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Masters Degrees (Social Cohesion)

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies.

Are people living in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods more inclined to turn inwards and to ‘hunker down’ compared to people of ethnically homogeneous settings? Are there cross-country differences in the causes of hooliganism, and in the effectiveness of methods used to combat hooligans in different European countries?

More and more comparative questions on societies are being raised. At Radboud University we believe that answers to comparative questions are more informative, lead to a better understanding of societal phenomena and processes, and therefore have more scientific and social importance than answers to questions about one society in one historical period.

This programme therefore fully focuses on teaching students how to perform high-quality comparative research. We look into the degree of inequality, cohesion and modernisation in both Western and non-Western societies. You’ll learn how to translate social problems into empirical research questions and understand the diverse theoretical approaches, research designs, data collections and analyses you need to get the answers you are looking for.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Why study Social and Cultural Science at Radboud University?

- A majority of our courses are exclusively created and offered for the research students enrolled in this programme, and therefore perfectly match the needs and desires of social and cultural researchers.
- This programme is linked to the Nijmegen Institute for Social and Cultural Research (NISCO) who offer an excellent research environment and have extensive social science databases that students are free to use.
- You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.
- You’ll be given your own workplace (equipped with a computer) in a room with your fellow students to enhance solidarity. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision.
- You’ll write two scientific journal papers which will not only give you plenty of practise but will also give you a good academic research portfolio that you can use when applying for research positions.
- A large majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions; almost all of our graduates found work shortly after graduating.

Multidisciplinary

The programme combines the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, development studies and communication science. This programme is therefore ideal for Bachelor’s students from these disciplines with an interest in research. However, we believe that students from disciplines such as political science, economics and human geography can also profit from this Master’s.

The Research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science trains aspiring researchers and is ideal preparation for PhD positions or research positions in relevant non-academic research institutes. Or you could build a bridge between academic research and the world of practice, thereby influencing policy-making in the public and private sphere.

Quality label

This programme was recently awarded the quality label ‘Top Programme' in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Social and Cultural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni found a job or research position immediately after graduating.

Job positions

There are plenty of options open to graduates of the research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science:
- Scientific research career (academia)
The programme provides an excellent basis for a scientific research career and attaining PhD positions.

- Societal research career
Our graduates can also go on to have careers in relevant non-academic research and policy institutes like government ministries, Statistics Netherlands (CBS), The Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP) and The Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and foreign equivalents.

- More
Of course, this Master’s programme does not close other doors. Students with a research Master’s are also highly sought after by (commercial) businesses and organisations because of their analytical and communication skills and in-depth understanding of social and cultural behaviour. Other careers, such as policymaker, manager, journalist, etc are certainly within reach.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Our research in this field

Half of the Master’s programme in Social and Cultural Science consists of practical research training.

In the first year, you’ll do a research project in which you conduct a small-scale empirical research under guided supervision of a senior researcher. The comparative research issue is typically part of the ongoing research within a Radboud chair group. Finally, you’ll write a scientific journal paper regarding the research results. The project is done in small groups (2-3 students) and prepares you well to independently conduct a comparative empirical social science study for your Master’s thesis in the second.

- Master’s thesis topics in the field of Social and Cultural Science
For your Master’s thesis you are completely free to tackle any social issue in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, communication science or development studies. Important is the ability to reflect on the societal significance of your research question and the societal importance of your research. Thesis topics vary widely:
- Many theses are concerned with cross-country comparisons of behaviour or attitude measures using European cross-sectional survey data on, for example, xenophobia or gender roles.
- Others theses compare classrooms and the effect ethnic composition has on interethnic bullying or the impact of the economic crisis on African migrants in Athens, Greece, or the utilisation of different sexual health services by Aboriginal adolescents.
- Thesis topics can also be found in the field of communication science, like examining the news on extreme right political parties in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and correlating it with election results, or studying patterns in TV drama (e.g. increasing Americanisation) and comparing these media trends with societal processes such as individualisation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

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IN BRIEF. Support your career progression within the field of health and social care education and become an NMC Stage 3 Practice Teacher. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Support your career progression within the field of health and social care education and become an NMC Stage 3 Practice Teacher
  • Teaching and learning techniques used will advance your personal growth as a leader of education and enable you to deliver excellent health and social education care now and in the future
  • Use this certificate as part of the MSc Leading Education for Health and Social Care Reform
  • Part-time study option

COURSE SUMMARY

This course will prepare you as an effective leader of health and social care education whilst at the same time provide you with an opportunity to become an NMC Stage 3 Practice Teacher.

This postgraduate certificate is the vehicle to achieve successful entry onto the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Practice Teacher register.

This course is different to others as it combines developing yourself in the role as NMC Stage 3 Practice Teacher whilst at the same time developing your skills, knowledge, qualities and behaviours of an effective leader of health and social care education. Within the context of your organisation, you will develop the skills to lead practice based learning that is based on sound education and leadership practices that are research and evidence based. You will develop the skills to take into consideration the complexity of the different levels of practice and student experience. You will critically apply the NMC Practice Teacher Standard, thus facilitate learning within a professional and inter-professional learning and working environment and in collaboration with the range of teaching personnel. You will be provided with opportunities to design and undertake assessment of educational knowledge, attitudes and skills in the practice context and identify a clear theory and/or research and evidence base in the design of learning, teaching and assessment.

There are opportunities for you to work flexibly full or part-time with options to use credits from this course towards the MSc Leading Education for Health and Social Care Reform.

COURSE DETAILS

The range of knowledge, skills and attitudes required of an effective practice teacher and educational leader have been carefully developed into two specialist modules.

Teaching and learning strategies reflect the real world recognising that you as Practice Teacher and educational leader have to present, report, justify, reflect, defend and write critically. Therefore you will be given opportunities to develop these skills throughout the course. These strategies will also prepare you to work in the range of health and social care practice setting that are often in a state of flux and transformation.

The teaching and learning strategies are dependent on sound group dynamics, trust and cohesion. The course commences with an induction day which explores students’ expectations, hopes and fears, work based learning opportunities, along with confidentiality and other issues. Specific teaching and learning strategies include: seminars, master classes, teaching experience, and shadowing experienced health and social care educational leaders. These are interactive, discursive, participatory, collaborative and practice based and employ a variety of teaching and learning methods including group activities, sharing of work based and learning experiences and personal and group reflections on educational leadership and practice Teacher ‘real life’ scenarios , utilising best-evidence generated from models, theoretical concepts, the workplace and their own experiences.

TEACHING

A variety of teaching approaches will be employed to provide a rich and diverse immersive and experiential learning environment. All sessions will target specific NMC Practice Teacher domains and will focus on your role as an educational leader. Specific teaching and learning strategies include:

  • Seminars
  • Work based learning
  • Workshops
  • Practice profile evidence building and shadowing experienced health and social care educational leaders.
  • Sharing of work based and learning experiences and personal and group reflections on educational leadership and Practice Teacher 'real life' scenarios
  • Attendance of action learning sets provide more focused opportunities for peer review and feedback and provide a safe environment to resolve 'real life' leadership and Practice Teacher issues and to develop you into the role of Practice Teacher
  • Assessment in practice by your Practice Teacher Mentor

ASSESSMENT

The course allows for a variety of assessments, depending on the module you will undertake, and include:

  • Poster presentation to critically explore an aspect of clinical teaching and learning in education
  • Practice profile summary demonstrating your achievement of the 8 domains within the NMC Stage 3 Practice Teacher Standard
  • Development of a simulated clinical teaching and learning scenario and clinical viva (100%)

EMPLOYABILITY

  • Completing CPD is now an essential part of maintaining your professional registration.
  • By undertaking CPD modules and courses, students demonstrate to employers a commitment to the profession.
  • Undertaking modules leads to better career prospects and promotion.
  • Modules are aligned to the College of Social Work’s Professional Capabilities Framework ASYE, Social Worker, Experienced Social Worker, and Advanced social worker levels.
  • Successful completion of the course demonstrates your capability to become a Strategic level social worker.
  • The course supports The College of Social Work developmental pathways of Professional Social Work Educator, Advanced Social Work Practitioner and Social Work Manager.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Following completion of the course you will have developed the expertise to lead education in health and social care contexts. There are opportunities for you to use credits from any existing postgraduate educational studies (NMC Stage 3 Practice Teacher and Stage 4 Teacher Award) towards this  Master’s programme. This provides you with a flexible and dynamic educational leadership career pathway.  Indeed this is a real strength of attending the programme.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

This course supports you to develop a teaching career in education within the field of health and social care and Higher Education.



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This Professional Doctorate (EdD) is a partly taught and partly research-based Professional Doctorate which has proved to be both successful and convenient for senior professionals in education and related fields. Read more

This Professional Doctorate (EdD) is a partly taught and partly research-based Professional Doctorate which has proved to be both successful and convenient for senior professionals in education and related fields. We offer a wide range of taught modules in the areas of research methods, education policy, education management, TESOL and professional development.

On successful completion, students will have made an original and independent contribution to educational knowledge in the field determined by the topic of their research dissertation study. They will demonstrate a critical evaluation of the relevant literature, a high level of competence in appropriate research methods, and the ability to communicate the results and their implications.

We undertake a wide range of research that falls within two broad themes: pedagogy, learning and curriculum; and human rights, equality and social cohesion in education. Underpinning all of our research is a commitment to achieving a real impact in the lives of educators and learners.

Aims

On successful completion of the programme students will have made an original and independent contribution to educational knowledge in the field determined by the topic of their research dissertation study. They will, through this dissertation, demonstrate a critical evaluation of the relevant literature, a high level of competence in appropriate research methods, and the ability to communicate their results and their implications.

The EdD programme may be taken on a part-time or full-time basis. The normal period of study will be not less that three years full-time or not less than four years part-time. The aim is to allow flexibility for busy professionals, enabling you to complete the degree with minimal disruption to your professional and personal life.

The EdD comprises nine taught doctoral modules (of which four must be research modules) and a research dissertation. The research dissertation has the same level of challenge and high standards as a PhD but is approximately half the scale (40,000 words). Each module is assessed by one 5000 word assignment. The University operates a Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Scheme which recognises relevant prior assessed and certified learning for credit purposes. This is also known as credit transfer where the credits were awarded by another Higher Education (HE) provider. Applicants who have completed a masters degree within the last 10 years that involved a substantive element of educational research methods training, including a research-based dissertation or project, may be eligible to transfer credit. Applicants for RPL should submit the RPL Application Form to the Postgraduate Administrator, 20 College Green, Belfast, BT7 1LN. Applications for RPL should be made at the same time as your online course application. The dissertation is assessed by an oral examination (a viva-voce).

There are three stages to each EdD taught module which covers a four month period. The first stage is pre-reading. The second stage is attendance for the intensive teaching, normally over a consecutive period of two and a half days. The third stage involves the completion and submission of an assignment, normally within three months of the last date of the taught module.

Students must complete the following research modules:

  • Introduction to Doctoral Study in Education
  • Quantitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory
  • Qualitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory

Plus one other research module from:

  • Experimental Methods in Educational Research
  • Narrative and Arts-Based Research Approaches
  • Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Educational Research
  • Researching Children and Young People in Educational Settings
  • Survey Methods in Educational Research
  • The Professional as Researcher

Optional modules:

  • Assessment and Testing: Concepts and Issues
  • Children’s Rights - Research and Practice
  • Critical Perspectives on Early Childhood
  • Education in Divided Societies: Contribution to Social Cohesion
  • Educational Special Needs: Policy and Partnerships for Inclusion
  • TESOL: Discourse and Pedagogy
  • TESOL: Issues in Language Learning

* These modules are an example of what is available in any one year and are subject to change.



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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create. Read more

This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create.

Our aim is to prepare students to be collaborative, responsive, imaginative, politically engaged and culturally aware artist practitioners. The course is aimed at newly-emerging practitioners with a background in theatre, education, activism or social change, as well as at more established practitioners who want to reflect, refresh and develop their skills. We actively encourage the sharing of skills and expertise among our multi-national group of students. We prioritise applicants with some experience in the arts, education, activism or social care, and it is rare that we take applicants directly from their first degree.

Together we explore the ways in which theatre and performance is created by diverse groups of people in a variety of community, social and educational settings: in schools or on the streets, in children’s homes and elderly care, in conflict zones, conferences, crèches and youth clubs, pupil referral units and prisons, women’s refuges and refugee centres, hospitals and hostels – anywhere groups of people meet and interact.

What is applied theatre?

Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of exciting worldwide performance forms concerned with personal and social change.

The term embracestheatre of the oppressed, community theatre, theatre-in-education, drama in education, theatre for development, prison theatre, intercultural arts, intergenerational arts, theatre in museums, archives and heritage sites, story-telling, reminiscence theatre, conflict resolution. The work often moves across art forms. This is not a definitive list, as it is a field that is dynamic and changing.

The MA considers case studies from the UK and from across the globe. Central to this investigation are: questions of identity; representation; discrimination; health; equality; human rights; opportunity; access; social inclusion/exclusion; participation; ethics; evaluation and documentation; aesthetics and the role of the artist.

Placement and partnerships

The course is structured so that practice and theory constantly respond to one another, through practical classes and seminars. All students undertake a placement in a recognised host organisation where you'll work with experienced practitioners, and learn from the inside how participatory arts organisations function.

We have active partnerships with many companies, and the majority of the tutors, including the convenor, are active artists, with a variety of arts practices in performance, community and social settings.

Modules & structure

Practical workshops

In the autumn term we look at the roots of Applied Theatre in Education, in Social and Political Change, and in Community. Classes include work with Geese Theatre on their use of mask in Prisons, Drama and Theatre in Education techniques with Gail Babb of Talawa Theatre, intergenerational arts practices with Convenor Sue Mayo, and the use of Drama to explore Domestic Violence, with Tender. Throughout this term students are also engaged in skills-sharing sessions in order to pool their knowledge and expertise. 

In the Spring Term Tutor Raj Bhari, from Talk for Change, leads a module on creative approaches to Community Cohesion, Conflict Resolution, and the artist as activist. We have a short festival of art forms, with classes in song, puppetry and dance- and a residency shared with students of the MA in performance making, working across modules with artists of distinction from within the Goldsmith’s staff and beyond.

Throughout the practical sessions we work with students to develop their facilitation, devising,- project planning and management skills with attention to issues such as group dynamics; power and leadership; inclusion; accessibility; equality; conflict; intercultural practice; safe space and the ethics of touch.

In the summer term students design and lead a weekend of workshops for a public audience.

Histories, Theories and Contexts seminars

This contextual strand enables us consider the thinking behind our embodied knowledge. Through a series of seminars, we consider: the development of applied methods from political theatre; radical and celebratory arts; drama and theatre-in-education; community theatre; prison theatre; therapeutic creative practices and the legacy of Augusto Boal. We study the growing body of writing on applied theatre and its practitioners, and theatre theory. We consider local and international case studies; we read, discuss, watch videos and experience live performances.

Complementary Contextual lectures

Students also choose a lecture based Option module from one of the other exciting MA programmes. Previous modules have included, African Theatre, Performance Praxis, Radical Performance, and The Reflecxtive Practitioner. Our students can also take a specialist applied module led by Danny Braverman, on Disability Theatre, examining the scope and radical nature of disability theatre.

Placement

The Convenor, Sue Mayo, supports students to locate and develop a placement in a recognised host organisation. On the placement students further the skills they have practiced on the programme, whilst dealing with the challenges of a professional context. Placement hosts include London Bubble, Magic Me, Resonate. Greenwich & Lewisham Young People's Theatre, Talawa Theatre, Pan-arts, Crisis, Ovalhouse, Green Shoes Arts, The Young Vic, MIND, CEN8, Lewisham Youth Theatre and Spare Tyre.

Professional development

As part of our commitment to student’s employability, we offer up to five workshops covering various areas directly relevant to workplaces where drama may be applied; for example: planning and managing projects, child protection and working with vulnerable adults, ethics, evaluation, setting up a theatre company or working as an independent artist.

Assessment

The MA Applied Theatre has five points of assessment:

  • a 6,000-word essay based on material covered in Term 1
  • a 6,000-word reflective portfolio on the placement
  • a 12,000-word research project/dissertation

These assessments count towards 80% of the final mark.

The remaining 20% is derived from assessment of the two shared complementary/contextual modules, which include Disability Theatre, Performance Praxis, African Theatre, Musical Theatre and Cultural Theory.



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This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity. Read more
This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity.

The course will give you the opportunity to study and research the main ways in which social scientists analyse the role of the mass media in the social construction, representation and understanding of difference and social diversity and get a critical understanding of the social and media structures and journalistic practices that impact upon these processes. It will also equip you with practical skills that will enable you to produce your own media product on a topic related to social and cultural diversity.

The course combines a portfolio of theory modules aimed to develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the processes of managing and making sense of cultural diversity, key issues in intercultural communication and of various aspects of the sociology of news with a number of practice-oriented modules intended to give you first hand experience in the practice of inclusive journalism.

Drawing upon this unique combination of rigorous theoretical engagement and specialist practical training, this course is designed to equip you with a comprehensive conceptual/theoretical grounding and the practical skills to engage in responsible media coverage of diversity, to practice culturally informed and inclusive journalism and to develop a career (whether practical, strategic, or research-based) involving understanding and responding to the challenges of social diversity.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced academics and journalism professionals with expertise in inclusive journalism.

Course content

Two study routes to suit your future plans: You can choose one of two routes for the award: the Dissertation Route or a Practice Route culminating in a final project.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. For more details on course structure and modules, and how you will be taught and assessed, see the full course document.

Semester one
Core module
-APPROACHES TO SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY

Option modules
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: GENDER, SEXUALITY, AGE, DISABILITY
-INTRODUCTION TO INCLUSIVE JOURNALISM
-MEDIA PRODUCTION SKILLS
-ISSUES IN JOURNALISM: FREEDOM OF SPEECH, ETHICS AND DEMOCRACY

Semester two
Core modules
-DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: MODELS, INSTITUTIONS, PRACTICES

Option modules
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: MIGRATION, RACE, ETHNICITY
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: FAITH AND RELIGION
-PLANNING CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATIONS
-MEDIA, ACTIVISM AND POLITICS
-SOCIOLOGY OF NEWS
-MEDIA AUDIENCES

Associated careers

This course is designed to attract a mix of new graduates, often with a media-related degree or work experience, and people who have already worked in journalism, but want to enhance their understanding of social diversity and their skills in the area of inclusive journalism. It is suitable for existing media professionals that want to reflect on their practice as journalists, as well as students who want to pursue a career in the media, national and local government, IGOs and NGOs or who intend to embark on a relevant research/academic career. It will be a valuable asset for civil servants and local authority staff, NGO workers working on immigration, equality, social inclusion and cohesion and community regeneration whose duties involve communication and media work.

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IN BRIEF. Strong clinical focus. Facilitated work-based learning driven by client need and service redesign. Protected learning time and support from practice-based mentors and assessors. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Strong clinical focus
  • Facilitated work-based learning driven by client need and service redesign
  • Protected learning time and support from practice-based mentors and assessors
  • A part-time only course

COURSE SUMMARY

This course is aimed at health and social care practitioners who wish to develop the competencies of advanced practice and to facilitate change in patient and service outcomes. It uses a work-based learning approach to develop the higher level skills that will lead to advanced practitioner status and enhance your career prospects.

COURSE DETAILS

This inter-professional course places work at the centre of learning. You'll have access to expertise and skills from a wide range of professionals including nonmedical consultants, advanced practitioners, medical practitioners and guest lecturers at the cutting-edge of health and social care. You can also draw on the expertise of professorial and research staff across the University.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The full course runs part-time over two years giving you the chance to exit with the following awards:

  • Postgraduate Certificate: two modules over one year
  • Postgraduate Diploma: four modules over one year six months
  • Masters: six modules over two years

This course is aligned with:

  • Department of health Position Statement: Advanced Nursing Practice (2010)
  • Royal College of Nursing Competencies for Advanced Nurse Practitioners (2008)
  • NHS North West Concordat for Advanced Practice (2009).

This course comprises a number of core and optional modules depending on which pathway you choose.

TEACHING

The facilitation strategies within the course will prepare you for the development of generic and specific practice at advanced level. In essence this course embraces the concept of learning at work to develop new ways of working and will develop the 'advanced practitioner' as outlined by the NHS North West Concordat for Advanced Practice (2009).

You will engage in critical self-assessment of knowledge and skills against appropriate competency frameworks in order to identify, in negotiation with their employer and academic supervisor, an individual learning pathway within the course.

The facilitation strategies for the course are dependent on sound group dynamics, trust and cohesion. The course will commence with an orientation programme, which will explore your expectations, roles and responsibilities, work based mentors and assessors and learning facilitators, along with confidentiality and other issues.

Facilitation will be complemented by academic and professional supervision.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment strategies have been developed to reflect the ethos and learning aims and objectives of individual modules and may include:

  • Self assessment
  • Peer assessment
  • Practice-based assessments
  • Critical reflective commentaries
  • Portfolio of evidence
  • Viva Voce
  • OSCA
  • Poster presentations
  • Service delivery and organisational assessment and redesign
  • Assessed essays
  • Client management plans
  • Written reports
  • Unseen examinations

CAREER PROSPECTS

This course is normally commissioned by the North West Workforce Modernisation Hub to meet the needs of modernising the NHS and workforce development. On completion, you will be eligible for a non-medical advanced practitioner role in your own specialist field such as midwifery, accident and emergency, radiography, mental health and intensive care outreach.

Graduates of this course have undertaken a wide variety of advanced practice roles within their own field of practice. Many have made a significant contribution to improving services for their patient group and have demonstrated evidence of the impact of their role.

Whilst many advanced practitioners remain in post, some have chosen to become non-medical consultants.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

The emphasis on work-based learning rather than classroom teaching distinguishes this course from more traditional taught courses. The collaboration between the workplace and academic facilitators is innovative and embraces the ethos of overall course philosophy and design and is in accordance with the University strategic objective of strengthening partnerships with partner organisations.

A learning facilitator will be employed with a particular remit to work with practice-based assessors and mentors in order to assure the quality of clinical and work based learning/assessments.

FURTHER STUDY

As a graduate of this master's degree, you will be eligible to undertake a PhD or Professional Doctorate.



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Diversity within very local communities is growing as our world becomes more interconnected and our markets more globalised. Within this increased complexity the need to understand diversity, its impact and consequences is ever more crucial. Read more
Diversity within very local communities is growing as our world becomes more interconnected and our markets more globalised. Within this increased complexity the need to understand diversity, its impact and consequences is ever more crucial. The way we deal with differences between people is a key variable in almost every sphere of modern life and of particular relevance for public and private management. Managing diversity and capturing its benefits is a key challenge for contemporary societies. It is as important for secure and stable cities as for successful and profitable companies, and especially critical for public services managers with heavily constrained expenditures.

The MPA Global Diversity Governance builds upon the global understanding and practical expertise that Coventry University, through the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations (CTPSR), has developed in the fields of intercultural relations, social cohesion and diversity around the world. It is a programme that rises to the challenges of managing diversity and is designed to support professionals from around the world who are responsible for service design and delivery that must take full account of an unprecedented level of diversity in their communities, workplaces and families.

The MPA brings together experienced, mid- and senior-career professionals from different countries and regions, as a collaborating and diverse group with global and local perspectives, to learn from leading experts and active researchers from across the social and political sciences. The programme is open to professionals with the requisite qualifications looking to more effectively understand and confront the challenges of diverse societies and manage lasting, positive social change in their own local areas.

The global political and economic environment is changing and a new and very different geo-political reality is emerging. The MPA has been designed to explore in detail the nature and implications of these changes, providing professionals with the skills and mind-sets that will allow them to manage cultural diversity and lead the organisations of the future, whether in education, health, security or other areas of service delivery.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

This course is a unique, pioneering programme of study that prepares practitioners and leaders from across the world to more effectively confront one of the prime responsibilities of our time: the successful governance of diversity.

The MPA represents the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations’ ambition to equip those who work with, for and in diversity communities with the latest and most innovative tools, evidence and thinking. Joining the MPA means becoming a part of a network of professionals who have the enthusiasm, theoretical and conceptual knowledge and practical skills required to create positive social change in their own contexts.

The course is designed and delivered by leading, active scholars in the field who have assembled the most powerful contemporary thinking from across the social sciences to inform your study. If you are interested in global diversity, cultural difference and their governance, Coventry University is the place to learn more.

We will provide you with:
-An opportunity to achieve an MPA via distance learning in the period of 15 months
-Access to all the same resources that would be available to you on campus, including library resources and access to relevant speakers
-The possibility to enhance your CV
-Recognition of your professional experience and prior learning, which enables you to obtain a postgraduate qualification based on your experience, rather than necessarily previous academic experience
-Access to a professional network of individuals working in various roles related diversity governance all over the world, with an opportunity to benefit from their perspectives and experiences, which allows for robust and informative learning beyond formal study

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

Working effectively with diversity and cultural difference is a core requirement of almost every career path in public, private and voluntary sectors around the world – as important for charity managers in Africa and Asia as it is to senior police teams in Europe. Our MPA is designed to enhance the skills and understanding of professionals working in, with and for diverse communities; our aim is for students to leave the Programme with not only an enhanced CV and career prospects but with the networks, confidence and competence to create positive change in the communities they serve.

The MPA offers professionals an unparalleled opportunity to build their understanding of the challenges and opportunities presented by global diversity. We aim for each course member to graduate with stronger analytical abilities in assessing the challenges posed by cultural difference as well as a set of tools for responding to these challenges – essential prerequisites for any senior career in public administration.

The MPA provides professionals with:
-A greater ability to assess the local relevance of national policies and global trends in diversity governance
-Improved comparative analytical skills in understanding diversity governance contexts around the world
-Enhanced capabilities in designing and delivering services which meet the needs of diverse societies
-Advanced skills in dialogue facilitation and communication with people from different cultures

Whilst also gaining a formal, accredited postgraduate qualification, the MPA offers the opportunity to broaden your professional networks and study alongside people in similar roles around the world. The course ultimately seeks to create a learning community, where ideas can be interchanged and debated amongst academic staff, alumni, and current students, lasting well beyond the timespan of the academic programme itself.

The MPA is ideally suited for professionals looking to progress their careers in senior management where an ability to work effectively with the complexity of diverse communities is of paramount importance. The MPA equips you with the skills and knowledge necessary to take up roles within a broad spectrum of organisations including international non-governmental organisations, national and local government agencies, supranational government organisations like the United Nations, regional communities such as the European Union or the Economic Community of West African States, local and national charities and, indeed, also academia – a number of our Centre’s alumni have gone on to join our team as PhD candidates.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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This programme will provide you with a firm grounding in political analysis and a critical insight into the real politics behind the headlines. Read more

This programme will provide you with a firm grounding in political analysis and a critical insight into the real politics behind the headlines.

You will explore the variety, dynamism and relevance of political theory in the modern world, gaining an insight into political thought and practical application of political ideas.

You will consider the various ways in which theory is vital to understanding a range of urgent and pressing problems (such as terrorism, global poverty, social cohesion, immigration, censorship, war and the environment) in contemporary politics and address the practical implications of these ideas.

Throughout the course you will build a portfolio of in-depth study of many of the defining events and dynamics of modern society, across Europe, North America, Africa and Asia, providing an understanding of the world that will prove invaluable in further academic study or a range of postgraduate careers.

The Political Theory and Cultural Values Research Group is an active team of enthusiastic academics, pursuing cutting-edge research into a wide variety of strands of political thought.

The Political Theory Centre is part of the White Rose Association for Political Philosophy, linking you into the complementary political theory teams at York and Sheffield Universities.

Links with the Leeds Centre for Democratisation afford excellent opportunities for discussing the application of many of the ideas studied on the programme. Political theorists form part of a large department of political studies, including International Relations and Development, which additionally provide an auspicious context for the study of applied theory.

Course content

Through compulsory and optional modules, this programme will offer you:

  • the chance to engage in in-depth critical analysis of political thought
  • the opportunity to examine the nature of freedom, justice and equality
  • a firm grounding in political analysis
  • a critical insight into the defining events and dynamics of modern society
  • a rigorous grounding in the dominant paradigms of political science
  • the chance to personalise your programme.

You will also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

If you are a part-time student, you will study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Political Theory in Action 30 credits
  • Advanced Political Analysis 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • European Defence and Security Analysis 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits
  • American Foreign Policy 30 credits
  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • International Relations and the Environment 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Research Methods 30 credits
  • Political Theory in Action 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Politics (Political Theory) MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Politics (Political Theory) MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is tailored for interactive small-group work, and uses a combination of lecture and seminar-discussion modes.

Teaching on political theory modules is predominantly seminar discussion-based, while other modules include more lecture-oriented material.

You will be expected to do a significant amount of preparatory reading before each session, and emphasis will be on student-led discussion to build critical and reflective confidence in a group environment.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by varying combinations of exam and coursework, depending on the module.

Career opportunities

The emphasis on applied use of political thought, particularly from a transformative perspective, means the critical analytical skills learnt here are of use in a wide range of employment sectors, including the civil service, public sector organisations and the third sector.

Many graduates go on to complete PhDs in Political Theory, having had the opportunity to strengthen their command of a certain area of political thought during their Masters studies.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Read more
The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Planning has a key role to play in improving the condition of life in our towns, cities and rural areas. Towns and cities themselves impact on global sustainability and can play a very influential role in tackling global environmental, social and economic problems. Equally, implementing sustainability principles within urban and rural areas is essential for the well-being of the local residents and improvement of the local environment. Creating more sustainable towns and cities will be central to the future of society and the planet. The planning system is so important because it provides one of the most sophisticated mechanisms for regulating environmental change. Recent policy changes have made planning in neighbourhoods and in communities even more important.

About the course

Increasingly planners are being required to facilitate the creation of more sustainable urban environments. This requires expertise and skills in a diverse range of disciplines and nationally there is a shortage of relevant skills. This course offers both personal opportunities for students to gain valuable skills that make them highly employable, and allows them to contribute to a much needed and fast changing professional area.

Why choose this course?

This exciting new course is specifically aimed at people wishing to gain expertise in contemporary sustainability issues. It provides graduates with excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design, community development, regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and other planning related careers. The course is suitable for:
-Students who have work experience in planning or related discipline and require a postgraduate qualification and subsequent professional accreditation to develop their career further
-New graduates starting their career in planning with a first degree in geography, environmental science, conservation, sociology, architecture and urban studies
-Students from other disciplines who have developed an interest in planning from voluntary work, work experience or project work.

Key Features

-A combination of stimulating academic study and strong career orientation
-Focus on the role of planning in addressing key sustainability concerns: climate change; urban sprawl; social cohesion; and demands for personal mobility
-Using the latest techniques including GIS; urban design tools and community design engagement techniques such as charettes
-Practical problem based approach to learning that uses real planning issues and case studies
-Flexibility of study based on a programme of short courses scheduled over two or three days at weekends
-UK field trips including visits to the start of town planning nearby at Letchworth and the first New Towns
-International study visit to look at European best practice in France and Germany

This course is available both full and part-time. Full time study in Semester A takes 1 year. Full time study beginning in Semester B will take 15 months. Part time study options typically take two years but students are given a maximum of five years to complete.

Careers

When you graduate from this course you will have excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design and urbanism, community development and regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and adaptation and other planning related careers - all with a special focus on maximizing your sustainability expertise. Prospective employers include: local government; private sector planning consultancies; specialist consultancies in environmental management, urban design, transport planning; public involvement bodies; national government agencies; third sector employers including charities with an urban and rural focus; and professional bodies.

Teaching methods

The MSc Sustainable Planning course structure is based on a series of two to three day short courses and tutorials that usually run Friday and Saturday, though some modules may require a Thursday as well.

For full time students the modules run approximately twice a month which means that you will be attending classes on four weekdays and two Saturdays.

Part-time students attend the MSc Sustainable Planning short courses over two years. This makes the course easy to attend and fit around a busy workload schedule.

Structure

Core Modules
-Development Viability
-Place-making and Spatial Mediation
-Planning law, policy & practice
-Research Methods
-Spatial Planning: Theories and Strategies
-Sustainable Communities & Environment
-Sustainable Energy
-Sustainable Planning Dissertation
-Urban Design and Conservation

Optional
-Community Engagement and the Planning Process
-Planning for Rural Communities
-Research Methods
-Spatial Analysis for Planning
-Urban Regeneration
-Water Resources

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The Master in Sociology is an English-taught program that focuses on the analysis of problems of social cohesion (e.g., crime, social contacts, solidarity). Read more
The Master in Sociology is an English-taught program that focuses on the analysis of problems of social cohesion (e.g., crime, social contacts, solidarity). It does so comparing individuals and countries. The Master program has a theoretical- empirical research focus. That is, social problems and issues are translated into sociological research questions and analyzed with the aid of theories and advanced research methods. Students will also learn how policy solutions can be derived from results of sociological analyses, and to evaluate policy.

Career Perspective Sociology

Sociology is a broad program that can lead to employment in a wide range of fields, giving excellent employment prospects for graduates, both within the Netherlands and beyond. People with a Master's degree in Sociology work for either local or national governmental institutions, private companies, and for research agencies. The work may be in the field of labor and employment, culture, welfare, recreation, entertainment or health care. Sociologists may be employed as researchers, policy officers, advisors or management team members. Jobs in communication, media, research and education are also suitable for sociologists. Some graduates work as organizational or human resources policy advisors in the public or private sector.

The broad and in-depth knowledge acquired during your Sociology studies here at Tilburg will enable you to make a substantial contribution to the analysis of and solutions to today's social problems.

The range of careers open to our sociology graduates include:
•general policy officer, secretary or board member for national, provincial, municipal or private institutes working on issues related to employment, welfare, culture, education, recreation or health care
•adviser on organizational or personnel policy for the government, the education sector or the business sector
•jobs in journalism and the media within the field of verbal and written communication, and jobs in the information sector
•researcher for the government, the education sector or the business sector
•teacher in secondary or tertiary education.

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Tourism and heritage have come to be understood internationally as important economic sectors in their own right. There are also vital resources for nations, regions and cities seeking to stimulate tourism, attract inward investment and promote social cohesion. Read more

NEW FOR 2014

Tourism and heritage have come to be understood internationally as important economic sectors in their own right. There are also vital resources for nations, regions and cities seeking to stimulate tourism, attract inward investment and promote social cohesion.

Our MSc International Marketing Management with Tourism will appeal to students seeking to develop a career in global tourism, heritage, leisure and event marketing management areas.

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This course enables you to understand a field that is buzzing with creativity. where art meets commerce, and where culture generates innovation and social cohesion. Read more

This course enables you to understand a field that is buzzing with creativity: where art meets commerce, and where culture generates innovation and social cohesion.

What do your clothes say about your identity? Can an artist still break out without competing on a talent show? Should a city’s history and heritage be ‘repackaged’ to attract visitors? The creative industries are a fast-changing sector where the focus always seems to be on the tension between creativity and commerce. You may wonder how it could be otherwise, in a world where creativity has become a commodity. At Radboud University we address such questions.

In the Master’s specialisation in Creative Industries, we focus on the artistic product. We look at, for example, the wonderful world where high fashion interacts with technological gadgets. Where tourists can discover a town’s cultural highlights with an app for a guide. Where television series are gaining ground on cinema. You will study our (post-)industrial society as a cultural phenomenon.

If you want to contribute to the development of a young, dynamic and steadily expanding creative sector, then this Master’s specialisation is for you.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/creativeindustries

Why study Creative Industries at Radboud University?

- We approach the creative industries with a strong focus on culture as we put the creative object, product or process itself at the centre of the study. This emphasis makes our approach unique in the Netherlands.

- We look at diverse areas of the creative industry: including fashion, music, film and television, (social) media, tourism and education.

- We take a practical approach to this field by not only studying the big players, like global conglomerates but also studying small and medium enterprises.

- Our programme is hands-on, with assignments on a weekly basis challenging you to develop the ‘soft skills’ necessary to be successful in the labour market.

- We have close contacts with art and cultural organisations in and around Nijmegen. You can use these contacts to get a real taste of the industries you’re going to be working in.

Our approach to this field

The creative industries is a dynamic and complex field that changes rapidly due to globalisation and the continuous development of new and exciting technologies. At Radboud University we look at many areas of the creative industry, such as:

- Fashion: Fashion is a commercial, creative and cultural industry producing material objects like textile and garments, but also more conceptual products like trends, and beauty ideals. The glamour of fashion may lure us, but it is one of the most polluting industries. Currently, the field is characterized by incredible speed, rapid turnover, and high waste. In the future, can the fashion industry retain its glamour while becoming more sustainable?

- Media: The contemporary mediascape is dominated by global conglomerates with companies in various industries, such as film studios, sports and news channels, and game developers, to name a few. As a result, the industry has transformed into a cultural economy where only six ‘media giants', including Disney and Time Warner, control 90% of everything we read, watch and listen to. We will look at how the industry shapes both the form and the content of contemporary media productions.

- Tourism: The rise of mass tourism in the second part of the nineteenth century has been called the most important migratory movement in the history of mankind. We will study how art and culture are used to stimulate the tourist industry, and discuss the role of artists in the phenomenon. We examine renowned artists, as well as behind-the-scenes designers of sites, and tourists themselves.

- Education: Creativity and the so-called ‘21st Century Skills' in education are critical for contemporary post-industrial societies. Individuals are also becoming more driven to expand their cultural intellect; a factor that is sometimes used to promote educational goods and services. For examples, museums are becoming more interactive to help visitors understand the content better.

Career prospects

If you want to make a career in the intersection of art and commerce, then the Master’s specialisation in Creative Industries is the right choice for you.

- Skills

This Master’s will help you develop the reflective, inquisitive and critical attitude you need to succeed in this field, while closely looking at research methods and engaging in discussions currently surrounding these topics. You will familiarise yourself with policy papers, business plans, and gain advanced knowledge of the industries based on the creative product. You will also be able to assess future trends, especially where the industry is concerned. In short, you will have the skills you need to contribute to the development of the young and dynamic creative sector.

Job positions

The jobs you might find yourself doing have graduating from this programme are extremely varied. The terrain of creative industries is as diverse as it is large and it is constantly expanding. We therefore expect that there will be and more and more demand for people with expertise in the creative industries.

To give you an idea of possible jobs, here is a sample of jobs our graduates hold:

- Trend watcher for companies

- Consultant in art education for an educational organisation

- Consultant in ‘quality television’ for a national commercial television station

- Cultural policy-maker for the government

- Festival organiser

- Webmaster at a museum

- Programme organiser at a film festival

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/creativeindustries

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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This flexible programme will give you a sophisticated understanding of theories and methods at the forefront of Theology and Religious Studies. Read more

This flexible programme will give you a sophisticated understanding of theories and methods at the forefront of Theology and Religious Studies. You’ll study diverse religious traditions in the UK and beyond, as well as their impact on the world around us.

Core modules explore the relationship between religion, theology and the public sphere in areas such as human rights, wealth and wealth creation, terrorism and social justice. You’ll also gain an understanding of research methods in the humanities and social sciences.

Then you’ll select from optional modules focusing on topics that suit your interests such as philosophy of religion, the links between religion and global development or gender, multiculturalism and more.

With the support of leading researchers, including those working in our Centre for Philosophy of Religion and Centre for Religion and Public Life, you’ll develop a wide range of skills while exploring a subject that is vital for understanding the world we live in.

You’ll find plenty of resources at Leeds to inspire and inform your studies. The Special Collections housed in our world-class Brotherton Library include extensive collections of archive and early printed material, including hundreds of theological works from the 17th century onwards.

We also hold the library of Ripon Cathedral and the archives of the Dean and Chapter, spanning from the late Middle Ages to the 20th century, as well as extensive archives relating to Quaker history. There are even a large number of early printed books and manuscripts connected with Jewish theology and history. All the major world religions are also fully represented in our excellent library resources.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months. You can also study for a postgraduate certificate (PGCert) or diploma (PGDip) qualification, where you take fewer modules overall.

Course content

Your first semester will equip you with the knowledge and skills to study theology and religion. You’ll take core modules introducing you to research methods in the subject, using approaches from across the humanities and social sciences, as well as exploring the relationship between theology and public life. You’ll learn about political, urban, systematic and practical theologies among many others, focusing on issues such as racism, criminal justice and social cohesion.

This foundation will enable you to gain specialist knowledge in the areas that suit your interests. You’ll choose two optional modules from the range we offer, allowing you to focus on topics such as Muslims and multiculturalism, or philosophical approaches to spirituality.

During the programme you’ll acquire skills in research and interpretation and good social and cultural awareness. You’ll demonstrate this with your dissertation – an independent study on a research topic of your choice – which you’ll submit by the end of the programme in August. You can even go into greater depth if you swap one optional module for an extended dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

If you study for the PGCert or PGDip qualification, you’ll take fewer modules. You’ll also specialise in either theology or religious studies, depending on the modules you choose.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

There are three compulsory modules throughout the year including the Dissertation (60 credits). You’ll then choose two optional modules, or just one if you select the Extended Dissertation (90 credits).

  • Religion and Society: Research Process and Methods 30 credits
  • Theology and Public Life 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Philosophy and Spiritual Practice 30 credits
  • Sin, Public Discourse and Public Life 30 credits
  • Religions and Global Development 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • Muslims, Multiculturalism and the State 30 credits
  • Religion, Politics and the Future: From Apocalypse to Utopia 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits
  • Philosophy and the Spiritual Life: Contemporary Perspectives 30 credits
  • Special Options in Theology and Religious Studies 30 credits
  • Theology & Religious Studies: Extended Dissertation 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Theology and Religious Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Theology and Religious Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials where you can discuss the issues arising from your reading in greater depth. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

To help you gain and demonstrate a range of skills, you’ll be assessed using a range of different methods. These include essays and assignments as well as literature reviews, project reports and presentations.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you a range of in-depth subject knowledge, as well as valuable transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation, communication and cultural awareness. All of these qualities are valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates pursue careers in a variety of sectors including the charity sector, NGOs, education, local government, civil service and policy work, business and legal services, the media and social work. Many also continue their studies at PhD level, and even pursue academic careers after this.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) TESOL, which is a combination of both taught and research elements, provides an alternative route to the PhD for mid-career and senior professionals in English Language education and related disciplines. Read more

The Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) TESOL, which is a combination of both taught and research elements, provides an alternative route to the PhD for mid-career and senior professionals in English Language education and related disciplines.

We offer a wide range of taught modules in the areas of research methods (four compulsory), TESOL (two compulsory), issues in education and professional development.

On successful completion of the programme you will have made an original and independent contribution to educational knowledge in a TESOL-related area. You will, through your dissertation, demonstrate a critical evaluation of the relevant literature, a high level of competence in appropriate research methods, and the ability to communicate your results and their implications.

Aims

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the research findings of published, empirical studies.
  • Make use of appropriate research methods to conduct educational research
  • Design small-scale, class-based research projects to investigate the local context

Programme Structure and Modules

The EdD TESOL comprises nine taught doctoral modules (of which four must be research modules and two must be TESOL modules) and a research dissertation in the area of TESOL. The research dissertation has the same level of challenge and high standards as a PhD but is approximately half the scale (40,000 words). Each module is assessed by one 5000 word assignment. The dissertation is assessed by an oral examination (a viva-voce).

There are three stages to each EdD taught module which covers a four month period. The first stage is pre-reading. The second stage is attendance for the intensive teaching, normally over a consecutive period of two and a half days. The third stage involves the completion and submission of an assignment, normally within three months of the last date of the taught module.

Students must complete the following research modules:

  • Introduction to Doctoral Study in Education
  • Quantitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory
  • Qualitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory

Plus one other research module from:

  • Experimental Methods in Educational Research
  • Narrative and Arts-Based Research Approaches
  • Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Educational Research
  • Researching Children and Young People in Educational Settings
  • Survey Methods in Educational Research
  • The Professional as Researcher

Plus two TESOL modules:

  • TESOL: Discourse and Pedagogy
  • TESOL: Issues in Language Learning

Optional modules:

  • Assessment and Testing: Concepts and Issues
  • Children’s Rights - Research and Practice
  • Critical Perspectives on Early Childhood
  • Education in Divided Societies: Contribution to Social Cohesion
  • Educational Special Needs: Policy and Partnerships for Inclusion

* These modules are an example of what is available in any one year and are subject to change.

Graduate Quote

“I was able to choose my elective modules according to my schedule and my particular field of interest. One advantage was that the EdD TESOL (the taught elements) is conducted intensively and can be completed in less than one and a half years.”

Chiu-Kuei Chang Chien, EdD TESOL graduate



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