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Masters Degrees (Social Computing)

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The web revolution has generated a social interactive environment that creates new business opportunities for enterprises. Many international software development enterprises such as IBM, HP, Microsoft, Google and SAS have their own social computing/media development teams. Read more
The web revolution has generated a social interactive environment that creates new business opportunities for enterprises. Many international software development enterprises such as IBM, HP, Microsoft, Google and SAS have their own social computing/media development teams. Other IT enterprises, such as Apple, Oracle, CISCO and Nokia, own products with social computing functions. Similarly, many national and international companies successfully turn significant profits through social network sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Yahoo, Twitter, Google, Myspace, Amazon, Sina Weibo, TaoBao, RenRen and QQ.

This programme addresses market demand by providing you with training for understanding, managing, developing, implementing and commercialising interactive social media on the internet. It will train you for advanced technical or managerial roles in new interdisciplinary areas of social informatics and internet computing. You will gain:
• theoretical and practical knowledge of key areas of social business and social computing in today’s industry and research
• key tools enabling you to enhance and apply your skills in management, design and implementation of IT-based solutions to social business and computation domains
• practical skills in research, analysis, realisation and evaluation of the technical or research documents in social commerce and social computing

You will complete eight in the first two semesters and a dissertation project in the third semester for a total duration of 18 months. The precise content of your dissertation project will be discussed and decided with your project supervisor and is subject to approval. The department is equipped with specialist lab facilities for operating systems, networking, mobile computing and multimedia technology that will support your learning and research.

Modules

Core Modules
• Cloud Computing
• Project Management
• Research Methods
• Social Media Marketing
• Social Network Analysis
• Social Web Programming
• Dissertation

Elective Modules
• Computer Systems Security
• Data Mining and Big Data Analytics
• Interactive Systems
• Object Oriented Programming
• Social Commerce

What are my career prospects?

Graduates from this programme will find employment research and development engineers, systems developers and project leaders in an IT companies. Some students choose to go on to further studies as a PhD candidate at XJTLU or a renowned overseas university.

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The School of Computer Science offers the opportunity to work alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised. Read more
The School of Computer Science offers the opportunity to work alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised. You will have the chance to work within a supportive community, sharing ideas and experiences with the aim of advancing knowledge.

Research being undertaken in the School includes advancements in imaging technology for the detection and treatment of diseases such as cancer, the design of mobile and social computing platforms for health and wellbeing, and enhancing our understanding of how long-term relationships can be developed between humans and androids.

As a research student, you can benefit from a comprehensive programme of training designed to develop your research skills and methodologies. You will have access to the latest industry-standard equipment and software to aid your investigations, including Oculus Rift, embedded system development and microelectronic engineering design and simulation platforms. A supervisory team of experienced academics is available to provide guidance in publishing your work in journals and presenting at conferences.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

We conduct a blend of fundamental, applied and interdisciplinary research and have particular strengths in robotics, computer vision, social computing, and many aspects of computer gaming. Example Research Areas:
-Robotics and Autonomous Systems
-Device and System Design
-Computer Vision and Image/Video Analysis
-Medical Image Analysis
-Data Analytics
-Social Computing, Games and Serious Gaming Applications

For detailed information about the School’s research activity please visit: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/socs/research/

How You Study

Entry to the doctoral study programmes can be through MPhil or PhD registrations depending on previous experience. You will usually work under the guidance of one main supervisor and one secondary supervisor throughout your studies, and you will have access to a range of the School’s facilities.

Students should expect the equivalent to a one hour supervision meeting each week. Training in research methods features in the early part of the programme and, as you progress, you will be encouraged to present and publish your findings in national and international conferences and journals.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. Read more
The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/264/digital-arts

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/default.aspx) that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

There is particular strength in web design and development, including e-commerce, e-learning, e-health; and the group has substantial experience in interaction design (eg, Usability and accessibility), social computing (eg, Social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile technology (eg, iPhone), virtual worlds (eg, Second Life) and video games. In the area of time-based media, the group has substantial interest in digital film capture and editing, and manipulation on to fully animated 3D modelling techniques as used in games and feature films.

Research Themes:
- E-Learning Technology (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=1)

- Medical Multimedia Applications and Telemedicine (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=2)

- Human Computer Interaction and Social Computing (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=3)

- Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=4)

- Mobile Application Design and Development (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=25)

- Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=26)

Research areas

- Intelligent Interactions

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Who is it for?. This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. Read more

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:

  • Cognitive Neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language)
  • Clinical Neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents)
  • and Social Neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in Clinical, Social or Cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Check our labs facilities in the Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit (CRNU)the Baby lab, the Autism Research Group (ARG), the Human Memory Research Group, etc. For a full list of facilities visit the Psychology Department.

Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging methods.  We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG)Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We facilitate clinical internships through our specialist research Centre for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) and with the local Mind centre.

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Check out what is going on in our laboratories and at the Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN).

Find our more about our work on our Facebook group.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.



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Designed for graduates who want to move into computing from another discipline, the MSc Computing and IT Management provides you with a broad technical knowledge and a sound business context for managing IT systems. Read more
Designed for graduates who want to move into computing from another discipline, the MSc Computing and IT Management provides you with a broad technical knowledge and a sound business context for managing IT systems.

Through this course you will learn the skills needed to develop business applications through a fundamental understanding of software and web development, e-commerce and database management. You will also gain an understanding of the professional skills required to lead IT managers by working as a part of a team on a business change project.

You will have the option of learning about new and emerging technologies, such as cloud computing, that are radically changing the opportunities and threats for the provision of IT systems. You may also opt for human-centric computing which focuses on defining and delivering effective information systems from a human-centric perspective. You also have the option of learning the knowledge and skills required to create interactive visualisations and explanations of data.

On successful completion of the taught phase you will move to the dissertation phase. This provides the opportunity of developing your research skills and applying technical and management concepts and techniques to solve a complex computing problem.

This one-year full-time or three-year part-time course offers a balanced combination of theory and practice, and can serve either as preparation for a career as an IT professional, doctoral research, or as a self-contained advanced qualification in its own right.

Distinctive features

• The opportunity to undertake a conversion course in Computing and IT.

• Provides an intensive course specifically designed for those who wish to move into computing and IT management from another discipline.

• Professionally accredited by the BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

• The opportunity to learn the technical knowledge and skills needed to develop business applications.

• Working in a team on a business change project to develop IT management skills.

• The facility to tailor the course to your interests by the selection of an advanced option module.

Structure

You will study core modules to a total of 160 credits including dissertation, with an optional module worth 20 credits. Students will also undertake an individual project.

This is a full-time course undertaken over one calendar year. It is also available as a part-time course over three years, and with placement.

Core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Information Modelling & Database Systems
Business and IT Management
E-Commerce and Innovation
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Visual Communication and Information Design
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing (Part-time only)

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

A diverse range of teaching and learning styles are used throughout the MSc in Computing and IT Management. Students will attend lectures, participate in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and carry out practical and laboratory work.

Students obtain support materials usually via Learning Central (Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment).

Students will also undertake a project and independent study to enable them to complete their dissertation. Dissertation topics may be suggested by the student or chosen from a list of options proposed by academic staff reflecting their current interest.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your personal development planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Our Senior Personal Tutor can also advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise. The School also has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules within the courses are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The individual project and dissertation will enable students to demonstrate their ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Recent graduates from the MSc Computing and IT Management course have gained employment in roles such as systems and business analysts, quality assurance testers, IT consultants and project managers.

Graduates are employed by organisations of all sizes locally, nationally, and internationally.

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This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development. Read more
This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development.

Through this one-year programme you will get a first-hand understanding of the vital problem-solving role of software, the interdisciplinary opportunities available, and what computational systems can achieve.

Through a gentle introduction and intensive support, you will be introduced to programming skills using important languages such as Java and Python. Emphasis is placed on handling data and you will develop essential skills in SQL (Structured Query Language) for advanced database functionality using industry standard products such as Oracle™.

A choice of taught optional modules allows you to further develop skills in areas of your choice.

Graduates from these programmes will be ideally placed for employment in the computing industry or for careers requiring a combination of their graduate discipline with computing expertise.

Distinctive features:

• An opportunity to take a conversion course which is also an accredited course recognised by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

• The opportunity to complement the discipline in which you graduated with the discipline of Computing.

• The facility to tailor the course to your interests by the selection of advanced option modules.

• Flexible choice of project topic, for example: associated with the research activity of the School fulfilling a business need reflecting your own interest.

Structure

You will study core modules to a total of 80 credits, with two optional modules worth a total of 40 credits. Students will also undertake an individual project and dissertation (worth 60 credits).

This course is a full-time programme undertaken over one calendar year. It is also available as a part-time programme over three years, and with placement.

Core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Object-Oriented Development with Java
Software Engineering
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Computational Systems
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Information Modelling & Database Systems
Visual Communication and Information Design
E-Commerce and Innovation

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

A diverse range of teaching and learning styles are used throughout the MSc in Computing and the MSc in Computing with Placement. Students will attend lectures, participate in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and carry out practical and laboratory work.

Students obtain support materials either via Learning Central (Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment) or from study packs specially developed for selected modules.

Students will also undertake a project and independent study to enable them to complete their dissertation. Dissertation topics may be suggested by the student or chosen from a list of options proposed by academic staff reflecting their current interest.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your Personal Development Planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Outside of scheduled tutor sessions, our Senior Personal Tutor runs an open door policy, being on hand to advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise.

The School has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest, in addition we schedule fortnightly informal gatherings over coffee for all students and staff associated with MSc Programmes.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules within the programmes are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The individual project and dissertation will enable students to demonstrate their ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Recent graduates have gained employment in roles such as software developers, systems analysts, business analysts, IT consultants, and support engineers.

MSc Computing graduates are employed by organisations of all sizes locally, nationally, and internationally. For example, recent graduates have taken up positions with local NHS Trusts, Logica, Sun Microsystems, BT, and the National Library of Medicine in the USA, as well as undertaking further doctoral study.

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This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development. Read more
This MSc Computing offers students from diverse career and subject areas a balance of software engineering skills and technical abilities required for a career in Software Development.

Through this two-year programme you will get a first-hand understanding of the vital problem-solving role of software, the interdisciplinary opportunities available, and what computational systems can achieve.

Through a gentle introduction and intensive support, you will be introduced to programming skills using important languages such as Java and Python. Emphasis is placed on handling data and you will develop essential skills in SQL (Structured Query Language) for advanced database functionality using industry standard products such as Oracle™.

A choice of taught optional modules allows you to further develop skills in areas of your choice.

Students may choose to apply for a paid 7-12 month professional work placement to be undertaken on completion of Spring semester and before completing the MSc course with a 60-credit dissertation. This provides valuable work experience to develop your IT Professional skills.

Graduates from these programmes will be ideally placed for employment in the computing industry or for careers requiring a combination of their graduate discipline with computing expertise.

Distinctive features

• A conversion course as well as an accredited course recognised by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

• The opportunity to complement the discipline in which you graduated with the discipline of Computing.

• The facility to tailor the course to your interests by the selection of advanced option modules.

• Flexible choice of project topic, for example: associated with the research activity of the School; fulfilling a business need; reflecting your own interest.

• 7-12 month experience as an IT Professional for students who successfully find a suitable placement.

Structure

You will undertake a placement following the taught stage of the course and prior to undertaking your individual project and dissertation. Most students start their placement in the summer of Year 1. The breakdown is as follows:

Year 1: 80 credits core modules, 40 credit optional modules.

Year 2: 120 credits placement, dissertation.
This is a full-time course undertaken over two calendar years. It is also available as a full-time course over one year or a part-time course over three years, both without placement.

Year ONE core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Object-Oriented Development with Java
Software Engineering

Year ONE optional modules:

Computational Systems
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Information Modelling & Database Systems
Visual Communication and Information Design
E-Commerce and Innovation

Year TWO core modules:

Placement
Dissertation

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

A diverse range of teaching and learning styles are used throughout the MSc in Computing and the MSc in Computing with Placement. Students will attend lectures, participate in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and carry out practical and laboratory work.

Students obtain support materials either via Learning Central (Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment) or from study packs specially developed for selected modules.

You will also undertake a project and independent study to enable you to complete a dissertation. Dissertation topics may be suggested by you or chosen from a list of options proposed by academic staff reflecting their current interest.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your Personal Development Planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Outside of scheduled tutor sessions, our Senior Personal Tutor runs an open door policy, being on hand to advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise.

The School has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest, in addition we schedule fortnightly informal gatherings over coffee for all students and staff associated with MSc Programmes.

Students are responsible for obtaining their placement. The School actively assists students on “with Placement” courses in finding a suitable placement.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules within the programmes are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The placement is assessed through a reflective report that demonstrates that the student has developed skills as an IT Professional.

The individual project and dissertation will enable you to demonstrate your ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Recent graduates have gained employment in roles such as software developers, systems analysts, business analysts, IT consultants, and support engineers.

MSc Computing graduates are employed by organisations of all sizes locally, nationally, and internationally. For example, recent graduates have taken up positions with local NHS Trusts, Logica, Sun Microsystems, BT, and the National Library of Medicine in the USA, as well as undertaking further doctoral study.

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The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. Read more
The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. As the need for skilled modellers and animators with an awareness of architectural, as well as cinematic, issues increases in both Architecture and Film, the MA in Architectural Visualisation builds on the connections between these two industries. This MA programme develops skills to communicate architecture and urbanity for a variety of applications and audiences.

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture (http://www.kent.ac.uk/architecture/) and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/).

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting new field of digital media. The School was established over 40 years ago and has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

Kent School of Architecture is a young school that has built an excellent reputation, based on high quality teaching and excellent resources. For architecture graduate employment prospects, Kent was ranked 6th in the UK in The Times Good University Guide 2014 and 7th in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/245/architectural-visualisation

Course structure

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts. Building on the successful Master's programmes in Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects, this MA enables students to develop at an advanced level the skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling which will equip them to become highly skilled professionals in architectural visualisation.

Drawing influence from both architecture and film, this programme offers a progression route into both industries, highlighting the different requirements needed for each profession while exploring the similarities of these markets. In this programme, the professions of architecture, film and animation fuse together, providing students with the ability and understanding to work in each or all of them.

Modules

Stage 1
AR821 - Film and Architecture (15 credits)
AR822 - Virtual Cities (30 credits)
AR823 - Digital Architecture (15 credits)
AR846 - Architectural Photography (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL868 - High Definition Compositing (15 credits)
EL869 - Film and Video Production (15 credits)
Stage 2
Either
EL870 - Visual Effects Project (60 credits)
OR
AR845 - Independent Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules are taught over three terms, concluding with a Major Project Visualisation, which accounts for one third of the programme. The content of the visualisation is agreed with programme staff and you build a showreel to a professional standard. Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop advanced level skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling, which will equip you to become a highly skilled professional in architectural visualisation

- train you in the requirements and skills needed for work in high definition

- produce professionally-trained architectural visualisers who are highly skilled in using state-of-the-art 3D modelling and visual effects software

- provide proper academic guidance and welfare support for all students

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential.

Research areas

- Digital Media

The Digital Media group is a multidisciplinary group with interests in many areas including social computing (eg, social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile/ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction and digital arts (eg, computer games, 3D animation, digital film). Our work is applied across a wide range of domains including e-health, cultural heritage and cyber influence/identity.

Current research themes include:

- interface/interaction design and human-computer interaction
- cyber behaviour/influence
- social computing and sociability design
- natural user interfaces
- virtual worlds
- online communities and computer-mediated communication
- mobile applications
- digital film-making and post-production.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers seek, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our MSc in Data Science and Analytics aims to provide you with a comprehensive set of skills needed to handle, collect, store and analyse large and complex sets of data. Read more
Our MSc in Data Science and Analytics aims to provide you with a comprehensive set of skills needed to handle, collect, store and analyse large and complex sets of data. You will be taught by subject experts from both the School of Mathematics and the School of Computer Science and Informatics, which will allow you to see the topic from different perspectives and provides access to a wide range of modules across both Schools.

Throughout the course you will develop data handling and extraction skills, programming skills, machine learning and informatics skills, and problem solving and modelling skills. You will undertake case studies and project work which will give you the opportunity to put your skills into practice and provides valuable experience of working in the field. The dissertation project, typically undertaken with an industrial partner, will allow you to work with complex data in a creative manner and a problem-solving environment, as well as to communicate your ideas and findings effectively.

This programme is available on a one year full-time basis or a three-year part-time basis.

Distinctive features:

• A three-stage degree with exit points at PG Certificate, PG Diploma and Master’s level, allowing you to go into as much depth as you like.

• Acquire transferable data science and analytics skills that are highly sought after in a broad range of sectors.

• Learn from experts across the Schools of Mathematics and Computer Science and Informatics, and related University research groups specialising in various applications of data science and analytics, for example the Data Innovation Research Institute, Social Data Science Lab, and Health Modelling Centre Cymru.

• Gain valuable work experience; we have some placement opportunities available with industrial partners in the UK and abroad.

Structure

There are three stages to this programme. During the first stage, you will study a number of core modules covering fundamental subjects such as statistics, pattern recognition, data mining and optimisation. You may choose to exit after this first stage, at which point you may be able to obtain a PG Certificate qualification.

The second stage consists of a range of optional modules where you can explore subjects of interest to you and relevant your potential career path, for example web and social computing, time series and forecasting, supply chain modelling and visual communication and information design. You may choose to exit after the second stage, at which point you may be able to obtain a PG Diploma qualification.

The third and final stage consists of a three-month dissertation project, which will typically involve working with a company on a real problem of importance. Following successful completion of all modules and the dissertation, you may be able to obtain a Master’s qualification.

As a full-time student, you will complete all modules and your dissertation project in year one.

Part-time students will typically only need to be in the University for lectures and workshops for the equivalent of one day per week over 24 weeks for years 1 and 2. The dissertation project is undertaken during year 3.

Core modules:

Pattern Recognition and Data Mining
Statistical Methods
Optimisation Methods
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Information Processing in Python
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Web Application Development
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Informatics
Visual Communication and Information Design
Time Series and Forecasting
Supply Chain Modelling
Statistics and Operational Research in Government
Credit Risk Scoring

Teaching

The methods of teaching we employ will vary from module to module, as appropriate depending on the subject matter and the method of assessment. We teach using a mixture of lectures, seminars, computer workshops and tutorials.

Programming skills and the use of relevant software packages will be taught in our dedicated computer suites. We often invite industry experts to give presentations, which our students are welcome to attend.

We will allocate three supervisors to you for your dissertation project. Usually your supervisors will be two members of academic staff with an interest or specialism in your field of research and a sponsor supervisor from the organisation you will work with during your project. You should meet regularly with your supervisor throughout your project.

Support

All of our students are allocated a personal tutor when they enrol on the course. A personal tutor is there to support you during your studies, and can advise you on academic and personal matters that may be affecting you. You should have regular meetings with your personal tutor to ensure that you are fully supported.

You will have access to the Trevithick Library, which holds our collection of mathematical and computer science-related resources, as well as to the other Cardiff University Libraries.

We will provide you with a copy of the Student Handbook, which contains details of each School’s policies and procedures. We also support students through the University’s virtual learning environment, Learning Central, where you can ask questions in a forum or find course-related documents.

Cardiff University also offers a wide range of support services which are open to our students, such as the Graduate Centre, counselling and wellbeing, financial and careers advisors, the international office and the Student Union.

Feedback:

We offer written and oral feedback, depending on the coursework or assessment you have undertaken. You will usually receive your feedback from the module leader. If you have questions regarding your feedback, module leaders are usually happy to give advice and guidance on your progress. We aim to provide you with feedback in a timely manner after you have submitted an assessment.

Assessment

We will assess your progress throughout the course. These assessments may take the form of written exam papers, in-module assignments, and the project dissertation, where knowledge and technical competence will be appraised. We may also use group work, oral presentations and poster displays to test communication, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Career prospects

Data is increasingly cheap and ubiquitous, and is being collected on a massive scale. There is a significant and growing demand for professionals who can work efficiently and effectively with handling such complex and sizeable data and to extract insights to help inform decision-making. The skills you gain during the programme will equip you for graduate roles in this field. This new MSc programme enhances the already well-established related postgraduate taught programmes that the School of Mathematics offers, and is expected to be as successful in the recruiting of our graduates. Previous postgraduates have gone on to work with a variety of companies and Government organisations including the Office for National Statistics, Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide, British Airways, Network Rail, UK Government, The Financial Times, Virgin Media, Welsh Water and Admiral Insurance.

If you prefer to continue on a more academic career pathway, you may choose to continue your studies with a PhD.

Placement

You will undertake a three-month placement for your dissertation project, based with one of our industrial partners in the UK or abroad.

We employ a dedicated Knowledge Exchange Officer who will work with you to obtain a placement and support you throughout your project.

Past placements achieved by our students have been with companies such as Admiral, British Airways, Lloyds Banking Group, Welsh Water, Office for National Statistics, Sainsbury’s, Virgin Media, Transport for London, and Deloitte.

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level. Read more
The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Key benefits

- The School is one of the world's leading institutions in the field of the application of computing techniques to anthropology.

- In the latest Student Barometer survey 100% of our postgraduate students were satisfied with the academic content of their course and 97% said they found their programme intellectually stimulating.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/199/social-anthropology-and-computing#!overview

Course detail

In this joint programme with the School of Computing you develop the basics of research in anthropology – the design, planning, implementation and analysis of anthropological research – and learn to apply specialised computing methods that you develop or adapt to anthropological research and analysis, usually requiring computer programming skills and/or a broad understanding of computing at the applications level.

Format and assessment

Students with no background in Java programming are required to take a special three-week module before the beginning of the academic year in September.

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

- Research Methods in Social Anthropology (20 credits)
- Research Methods in Social Anthropology II (20 credits)
- Computational Methods in Anthropology (30 credits)
- Dissertation: Anthropology (60 credits)
- Contemporary Problems in Social Anthropology (20 credits)

Assessment is by essays and the dissertation.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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About the MSc programme. The MSc Statistics (Social Statistics) aims to provide high-level training in the theory and application of modern statistical methods, with a focus on methods commonly used in the social sciences. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Statistics (Social Statistics) aims to provide high-level training in the theory and application of modern statistical methods, with a focus on methods commonly used in the social sciences.

You will gain insights into the design and analysis of social science studies, including large and complex datasets, study the latest developments in statistics, and learn how to apply advanced methods to investigate social science questions.  

The programme includes two core courses which provide training in fundamental aspects of probability and statistical theory and methods, the theory and application of generalised linear models, and programming and data analysis using the R and Stata packages. These courses together provide the foundations for the optional courses on more advanced statistical modelling, computational methods and statistical computing. Options also include specialist courses from the Departments of Methodology, Economics, Geography and Social Policy. 

Research Stream

The Research stream is similar to the nine-month programme, but will include a dissertation component, extending the programme to twelve months.

Graduate destinations

There is a high demand for graduates with advanced statistics training and an interest in social science applications, and students on this programme have excellent career prospects. 

Potential employers include the public sector (the Office for National Statistics, government departments, universities), market research organisations, survey research organisations and NGOs. This programme would be ideal preparation for doctoral research in social statistics or quantitative social science.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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Would you like personalised supervision from the very first week of study?. Do you want a course that links with Visual Anthropology and uses our ethnographic film-making facilities?. Read more
  • Would you like personalised supervision from the very first week of study?
  • Do you want a course that links with Visual Anthropology and uses our ethnographic film-making facilities?
  • Are you interested in the series of pathways offering specialist knowledge of different areas?

The objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. 

Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics. If they wish, students are able, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In total, there are currently 5 pathways.  

However, please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same degree, an MA in Social Anthropology

Teaching and learning

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they select shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

In total, some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but in a broad range of other disciplines across the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, History, Sociology and Drama. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic and timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students. However students are not obliged to select one of these pathways and, provided the course director and tutor are in agreement, may follow their own 'customized' selection of modules.

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. Certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations and/or portfolios of practical work. In addition, all MA students are required to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.

About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important. Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.



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The MSc Advanced Computer Science will offer you exposure to key topics that are driving key technological developments and trends. Read more
The MSc Advanced Computer Science will offer you exposure to key topics that are driving key technological developments and trends.

Computer Science is one of the fastest-moving academic disciplines and the outcomes of research and innovation in this field could have a massive social impact.

The subject spans all aspects of modern life, and this programme offers you the opportunity to apply new skills and advanced techniques to the area of your choice, whilst allowing you to demonstrate that you are at the forefront of your discipline.

Core to this programme is the opportunity to further develop the scope of your problem-solving skills by studying advanced programming languages and new programming paradigms.

You will choose to study optional, research-led modules that allow the freedom to build a distinctive personal portfolio of skills and knowledge. These are structured around advanced topics in the School's three core research areas:

• Complex Systems
• Visual Computing
• Data and Knowledge Engineering

Distinctive features:

• This is an advanced computer science degree designed for computing graduates who wish to differentiate themselves further through an advanced mastery of the discipline.

• In addition to covering core advanced computer science topics, you may select from up to two of three research topics in which to specialise (Complex Systems, Visual Computing, Data and Knowledge Engineering).

• During the summer months you will undertake an individual research project and complete a dissertation under the supervision of a member of academic research staff. The topic for this will be driven by your own interests.

Structure

You will study taught modules to a total of 120 credits during the Diploma stage of your degree. All taught modules are worth 20 credits.

The Master’s stage of your degree will be an individual project (worth 60 credits) which you will write up as a dissertation, after the Diploma stage.

During the Diploma stage, students must take all core modules and then select further optional modules to make up their 120 credit total.

During the summer months you will undertake an individual research project and complete a dissertation (worth 60 credits) under the supervision of a member of academic research staff.

This specialist Master’s degree will provide graduates of computing with the opportunity to enhance knowledge, skills and understanding of the subject through modules taught by research experts in their specialist area.

As well as being taught a compulsory module on new programming paradigms, you will choose from a range of carefully selected modules focusing on contemporary and relevant topics currently emerging within the discipline.

Core modules:

Programming Paradigms
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Information, Network & Cyber Security
Security Techniques
High Performance Computing
Visual Computing
Pattern Recognition and Data Mining
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Informatics
Digital Forensics
E-Commerce and Innovation
Secure Applications, Identity and Trust

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

Modules are delivered through a series of either full or half-day contact sessions, which include lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and laboratory classes.

Most of your taught modules will have further information for you to study and you will be expected to work through this in your own time according to the guidance provided by the lecturer for that module.

Support

As a School, we pride ourselves on providing a supportive environment in which we are able to help and encourage our students.

We believe that providing suitable feedback mechanisms is crucial to ensure that the best programmes of study are available to our students.

We have a student/staff panel consisting of elected student representatives and members of teaching staff who meet to discuss academic issues.

In conjunction with the work of the panel, all students are provided with an opportunity to complete feedback questionnaires at the end of the Autumn and Spring semesters.

These mechanisms allow the School to regularly review courses and ensure our students receive the best provision, delivered in a consistent manner, across all of our degrees.

At the start of your course you will be allocated a Personal Tutor who is an academic member of staff in the School and serves as a point of contact to advise on both academic and personal matters in an informal and confidential manner.

Your Personal Tutor will monitor your academic progress and supply references in support of any job applications that you make.

Your Personal Tutor will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your Personal

Development Planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Outside of scheduled tutor sessions, our Senior Personal Tutor runs an open door policy, being on hand to advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

Modules will be assessed either by coursework, examination, or a combination of both.

Career prospects

Successful graduates will be able to demonstrate to employers both a deep understanding and broad knowledge concerning contemporary computer science from a research and development perspective.

Graduates will be ideally placed to pursue a number of careers such as systems architects, programmers and software developers, and will be in a strong position to pursue a research career via doctoral studies.

The selection of modules on offer aim to enhance your transferable skills and boost employment prospects.

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The MSc Advanced Computer Science with Placement offers students exposure to key topics that are driving emerging technological developments and trends. Read more
The MSc Advanced Computer Science with Placement offers students exposure to key topics that are driving emerging technological developments and trends.

Computer Science is one of the fastest moving academic disciplines and the outcomes of research and innovation in this field could have a massive social impact.

The subject spans all aspects of modern life, and this programme offers you the opportunity to apply new skills and advanced techniques to the area of your choice, whilst allowing you to demonstrate that you are at the forefront of your discipline.

Core to this programme is the opportunity to further develop the scope of your problem solving skills by studying advanced programming languages and new programming paradigms.

You will choose to study optional, research-led modules that allow the freedom to build a distinctive personal portfolio of skills and knowledge. These are structured around advanced topics in the School's three core research areas:

• Complex Systems
• Visual Computing
• Data and Knowledge Engineering

You may choose to apply for a paid 7-12 month professional work placement to be undertaken on completion of Spring semester and before completing the MSc course with a 60-credit dissertation. This provides valuable work experience to develop your IT Professional skills.

Distinctive features

• An advanced computer science degree.

• Designed for computing graduates who wish to differentiate themselves further through an advanced mastery of the discipline.

• In addition to coverage of core advanced computer science topics, students may further differentiate themselves by selecting from up to two of three research topics in which to specialise (Complex Systems, Visual Computing, Data and Knowledge Engineering).

• 7-12 month experience as an IT Professional for students who successfully find a suitable placement.

Structure

Students will undertake a placement following the taught stage of the course and prior to undertaking their individual project and dissertation. Most students start their placement in the summer of Year 1. The breakdown is as follows:

Year 1: 20 credits core modules, 100 credit optional modules.
Year 2: 120 credits placement, 60 credits dissertation.
This is a full-time course undertaken over two calendar years. It is also available as a full-time course over one year or a part-time course over three years, both without placement.

You will undertake an individual research project and complete a dissertation (worth 60 credits) under the supervision of a member of academic research staff.

Year one

This specialist Master’s degree will provide graduates of computing with the opportunity to enhance your knowledge, skills and understanding of the subject through modules taught by research experts in their specialist area.

As well as being taught a compulsory module on new programming paradigms, you will choose from a range of carefully selected modules focusing on contemporary and relevant topics currently emerging within the discipline.

Core modules:

Programming Paradigms

Optional modules:

Information, Network & Cyber Security
Security Techniques
High Performance Computing
Visual Computing
Pattern Recognition and Data Mining
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Human Centric Computing
Informatics
Digital Forensics
E-Commerce and Innovation
Secure Applications, Identity and Trust

Year two

Your work placement will normally last between 7 and 12 months, usually taking place at the end of the spring semester in July between the taught elements of the course and your final dissertation, allowing you to practice the new skills you have learned and apply the knowledge you have acquired, in the workplace.

You will return to university following successful completion of your work placement at the start of the summer semester the following year to undertake your individual project and write your dissertation, with the aim of completing the course within 24 months of entry.

Core modules:

Placement
Dissertation

Teaching

The School of Computer Science and Informatics has a strong and active research culture which informs and directs our teaching. We are committed to providing teaching of the highest standard and received an excellent report in the most recent Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review.

Modules are delivered through a series of either full or half-day contact sessions, which include lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and laboratory classes.

Most of your taught modules will have further information for you to study and you will be expected to work through this in your own time according to the guidance provided by the lecturer for that module.

Support

All students are allocated a personal tutor who will monitor your progress throughout your time at university and will support you in your personal development planning. You will see your Personal Tutor at least once each semester.

Our Senior Personal Tutor can also advise and respond to any personal matters as they arise. The School also has a formal student-staff panel to discuss topics or issues of mutual interest.

Students are responsible for obtaining their placement. The School actively assists students on “with Placement” courses in finding a suitable placement.

Feedback:

Feedback on coursework may be provided via written comments on work submitted, by provision of ‘model’ answers and/or through discussion in contact sessions.

Assessment

The taught modules are assessed through examinations and a wide range of in-course assessments, such as written reports, extended essays, practical assignments and oral presentations.

The placement is assessed through a reflective report that demonstrates that the student has developed skills as an IT Professional.

The individual project and dissertation will enable students to demonstrate their ability to build upon and exploit knowledge and skills gained to exhibit critical and original thinking based on a period of independent study and learning.

Career prospects

Graduates from this course will be ideally placed to pursue a number of careers, such as systems architects, programmers and software developers, and could also pursue a research career via doctoral studies.

The selection of modules on offer aim to enhance your transferable skills and boost employment prospects.

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