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The web revolution has generated a social interactive environment that creates new business opportunities for enterprises. Many international software development enterprises such as IBM, HP, Microsoft, Google and SAS have their own social computing/media development teams. Read more
The web revolution has generated a social interactive environment that creates new business opportunities for enterprises. Many international software development enterprises such as IBM, HP, Microsoft, Google and SAS have their own social computing/media development teams. Other IT enterprises, such as Apple, Oracle, CISCO and Nokia, own products with social computing functions. Similarly, many national and international companies successfully turn significant profits through social network sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Yahoo, Twitter, Google, Myspace, Amazon, Sina Weibo, TaoBao, RenRen and QQ.

This programme addresses market demand by providing you with training for understanding, managing, developing, implementing and commercialising interactive social media on the internet. It will train you for advanced technical or managerial roles in new interdisciplinary areas of social informatics and internet computing. You will gain:
• theoretical and practical knowledge of key areas of social business and social computing in today’s industry and research
• key tools enabling you to enhance and apply your skills in management, design and implementation of IT-based solutions to social business and computation domains
• practical skills in research, analysis, realisation and evaluation of the technical or research documents in social commerce and social computing

You will complete eight in the first two semesters and a dissertation project in the third semester for a total duration of 18 months. The precise content of your dissertation project will be discussed and decided with your project supervisor and is subject to approval. The department is equipped with specialist lab facilities for operating systems, networking, mobile computing and multimedia technology that will support your learning and research.

Modules

Core Modules
• Cloud Computing
• Project Management
• Research Methods
• Social Media Marketing
• Social Network Analysis
• Social Web Programming
• Dissertation

Elective Modules
• Computer Systems Security
• Data Mining and Big Data Analytics
• Interactive Systems
• Object Oriented Programming
• Social Commerce

What are my career prospects?

Graduates from this programme will find employment research and development engineers, systems developers and project leaders in an IT companies. Some students choose to go on to further studies as a PhD candidate at XJTLU or a renowned overseas university.

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Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science. Read more
Our highly sought-after graduates benefit from a programme that integrates training in identifying, framing and effectively researching social problems with a leading computational approach to social science.

Furthermore, we are home to the Centre for Research in Social Simulation (CRESS) and its world-leading expertise in agent-based modelling.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Interest in simulation has grown rapidly in the social sciences. New methods have been developed to tackle this complexity. This programme will integrate traditional and new methods, to model complexity, evolution and the adaptation of social systems.

These new methods are having an increasing influence on policy research through a growing recognition that many social problems are insufficiently served by traditional policy modelling approaches.

The Masters in Social Science and Complexity will equip you to develop expertise in the methods necessary to tackle complex, policy-relevant, real-world social problems through a combination of traditional and computational social science methods, and with a particular focus on policy relevance.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Data Analysis
-Field Methods
-Computational Modelling
-Theory Model Data
-Modelling the Complex World
-Policy Modelling
-Theory and Method
-Statistical Modelling
-Evaluation Research
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The main aims of the programme are to:
-Provide an appropriate training for students preparing MPhil/PhD theses, or for 
 students going on to employment involving the use of social science and policy research
-Provide training that fully integrates social science, policy modelling and computational methodologies to a high standard
-Provide training resulting in students with high quality analytic, methodological, computational and communication skills

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES
The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Develop skills in tackling real world policy problems with creativity and sound methodological judgment
-Cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research 
questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs and models
-Introduce students to the methodological and epistemological issues surrounding research in the social sciences in general and computational modelling in particular
-Develop skills in programming in NetLogo for the implementation of agent-based models for the modelling of social phenomena
-Develop skills in the acquisition and analysis of social science data
-Make students aware of the range of secondary data available and equip them to evaluate its utility for their research
-Develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and Internet resources
-Develop skills in the use of SPSS, and in the main statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis
-Develop skills in the use of CAQDAS software for the analysis of qualitative data
-Develop skills in writing, in the preparation of a research proposal, in the presentation ofresearch results and in verbal communication
-Help students to prepare their research results for wider dissemination, in the form of seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications, in a form suitable for a range of audiences, including academics, stakeholders, policy makers, professionals, service users and the general public

Knowledge and understanding
-Show advanced knowledge of qualitative, quantitative and computational methodologies in the social science
-Show advanced knowledge of modelling methodologies, model construction and analysis
-Show critical understanding of methodological and epistemological challenges of social science and computer modelling
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the methodological implications of a range of sociological theories and approaches
-Show understanding the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Show advanced knowledge in data collection, analysis and data driven modelling
-Show advanced knowledge of policy relevant social science research and modelling
-Show advanced understanding of the policy process and the role of social science and modelling therein
-Show advanced knowledge of statistical modelling

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Systematically formulate researchable problems; analyse and conceptualise issues; critically appreciate alternative approaches to research; report to a range of audiences
-Conceptual development of Social Science and Complexity models to creatively enhance the understanding of social phenomena
-Integration of qualitative, quantitative and computational data
-Judgement of problem-methodology match
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Develop original insights, questions, analyses and interpretations in respect of research questions
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of traditional and computational techniques employed in sociological research
-Ability to produce well founded, data driven and validated computational models
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Ability to communicate research findings models in social science and policy relevant ways
-Ability to manage independent research

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate complex ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means
-Apply computational modelling methodology to complex social issues in appropriate ways
-Creativity in approaching complex problems and a the ability of communicating and justifying problem solutions
-Apply computing skills for computational modelling, research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Work independently or as part of a team
-Demonstrate experience of a work environment

PLACEMENTS

On the MSc Social Science and Complexity, we offer the opportunity to take a research placement during the Easter vacation. This will provide you with first-hand experience of real-life policy research in action.

Organisations in which placements might be possible are a number of consultancies (e.g. Sandtable), government departments (e.g. Defra) and academic research centres (e.g. Centre for Policy Modelling at Manchester).

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Computational methods and especially computer-based simulations, are becoming increasingly important in academic social science and policy making.

Graduates might find career opportunities in government departments, consultancies, government departments, consultancies, NGOs and academia.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The School of Computer Science offers the opportunity to work alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised. Read more
The School of Computer Science offers the opportunity to work alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised. You will have the chance to work within a supportive community, sharing ideas and experiences with the aim of advancing knowledge.

Research being undertaken in the School includes advancements in imaging technology for the detection and treatment of diseases such as cancer, the design of mobile and social computing platforms for health and wellbeing, and enhancing our understanding of how long-term relationships can be developed between humans and androids.

As a research student, you can benefit from a comprehensive programme of training designed to develop your research skills and methodologies. You will have access to the latest industry-standard equipment and software to aid your investigations, including Oculus Rift, embedded system development and microelectronic engineering design and simulation platforms. A supervisory team of experienced academics is available to provide guidance in publishing your work in journals and presenting at conferences.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

We conduct a blend of fundamental, applied and interdisciplinary research and have particular strengths in robotics, computer vision, social computing, and many aspects of computer gaming. Example Research Areas:
-Robotics and Autonomous Systems
-Device and System Design
-Computer Vision and Image/Video Analysis
-Medical Image Analysis
-Data Analytics
-Social Computing, Games and Serious Gaming Applications

For detailed information about the School’s research activity please visit: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/socs/research/

How You Study

Entry to the doctoral study programmes can be through MPhil or PhD registrations depending on previous experience. You will usually work under the guidance of one main supervisor and one secondary supervisor throughout your studies, and you will have access to a range of the School’s facilities.

Students should expect the equivalent to a one hour supervision meeting each week. Training in research methods features in the early part of the programme and, as you progress, you will be encouraged to present and publish your findings in national and international conferences and journals.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level. Read more
The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Key benefits

- The School is one of the world's leading institutions in the field of the application of computing techniques to anthropology.

- In the latest Student Barometer survey 100% of our postgraduate students were satisfied with the academic content of their course and 97% said they found their programme intellectually stimulating.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/199/social-anthropology-and-computing#!overview

Course detail

In this joint programme with the School of Computing you develop the basics of research in anthropology – the design, planning, implementation and analysis of anthropological research – and learn to apply specialised computing methods that you develop or adapt to anthropological research and analysis, usually requiring computer programming skills and/or a broad understanding of computing at the applications level.

Format and assessment

Students with no background in Java programming are required to take a special three-week module before the beginning of the academic year in September.

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

- Research Methods in Social Anthropology (20 credits)
- Research Methods in Social Anthropology II (20 credits)
- Computational Methods in Anthropology (30 credits)
- Dissertation: Anthropology (60 credits)
- Contemporary Problems in Social Anthropology (20 credits)

Assessment is by essays and the dissertation.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Surrey’s highly regarded Department of Sociology specialises in pioneering research methods and offers a stimulating study environment for our highly sought-after graduates. Read more
Surrey’s highly regarded Department of Sociology specialises in pioneering research methods and offers a stimulating study environment for our highly sought-after graduates.

The MSc Social Research Methods programme is backed by decades of experience: we were the first in the UK to run this type of programme in 1974.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Social researchers employ a constantly evolving range of qualitative and quantitative methods to explore attitudes and experiences, and to understand patterns of social behaviour.

This programme won't just train you in the application of specific research techniques: it will illuminate the connections between sociological theory and empirical research, and relate research to the development of public policy and the analysis of substantive social issues.

Wider issues of the social research process are also covered and include: the planning and management of research projects; the methodological, theoretical, philosophical and ethical aspects of research; and the presentation and publication of research findings.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Data Analysis
-Documentary Analysis and Online Research
-Field Methods
-Principle of Survey Design
-Research: From Design to Dissemination
-Evaluation Research
-Statistical Modelling
-Theory and Method
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The main aims of the programme are to:
-Provide an appropriate training for students preparing MPhil/PhD theses, or for students on to employment involving the use of social science research
-Introduce students to a variety of different approaches to social science research at an advanced level
-Cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs
-Make students aware of the range of secondary data available and equip them to evaluate its utility for their research
-Develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and Internet resources
-Introduce students to the philosophical, theoretical and ethical issues surrounding research and to debates about the relationship between theory and research, about problems of evidence and inference, and about the limits of objectivity
-Develop skills in the use of SPSS, and in the main statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis
-Develop skills in the use of CAQDAS software for the analysis of qualitative data
-Develop skills in writing, in the preparation of a research proposal, in the presentation of research results and in verbal communication
-Help students to prepare their research results for wider dissemination, in the form of seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications, in a form suitable for a range of audiences, including academics, policy makers, professionals, service users and the general public

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of research techniques commonly employed in sociological research, from survey research to field methods
-Collect or generate quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Analyse: quantitative data using basic and more advanced skills; qualitative data from both ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments
-Employ a quantitative and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Apply critical reflection skills to the methodological, theoretical, ethical, and philosophical aspects of social research practice
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Present research findings to differing audiences
-Have an understanding of the contribution social research makes to social policy formulation and the evaluation of planned social interventions

Knowledge and understanding
-Appreciate the epistemological and ontological questions that underpin social research
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the methodological implications of a range of sociological theories and approaches
-Show systematic knowledge of basic principles of research design and strategy
-Understand the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Show advanced knowledge of techniques, and appropriate use, of quantitative and qualitative data analysis
-Recognise the significance of social/political contexts and uses of research
-Show engagement with innovations and developments in social research
-Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of research ethics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Systematically formulate researchable problems; analyse and conceptualise issues; critically appreciate alternative approaches to research; report to a range of audiences
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Develop original insights, questions, analyses and interpretations in respect of research questions
-Use methodological, theoretical, ethical, and philosophical knowledge about social research practice to address complex issues creatively
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Formulate, design, plan, carry out and report on a complete research project
-Use the range of research techniques commonly employed in sociological research
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological bases
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data
-Plan, manage and execute research as part of a team and as a sole researcher
-Present research findings to differing audiences in both written and oral formats, as appropriate

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate complex ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Work independently and self-organise
-Apply computing skills for research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Formulate and solve problems, both individually and as part of a team
-Demonstrate experience of a work environment

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements. Read more
We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/126/social-policy

About the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR):

SSPSSR has a long and distinguished history, and is one of the largest and most successful social science research communities in Europe. It has received top ratings in Research Assessment Exercises, and most recently had 70% of its work judged as either “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” in terms of its “originality, significance and rigour”.

The School supports a large and thriving postgraduate community and in 2010 distributed in excess of £100,000 in Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) quota awards, and in University and SSPSSR bursaries and scholarships to new students.

Academic staff specialise in research of international, comparative and theoretical significance, and we have collective strengths in the following areas: civil society, NGOs and the third sector; cross-national and European social policy; health, social care and health studies; work, employment and economic life; risk, ‘risk society’ and risk management; race, ethnicity and religion; social and public policy; sociology and the body; crime, culture and control; sociological theory and the culture of modernity.

Study support

Research programmes involve writing a thesis on a particular topic with specialist supervision. You are given research training, which is tailored to the particular needs of your research and takes into account any training you have previously received. You also have opportunities to attend modules on relevant subjects on a non-assessed basis to fill any gaps in your background.

- Postgraduate resources

The atmosphere in the School is informal and friendly and has at its centre a lively and diverse postgraduate community. The weekly staff/postgraduate seminar series is designed to introduce you to the work of major scholars from the UK and abroad, and there is also a wide range of other seminar and workshop series each academic year.

Our postgraduate students have access to dedicated office space within the department and are able to take advantage of excellent library and computing facilities. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to expand their experience by teaching part-time in the School.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Social Policy; Journal of European Social Policy; Voluntas; Social Policy and Administration; and Social Policy and Society.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements. Read more
We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/128/social-work

About the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR):

SSPSSR has a long and distinguished history, and is one of the largest and most successful social science research communities in Europe. It has received top ratings in Research Assessment Exercises, and most recently had 70% of its work judged as either “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” in terms of its “originality, significance and rigour”.

The School supports a large and thriving postgraduate community and in 2010 distributed in excess of £100,000 in Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) quota awards, and in University and SSPSSR bursaries and scholarships to new students.

Academic staff specialise in research of international, comparative and theoretical significance, and we have collective strengths in the following areas: civil society, NGOs and the third sector; cross-national and European social policy; health, social care and health studies; work, employment and economic life; risk, ‘risk society’ and risk management; race, ethnicity and religion; social and public policy; sociology and the body; crime, culture and control; sociological theory and the culture of modernity.

Course structure

Research programmes involve writing a thesis on a particular topic with specialist supervision. You are given research training, which is tailored to the particular needs of your research and takes into account any training you have previously received. You also have opportunities to attend modules on relevant subjects on a non-assessed basis to fill any gaps in your background.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The atmosphere in the School is informal and friendly and has at its centre a lively and diverse postgraduate community. The weekly staff/postgraduate seminar series is designed to introduce you to the work of major scholars from the UK and abroad, and there is also a wide range of other seminar and workshop series each academic year.

Our postgraduate students have access to dedicated office space within the department and are able to take advantage of excellent library and computing facilities. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to expand their experience by teaching part-time in the School.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Social Policy; Journal of European Social Policy; Voluntas; Social Policy and Administration; and Social Policy and Society.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements. Read more
We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/125/personal-social-services

About the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR):

SSPSSR has a long and distinguished history, and is one of the largest and most successful social science research communities in Europe. It has received top ratings in Research Assessment Exercises, and most recently had 70% of its work judged as either “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” in terms of its “originality, significance and rigour”.

The School supports a large and thriving postgraduate community and in 2010 distributed in excess of £100,000 in Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) quota awards, and in University and SSPSSR bursaries and scholarships to new students.

Academic staff specialise in research of international, comparative and theoretical significance, and we have collective strengths in the following areas: civil society, NGOs and the third sector; cross-national and European social policy; health, social care and health studies; work, employment and economic life; risk, ‘risk society’ and risk management; race, ethnicity and religion; social and public policy; sociology and the body; crime, culture and control; sociological theory and the culture of modernity.

Course structure

Research programmes involve writing a thesis on a particular topic with specialist supervision. You are given research training, which is tailored to the particular needs of your research and takes into account any training you have previously received. You also have opportunities to attend modules on relevant subjects on a non-assessed basis to fill any gaps in your background.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The atmosphere in the School is informal and friendly and has at its centre a lively and diverse postgraduate community. The weekly staff/postgraduate seminar series is designed to introduce you to the work of major scholars from the UK and abroad, and there is also a wide range of other seminar and workshop series each academic year.

Our postgraduate students have access to dedicated office space within the department and are able to take advantage of excellent library and computing facilities. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to expand their experience by teaching part-time in the School.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Social Policy; Journal of European Social Policy; Voluntas; Social Policy and Administration; and Social Policy and Society.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The Environmental Social Science programmes are interdepartmental and benefit from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences. Read more
The Environmental Social Science programmes are interdepartmental and benefit from expertise found across the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Social science perspectives are crucial to understanding and solving environmental problems. Human behaviour produces many elements of the ‘natural’ environment, fromlandscapes to floods and famines. Local and national policies and international agreements regulate the environmental practices of corporations, governments and households. The social sciences have a great deal to contribute to understanding what have become defined as environmental issues, and what measures can most effectively tackle them.

The multidisciplinary Environmental Social Science programmes draw on the contributions of Anthropology, Conservation and Ecology, Law, Social Policy and Sociology. In each of these disciplines, Kent is very active in research, and the majority of research outputs were rated “internationally excellent” or better in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. The programmes therefore build upon a strong base.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/14/environmental-social-science

Study support

Research programmes involve writing a thesis on a particular topic with specialist supervision. You are given research training, which is tailored to the particular needs of your research and takes into account any training you have previously received. You also have opportunities to attend modules on relevant subjects on a non-assessed basis to fill any gaps in your background.

We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Postgraduate resources
Our postgraduate students have access to dedicated office space within the Department and are able to take advantage of excellent library and computing facilities. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to expand their experience by teaching part-time in the School.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Environmental Politics; Global Environmental Change; Human Organization; Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute; and Sociology of Health and Illness.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Staff research interests

Kent’s world-class academics provide research students with excellent supervision. The academic staff in this school and their research interests are shown below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the school to discuss your proposed research and potential supervision prior to making an application. Please note, it is possible for students to be supervised by a member of academic staff from any of Kent’s schools, providing their expertise matches your research interests.

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/).

- Professor Adam Burgess:

Professor of Sociology
Communications; mass media; risk.

- Professor William Howarth:

Professor of Environmental Law
Environmental law; conservation of aquatic environment and ecosystems.

- Dr Jeremy Kendall:

Senior Lecturer in Social Policy
NGOs, charities, voluntary organisations and civil society.

- Dr Rajindra K Puri:

Senior Lecturer in Environmental Anthropology
Historical ecology; knowledge transmission; adaptation to climate change; wildlife trade; protected areas; South-east Asia; Borneo.

- Professor Christopher Rootes:

Professor of Environmental Politics and Political Sociology
Environmental politics; protest, social and political movements; environmental citizenship; politics of climate change.

- Dr Joy Zhang:

Lecturer in Sociology
Sociology of science, medicine, the environment and globalisation, especially in China.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Environmental Social Science is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers in environmental law, community projects, research, education, advocacy and social policy at both local and central government levels.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Designing at the forefront of communication technology. The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. Read more
Designing at the forefront of communication technology.

Overview

The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. These advances have created a demand for graduates who understand social and participatory design principles and have the skills to design new interactive technologies.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies provides an innovative mix of social and technical skills. You will gain an understanding of the social, political and economic factors that affect the use of interactive technologies, examining how technology is perceived and employed by the user, and you will develop the skills to design and create usable and accessible devices and applications.

Course content

Understand social media and interactive technologies through the key roles they play in society. Explore topics in human-computer interaction, user-centred design, social and cultural theory and human psychology and learn to apply them to the practical problems of designing interactive pages, devices and systems.

Modules for this social media degree are taught by experts from both the Department of Sociology and the Department of Computer Science.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies includes eight core modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Metrics and Society
-Themes and Issues in Contemporary Sociology
-Research Methods for Interactive Technologies
-User-centred Design for Interactive Technologies

You will develop, design, implement and manage your own original research project, supervised by a member of staff with the relevant experience for your topic. You will analyse the data and produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Examples of previous projects include:
-Accessibility of iPhone/iPad apps
-Democracy and participation in York City
-The use of social networking sites by the older generation
-Social robotics and companionship
-Living with the h-index?
-Investigating immersion in games with inattentional blindness
-Immersion and cognitive effort when playing videogames
-Immersion in audio-only games

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge needed to play a leading role in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. This social media degree also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD level.

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Learn how different brain functions contribute to cognition, mediate social interaction, and determine mental health, well-being and psychiatric illness. Read more
Learn how different brain functions contribute to cognition, mediate social interaction, and determine mental health, well-being and psychiatric illness.

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:
-Cognitive neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language).
-Clinical neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents).
-Social neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in clinical, social or cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI).

We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG), Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We help facilitate Clinical placements and are able and offer Research placements within our department.

Clinical placements: Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) in collaboration with City and Hackney Mind (CHM).

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Course structure
-Principles of Neuroscience: Brain anatomy, techniques and paradigms
-Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
-Mental Health, Well-being and Neuroscience
-Fundamental Processes in Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuropsychology I
-Fundamental Processes in Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuropsychology II
-Social Cognition and the Social Brain
-Statistical models and Research Methods and Programming
-Research Dissertation
-Invited speakers programme

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.

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The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. Read more
The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/264/digital-arts

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/default.aspx) that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

There is particular strength in web design and development, including e-commerce, e-learning, e-health; and the group has substantial experience in interaction design (eg, Usability and accessibility), social computing (eg, Social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile technology (eg, iPhone), virtual worlds (eg, Second Life) and video games. In the area of time-based media, the group has substantial interest in digital film capture and editing, and manipulation on to fully animated 3D modelling techniques as used in games and feature films.

Research Themes:
- E-Learning Technology (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=1)

- Medical Multimedia Applications and Telemedicine (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=2)

- Human Computer Interaction and Social Computing (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=3)

- Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=4)

- Mobile Application Design and Development (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=25)

- Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=26)

Research areas

- Intelligent Interactions

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. Read more
The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. As the need for skilled modellers and animators with an awareness of architectural, as well as cinematic, issues increases in both Architecture and Film, the MA in Architectural Visualisation builds on the connections between these two industries. This MA programme develops skills to communicate architecture and urbanity for a variety of applications and audiences.

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture (http://www.kent.ac.uk/architecture/) and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/).

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting new field of digital media. The School was established over 40 years ago and has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

Kent School of Architecture is a young school that has built an excellent reputation, based on high quality teaching and excellent resources. For architecture graduate employment prospects, Kent was ranked 6th in the UK in The Times Good University Guide 2014 and 7th in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/245/architectural-visualisation

Course structure

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts. Building on the successful Master's programmes in Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects, this MA enables students to develop at an advanced level the skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling which will equip them to become highly skilled professionals in architectural visualisation.

Drawing influence from both architecture and film, this programme offers a progression route into both industries, highlighting the different requirements needed for each profession while exploring the similarities of these markets. In this programme, the professions of architecture, film and animation fuse together, providing students with the ability and understanding to work in each or all of them.

Modules

Stage 1
AR821 - Film and Architecture (15 credits)
AR822 - Virtual Cities (30 credits)
AR823 - Digital Architecture (15 credits)
AR846 - Architectural Photography (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL868 - High Definition Compositing (15 credits)
EL869 - Film and Video Production (15 credits)
Stage 2
Either
EL870 - Visual Effects Project (60 credits)
OR
AR845 - Independent Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules are taught over three terms, concluding with a Major Project Visualisation, which accounts for one third of the programme. The content of the visualisation is agreed with programme staff and you build a showreel to a professional standard. Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop advanced level skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling, which will equip you to become a highly skilled professional in architectural visualisation

- train you in the requirements and skills needed for work in high definition

- produce professionally-trained architectural visualisers who are highly skilled in using state-of-the-art 3D modelling and visual effects software

- provide proper academic guidance and welfare support for all students

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential.

Research areas

- Digital Media

The Digital Media group is a multidisciplinary group with interests in many areas including social computing (eg, social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile/ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction and digital arts (eg, computer games, 3D animation, digital film). Our work is applied across a wide range of domains including e-health, cultural heritage and cyber influence/identity.

Current research themes include:

- interface/interaction design and human-computer interaction
- cyber behaviour/influence
- social computing and sociability design
- natural user interfaces
- virtual worlds
- online communities and computer-mediated communication
- mobile applications
- digital film-making and post-production.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers seek, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our unique emphasis on research methodology will sharpen your ability to think in a logical and informed manner about criminological problems, and to design, conduct and manage effective research and evaluation. Read more
Our unique emphasis on research methodology will sharpen your ability to think in a logical and informed manner about criminological problems, and to design, conduct and manage effective research and evaluation.

We’ve combined modules in academic criminology and the criminal justice system with training in qualitative and quantitative research methods.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The combination of analytic criminological knowledge and applied research skills on this programme will equip you with a sophisticated understanding of the key challenges and perspectives in contemporary criminology.

The Masters in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research is aimed at graduates and practitioners with an appropriate first degree who seek advanced knowledge about issues connected with crime, deviance, control, the criminal justice system and social research.

It will also suit graduates and practitioners considering a PhD in this area; and practitioners in the criminal justice system and related government and voluntary agencies who wish to develop their understanding of the wider issues connected to crime.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Field Methods
-Data Analysis
-Criminological Theories
-Research: From Design to Dissemination
-Criminal Justice System
-Law, Society and Social Control
-Crime and Offending
-Evidence Based Practice in Crime and Criminal Justice
-Dissertation

Students are encouraged to take up opportunities for experiential learning in workplace settings, providing extended opportunities for work experience and career development in professional research settings.

The department supports students in finding three-to-four week research placements during Spring and Summer vacation periods, and this approach has recently been supplemented to include strategies of support for students seeking a wider range of opportunities for professional development in the first-hand experience of research organisation – including such activities as part-time internships over longer periods, workplace visits, or shadowing research professionals.

This introduces further flexibility in a student-led process of professional development in light of increasing external pressures on students’ commitments and responsibilities. All, however, involve opportunities to consider issues in career development and professional skills.

The support process involves the Department working closely with students on a one-to-one basis toward their goals and requirements, in association with the University’s Careers Service, to offer pastoral advice and support.

Organisations the department has worked with in the past have included the Office of National Statistics, Cabinet Office, HM Inspectorate of Prisons, Sussex Youth Offending team and Surrey Police.

In some cases the work experience may also be with projects in academic contexts. Students seek experiential learning opportunities with the support of the Department’s Senior Placement Tutor, and assistance from the Faculty Placement Office.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MSc in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research (CCJSR) provides a thorough grounding in the discipline of criminology combined with advanced training in the full range of qualitative and quantitative methods of social research.

It is designed to meet the needs of students graduating from a first degree who have an interest in crime and the criminal justice system, people who are currently employed and wish to apply a knowledge of criminological research within their present job, or those who wish to move into a criminological research career.

The degree provides an ideal foundation to undertake a part-time or full-time PhD.

The degree is suitable for a wide range of students in terms of age, professional background, and current occupation and circumstances.

Because of this diversity of experience, students on the degree learn a great deal from each other, including at the residential Weekend Conference in the middle of the first semester, and the Day Conference at the end of the first semester.

The full-time MSc is taught over 12 months and the part-time course over 24 months. Students who do not wish to undertake the Masters dissertation can obtain the Postgraduate Certificate in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research after gaining 60 credits, or the Postgraduate Diploma after gaining 120 credits.

Students studying for the MSc in full-time mode are required to submit their dissertation during the academic year in which they commenced registration.

It is expected that students studying part-time will have obtained a minimum of 60 credits by the end of the first 12 months of registration in order to proceed into the second year.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completing the MSc, students will have:
-Gained experience in conducting an extended piece of criminological research of a high calibre
-Obtained a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of the discipline of criminology
-Developed and demonstrated extensive knowledge about the core debates in academic criminology and the central issues in criminal justice policy
-Understood how the concerns of criminology and the criminal justice system connect to and interact with wider social issues
-Acquired and utilised practical knowledge of a range of different traditions and methods relevant to conducting criminological research, from survey research to field methods
-Planned, manage and execute research as part of a team
-Developed the analytic skills and substantive knowledge to enable them to pursue a successful career in academe, research institutes, or relevant government departments

Knowledge and understanding
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of the discipline of criminology
-Show systematic knowledge of basic principles of research design and strategy
-Understand the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Appreciate the epistemological and ontological questions that underpin social research
-Recognise the significance of social/political contexts and uses of research developed competence about the core debates in academic criminology and the central issues in criminal justice policy
-Show engagement with innovations and developments in social research
-Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of research ethics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Understood how the concerns of criminology and the criminal justice system connect to and interact with wider social issues
-Acquired and utilised practical knowledge of a range of different traditions and methods relevant to conducting criminological research, from survey research to field methods
-Systematically formulate researchable problems
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Use the range of research techniques commonly employed in criminological research
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological base
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data

Key / transferable skills
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Apply computing skills for research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Communicate ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means

PLACEMENTS

A distinctive component of the MSc is the opportunity to undertake a placement at a criminal justice agency or research institute for four weeks during the spring break. The practical experience and insights gained reinforce formal learning.

CONFERENCES

A residential weekend conference is attended by all programme members, PhD students and teaching staff in November. This provides a less formal atmosphere for discussions concerning criminology, research and related themes; it includes lectures from eminent guest speakers and members of staff, seminars and small group discussions. The Department also organises a day conference for MSc students at the University, with student presentations and guest speakers.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The MSc Statistics (Social Statistics) aims to provide high-level training in the theory and application of modern statistical methods, with a focus on methods commonly used in the social sciences. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Statistics (Social Statistics) aims to provide high-level training in the theory and application of modern statistical methods, with a focus on methods commonly used in the social sciences. You will gain insights into the design and analysis of social science studies, including large and complex datasets, study the latest developments in statistics, and learn how to apply advanced methods to investigate social science questions.

The programme includes two core courses which provide training in fundamental aspects of probability and statistical theory and methods, the theory and application of generalised linear models, and programming and data analysis using the R and Stata packages. These courses together provide the foundations for the optional courses on more advanced statistical modelling, computational methods and statistical computing. Options also include specialist courses from the Departments of Methodology, Economics, Geography and Social Policy. Students on the taught master’s programme will take optional courses to the value of two units, while those on the research track will substitute one unit with a dissertation.

Graduate destinations

The programme will prepare graduates for work within the public sector, market research organisations and survey research organisations, or for further study.

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