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Masters Degrees (Social Computing)

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The web revolution has generated a social interactive environment that creates new business opportunities for enterprises. Many international software development enterprises such as IBM, HP, Microsoft, Google and SAS have their own social computing/media development teams. Read more
The web revolution has generated a social interactive environment that creates new business opportunities for enterprises. Many international software development enterprises such as IBM, HP, Microsoft, Google and SAS have their own social computing/media development teams. Other IT enterprises, such as Apple, Oracle, CISCO and Nokia, own products with social computing functions. Similarly, many national and international companies successfully turn significant profits through social network sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Yahoo, Twitter, Google, Myspace, Amazon, Sina Weibo, TaoBao, RenRen and QQ.

This programme addresses market demand by providing you with training for understanding, managing, developing, implementing and commercialising interactive social media on the internet. It will train you for advanced technical or managerial roles in new interdisciplinary areas of social informatics and internet computing. You will gain:
• theoretical and practical knowledge of key areas of social business and social computing in today’s industry and research
• key tools enabling you to enhance and apply your skills in management, design and implementation of IT-based solutions to social business and computation domains
• practical skills in research, analysis, realisation and evaluation of the technical or research documents in social commerce and social computing

You will complete eight in the first two semesters and a dissertation project in the third semester for a total duration of 18 months. The precise content of your dissertation project will be discussed and decided with your project supervisor and is subject to approval. The department is equipped with specialist lab facilities for operating systems, networking, mobile computing and multimedia technology that will support your learning and research.

Modules

Core Modules
• Cloud Computing
• Project Management
• Research Methods
• Social Media Marketing
• Social Network Analysis
• Social Web Programming
• Dissertation

Elective Modules
• Computer Systems Security
• Data Mining and Big Data Analytics
• Interactive Systems
• Object Oriented Programming
• Social Commerce

What are my career prospects?

Graduates from this programme will find employment research and development engineers, systems developers and project leaders in an IT companies. Some students choose to go on to further studies as a PhD candidate at XJTLU or a renowned overseas university.

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The School of Computer Science offers the opportunity to work alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised. Read more
The School of Computer Science offers the opportunity to work alongside academics whose research has been internationally recognised. You will have the chance to work within a supportive community, sharing ideas and experiences with the aim of advancing knowledge.

Research being undertaken in the School includes advancements in imaging technology for the detection and treatment of diseases such as cancer, the design of mobile and social computing platforms for health and wellbeing, and enhancing our understanding of how long-term relationships can be developed between humans and androids.

As a research student, you can benefit from a comprehensive programme of training designed to develop your research skills and methodologies. You will have access to the latest industry-standard equipment and software to aid your investigations, including Oculus Rift, embedded system development and microelectronic engineering design and simulation platforms. A supervisory team of experienced academics is available to provide guidance in publishing your work in journals and presenting at conferences.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

We conduct a blend of fundamental, applied and interdisciplinary research and have particular strengths in robotics, computer vision, social computing, and many aspects of computer gaming. Example Research Areas:
-Robotics and Autonomous Systems
-Device and System Design
-Computer Vision and Image/Video Analysis
-Medical Image Analysis
-Data Analytics
-Social Computing, Games and Serious Gaming Applications

For detailed information about the School’s research activity please visit: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/socs/research/

How You Study

Entry to the doctoral study programmes can be through MPhil or PhD registrations depending on previous experience. You will usually work under the guidance of one main supervisor and one secondary supervisor throughout your studies, and you will have access to a range of the School’s facilities.

Students should expect the equivalent to a one hour supervision meeting each week. Training in research methods features in the early part of the programme and, as you progress, you will be encouraged to present and publish your findings in national and international conferences and journals.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. Read more
The School conducts high-quality significant national and international research and offers excellent opportunities for graduate studies, successfully combining modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/264/digital-arts

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/default.aspx) that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

The digital media group has interests in many areas of interactive multimedia and digital film and animation.

There is particular strength in web design and development, including e-commerce, e-learning, e-health; and the group has substantial experience in interaction design (eg, Usability and accessibility), social computing (eg, Social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile technology (eg, iPhone), virtual worlds (eg, Second Life) and video games. In the area of time-based media, the group has substantial interest in digital film capture and editing, and manipulation on to fully animated 3D modelling techniques as used in games and feature films.

Research Themes:
- E-Learning Technology (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=1)

- Medical Multimedia Applications and Telemedicine (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=2)

- Human Computer Interaction and Social Computing (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=3)

- Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=4)

- Mobile Application Design and Development (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=25)

- Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/research/theme_detail.aspx?gid=1&tid=26)

Research areas

- Intelligent Interactions

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Who is it for?. This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. Read more

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:

  • Cognitive Neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language)
  • Clinical Neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents)
  • and Social Neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in Clinical, Social or Cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Check our labs facilities in the Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit (CRNU)the Baby lab, the Autism Research Group (ARG), the Human Memory Research Group, etc. For a full list of facilities visit the Psychology Department.

Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging methods.  We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG)Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We facilitate clinical internships through our specialist research Centre for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) and with the local Mind centre.

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Check out what is going on in our laboratories and at the Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN).

Find our more about our work on our Facebook group.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.



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The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. Read more
The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. As the need for skilled modellers and animators with an awareness of architectural, as well as cinematic, issues increases in both Architecture and Film, the MA in Architectural Visualisation builds on the connections between these two industries. This MA programme develops skills to communicate architecture and urbanity for a variety of applications and audiences.

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture (http://www.kent.ac.uk/architecture/) and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/).

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting new field of digital media. The School was established over 40 years ago and has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

Kent School of Architecture is a young school that has built an excellent reputation, based on high quality teaching and excellent resources. For architecture graduate employment prospects, Kent was ranked 6th in the UK in The Times Good University Guide 2014 and 7th in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/245/architectural-visualisation

Course structure

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts. Building on the successful Master's programmes in Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects, this MA enables students to develop at an advanced level the skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling which will equip them to become highly skilled professionals in architectural visualisation.

Drawing influence from both architecture and film, this programme offers a progression route into both industries, highlighting the different requirements needed for each profession while exploring the similarities of these markets. In this programme, the professions of architecture, film and animation fuse together, providing students with the ability and understanding to work in each or all of them.

Modules

Stage 1
AR821 - Film and Architecture (15 credits)
AR822 - Virtual Cities (30 credits)
AR823 - Digital Architecture (15 credits)
AR846 - Architectural Photography (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL868 - High Definition Compositing (15 credits)
EL869 - Film and Video Production (15 credits)
Stage 2
Either
EL870 - Visual Effects Project (60 credits)
OR
AR845 - Independent Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules are taught over three terms, concluding with a Major Project Visualisation, which accounts for one third of the programme. The content of the visualisation is agreed with programme staff and you build a showreel to a professional standard. Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop advanced level skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling, which will equip you to become a highly skilled professional in architectural visualisation

- train you in the requirements and skills needed for work in high definition

- produce professionally-trained architectural visualisers who are highly skilled in using state-of-the-art 3D modelling and visual effects software

- provide proper academic guidance and welfare support for all students

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential.

Research areas

- Digital Media

The Digital Media group is a multidisciplinary group with interests in many areas including social computing (eg, social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile/ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction and digital arts (eg, computer games, 3D animation, digital film). Our work is applied across a wide range of domains including e-health, cultural heritage and cyber influence/identity.

Current research themes include:

- interface/interaction design and human-computer interaction
- cyber behaviour/influence
- social computing and sociability design
- natural user interfaces
- virtual worlds
- online communities and computer-mediated communication
- mobile applications
- digital film-making and post-production.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers seek, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level. Read more
The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Key benefits

- The School is one of the world's leading institutions in the field of the application of computing techniques to anthropology.

- In the latest Student Barometer survey 100% of our postgraduate students were satisfied with the academic content of their course and 97% said they found their programme intellectually stimulating.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/199/social-anthropology-and-computing#!overview

Course detail

In this joint programme with the School of Computing you develop the basics of research in anthropology – the design, planning, implementation and analysis of anthropological research – and learn to apply specialised computing methods that you develop or adapt to anthropological research and analysis, usually requiring computer programming skills and/or a broad understanding of computing at the applications level.

Format and assessment

Students with no background in Java programming are required to take a special three-week module before the beginning of the academic year in September.

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

- Research Methods in Social Anthropology (20 credits)
- Research Methods in Social Anthropology II (20 credits)
- Computational Methods in Anthropology (30 credits)
- Dissertation: Anthropology (60 credits)
- Contemporary Problems in Social Anthropology (20 credits)

Assessment is by essays and the dissertation.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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About the MSc programme. The MSc Statistics (Social Statistics) aims to provide high-level training in the theory and application of modern statistical methods, with a focus on methods commonly used in the social sciences. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Statistics (Social Statistics) aims to provide high-level training in the theory and application of modern statistical methods, with a focus on methods commonly used in the social sciences.

You will gain insights into the design and analysis of social science studies, including large and complex datasets, study the latest developments in statistics, and learn how to apply advanced methods to investigate social science questions.  

The programme includes two core courses which provide training in fundamental aspects of probability and statistical theory and methods, the theory and application of generalised linear models, and programming and data analysis using the R and Stata packages. These courses together provide the foundations for the optional courses on more advanced statistical modelling, computational methods and statistical computing. Options also include specialist courses from the Departments of Methodology, Economics, Geography and Social Policy. 

Research Stream

The Research stream is similar to the nine-month programme, but will include a dissertation component, extending the programme to twelve months.

Graduate destinations

There is a high demand for graduates with advanced statistics training and an interest in social science applications, and students on this programme have excellent career prospects. 

Potential employers include the public sector (the Office for National Statistics, government departments, universities), market research organisations, survey research organisations and NGOs. This programme would be ideal preparation for doctoral research in social statistics or quantitative social science.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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Affective computing is an exciting, multi-disciplinary strand of computing that addresses how computers, and other technologies, will become more interactive and efficient by recognising, and responding to, human emotions. Read more

Affective computing is an exciting, multi-disciplinary strand of computing that addresses how computers, and other technologies, will become more interactive and efficient by recognising, and responding to, human emotions.

This course offers students a unique opportunity to be at the forefront of intelligent, emotionally interactive technologies as they come to fruition in the industry and marketplace over the next 10 years. Utilising emergent technologies, such as the Internet of Things (IoT), wearable and mobile devices, and Big Data, the course combines theory and practice, as it prepares students to seize the opportunity to create innovative computers that are powerful, customisable, adaptive, and responsive to their users.

Ultimately, affective computing can provide a way for humans to seamlessly filter out a lot of the information they are presently swamped with and to get to the services and systems that are right for them. 

Indications from the Tech Partnership skills council show that there is a need for 1 million new employment roles in the digital economy between now and 2025 and that 52% of digital businesses currently struggle to fill specialist vacancies.

Key course features

  • Gain hands-on experience of working with a range of sensors and equipment in building experimental, affective computing systems.
  • Learn about the emerging fields of Affective Computing, the Internet of Things (IoT), and Big Data.
  • The course is taught and assessed by active researchers in the field, who all belong to the University’s Affective Audio and/or ARClab groups.
  • The ability to critically appraise and disseminate research results.
  • Provides students with a sound basis for further research and/or professional development.

What will you study

The course provides students with immersion in several distinct subject disciplines that support the design, development, and evaluation of affective computing systems. The course modules cover the practical skills of computing, necessary to build affective, interactive technologies, supported by learning the theories, investigation techniques, and research skills that allow them to work successfully with leading edge, emerging technologies and devise solutions that are fit for purpose.

 

ALL MODULES ARE CORE.

 

As with most masters programmes this has 2 parts, a taught part followed by a dissertation.

 

Students study 5 core modules, totalling 120 credits, followed by a 60 credit dissertation, making a total of 180 credits.

 

MODULES:

  • Affective Computing: This module introduces students to the theory and practical application of affective computing. Students will gain insight into the multi-disciplinary aspects and influences of affective computing and the various models and paradigms of emotion. Students will learn to design, construct, and test affective systems to address specific problems. As such, students will gain experience in configuring a range of sensors, and interpreting the data they produce, in a hands-on fashion.
  • Human Factors Engineering: This module provides a range of skills that can be applied in the development efficient technologies that are easy to use and highly effective. As such, the module provides students with a deep knowledge of the societal, psychological, physical, and technical factors relating to human factors engineering. Students will develop a degree of expertise in human factors engineering, particularly focused on the evaluation of existing information and computer systems. In practical terms, students will conduct and report upon usability studies in a mature and professional manner, with an awareness of the legal and ethical issues involved.
  • Advanced Artificial Intelligence: In this module students are given the opportunity to study problem-solving techniques that are applicable to artificial intelligence with the intention of providing them with the ability to develop intelligent systems. Investigating the role of human intelligence from the Computer Science point of view will enable students to appreciate the role of problem solving. Typical techniques include identification trees, neural nets, genetic algorithms, sparse spaces, near misses particularly applicable to nearest neighbours will be studied. These techniques will enable students to tackle problems in the areas of machine learning, pattern recognition, natural language processing and understanding, perception and expert systems.
  • Postgraduate Study and Research Methods: This module will provide the necessary underpinning skills to ensure that competent work and standards are achieved and maintained throughout the student’s chosen programme of study. This will encompass the development of professional level information handling and analysis skills, as well as ensuring students become proficient at recognising and managing their own professional development.
  • Future and Emerging Technologies: The module explores emerging and future technologies in the field of computing and affords students the opportunity to investigate novel application and research areas and environments where computing can be potentially beneficial. Consideration is given to the the legal, ethical, social, political, economic, environmental, demographic, philosophical and cultural issues on which future technologies may have influence, and be influenced by. Students are expected to apply research methods and forecasting techniques to make and justify credible predictions in their field of study.
  • Dissertation: The dissertation is a study-led piece of work that focuses on applying a wide range of the technical and critical analysis skills that have been developed throughout the course. Students will agree a topic of study with their academic supervisor that falls within the remit of affective computing. This typically follows the development and implementation of a computer system and or may be based upon a research investigation.

For a full-time student, the taught components (all modules apart from the Dissertation) of the course, requiring attendance in a classroom or lab, will be in the region of 12 hours per week during each semester. In addition, students are expected to study independently outside of the classroom for around 15 hours per week. The commitment for a part-time student is approximately half that of a full-time student.

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.





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Would you like personalised supervision from the very first week of study?. Do you want a course that links with Visual Anthropology and uses our ethnographic film-making facilities?. Read more
  • Would you like personalised supervision from the very first week of study?
  • Do you want a course that links with Visual Anthropology and uses our ethnographic film-making facilities?
  • Are you interested in the series of pathways offering specialist knowledge of different areas?

The objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. 

Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics. If they wish, students are able, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In total, there are currently 5 pathways.  

However, please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same degree, an MA in Social Anthropology

Teaching and learning

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they select shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

In total, some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but in a broad range of other disciplines across the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, History, Sociology and Drama. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic and timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students. However students are not obliged to select one of these pathways and, provided the course director and tutor are in agreement, may follow their own 'customized' selection of modules.

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. Certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations and/or portfolios of practical work. In addition, all MA students are required to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.

About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important. Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.



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This course runs in Germany. This course covers a range of essential topics related to distributed computing systems. Yet these modules are not isolated; each one takes its place in the field in relation to others. Read more

About the course

This course runs in Germany.

This course covers a range of essential topics related to distributed computing systems. Yet these modules are not isolated; each one takes its place in the field in relation to others.

The emphasis in the course is to build the connections between topics, enabling software engineers to achieve co-operation between distinct autonomous systems under constraints of cost and performance requirements.

The course is suitable for:

Recent graduates in Electrical or Electronic Engineering or Computer Science, who wish to develop their skills in the field of distributed computing systems.
Practicing engineers and computer professionals who wish to develop their knowledge in this area.
People with suitable mathematical, scientific or other engineering qualifications, usually with some relevant experience, who wish to enter this field.

Aims

The past few years have witnessed that Grid computing is evolving as a promising large-scale distributed computing infrastructure for scientists and engineers around the world to share various resources on the Internet including computers, software, data, instruments.

Many countries around the world have invested heavily on the development of the Grid computing infrastructure. Many IT companies have been actively involved in Grid development. Grid computing has been applied in a variety of areas such as particle physics, bio-informatics, finance, social science and manufacturing. The IT industry has seen the Grid computing infrastructure as the next generation of the Internet.

The aim of the programme is to equip high quality and ambitious graduates with the necessary advanced technical and professional skills for an enhanced career either in industry or leading edge research in the area of distributed computing systems.

Specifically, the main objectives of the programme are:

To critically appraise advanced technologies for developing distributed systems;
To practically examine the development of large scale distributed systems;
To critically investigate the problems and pitfalls of distributed systems in business, commerce, and industry.

Course Content

Compulsory Modules:

Computer Networks
Network Security and Encryption
Distributed Systems Architecture
Project and Personal Management
High Performance Computing and Big Data
Software Engineering
Embedded Systems Engineering
Intelligent Systems
Dissertation

Special Features

Electronic and Computer Engineering is one of the largest disciplines in the University, with a portfolio of research contracts totalling £7.5 million, and has strong links with industry.

The laboratories are well equipped with an excellent range of facilities to support the research work and courses. We have comprehensive computing resources in addition to those offered centrally by the University. The discipline is particularly fortunate in having extensive gifts of software and hardware to enable it to undertake far-reaching design projects.

We have a wide range of research groups, each with a complement of academics and research staff and students. The groups are:

Media Communications
Wireless Networks and Communications
Power Systems
Electronic Systems
Sensors and Instrumentation.

Women in Engineering and Computing Programme

Brunel’s Women in Engineering and Computing mentoring scheme provides our female students with invaluable help and support from their industry mentors.

Accreditation

Distributed Computing Systems Engineering is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

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The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. Read more

The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of around 50 different modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics. Go to the Study Details tab for more details on the Visual and Sensory Mediapathway. Pathways are designed to ensure both an academic and timetabling fit between the options. Students are encouraged, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In addition to the Visual and Sensory Media pathway, there are currently six others. 

Please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same generic degree, MA in Social Anthropology

Teaching and learning

In each semester students take a small number of 15 credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they choose shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

Some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but across many other disciplines in the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, Drama, Sociology & History. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic & timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students.

The Visual & Sensory Media pathway draws exclusively on modules offered by Social Anthropology & the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology.

  • Students normally take two modules exploring the representation of visual culture in the visual arts, in cinema & in ethnographic film & related documentary genres.
  • In the second semester, they take a practice-based module that offers basic training in photography & sound-recording as well as encouraging reflection on these media both as means of creating anthropological knowledge & as a means of representing it. An important feature of this module are the workshops given by practising professional photographers & sound-recordists. Please note that this last module requires the payment of an additional fee of £500 (currently under review) to cover equipment & facilities costs.
  • The dissertation normally consists of a text directly supported by & integrated with still images &/or sound recordings.

Coursework and assessment

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, & up to 30 credits of optional modules. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, MA students write a dissertation worth a further 60 credits.

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. But certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations &/or portfolios of practical work. The dissertation that MA students are required to submit is normally 15,000 words though this may be reduced in length if work in other media is presented in conjunction with the written text.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.

About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important. Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.



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Designing at the forefront of communication technology. The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. Read more
Designing at the forefront of communication technology.

Overview

The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. These advances have created a demand for graduates who understand social and participatory design principles and have the skills to design new interactive technologies.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies provides an innovative mix of social and technical skills. You will gain an understanding of the social, political and economic factors that affect the use of interactive technologies, examining how technology is perceived and employed by the user, and you will develop the skills to design and create usable and accessible devices and applications.

Course content

Understand social media and interactive technologies through the key roles they play in society. Explore topics in human-computer interaction, user-centred design, social and cultural theory and human psychology and learn to apply them to the practical problems of designing interactive pages, devices and systems.

Modules for this social media degree are taught by experts from both the Department of Sociology and the Department of Computer Science.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies includes eight core modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Metrics and Society
-Themes and Issues in Contemporary Sociology
-Research Methods for Interactive Technologies
-User-centred Design for Interactive Technologies

You will develop, design, implement and manage your own original research project, supervised by a member of staff with the relevant experience for your topic. You will analyse the data and produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Examples of previous projects include:
-Accessibility of iPhone/iPad apps
-Democracy and participation in York City
-The use of social networking sites by the older generation
-Social robotics and companionship
-Living with the h-index?
-Investigating immersion in games with inattentional blindness
-Immersion and cognitive effort when playing videogames
-Immersion in audio-only games

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge needed to play a leading role in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. This social media degree also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD level.

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Cloud Computing is the outsourcing of IT resources like servers, storages, network, and services and their provisioning over the Internet. Read more

Cloud Computing is the outsourcing of IT resources like servers, storages, network, and services and their provisioning over the Internet. Its advantages, when compared to self-operated IT resources, are significant cost reductions and increased elasticity, which is due to the fact that the IT resources can be simultaneously and flexibly shared among many customers by the concept of virtualisation.

Thus, more and more companies take advantage of the benefits that cloud can provide, and the demand for cloud professional is booming. According to a study conducted by Deloitte for the EU in 2016, 1.6 million jobs could be created and the formation of 303 000 new businesses, in particular SMEs, is expected.

As a result, knowing how to build applications with cloud-based concepts and technologies and how they work is an essential key skill for a promising and rewarding career.

Why choose Cloud Computing and Services at EIT Digital?

Cloud Computing and Services at EIT Digital Master School combines a technical major on cloud computing at two leading European universities with a minor in Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E).

Part of the technical major is the transfer of knowledge in technology platforms, practical skills, and formal foundations that are needed to understand state-of-the-art cloud solutions to implement distributed software applications on top of them. The programme also focuses on future directions of cloud computing, for example, in the fields of edge and fog computing as well as blockchains and distributed ledger applications respectively.

The technical skills will be extended with a comprehensive understanding of user driven innovation and how to build business models and business cases. Students get the chance to get in contact with Europe’s leading companies and start-ups and conduct an industry-based internship at one of these companies. Successful students receive a degree from both universities they visited during their two-years study as well as a certificate from EIT Digital.

What are the career opportunities?

Graduates qualify for jobs in international and local organisations in both technical and business roles. Typical titles are:

  • Cloud CTO
  • Cloud Software Engineer
  • Lead software Developer
  • Cloud Service Broker
  • Cloud Alliance Manager
  • Cloud Infrastructure Architect
  • Business developer
  • Product manager
  • Consultant

Through their multidisciplinary attitude graduates are valuable in open innovation settings where different aspects (market, users, social aspects, media technologies) come together. They easily find jobs within companies that provide value-added products and services, such as telecom companies, ecommerce providers, e-learning, web developers, and cloud operators. An alternative path would be to start your own company to provide product or technology development, media content, business development or consultancy services.

How is the programme structured?

All EIT Digital Master School programmes follow the same scheme:

  • Students study one year at an ‘entry’ university and one year at an ‘exit’ university in two of EIT Digital’s hot spots around Europe.
  • Upon completion, graduates receive degrees from the two universities and a certificate awarded by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology.
  • The first year is similar at all entry points with basic courses to lay the foundation for the chosen technical programme focus. Some elective courses may also be chosen. At the same time, students are introduced to business and management. During the second semester, a design project is combined with business development exercises. These teach how to turn technology into business and how to present a convincing business plan.
  • In between the first year and the second year, a summer school addresses business opportunities within a socially relevant theme.
  • The second year offers a specialisation and a graduation project. The gradation project includes an internship at a company or a research institute and results in a Master thesis with a strong innovation and entrepreneurship dimension.

To learn more about the structure of the programme, please click here.

To learn more about the I&E minor please click here.

Where can I study Cloud Computing and Services?

Entry - 1st year, common courses

  • Aalto University (Aalto), Finland
  • Technical University of Berlin (TUB), Germany 
  • University of Rennes 1 (UR1), France
  • University of Technology Delft (DUT), Netherlands

Exit - 2nd year, specialisation

  • Mobile Services at Aalto University (Aalto), Finland
  • Data intensive computing at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden
  • Cloud & Data Analytics at Technical University of Berlin (TUB), Germany
  • Distributed Data Processing at University of Technology Delft (DUT), Netherlands
  • Data and Knowledge at University Paris Sud (UPS), France
  • Cloud Infrastructures at University of Rennes 1 (UR1), France

About EIT Digital Master School

EIT Digital Master School offers two-year, European Masters in computer science and information technology, with a focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. Students study two years in two leading European universities. They earn two Masters degrees from those universities together with a certificate awarded by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). Students enjoy an array of benefits which includes European mobility, a three-day business challenge, a two-week Summer School, an internship and access to the EIT Digital community. Upon graduation, students are equipped with the tools to become digital innovators.

Scholarship:

  • European citizen: No tuition fees. Up to 750 Euros monthly allowance
  • Non-European citizen: tuition fee waiver of up to 50% and 750 Euros monthly allowance

Application deadline to begin studying in September 2018:

  • 15 April 2018 (Open to EU/EEA/CH citizens/ Non-EU citizens*.)

*Please note that this application period is not recommended for applicants who require a visa due to time constraints. If you require a visa to study in an EU country, we recommend you delay your application to November 2018 when the application portal opens again, to start in Autumn 2019.

How should you apply?

To apply, you need to register and submit your application on the EIT Digital Application Portal. You don’t need to do your application all at once. You can access the list of required documents for your application here.

Need more information?

Master School Office: , we will be happy to help.



Read less
Cloud Computing is the outsourcing of IT resources like servers, storages, network, and services and their provisioning over the Internet. Read more

Cloud Computing is the outsourcing of IT resources like servers, storages, network, and services and their provisioning over the Internet. Its advantages, when compared to self-operated IT resources, are significant cost reductions and increased elasticity, which is due to the fact that the IT resources can be simultaneously and flexibly shared among many customers by the concept of virtualisation.

Thus, more and more companies take advantage of the benefits that cloud can provide, and the demand for cloud professional is booming. According to a study conducted by Deloitte for the EU in 2016, 1.6 million jobs could be created and the formation of 303 000 new businesses, in particular SMEs, is expected.

As a result, knowing how to build applications with cloud-based concepts and technologies and how they work is an essential key skill for a promising and rewarding career.

Why choose Cloud Computing and Services at EIT Digital?

Cloud Computing and Services at EIT Digital Master School combines a technical major on cloud computing at two leading European universities with a minor in Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E).

Part of the technical major is the transfer of knowledge in technology platforms, practical skills, and formal foundations that are needed to understand state-of-the-art cloud solutions to implement distributed software applications on top of them. The programme also focuses on future directions of cloud computing, for example, in the fields of edge and fog computing as well as blockchains and distributed ledger applications respectively.

The technical skills will be extended with a comprehensive understanding of user driven innovation and how to build business models and business cases. Students get the chance to get in contact with Europe’s leading companies and start-ups and conduct an industry-based internship at one of these companies. Successful students receive a degree from both universities they visited during their two-years study as well as a certificate from EIT Digital.

What are the career opportunities?

Graduates qualify for jobs in international and local organisations in both technical and business roles. Typical titles are:

  • Cloud CTO
  • Cloud Software Engineer
  • Lead software Developer
  • Cloud Service Broker
  • Cloud Alliance Manager
  • Cloud Infrastructure Architect
  • Business developer
  • Product manager
  • Consultant

Through their multidisciplinary attitude graduates are valuable in open innovation settings where different aspects (market, users, social aspects, media technologies) come together. They easily find jobs within companies that provide value-added products and services, such as telecom companies, ecommerce providers, e-learning, web developers, and cloud operators. An alternative path would be to start your own company to provide product or technology development, media content, business development or consultancy services.

How is the programme structured?

All EIT Digital Master School programmes follow the same scheme:

  • Students study one year at an ‘entry’ university and one year at an ‘exit’ university in two of EIT Digital’s hot spots around Europe.
  • Upon completion, graduates receive degrees from the two universities and a certificate awarded by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology.
  • The first year is similar at all entry points with basic courses to lay the foundation for the chosen technical programme focus. Some elective courses may also be chosen. At the same time, students are introduced to business and management. During the second semester, a design project is combined with business development exercises. These teach how to turn technology into business and how to present a convincing business plan.
  • In between the first year and the second year, a summer school addresses business opportunities within a socially relevant theme.
  • The second year offers a specialisation and a graduation project. The gradation project includes an internship at a company or a research institute and results in a Master thesis with a strong innovation and entrepreneurship dimension.

To learn more about the structure of the programme, please click here.

To learn more about the I&E minor please click here.

Where can I study Cloud Computing and Services?

Entry - 1st year, common courses

  • Aalto University (Aalto), Finland
  • Technical University of Berlin (TUB), Germany 
  • University of Rennes 1 (UR1), France
  • University of Technology Delft (DUT), Netherlands

Exit - 2nd year, specialisation

  • Mobile Services at Aalto University (Aalto), Finland
  • Data intensive computing at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden
  • Cloud & Data Analytics at Technical University of Berlin (TUB), Germany
  • Distributed Data Processing at University of Technology Delft (DUT), Netherlands
  • Data and Knowledge at University Paris Sud (UPS), France
  • Cloud Infrastructures at University of Rennes 1 (UR1), France

About EIT Digital Master School

EIT Digital Master School offers two-year, European Masters in computer science and information technology, with a focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. Students study two years in two leading European universities. They earn two Masters degrees from those universities together with a certificate awarded by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). Students enjoy an array of benefits which includes European mobility, a three-day business challenge, a two-week Summer School, an internship and access to the EIT Digital community. Upon graduation, students are equipped with the tools to become digital innovators.

Scholarship:

  • European citizen: No tuition fees. Up to 750 Euros monthly allowance
  • Non-European citizen: tuition fee waiver of up to 50% and 750 Euros monthly allowance

Application deadline to begin studying in September 2018:

  • 15 April 2018 (Open to EU/EEA/CH citizens/ Non-EU citizens*.)

*Please note that this application period is not recommended for applicants who require a visa due to time constraints. If you require a visa to study in an EU country, we recommend you delay your application to November 2018 when the application portal opens again, to start in Autumn 2019.

How should you apply?

To apply, you need to register and submit your application on the EIT Digital Application Portal. You don’t need to do your application all at once. You can access the list of required documents for your application here.

Need more information?

Master School Office: , we will be happy to help.



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