through which to understand the Middle East.

Our course offers you an in-depth analysis of major scholarly debates in the political economy of the region through the required module Political Economy of the Middle East: Theory & Practice. It also allows you to pursue your own developing interests by choosing from a wide range of specialist modules.

This course is ideal for graduates with a degree in international relations, economics, politics, international political economy and Middle Eastern studies. We also welcome recent graduates from other disciplines in the humanities, the social sciences and law, as well as those from a professional background.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For every 20-credit module, we will typically provide you with 20 hours of lectures and seminars (two hours of teaching per week), and we will expect you to undertake 180 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide you with a course in Dissertation Methods which totals 20 hours of contact spread over two terms and up to four hours of one-to-one supervision. You will typically undertake 586 hours of independent study and project work.

As part of their two-year schedule, part-time students typically take the required Political Economy of the Middle East: Theory & Practice module and two optional modules in Year 1, and two optional modules and the dissertation module in Year 2.

Assessment

We assess Political Economy of the Middle East: Theory & Practice through essay and class participation. You may also be assessed by essays, Q&As and class participation. The nature of assessment varies by module. Your dissertation will be a 10,000-word thesis on a topic of your choosing, and you may take it in the UK or overseas.

Career prospects

This course provides you with the enhanced skills and qualifications which will allow you to excel in future employment and research in an increasingly important field. Our students have transferred the skills they have developed to careers in development organisations, the corporate or financial sector, the diplomatic service, international NGOs, civil society organisations or journalism. Some students have gone on to further research in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, or another department.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



Read less
You want a course that draws on a long and highly distinguished tradition of political economy at The University of Manchester. You are interested in a unique, cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy. Read more
  • You want a course that draws on a long and highly distinguished tradition of political economy at The University of Manchester
  • You are interested in a unique, cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy
  • You would like to pursue your own particular interests in political economy through one of our distinct pathways

The MA in Political Economy programme at Manchester University offers a cross-disciplinary curriculum of study in political economy. The MA is housed in the Centre for the Study of Political Economy, which brings together the world-class research strengths in the field of political economy at Manchester University. The programme is taught from members across the Faculty of Humanities in the School of Social Sciences, the School of Environment and Development, and the Alliance Manchester Business School.

Each student will pursue their particular interests in political economy through one of four pathways:

  • Theoretical Political Economy
  • Political Economy of Society, Space and Environment
  • Political Economy of Finance, Business and Work
  • Political Economy of Development.

Each pathway offers courses drawn from across the different disciplines in the schools, offering the student an exposure to the full breadth of the field of political economy.

  • Course Director: Professor John O'Neil
  • Tel: +44 (0)161 275 4853
  • Email:  John.F.O

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Course unit details

All students take a core module, Theoretical Approaches to Political Economy , which provides a thorough grounding in both classical and contemporary theories of political economy and introduces the basic concepts of the discipline. Students on the standard route will also take at least two core modules from their chosen pathway together with three other optional modules from that pathway. Students will also undertake research training units in  Dissertation Research Design . Taught units comprise two thirds of the programme. The remainder of the programme consists of a 12000-15000 word dissertation on a substantial issue in political economy.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. Read more

Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. The MA provides quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate to a wide range of historical approaches. Accredited by the ESRC, this MA is part of our four year funding scheme offered by the North-East Doctoral Training Centre. You can apply for 1+3 funding for this MA followed by a PhD in any aspect of social and economic history with expert supervision available within the Department – and with our partner institution in the NEDTC at Newcastle University. This includes African history, and aspects of governance, as well as traditional social and economic topics. For further information on funding see further below.

The MA programme is shared with the School of Applied Social Science and will help you to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of social and economic history and to master advanced understanding of the concepts and methods with which it may be interrogated. It seeks to equip you with a diverse portfolio of research techniques and approaches to enable you to undertake extended independent research in your dissertation, and to make your own contribution to the field. The skills provided by this MA are also transferrable to a wide range of careers.

Durham has a long tradition of economic and social history, on which this MA draws. The breadth of possible subjects for study mirrors the comprehensive and global nature of the department staff: from medieval Europe to modern-day Africa, and from north-east England to the global economy. Durham's History Department is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Students of social and economic history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity.

Course Structure

The MA in Social and Economic History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year.

You will take 30 credits of core modules from History: Themes, Reading and Sources (30 credits); and 30 credits of core modules from the School of Applied Social Sciences: Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits) AND EITHER Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits). You will write a 60-credit dissertation (15,000 words) supervised by a member of academic staff in the History Department. You will also choose a 30-credit optional module in History; AND 30 credits of optional modules from Social Sciences: EITHER Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits) and Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Applied Statistics (30 credits).

The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)

  • Themes, Reading and Sources (30 credits)
  • Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
  • Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
  • Applied Statistics (30 credits; OPTIONAL; runs across Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms)

Epiphany Term (January-March)

  • Themes, Reading and Sources (30 credits) continued on from Themes, Reading and Sources module taken in Michaelmas Term.
  • Option module (30 credits)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
  • Quantitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)

  • Dissertation (60 credits)

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 20 contact hours. Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor. Social science modules are taught through lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical classes.



Read less
Sussex is a world leader in the anthropological study of economic life – one of the most dynamic and fast-growing areas within anthropology. Read more
Sussex is a world leader in the anthropological study of economic life – one of the most dynamic and fast-growing areas within anthropology.

This course helps you to develop a critical understanding of:
-Equality and inequality
-Labour in the global economy
-The impacts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and social enterprise
-Precarious employment and post-industrialisation
-Petty capitalism and informal trade
-The marketisation of poverty
-Financialisation and microfinance
-New social movements for social and economic justice (including the Occupy movement and mass public protests by ‘the 99%’)

This MA is for you if you want to deepen your existing knowledge of anthropology but it also offers professional training if you’re new to the field.

How will I study?

You take modules and options and have the opportunity to take a research placement.

Modules are assessed via term papers, concept notes, book reviews, essays and case studies. You also write a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Sussex is a world leader in the anthropological study of economic life – one of the most dynamic and fast-growing areas of the discipline. We have particular research expertise in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Europe, but also cover the Caribbean, Latin America, South-East Asia and China.

Our faculty and students are members of:
-Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies
-Centre for World Environmental History
-Sussex Centre for Cultural Studies
-Centre for Cultures of Reproduction, Health and Technologies
-Africa Centre
-Asia Centre
-Sussex Centre for Migration Research
-Sussex Centre for Photography and Visual Culture
-Centre for Security and Conflict Research Centre for Global Political Economy
-Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence

Careers

This MA is ideal for you if you are working in, or planning to work in:
-International development (including fair trade and social enterprise)
-Socially responsible business
-The charity sector
-Trade unions or labour rights organisations
-Activist movements for social and economic justice nationally or internationally

This MA is also excellent preparation for a PhD in Anthropology.

Read less
The Master of Cultural Economy is a program built on the recognition that contemporary culture is a growing economy. Music, film, new media, computer games, publishing, music, the visual and performing arts, tourism, crafts, design and fashion all offer dynamic careers now and in the future. Read more
The Master of Cultural Economy is a program built on the recognition that contemporary culture is a growing economy. Music, film, new media, computer games, publishing, music, the visual and performing arts, tourism, crafts, design and fashion all offer dynamic careers now and in the future. Policymakers at city, national and international levels understand that the benefits of the cultural economy go beyond monetary value and are essential for social well-being. Cultural pursuits are the markers of contemporary civilised societies. 'Cultural economy' helps you understand how the cultural and the economic fit together – for without the culture, there would be no economy.

The Master of Cultural Economy offers an individual roadmap to dynamic careers in the independent arts and creative/cultural industries; working in cultural policy, governance and community development; and/or seeking to place cultural economies in an historical context, and its implications for contemporary practice.

The course offers a research or internship project component, which provides the opportunity to work in interdisciplinary contexts to combine theory and practice in responding to local and global issues at individual, community, corporate and government levels. For instance, you may participate in the unit Shanghai City Lab, a unique program aimed at immersing students in the cultural economy of Asia's new global metropolis.

As a student in the Master of Cultural Economy, you will be taught by academic staff who are widely regarded as leading experts in their respective fields. Further, you will attend regular presentations from a range of policymakers, industry practitioners, cultural activists, urban planners and community groups. These include Renew Newcastle and Renew Australia; Melbourne cultural policy representatives; live music campaigners; cultural consultants working with indigenous groups; and creative industry practitioners and advisors.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/cultural-economy-a6004?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced cultural economy studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced cultural economy studies
These studies will introduce you to cultural economy studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of cultural economy studies practice and research to further your understanding of the complex ecosystem in which cultural and economic goals and dynamics combine in ways that transgress traditional disciplinary and policy boundaries.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/cultural-economy-a6004?domestic=true#making-the-application

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X