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Masters Degrees (Social Ecology)

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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The Environmental Social Science programme is interdepartmental and benefits from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences. Read more

The Environmental Social Science programme is interdepartmental and benefits from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Social science perspectives are crucial to understanding and solving environmental problems. Human behaviour produces many elements of the ‘natural’ environment, from landscapes to floods and famines. Local and national policies and international agreements regulate the environmental practices of corporations, governments and households. The social sciences have a great deal to contribute to understanding what have become defined as environmental issues, and what measures can most effectively tackle them.

Environmental Social Science draws on contributions from the study of Anthropology, Conservation and Ecology, Law, Social Policy and Sociology.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/13/environmental-social-science

Course structure

This interdisciplinary programme introduces you to social science perspectives on environmental issues. It draws on sociology, politics, social policy, anthropology and law. The dissertation is a chance for you to make a specialised study of a topic that interests you, and we encourage first-hand research. The programme is suitable for graduates with a wide range of first degrees.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Social Science perspectives on environmental issues
  • Ethnobiological knowledge systems 
  • Social and political movements
  • Politics and sociology of the environment

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • Introduce you to the differing perspectives on environmental issues of the various social science disciplines
  • Develop your knowledge and understanding of environmental issues from a social science perspective
  • Acquaint you with the methods and procedures of social scientific investigation
  • Give you a practical introduction to research design so as to enable you to conceive and execute a social scientific research project on an environmental topic, whether as part of further academic work or in the course of non-academic employment with any of a variety of public agencies and private corporations.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of environmental social science is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professional advancement.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers in environmental law, community projects, research, education, advocacy and social policy at both local and central government levels.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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The Master of Science in Industrial Ecology (IE) offers talented students from around the world the opportunity to enhance their expertise and work on the grand challenge to achieve global prosperity within the planetary boundaries. Read more

The Master of Science in Industrial Ecology (IE) offers talented students from around the world the opportunity to enhance their expertise and work on the grand challenge to achieve global prosperity within the planetary boundaries.

What does this master’s programme entail?

The master's programme Industrial Ecology is an emerging scientific discipline that takes a systemic approach to environmental problems. An interdisciplinary approach, integrating technical, environmental and social frames of reference, is essential for sustainable development. The Master in Industrial Ecology is a co-operation between Leiden University and Delft University of Technology. Both universities are at the forefront of the field of Industrial Ecology.

Read more about our Industrial Ecology programme.

Why study Industrial Ecology at Leiden University?

  • You will learn concepts such as industrial metabolism, industrial symbiosis, industrial evolution and life cycle thinking, in order to generate innovative solutions as a catalyst for change.
  • We offer an international multidisciplinary environment, where each student brings their own specific bachelor knowledge and cultural background. We believe that this multidisciplinary approach is the best way to move forward.
  • Collaboration with third parties, such as national or international partner universities, NGOs, industrial partners, or government institutes is encouraged and facilitated.
  • You will be inspired by professors from two world-class universities, who are at the forefront of the field of Industrial Ecology.

Find more reasons to study Industrial Ecology at Leiden University.

Industrial Ecology: the right master’s programme for you?

The programme is open to students from a wide range of studies in engineering, natural and social sciences. If you are an idealistic, ambitious and critical thinking student who is looking for the opportunity to enhance expertise and work on the grand challenges facing our world today, this master’s programme is the right choice.

Read more about the entry requirements for Industrial Ecology.



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The MRes in Critical Social Science at Liverpool John Moores University critically combines the disciplines that inform society, organisations and institutions relevant to criminology, geography, media, culture, communication, politics and sociology. Read more
The MRes in Critical Social Science at Liverpool John Moores University critically combines the disciplines that inform society, organisations and institutions relevant to criminology, geography, media, culture, communication, politics and sociology.

•Complete this masters degree full time (one year)
•An interdisciplinary MRes bringing together staff from Criminology, Geography, Sociology and Media, Culture, Communication
•Fosters a creative and innovative postgraduate culture
•Critical approach with a research focus
•Can lead to doctorate study in social sciences
•Secure the research training demanded by the ESRC/AHRC for postgraduate funding

This Critical Social Science MRes programme will equip you with a range of knowledge and skills, allowing you to complete an independent research project, and become an expert in social analysis through the interdisciplinary application of critical theory.

The programme's structure, content and approach emerge from the expertise on offer in the School of Humanities and Social Science and LJMU's commitment to the interdisciplinary study of Critical Social Science.

Specifically, the MRes represents a bespoke collaboration between the disciplines of Criminology, Geography, Media, Culture and Communication and Sociology. It fosters a creative and innovative research culture, which crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries and builds on the distinctive, critical approaches of each of the disciplines.

You will prepare for and conduct a piece of independent research, interrogating a particular area of theory, policy and/or practice, within one of five interdisciplinary pathways:

•crime, criminalisation and social harm
•ecology, environment and activism
•consumption, identity and mass media
•health, disease and social wellbeing
•power inequality and the state

Our dynamic, professional and experienced staff excel in innovative and exciting research which contributes to the teaching and learning methods you will experience. Good working relationships with Merseyside employers and organisations also frequently benefit the academic and personal career development of our students.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Critical social science research proposition and development

Engages you in independent and critical thinking, and develops and applies theoretical concepts in critical social sciences

Research Project in critical social science

Assesses your ability to present, in scholarly form, a sustained piece of research which demonstrates knowledge and understanding of a relevant field and appropriate methodologies to organise material into a clear and relevant argument

Professional development for researchers in arts, professional and social studies

Provides you with professional guidance geared to the conduct and dissemination of research

Research methods for arts, professional and social studies

Introduces you to library, bibliographic, online and other facilities necessary for postgraduate research; assisting you in recognising and applying appropriate strategies for developing a research project

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Drawing on the expertise of our biogeography and ecology research group, this MRes programme advances your academic standing and enables you to conduct an original ecological research project. Read more
Drawing on the expertise of our biogeography and ecology research group, this MRes programme advances your academic standing and enables you to conduct an original ecological research project.

It prepares you either for a PhD or for industry-based work, as you gain experience with a host of modern research methods and build on your theoretical knowledge of the subject area.

The research interests of our department include:

• wetland ecology and management
• GIS and landscape ecology
• conservation biology
• molecular ecology
• human-wildlife conflict
• mammal behaviour, ecology and conservation.

Course structure

The Ecology MRes is typically completed as a full-time, one-year degree. It largely consists of core modules, but also allows you to choose from a host of optional modules as part of the 180-credit MSc requirement. If you choose to opt out of the course early, you can qualify for a PGCert with 60 credits and a PGDip with 120 credits.

Areas of study

The research project is central to the course and allows you to work at the forefront of the discipline as you advance your knowledge of research methods and ecological principles. You design your own project under the supervision of one or more members of the Biogeography and Ecology Research Group.

Modules:

Research project
Research Methods
Issues in Ecology and Conservation

Options:

Ecology Field Skills
Molecular Ecology and Conservation
Introduction to GIS
GIS in Environmental Applications
Water Quality Analysis
Work-in-Progress Seminars
Introduction to Statistics using Excel and Minitab
Advanced Statistical Analysis

Past projects

Examples of past projects include:

• Pollinator conservation and the value of domestic gardens
• Social interactions of urban foxes in Brighton and Hove
• Habitat use of the northern clade pool frog at their reintroduction site in Norfolk, UK
• Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: appearance and spread of diseases among bivalve molluscs in relation to climate change
• The impact of dry heathland management techniques on vegetation composition and Coleoptera abundance, species richness and diversity

Careers and Employability

Graduates from this course are thoroughly equipped to enter a PhD programme in ecological science, as well as careers in industry and the public sector. The MRes provides well-rounded and practical training, plus the necessary transferable skills to prepare you for employment.

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This MSc is taught by the Centre for Ecology and Conservation (CEC http://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/cec/), whose evolutionary and behaviour research groups are amongst the most dynamic in the UK. Read more
This MSc is taught by the Centre for Ecology and Conservation (CEC http://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/cec/), whose evolutionary and behaviour research groups are amongst the most dynamic in the UK. As an MSc student you will be integrated into these groups and conduct cutting-edge research projects that aim to make genuine contributions to the field of evolutionary and behavioural ecology. The goal is to prepare you for a future research career.

The Centre is the fastest growing institute of its kind in the UK and an integral part of the School of Biosciences at the Penryn Campus. Research is almost exclusively organismal, with particular emphasis on social mammals, birds, turtles and insects. We also specialise in modelling animal behaviour and species interactions and see this as essential and complementary to our whole approach. The other area of emphasis which underpins much of our work is quantitative and molecular genetics; fundamental to the evolutionary process and to conservation biology and policy issues.

Programme overview

- Delivered by leading international researchers in the Centre for Ecology and Conservation, who regularly publish in peer-reviewed journals;
- Designed to prepare you for a future research career with excellent graduate employment opportunities. In the first year of operation, 78 per cent of our students had secured a PhD position before finishing the programme;
- Provides extensive training in current research techniques;
- Develops knowledge and critical awareness of current problems and new insights in evolutionary and behavioural ecology, much of which is at, or informed by, study at the forefront of the field;
- Offers access to excellent facilities including state-of-the-art molecular and genetics labs with a full range of microscopy equipment, greenhouses, aviary and controlled environment rooms. (http://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/facilities/cornwall/)

Fieldwork

The census research projects will see you spending a considerable amount of time in the field collecting data at several key research sites in West Cornwall and interacting with local NGOs (Cornwall Wildlife Trust, South West Lakes Trust).

This programme includes a two week field course in Kenya and will include visits to some of Africa’s largest and most important game reserves, as well as an introduction to some of the day-to-day problems faced by conservation biologists in developing nations. You will study the behaviour of animals in a natural ecological setting with a focus on large mammals, birds and insects.

Find out more about our field course modules at http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/fieldwork/. You can also keep up to date and share the experiences of our students in the field on our Field Course Fortnight website at http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/fieldcourses/ .

Learning and teaching

The taught component of this programme is delivered in the first five months, during which time you will be encouraged to develop your census research projects. The rest of the academic year is dedicated to these projects.

Teaching and learning methods

All material is designed for Masters level and will involve fieldwork, seminars and group discussion. Within modules there is considerable scope for you to direct your learning towards fields of particular interest, especially through your choice of research project. Students are located in the Centre for Ecology and Conservation laboratories, where close working relationships are fostered. Every student has the personal and academic support of the programme director, as well as their academic tutor, module leaders and project supervisors. Because of the layout of our research laboratory, postdoctoral researchers and PhD students interact closely with postgraduates to provide more personal support during the research phase of the programme.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of compulsory modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Project; Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecology; Approaches in Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecology; African Behavioural Ecology Field Course; Statistical Modelling and Key Skills

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The world is experiencing important ecological and environmental challenges. To address them we need to expand and link scientific knowledge with practice, for example in the areas of environmental consultancy, policy implementation and development, and fundamental ecological and environmental research. Read more
The world is experiencing important ecological and environmental challenges. To address them we need to expand and link scientific knowledge with practice, for example in the areas of environmental consultancy, policy implementation and development, and fundamental ecological and environmental research.

The MSc in Applied Ecology and Environmental Management incorporates topics in ecology, environmental sciences and environmental management to explore the relationship between the natural world and society. You will explore, within a scientific and an ecological framework, the impact of human activities on the environment, and will obtain a thorough understanding of environmental management and sustainability issues, including policy and legislation, with the development of practical skills.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/applied-ecology-and-environmental-management.aspx

Course detail

Our programme aims to develop and challenge you at a postgraduate level to develop a deeper and applied understanding of environmental biology and science, its relevance to the impact of human activities on environmental systems, as well as the mitigation of those impacts, and the regulatory, political and scientific parameters that frame practice and research in the environmental sciences. We have experienced and research active staff who will be able to convey their enthusiasm for their disciplines, and our facilities will allow you to carry out your studies and projects.

Through this MSc, you will have the opportunity to expand and link conceptual scientific knowledge while also applying it to the practice and application of research as it serves public and private stakeholders, for example in the areas of environmental consultancy, policy implementation and development, and fundamental research.

Suitability

The programme is suited for those interested in the applied aspects of ecology and environmental sciences for environmental management and consultancy, or for those interested in delivering user­defined integrative solutions via research, management and consultancy within the areas of animal behaviour, welfare and conservation, human and physical geography, crop protection, and applied ecology and environmental management.

Content

This MSc covers several main themes which make the core modules, including:

• Environmental Management and Sustainability
• Environmental Science
• Applied Ecology and Conservation
• Research Methods
• Applied Skills in Ecology, Environmental Management and Research
• Understanding Landscapes
• Agro-ecology
• Dissertation

Format

We use a variety of teaching methods that provide support and guidance within a participative learning environment, including:

• Interactive lectures (students and lecturers or speakers),
• Practical sessions (field and laboratory),
• Seminars and workshops,
• Virtual learning environments,
• Problem-based learning as individuals and groups,
• Tutorials with supervisors.

Assessment

This programme is assessed through coursework only, including essays, mock grant proposals and consultancy reports and portfolios consisting of desk-studies, critical reviews, reports, data presentation and analysis as well as literature reviews and other pieces of scientific writing.

What can I do next?

The programme has been developed to address the skills and knowledge gaps in ecological and environmental research and management. The modules in this programme are designed to allow students to learn the theoretical framework, practical skills and transferrable skills that are required for developing a career in ecological and environmental research with an applied focus, and in environmental assessment and consultancy. Employability is promoted and embedded across individual modules within the programme. Students will gain a broad range of skills to enhance employability.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of the course. Read more
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of the course.

You’ll share a breadth of experience – the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component means you will share a broad experience of methodological and research issues. Allied with subject specific supervision, this will allow you to develop a unique awareness of knowledge and experiences across the natural and social sciences in addition to a focus on your own research topic.

Biosciences pathway:
Students pursuing the ecology pathway would be expected to have research which falls within the areas of the members of the ecology research group (ERG). Research within the ERG is organised into three research groupings:

*Animal behaviour, welfare and conservation.
*Pests, pathogens and crop protection.
*Applied ecology and environmental management.

Members also have collaborative interests with external partners including local schools and biotechnology businesses. For more information on member’s research activities or for contact details, please click on a member’s individual Staff Profile.

We are a close-knit community of academics, researchers and students dedicated to the study of Life Sciences. You would be joining an active and dynamic post-graduate community and would have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from this community.

Find out more about the section of Life Sciences at https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/human-and-life-sciences/life-sciences/about-us.aspx. You can also find out more about our research https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/human-and-life-sciences/life-sciences/research/research.aspx.

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The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researcher. Read more
The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researcher.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of topics in one of the sub-disciplines of anthropology (biological, social or material culture). They are prepared for advanced level research through a general training in social science research methods and specialised research training in broad-based anthropological research methods and techniques.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (105 credits).

Core modules:
-Research Methods and Skills
-Ethnographic Area: Critical Literature Review

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Anthropology of China
-Anthropology of Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
-Anthropology of Socialist and Post-Socialist Societies
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Ecology of Human Groups
-Evolution of Human Brain, Cognition and Language
-History and Aesthetics of Documentary
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Medical Anthropology
-Medical Anthropology and Primary Care
-Palaeoanthropology
-Population and Development
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
-Primate Socioecology
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Employment
-Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report
All MRes students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 17,000 words (inclusive of notes).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, video, and film and web-based courses. Assessment is through coursework, unseen and take-home examination, laboratory books, posters and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Students usually conduct fieldwork over the summer after the end of the third term. The research carried out will inform the final dissertation.

Careers

With the completion of the MRes, we expect students to be highly competent professionals, who will either continue to the MPhil/PhD level or who will be well equipped to apply their knowledge of social science methodologies and methods and their specific anthropological expertise in a range of settings.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Independent Consultant, Conferencia Inter Americana de Segundad Social
-Secondary School Teaching Assistant, Longsands Academy
-Anthropology, LSE (The London School of Economics and Political
-Anthropology, University College London (UCL)
-PhD Anthropology, University of Oxford

Employability
The MRes enhances the profile of students who already have a strong background in anthropology by training them in professional skills, statistics and various other social science methods. Exposure to positivist social science methodologies makes graduate attractive candidates for positions in NGOs or work in applied social science. Emphasis on research design and data collection through field research prepares graduates to be independent researchers. The general social science orientation of the degree qualifies students to apply for research positions on grants in various disciplines, and it opens the way to doctoral study in anthropology and other social science subjects.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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The Master of Science by Research degree in Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews. Read more
The Master of Science by Research degree in Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution is a 12-month, research only degree, in which the candidate will undertake a supervised research project in the broad area of Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution, in the School of Biology, University of St Andrews.

The candidate will be based in the interdisciplinary Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD), based in the centre of St Andrews. The CBD links researchers in evolution, behaviour, ecology, molecular biology and biodiversity, plus researchers in other Schools across St Andrews. Research themes include: the mechanistic causes and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of animal behaviour, with strengths in behavioural ecology, animal cognition, social evolution and social learning; evolutionary and population genetics, including the genetic basis of population divergence and speciation; animal-plant interactions, including pollinator biology; conservation biology, focusing in particular on the measurement of broad-scale patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity change. These themes are underpinned and guided by theoretical evolutionary ecologists and geneticists, asking fundamental questions about the causes and consequences of organismal interaction. Our final objective is to advance this scientific understanding of the diversity of life to contribute pro-actively to policy that helps protect and nurture biological diversity.

Candidates may approach potential supervisors in the CBD directly (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/phd-study/phd-study-supervisors/phd-study-cbd-supervisors/) or via advertised projects listed here (https://synergy.st-andrews.ac.uk/research/mscres/). We strongly recommend that potential candidates make contact with a potential supervisor before applying.

The School of Biology provides a unique and supportive environment for scholarship, amid a beautiful setting for university life. We are a highly research active School, with a diverse and vigorous post-graduate community. The School comprises a large number of research groups organised into three interdisciplinary Research Centres: the Scottish Oceans Institute (SOI), the Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) and the Centre for Biological Diversity (CBD). Together these centres encompass the full spectrum of research in biological sciences, spanning investigations on the properties and behaviour of individual molecules through to planetary environmental dynamics. Our postgraduate students enjoy a supportive and welcoming environment, including the student-led ‘Bionet’ society that provides a wide range of networking and social opportunities.

Progression and Assessment

Students in the MSc(Res) program will be assigned an Internal Examiner (IE) and Post-Graduate Tutor by the School. There will be a progress review meeting at three months to monitor and evaluate student progression, convened by the IE, with the student and Tutor in attendance.

In addition to the project-specific training that you will receive during your degree, Msc(Res) students will also have access to a wide range of training in transferable skills through the award-winning University of St Andrews GradSkills program, run by our Professional Development Unit CAPOD. Specific post-graduate programs run within the School of Biology may also offer additional training, for instance in statistical, bioinformatics or molecular techniques.

The degree requires submission and examination of a dissertation at the end of the one-year program. This thesis will consist of up to 30,000 words. The thesis will be evaluated by the IE and an External Examiner appointed at time of submission. Evaluation will be based on the written submission and there is no requirement for a viva voce examination.

Fees

For details of post-graduate tuition fees relevant to our research degrees including the MSc(Res), please visit:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/research-fees/

Application

Please apply via the University’s Post-Graduate Application portal: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgr/home.htm

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During the two-year MSc programme in Forest and Nature conservation you will learn about forest management, deforestation, forestry, ecosystem conservation, wildlife management, social aspects of nature and more. Read more

MSc Forest and Nature Conservation

During the two-year MSc programme in Forest and Nature conservation you will learn about forest management, deforestation, forestry, ecosystem conservation, wildlife management, social aspects of nature and more.

Programme summary

This programme focuses on policy, sustainable management and conservation of forest and nature; i.e. understanding and predicting the effect of phenomena such as global climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss, ecotourism, timber production, hunting and animal reintroduction. Insights into all aspects of forest and nature conservation are required to address these issues with emphasis on both ecological and social aspects. The MSc Forest and Nature Conservation programme represents an integrated approach to natural resource management that can be applied at different scales, to diverse ecosystems and in varying political and social contexts. A tailor-made structure, an outstanding research environment and three comprehensive specialisations contribute to making the programme challenging for undergraduates from both the natural and social sciences.

Specialisations

Policy and society
The central study object is the dynamics between people, organisations and institutions within policymaking and policy innovation processes, referred to as `governance'; relative to forest and nature conservation issues, including spatio-temporal aspects. Issues in the field of economics, public administration, communication and strategic planning are addressed in order to conserve and manage forests and natural areas in a sustainable way. Examples are: recreation, communities and natural resources, deforestation, forest governance, sustainable forestry and certification schemes.

Management
This specialisation aims to design and assess realistic and feasible management options for forests and natural areas. The approach is based on specific knowledge and understanding of wildlife management, management of forests and other terrestrial vegetation. Special attention is given to the following questions: What is the best option for wildlife conservation? Do populations need to be managed or not? How does one determine an optimal population level? How should the effects of various management activities, at different spatial and temporal scales, be evaluated? How should the perceptions of different people be dealt with? What are the best options in forest management for a specific area? How to manage nature? How to deal with abiotic, biotic and social bottlenecks in restoration ecology? What is the role of N and P pollution? How to restore shallow lakes? How to restore tropical forests? It is also possible to focus on specific aspects of natural resource management.

Ecology
The emphasis is on understanding the ecological processes that form the basis for the structure, composition and functioning of forests and natural areas. You can specialise in tropical forestry, landscape ecology, animal ecology, forest resource management, plant ecology, biodiversity conservation or tropical nature conservation.

Your future career

The programme provides excellent preparation for Dutch as well as European and non-European jobs. Career possibilities include positions at research institutes and universities, government ministries and local authorities. Positions are also available at state and private forestry, nature conservation services, and environmental assessment agencies. Examples include the European Forest Institute, Birdlife International, and landscape and animal protection organisations such as RAVON or WWF. In the private sector, graduates find jobs at engineering and consultancy bodies, such as Royal Haskoning, the National Fund for Rural Areas or forestry companies. Graduates often begin their career by carrying out research, computer analysis and modelling of ecological systems, working in knowledge transfer or preparing policy documents. Eventually, their careers usually shift towards advisory work, consultancies, research coordination and project management.

Alumnus Wouter Wubben.
Wouter Wubben works for the municipality Westland and is responsible for matters concerning ecology, landscape and water quality. “When I just started working I could directly apply the ecological knowledge from my master, and I was able to pick up missing knowledge very quickly”. Wouter went to the USA to work on forestry for his internship. “During my internship I worked in the field with a lot of different teams, this experience now helps me to communicate with people involved with the implementation of municipality plans. I have a constantly changing job, I started with executive work but I am now responsible for the development of issues in ecology, landscape and water.”

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Biology
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
MSc Landscape Architecture and Planning
MSc Geoinformation Science
MSc International Development Studies.

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This course will prepare you for a research career in the agricultural and agri-environment sectors or for subsequent doctoral studies in agroecology and environmental sciences. Read more

This course will prepare you for a research career in the agricultural and agri-environment sectors or for subsequent doctoral studies in agroecology and environmental sciences.

It is taught by researchers from the Centre for Agri-Environmental Research (CAER), one of the leading centres for agroecology research worldwide and highly respected by employers in the sector.

You will develop a multi-disciplinary appreciation of the underlying environmental, social and economic issues surrounding contemporary agricultural systems. You will also gain a rigorous training in research methods and statistical analyses commonly used in agriculture, ecology and environmental science.

You will then join one of the University’s thriving research teams to conduct a 30-week research project supervised closely by experts in the field. This will provide you with the necessary independent research skills to pursue a career in the sector.

What will you study?

  • Research Methods for Agriculture, Ecology and Environment
  • Research Project in Agriculture, Ecology and Environment
  • Issues in Agriculture, Ecology and Environment

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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Our MSc in Applied Ecology provides you with the advanced knowledge and skills required for employment in field biology, ecology and related areas.You will follow a curriculum with a highly practical emphasis, undertaking hands-on exercises in field and laboratory settings. Read more
Our MSc in Applied Ecology provides you with the advanced knowledge and skills required for employment in field biology, ecology and related areas.You will follow a curriculum with a highly practical emphasis, undertaking hands-on exercises in field and laboratory settings. In the field, you will learn identification skills for a wide range of species in several key taxonomic groups. You will also learn industry-standard survey techniques such as Phase One Habitat Surveying, Habitat Condition Assessments, National Vegetation Classification and Bird Territory Mapping. Laboratory sessions will include use of microscopes in taxonomy and analysis of environmental parameters, such as water oxygen levels and soil nutrient status, to enable better understanding of species-environment interactions.


There will be numerous opportunities to work on on-going projects with linked organisations including wildlife trusts, zoos and wildlife parks, charities and public authorities. It is an expectation that assignments, and especially dissertation work, will have direct impact on understanding and management of species and their environments.

The course is underpinned by the applied research expertise of the teaching team in applied ecology, including conservation of species in the wild and in captivity, biotic responses to climate change, avian and mammal biology, insect behaviour and evolution, non-native species introductions, population and community ecology, and environmental biology. An additional theme of citizen science develops awareness of the role of public engagement in surveying and conserving species in their environment.

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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