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Masters Degrees (Social Cohesion)

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies.

Are people living in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods more inclined to turn inwards and to ‘hunker down’ compared to people of ethnically homogeneous settings? Are there cross-country differences in the causes of hooliganism, and in the effectiveness of methods used to combat hooligans in different European countries?

More and more comparative questions on societies are being raised. At Radboud University we believe that answers to comparative questions are more informative, lead to a better understanding of societal phenomena and processes, and therefore have more scientific and social importance than answers to questions about one society in one historical period.

This programme therefore fully focuses on teaching students how to perform high-quality comparative research. We look into the degree of inequality, cohesion and modernisation in both Western and non-Western societies. You’ll learn how to translate social problems into empirical research questions and understand the diverse theoretical approaches, research designs, data collections and analyses you need to get the answers you are looking for.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Why study Social and Cultural Science at Radboud University?

- A majority of our courses are exclusively created and offered for the research students enrolled in this programme, and therefore perfectly match the needs and desires of social and cultural researchers.
- This programme is linked to the Nijmegen Institute for Social and Cultural Research (NISCO) who offer an excellent research environment and have extensive social science databases that students are free to use.
- You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.
- You’ll be given your own workplace (equipped with a computer) in a room with your fellow students to enhance solidarity. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision.
- You’ll write two scientific journal papers which will not only give you plenty of practise but will also give you a good academic research portfolio that you can use when applying for research positions.
- A large majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions; almost all of our graduates found work shortly after graduating.

Multidisciplinary

The programme combines the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, development studies and communication science. This programme is therefore ideal for Bachelor’s students from these disciplines with an interest in research. However, we believe that students from disciplines such as political science, economics and human geography can also profit from this Master’s.

The Research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science trains aspiring researchers and is ideal preparation for PhD positions or research positions in relevant non-academic research institutes. Or you could build a bridge between academic research and the world of practice, thereby influencing policy-making in the public and private sphere.

Quality label

This programme was recently awarded the quality label ‘Top Programme' in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Social and Cultural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni found a job or research position immediately after graduating.

Job positions

There are plenty of options open to graduates of the research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science:
- Scientific research career (academia)
The programme provides an excellent basis for a scientific research career and attaining PhD positions.

- Societal research career
Our graduates can also go on to have careers in relevant non-academic research and policy institutes like government ministries, Statistics Netherlands (CBS), The Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP) and The Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and foreign equivalents.

- More
Of course, this Master’s programme does not close other doors. Students with a research Master’s are also highly sought after by (commercial) businesses and organisations because of their analytical and communication skills and in-depth understanding of social and cultural behaviour. Other careers, such as policymaker, manager, journalist, etc are certainly within reach.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Our research in this field

Half of the Master’s programme in Social and Cultural Science consists of practical research training.

In the first year, you’ll do a research project in which you conduct a small-scale empirical research under guided supervision of a senior researcher. The comparative research issue is typically part of the ongoing research within a Radboud chair group. Finally, you’ll write a scientific journal paper regarding the research results. The project is done in small groups (2-3 students) and prepares you well to independently conduct a comparative empirical social science study for your Master’s thesis in the second.

- Master’s thesis topics in the field of Social and Cultural Science
For your Master’s thesis you are completely free to tackle any social issue in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, communication science or development studies. Important is the ability to reflect on the societal significance of your research question and the societal importance of your research. Thesis topics vary widely:
- Many theses are concerned with cross-country comparisons of behaviour or attitude measures using European cross-sectional survey data on, for example, xenophobia or gender roles.
- Others theses compare classrooms and the effect ethnic composition has on interethnic bullying or the impact of the economic crisis on African migrants in Athens, Greece, or the utilisation of different sexual health services by Aboriginal adolescents.
- Thesis topics can also be found in the field of communication science, like examining the news on extreme right political parties in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and correlating it with election results, or studying patterns in TV drama (e.g. increasing Americanisation) and comparing these media trends with societal processes such as individualisation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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This course is aimed at health and social care practitioners who wish to develop the competencies of advanced practice and to facilitate change in patient and service outcomes. Read more
This course is aimed at health and social care practitioners who wish to develop the competencies of advanced practice and to facilitate change in patient and service outcomes. It uses a work-based learning approach to develop the higher level skills that will lead to advanced practitioner status and enhance your career prospects.

Key benefits:

• Strong clinical focus
• Facilitated work-based learning driven by client need and service redesign
• Protected learning time and support from practice-based mentors and assessors

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/advanced-practice-health-and-social-care

Suitable for

Professional health and social care practitioners who are supported by their employing organisation in an advanced practitioner training role. This programme is aligned with the NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (Department of Health 2003). Required competencies are broadly determined by the NHS North West agreement and RCN guidance on Advanced Practice.

Programme details

This inter-professional course places work at the centre of learning. You'll have access to expertise and skills from a wide range of professionals including nonmedical consultants, advanced practitioners, medical practitioners and guest lecturers at the cutting-edge of health and social care. You can also draw on the expertise of professorial and research staff across the University.

Format

The facilitation strategies within the course will prepare you for the development of generic and specific practice at advanced level. In essence this course embraces the concept of learning at work to develop new ways of working and will develop the 'advanced practitioner' as outlined by the NHS North West Concordat for Advanced Practice (2009).

You will engage in critical self-assessment of knowledge and skills against appropriate competency frameworks in order to identify, in negotiation with their employer and academic supervisor, an individual learning pathway within the course.

The facilitation strategies for the course are dependent on sound group dynamics, trust and cohesion. The course will commence with an orientation programme, which will explore your expectations, roles and responsibilities, work based mentors and assessors and learning facilitators, along with confidentiality and other issues.

Facilitation will be complemented by academic and professional supervision

Module titles

This programme comprises a number of core and optional modules depending on the pathway you choose:

• Pathophysiology (30 credits)
• Clinical Examination (30 credits)
• Independent Learning (30 credits)
• Non-medical Prescribing (30 credits)
• Project Management and Methods of Inquiry (30 credits)
• Practitioner Competence (30 credits)
• Clinical Reasoning (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment strategies have been developed to reflect the ethos and learning aims and objectives of individual modules and may include:

• Self assessment
• Peer assessment
• Practice-based assessments
• Critical reflective commentaries
• Portfolio of evidence
• Viva Voce
• OSCA
• Poster presentations
• Service delivery and organisational assessment and redesign
• Assessed essays
• Client management plans
• Written reports
• Unseen examinations

Career Prospects

This course is normally commissioned by the North West Workforce Modernisation Hub to meet the needs of modernising the NHS and workforce development. On completion, you will be eligible for a non-medical advanced practitioner role in your own specialist field such as midwifery, accident and emergency, radiography, mental health and intensive care outreach.

Graduates of this course have undertaken a wide variety of advanced practice roles within their own field of practice. Many have made a significant contribution to improving services for their patient group and have demonstrated evidence of the impact of their role.

Whilst many advanced practitioners remain in post, some have chosen to become non-medical consultants.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity. Read more
This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity.

The course will give you the opportunity to study and research the main ways in which social scientists analyse the role of the mass media in the social construction, representation and understanding of difference and social diversity and get a critical understanding of the social and media structures and journalistic practices that impact upon these processes. It will also equip you with practical skills that will enable you to produce your own media product on a topic related to social and cultural diversity.

The course combines a portfolio of theory modules aimed to develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the processes of managing and making sense of cultural diversity, key issues in intercultural communication and of various aspects of the sociology of news with a number of practice-oriented modules intended to give you first hand experience in the practice of inclusive journalism.

Drawing upon this unique combination of rigorous theoretical engagement and specialist practical training, this course is designed to equip you with a comprehensive conceptual/theoretical grounding and the practical skills to engage in responsible media coverage of diversity, to practice culturally informed and inclusive journalism and to develop a career (whether practical, strategic, or research-based) involving understanding and responding to the challenges of social diversity.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced academics and journalism professionals with expertise in inclusive journalism.

Course content

Two study routes to suit your future plans: You can choose one of two routes for the award: the Dissertation Route or a Practice Route culminating in a final project.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. For more details on course structure and modules, and how you will be taught and assessed, see the full course document.

Semester one
Core module
-APPROACHES TO SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY

Option modules
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: GENDER, SEXUALITY, AGE, DISABILITY
-INTRODUCTION TO INCLUSIVE JOURNALISM
-MEDIA PRODUCTION SKILLS
-ISSUES IN JOURNALISM: FREEDOM OF SPEECH, ETHICS AND DEMOCRACY

Semester two
Core modules
-DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: MODELS, INSTITUTIONS, PRACTICES

Option modules
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: MIGRATION, RACE, ETHNICITY
-REPORTING DIVERSITY: FAITH AND RELIGION
-PLANNING CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATIONS
-MEDIA, ACTIVISM AND POLITICS
-SOCIOLOGY OF NEWS
-MEDIA AUDIENCES

Associated careers

This course is designed to attract a mix of new graduates, often with a media-related degree or work experience, and people who have already worked in journalism, but want to enhance their understanding of social diversity and their skills in the area of inclusive journalism. It is suitable for existing media professionals that want to reflect on their practice as journalists, as well as students who want to pursue a career in the media, national and local government, IGOs and NGOs or who intend to embark on a relevant research/academic career. It will be a valuable asset for civil servants and local authority staff, NGO workers working on immigration, equality, social inclusion and cohesion and community regeneration whose duties involve communication and media work.

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This programme will provide you with a firm grounding in political analysis and a critical insight into the real politics behind the headlines. Read more
This programme will provide you with a firm grounding in political analysis and a critical insight into the real politics behind the headlines.

You’ll explore the variety, dynamism and relevance of political theory in the modern world, gaining an insight into political thought and practical application of political ideas.

You’ll consider the various ways in which theory is vital to understanding a range of urgent and pressing problems (such as terrorism, global poverty, social cohesion, immigration, censorship, war and the environment) in contemporary politics and address the practical implications of these ideas.

Throughout the course you’ll build a portfolio of in-depth study of many of the defining events and dynamics of modern society, across Europe, North America, Africa and Asia, providing an understanding of the world that will prove invaluable in further academic study or a range of postgraduate careers.

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The EdD is a partly taught and partly research-based Professional Doctorate in Education which has proved to be both successful and convenient for senior professionals in education and related fields. Read more
The EdD is a partly taught and partly research-based Professional Doctorate in Education which has proved to be both successful and convenient for senior professionals in education and related fields. We offer a wide range of taught modules in the areas of research methods, education policy, education management and professional development. Dissertations are supported within the specialist research centres at the School of Education including effective education, shared education, children’s rights, and autism.

Aims - On successful completion of the programme students will have made an original and independent contribution to educational knowledge in the field determined by the topic of their research dissertation study. They will, through this dissertation, demonstrate a critical evaluation of the relevant literature, a high level of competence in appropriate research methods, and the ability to communicate their results and their implications.

The EdD programme may be taken on a part-time or full-time basis. The normal period of study will be not less that three years full-time or not less than four years part-time. The aim is to allow flexibility for busy professionals, enabling you to complete the degree with minimal disruption to your professional and personal life.

The EdD comprises nine taught doctoral modules (of which four must be research modules) and a research dissertation. The research dissertation has the same level of challenge and high standards as a PhD but is approximately half the scale (40,000 words). Each module is assessed by one 5000 word assignment. The University operates a Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Scheme which recognises relevant prior assessed and certified learning for credit purposes. This is also known as credit transfer where the credits were awarded by another Higher Education (HE) provider. Applicants who have completed a masters degree within the last 10 years that involved a substantive element of educational research methods training, including a research-based dissertation or project, may be eligible to transfer credit. Applicants for RPL should submit the RPL Application Form to the Postgraduate Administrator, 20 College Green, Belfast, BT7 1LN. Applications for RPL should be made at the same time as your online course application. The dissertation is assessed by an oral examination (a viva-voce).

There are three stages to each EdD taught module which covers a four month period. The first stage is pre-reading. The second stage is attendance for the intensive teaching, normally over a consecutive period of two and a half days. The third stage involves the completion and submission of an assignment, normally within three months of the last date of the taught module.

Research Modules

Educational Research: An Overview (compulsory)
Quantitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory (compulsory)
Qualitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory (compulsory)
The Professional as Researcher
Experimental Methods in Educational Research
Survey Methods in Education
Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Educational Research
Researching Children and Young People in Educational Settings
Narrative and Arts-based Research Approaches

Optional Modules

Education in Divided Societies: contribution to social cohesion
Assessment and Testing: Concepts and Issues
Educational Special Needs: Policy and Partnerships for Inclusion
Education and the Law
Children's Rights - Research and Practice
TESOL: Issues in Language Learning
TESOL: Discourse and Pedagogy

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The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Read more
The breadth of material covered in our MSc in Sustainable Planning gives students the skills they need in order to meet contemporary sustainability challenges in planning. Planning has a key role to play in improving the condition of life in our towns, cities and rural areas. Towns and cities themselves impact on global sustainability and can play a very influential role in tackling global environmental, social and economic problems. Equally, implementing sustainability principles within urban and rural areas is essential for the well-being of the local residents and improvement of the local environment. Creating more sustainable towns and cities will be central to the future of society and the planet. The planning system is so important because it provides one of the most sophisticated mechanisms for regulating environmental change. Recent policy changes have made planning in neighbourhoods and in communities even more important.

About the course

Increasingly planners are being required to facilitate the creation of more sustainable urban environments. This requires expertise and skills in a diverse range of disciplines and nationally there is a shortage of relevant skills. This course offers both personal opportunities for students to gain valuable skills that make them highly employable, and allows them to contribute to a much needed and fast changing professional area.

Why choose this course?

This exciting new course is specifically aimed at people wishing to gain expertise in contemporary sustainability issues. It provides graduates with excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design, community development, regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and other planning related careers. The course is suitable for:
-Students who have work experience in planning or related discipline and require a postgraduate qualification and subsequent professional accreditation to develop their career further
-New graduates starting their career in planning with a first degree in geography, environmental science, conservation, sociology, architecture and urban studies
-Students from other disciplines who have developed an interest in planning from voluntary work, work experience or project work.

Key Features

-A combination of stimulating academic study and strong career orientation
-Focus on the role of planning in addressing key sustainability concerns: climate change; urban sprawl; social cohesion; and demands for personal mobility
-Using the latest techniques including GIS; urban design tools and community design engagement techniques such as charettes
-Practical problem based approach to learning that uses real planning issues and case studies
-Flexibility of study based on a programme of short courses scheduled over two or three days at weekends
-UK field trips including visits to the start of town planning nearby at Letchworth and the first New Towns
-International study visit to look at European best practice in France and Germany

This course is available both full and part-time. Full time study in Semester A takes 1 year. Full time study beginning in Semester B will take 15 months. Part time study options typically take two years but students are given a maximum of five years to complete.

Careers

When you graduate from this course you will have excellent career opportunities in planning, environmental management, urban design and urbanism, community development and regeneration, transport management, climate change mitigation and adaptation and other planning related careers - all with a special focus on maximizing your sustainability expertise. Prospective employers include: local government; private sector planning consultancies; specialist consultancies in environmental management, urban design, transport planning; public involvement bodies; national government agencies; third sector employers including charities with an urban and rural focus; and professional bodies.

Teaching methods

The MSc Sustainable Planning course structure is based on a series of two to three day short courses and tutorials that usually run Friday and Saturday, though some modules may require a Thursday as well.

For full time students the modules run approximately twice a month which means that you will be attending classes on four weekdays and two Saturdays.

Part-time students attend the MSc Sustainable Planning short courses over two years. This makes the course easy to attend and fit around a busy workload schedule.

Structure

Core Modules
-Development Viability
-Place-making and Spatial Mediation
-Planning law, policy & practice
-Research Methods
-Spatial Planning: Theories and Strategies
-Sustainable Communities & Environment
-Sustainable Energy
-Sustainable Planning Dissertation
-Urban Design and Conservation

Optional
-Community Engagement and the Planning Process
-Planning for Rural Communities
-Research Methods
-Spatial Analysis for Planning
-Urban Regeneration
-Water Resources

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The Master in Sociology is an English-taught program that focuses on the analysis of problems of social cohesion (e.g., crime, social contacts, solidarity). Read more
The Master in Sociology is an English-taught program that focuses on the analysis of problems of social cohesion (e.g., crime, social contacts, solidarity). It does so comparing individuals and countries. The Master program has a theoretical- empirical research focus. That is, social problems and issues are translated into sociological research questions and analyzed with the aid of theories and advanced research methods. Students will also learn how policy solutions can be derived from results of sociological analyses, and to evaluate policy.

Career Perspective Sociology

Sociology is a broad program that can lead to employment in a wide range of fields, giving excellent employment prospects for graduates, both within the Netherlands and beyond. People with a Master's degree in Sociology work for either local or national governmental institutions, private companies, and for research agencies. The work may be in the field of labor and employment, culture, welfare, recreation, entertainment or health care. Sociologists may be employed as researchers, policy officers, advisors or management team members. Jobs in communication, media, research and education are also suitable for sociologists. Some graduates work as organizational or human resources policy advisors in the public or private sector.

The broad and in-depth knowledge acquired during your Sociology studies here at Tilburg will enable you to make a substantial contribution to the analysis of and solutions to today's social problems.

The range of careers open to our sociology graduates include:
•general policy officer, secretary or board member for national, provincial, municipal or private institutes working on issues related to employment, welfare, culture, education, recreation or health care
•adviser on organizational or personnel policy for the government, the education sector or the business sector
•jobs in journalism and the media within the field of verbal and written communication, and jobs in the information sector
•researcher for the government, the education sector or the business sector
•teacher in secondary or tertiary education.

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Tourism and heritage have come to be understood internationally as important economic sectors in their own right. There are also vital resources for nations, regions and cities seeking to stimulate tourism, attract inward investment and promote social cohesion. Read more

NEW FOR 2014

Tourism and heritage have come to be understood internationally as important economic sectors in their own right. There are also vital resources for nations, regions and cities seeking to stimulate tourism, attract inward investment and promote social cohesion.

Our MSc International Marketing Management with Tourism will appeal to students seeking to develop a career in global tourism, heritage, leisure and event marketing management areas.

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This couse enables you to understand a field that is buzzing with creativity. where art meets commerce, and where culture generates innovation and social cohesion. Read more
This couse enables you to understand a field that is buzzing with creativity: where art meets commerce, and where culture generates innovation and social cohesion.

What do your clothes say about your identity? Can an artist still break out without competing on a talent show? Should a city’s history and heritage be ‘repackaged’ to attract visitors? The creative industries are a fast-changing sector where the focus always seems to be on the tension between creativity and commerce. You may wonder how it could be otherwise, in a world where creativity has become a commodity. At Radboud University we address such questions.

In the Master’s specialisation in Creative Industries, we focus on the artistic product. We look at, for example, the wonderful world where high fashion interacts with technological gadgets. Where tourists can discover a town’s cultural highlights with an app for a guide. Where television series are gaining ground on cinema. You will study our (post-)industrial society as a cultural phenomenon.

If you want to contribute to the development of a young, dynamic and steadily expanding creative sector, then this Master’s specialisation is for you.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/creativeindustries

Why study Creative Industries at Radboud University?

- We approach the creative industries with a strong focus on culture as we put the creative object, product or process itself at the centre of the study. This emphasis makes our approach unique in the Netherlands.
- We look at diverse areas of the creative industry: including fashion, music, film and television, (social) media, tourism and education.
- We take a practical approach to this field by not only studying the big players, like global conglomerates but also studying small and medium enterprises.
- Our programme is hands-on, with assignments on a weekly basis challenging you to develop the ‘soft skills’ necessary to be successful in the labour market.
- We have close contacts with art and cultural organisations in and around Nijmegen. You can use these contacts to get a real taste of the industries you’re going to be working in.

Our approach to this field

The creative industries is a dynamic and complex field that changes rapidly due to globalisation and the continuous development of new and exciting technologies. At Radboud University we look at many areas of the creative industry, such as:

- Fashion: Fashion is a commercial, creative and cultural industry producing material objects like textile and garments, but also more conceptual products like trends, and beauty ideals. The glamour of fashion may lure us, but it is one of the most polluting industries. Currently, the field is characterized by incredible speed, rapid turnover, and high waste. In the future, can the fashion industry retain its glamour while becoming more sustainable?

- Media: The contemporary mediascape is dominated by global conglomerates with companies in various industries, such as film studios, sports and news channels, and game developers, to name a few. As a result, the industry has transformed into a cultural economy where only six ‘media giants', including Disney and Time Warner, control 90% of everything we read, watch and listen to. We will look at how the industry shapes both the form and the content of contemporary media productions.

- Tourism: The rise of mass tourism in the second part of the nineteenth century has been called the most important migratory movement in the history of mankind. We will study how art and culture are used to stimulate the tourist industry, and discuss the role of artists in the phenomenon. We examine renowned artists, as well as behind-the-scenes designers of sites, and tourists themselves.

- Education: Creativity and the so-called ‘21st Century Skills' in education are critical for contemporary post-industrial societies. Individuals are also becoming more driven to expand their cultural intellect; a factor that is sometimes used to promote educational goods and services. For examples, museums are becoming more interactive to help visitors understand the content better.

Career prospects

If you want to make a career in the intersection of art and commerce, then the Master’s specialisation in Creative Industries is the right choice for you.

- Skills
This Master’s will help you develop the reflective, inquisitive and critical attitude you need to succeed in this field, while closely looking at research methods and engaging in discussions currently surrounding these topics. You will familiarise yourself with policy papers, business plans, and gain advanced knowledge of the industries based on the creative product. You will also be able to assess future trends, especially where the industry is concerned. In short, you will have the skills you need to contribute to the development of the young and dynamic creative sector.

Job positions

The jobs you might find yourself doing have graduating from this programme are extremely varied. The terrain of creative industries is as diverse as it is large and it is constantly expanding. We therefore expect that there will be and more and more demand for people with expertise in the creative industries.

To give you an idea of possible jobs, here is a sample of jobs our graduates hold:
- Trend watcher for companies
- Consultant in art education for an educational organisation
- Consultant in ‘quality television’ for a national commercial television station
- Cultural policy-maker for the government
- Festival organiser
- Webmaster at a museum
- Programme organiser at a film festival

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/creativeindustries

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If you’re a practising professional in applied linguistics, this course will allow you to work on topics that reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the field, and that go beyond classroom-based language learning and teaching. Read more

Overview

If you’re a practising professional in applied linguistics, this course will allow you to work on topics that reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the field, and that go beyond classroom-based language learning and teaching.

You’ll be introduced to dynamic and challenging concepts and methods that reflect the role language plays as a communication tool in everyday life, and use these to reflect critically and constructively on your current experience and context.

The course is split into two distinct stages. In stage 1, you’ll create a research portfolio consisting of three 7,000-word papers. In stage 2, you’ll produce a 59,000-word thesis, based on original research linked to your professional practice.

For both stages, you’ll be assigned a subject specialist supervisor. Our supervisors are experienced in most areas of applied linguistics, including contemporary approaches, like corpus-driven studies on testing or material compilation, and issues relating to sociocultural adaptation and social cohesion in a migration context.

We’ll provide you with a collaborative environment with strong links to research networks in the University. We host and take part in many research oriented events for staff and postgraduate students, including regular Faculty and departmental research seminars and international conferences. Our staff contribute to the Research Unit for Intercultural and Transcultural Studies (RUITS), Anglia Research Centre in Media and Culture (ARCMedia) and Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), who organise many events that you’ll be welcome to attend. These events, along with our online environment, will help you connect with other research students from a range of disciplines.

All your subject-specific studies will be enhanced and supported by our University-wide training sessions, where you’ll gain important research expertise in areas like ethics, presentations, intellectual property and digital scholarship.

Research staff

Our permanent supervisory staff members are recognised experts in their field, and have produced a number of influential books, journal articles and edited collections. Our research expertise includes:

Dr Sebastian Rasinger, BA, PG Cert, PhD: sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multilingualism, linguistic and cultural identities.

Melanie Bell, MPhil (Cantab), MA (Cantab), DipTEFL: quantitative and corpus linguistics, discourse in the professions, design of language courses.

Dr Bettina Beinhoff, MPhil (Cantab), PhD (Cantab): sociolinguistics, acquisition of speech and discourse patterns in second/foreign languages, social psychology in language (esp. attitudes, stereotypes and identity construction).

Careers

This Professional Doctorate will give you the unique opportunity to research an issue or problem of particular significance to your practice, demonstrating your leadership and developing your expertise.

We’ll provide you with many opportunities for career development and training, in areas like writing up a paper for publication; placing an academic article; giving a conference paper; doctoral writing style; updates on research methods and literature searches; internet training; editing skills for doctoral research; subsequent monograph publication; and dealing with festivals, agents, and publishers.

In conjunction with the University’s research support, you can request specific support for writing-up, conference papers, general research methods and other research skills if you need it.

Specialist facilities

You’ll receive access to our fully-equipped language centre, the University of Cambridge Library, and our own on-campus library, as well as our Faculty’s PhD room, where all our doctoral students can meet up to work and take an active part in our postgraduate student community.

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This flexible programme will give you a sophisticated understanding of theories and methods at the forefront of Theology and Religious Studies. Read more
This flexible programme will give you a sophisticated understanding of theories and methods at the forefront of Theology and Religious Studies. You will study diverse religious traditions in the UK and beyond, as well as their impact on the world around us.
Core modules explore the relationship between religion, theology and the public sphere in areas such as human rights, wealth and wealth creation, terrorism and social justice. You will also gain an understanding of research methods in the humanities and social sciences.
Then you will select from optional modules focusing on topics that suit your interests such as philosophy of religion, the links between religion and global development or gender, multiculturalism and more.
With the support of leading researchers, including those working in our Centre for Philosophy of Religion and Centre for Religion and Public Life, you will develop a wide range of skills while exploring a subject that is vital for understanding the world we live in.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months. You can also study for a postgraduate certificate (PGCert) or diploma (PGDip) qualification, where you take fewer modules overall.

Course Content

Your first semester will equip you with the knowledge and skills to study theology and religion. You will take core modules introducing you to research methods in the subject, using approaches from across the humanities and social sciences, as well as exploring the relationship between theology and public life. You will learn about political, urban, systematic and practical theologies among many others, focusing on issues such as racism, criminal justice and social cohesion.

This foundation will enable you to gain specialist knowledge in the areas that suit your interests. You will choose two optional modules from the range we offer, allowing you to focus on topics such as Muslims and multiculturalism, or philosophical approaches to spirituality.

During the programme you will acquire skills in research and interpretation and good social and cultural awareness. You’ll demonstrate this with your dissertation – an independent study on a research topic of your choice – which you will submit by the end of the programme in August. You can even go into greater depth if you swap one optional module for an extended dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.
If you study for the PGCert or PGDip qualification, you’ll take fewer modules. You will also specialise in either theology or religious studies, depending on the modules you choose.

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75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded 3* for our environment - 'conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability' - Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Read more
75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded 3* for our environment - 'conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability' - Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014.

This Masters in Social Policy and Social Research Methods is particularly significant if you are currently working in local authorities or the voluntary sector. The skills you learn will progress your career in social welfare policy development, delivery or research. Or it is also relevant if you are thinking of starting a career related to social policy in the public, voluntary or private sectors.

The focus of this course is on contemporary substantive issues in social policy development and delivery, and social policy research methods. You'll develop your theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues related to policy-making, social welfare delivery, equality and social justice, and research methods.

You'll gain an advanced understanding of national and international factors influencing policy development and implementation. The changing relationship between the State, voluntary sector and private sector in terms of social welfare delivery. You'll also explore how ideas of equality, diversity, justice and human rights shape institutions and the programmes they offer.

You'll engage with recent research linked to changing family forms and how family policy impacts on children and families. You'll be equipped to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics then analyse and present the material such research generates.

The course fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilise your research knowledge and research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of social policy and broader social science research professions.

Flexible modes of study:
You can choose between three modes lasting one, two or three years allowing you to study whilst maintaining other life commitments.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/social-policy-and-social-research-methods

Modules

- Social policy analysis
This module will help you understand the policy making process and the factors that influence the formation and implementation of social policy, for example, demographic changes or policy transfer. You'll discuss current debates about policy making and delivery, including user involvement, localism and sustainability.

- The voluntary sector and the state: protagonist or partner
You'll explore the contemporary role of the voluntary sector in the delivery of social welfare, and the challenges they face in terms of management, capacity building and funding. You'll examine the role of the voluntary sector as partner or protagonist to the state, as well as its relationships with the private sector.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module is an introduction to core concepts in social research and how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll engage with central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices and explore the different ways research can be designed, and the way design affects permissible inferences. You'll also be introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Approaches to social change: equality, social justice and human rights
In this module you'll explore a number of different goals, and the theoretical underpinnings which aim to achieve social change. These goals include: equality, diversity, social justice, social inclusion, multiculturalism, social cohesion and human rights. You'll examine a range of different initiatives to promote these goals in both employment and social welfare delivery. Finally, the module will explore strategies: to identify inequality, injustice and forms of discrimination; to monitor policy development and implementation; and to evaluate outcomes and 'success'.

- Family policy
This module is taught by internationally recognised researchers from the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research. You'll be introduced to demographic changes in families and changes in State-family relationships and developments in 'family policy'. You'll explore early intervention into families, child welfare including adoption, fostering and child maintenance, child poverty, and childcare. Finally, cross cultural perspectives in family formation will be discussed.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
In this module you are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. You'll gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to your own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The aim of the dissertation is to enable you to expand and deepen your knowledge on a substantive area in social policy, whilst simultaneously developing your methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in areas linked to social policy and social welfare. You'll be able to access work in the statutory, commercial or voluntary sectors and operating at central, and local government levels, for example, local government; MORI, NSPCC and DEMOS. The acquisition of specific social policy and research methods knowledge will also enhance your career opportunities if you are currently working in the field in social policy development and delivery or in undertaking social policy related research. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

If you are not already working in an environment which is linked to social welfare you'll be encouraged to undertake voluntary work which will give you useful experience alongside the degree. In addition it may become used as a location where you can undertake primary research for your master's dissertation. The Employability team at LSBU can help students find voluntary placements.

Teaching and learning

Modules are assessed by coursework. There are different kinds of writing required which include: a critical reading log, a self-reflective essay, a methodological critique of a research article, a research proposal, extended essays, an evaluation of social change and a dissertation.

Modules are supported by Moodle, the LSBU virtual learning environment where most course reading will be made available. The classroom is envisaged as a core learning environment where you can discuss new ideas but also to think how they can be applied to previous or current work or voluntary experiences. Attendance is crucial for building your knowledge and skills. You'll be making use of computer laboratories in order to develop your use of a range of programmes that can be used to analyse quantitative and qualitative methods.

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The Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) TESOL, which is a combination of both taught and research elements, is specifically aimed at professionals engaged in English language teacher education. Read more
The Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) TESOL, which is a combination of both taught and research elements, is specifically aimed at professionals engaged in English language teacher education. We offer a wide range of taught modules in the areas of research methods (three compulsory), TESOL (two compulsory), education policy, education management and professional development.

The EdD TESOL may be taken on a part-time or full-time basis. The normal period of study will be not less that three years full-time or not less than four years part-time. This flexibility appeals to busy professionals, enabling them to complete the degree with minimal disruption to their professional and personal life.

Aims

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Critically evaluate the research findings of published, empirical studies.
Make use of appropriate research methods to conduct educational research
Design small-scale, class-based research projects to investigate the local context

Programme Structure and Modules

The EdD TESOL comprises nine taught doctoral modules (of which four must be research modules and two must be TESOL modules) and a research dissertation in the area of TESOL. The research dissertation has the same level of challenge and high standards as a PhD but is approximately half the scale (40,000 words). Each module is assessed by one 5000 word assignment. The dissertation is assessed by an oral examination (a viva-voce).

There are three stages to each EdD taught module which covers a four month period. The first stage is pre-reading. The second stage is attendance for the intensive teaching, normally over a consecutive period of two and a half days. The third stage involves the completion and submission of an assignment, normally within three months of the last date of the taught module.

Research Modules

You must complete four research modules:

Educational Research: An Overview (compulsory)
Quantitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory (compulsory)
Qualitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory (compulsory)
The Professional as Researcher
Experimental Methods in Educational Research
Survey Methods in Education
Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Educational Research
Researching Children and Young People in Educational Settings
Narrative and Arts-based Research Approaches

TESOL Modules

You must also complete the two TESOL modules:

TESOL: Issues in Language Learning
TESOL: Discourse and Pedagogy

Other Optional Modules

In addition to the research and TESOL modules you can choose from the following modules:

Education in Divided Societies: Contribution to Social Cohesion
Assessment and Testing: Concepts and Issues
Educational Special Needs: Policy and Partnerships for Inclusion
Education and the Law
Children's Rights - Research and Practice
TESOL: Issues in Language Learning
TESOL: Discourse and Pedagogy

Graduate Quote

“I was able to choose my elective modules according to my schedule and my particular field of interest. One advantage was that the EdD TESOL (the taught elements) is conducted intensively and can be completed in less than one and a half years.”
Chiu-Kuei Chang Chien, EdD TESOL graduate

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Ritual in Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies. Rituals are indispensable for human beings, in past and present. Read more
Ritual in Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies.

Rituals are indispensable for human beings, in past and present. The important moments in human life are always highlighted by rituals. In addition to ritual’s traditional function of marking key moments in human life, people assign great value to rituals as instruments to achieve social cohesion, as means of coping with grief and bereavement, and as powerful tools to remember the past. Apart from such a predominantly positive use of rituals, it should be noted that ritual is also a contested phenomenon. Ritual is all about inclusion and exclusion and about power and display in the public domain. Moreover, ritual is dynamic and fluid; it is an excellent gauge of cultural diversity and societal developments. Therefore, the study of ritual is of vital importance for understanding society.

Your lecturers are nationally and internationally renowned scholars who will introduce you to the field of ritual studies on the basis of their own research. They will present to you both the state of the art in ritual studies as well as the most recent developments in their various disciplines. The MA in Ritual in Society offers you a unique, multidisciplinary program with a focus on ritual dynamics in contemporary Europe with regular forays into the global context.

Career Perspective Ritual in Society

The program offers a Master’s career to prepare students for jobs in areas ranging from research to the world of travel and tourism (travel agencies) and from education to consultancy and management. The program will have an explicit international orientation so students are expected to find jobs in the labor market in a variety of countries in Europe and beyond. More specifically, Ritual in Society prepares you for jobs in fields like:
•Research (PhD; contract research)
•Education
•Ritual facilitator
•Ritual consultancy
•Consultancy (culture; memory culture; museum)
•Journalism
•Editorial and publishing work
•Policy work (minorities policy; diversity)
•Project work
•Human Resource Management
•Scholarly Travel Agency

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