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Masters Degrees (Social Cognition)

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This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgement and behaviour. Read more

This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgement and behaviour. The programme draws on the research of outstanding academic staff working in the areas of social cognition, social endocrinology, socio-cognitive neuroscience, and judgement and decision-making to provide unique, cutting-edge perspectives on humans as social beings.

About this degree

The programme provides an understanding of how the human emotional, cognitive and neural systems have evolved to sustain social co-ordination and adaptation to the environment. Key topics include: social perception, motivation, attitudes, embodiment, emotion, social judgement and decision-making, and social neuroscience.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Understanding Individuals and Groups
  • Social Cognition, Affect, and Motivation
  • Current Issues in Attitude Research
  • Social Neuroscience
  • Research Statistics
  • Social Cognition: Research Methods

Optional modules

Options may include the following:

  • Knowledge, Learning, and Inference
  • Applied Decision-making
  • Principles of Cognition
  • Human Learning and Memory
  • Social Psychology
  • The Psychology of Health
  • Organisational Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Consulting Psychology
  • Business Psychology Seminars
  • Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience II: Elaborative and Adaptive Processes
  • Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience III: Translational Research
  • The Brain in Action
  • Programming for Cognitive Science
  • Judgement and Decision-making
  • Talent Management
  • Evolution and Social Behaviour

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and seminars. The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences has advanced technology for the study of socio-cognitive processes, including fMRI, eye-, speech- and motion tracking equipment for dyadic and group settings, as well as a 360ovideo camera. Assessment is through coursework, online assessment and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Cognition: Research and Applications MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates have taken up positions in research, marketing, teaching, and management consultancy. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Behaviour Change Adviser, Bupa
  • PhD in Psychology, Humboldt University of Berlin
  • Research Consultant, Behaviour Change Partners
  • Business Director, Mindshare
  • University Lecturer, Northumbria University and studying PhD in Self-perception, Northumbria University

Employability

On completion of this programme students will have acquired an understanding of the processes involved in the construction of the social reality, in particular how cognitive and affective processes guide social judgement and behaviour, and how these processes are implemented in the brain. The students will have acquired methodological skills to design and carry out socio-cognitive research which will enable them to address real-world social problems and/or pursue an academic career. In addition, they will have acquired knowledge related to theoretical and philosophical issues underlying psychological research.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for graduate students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation, from basic processes to applied research. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.



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The Cognitive and Decision Sciences MSc at UCL studies the cognitive processes and representations underlying human thought, knowledge and decision-making. Read more

The Cognitive and Decision Sciences MSc at UCL studies the cognitive processes and representations underlying human thought, knowledge and decision-making. It integrates a wide range of disciplines and methodologies, with the core assumption that human cognition and choice are computational processes, implemented in neural hardware.

About this degree

Key topics include the nature of computational explanation; the general principles of cognition; the scope of rational choice explanation; probabilistic models of the mind; learning and memory; and applications to economics and business. The programme involves training in experimental design and methodology, building computational models and undertaking original research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to Cognitive Science
  • Principles of Cognition
  • Research Statistics
  • Research Skills and Programming for Cognitive Science
  • Judgement and Decision Making
  • Knowledge, Learning and Inference

Optional modules

  • Applied Decision-making
  • Human Learning and Memory
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Social Cognition: Research Methods
  • The Brain in Action
  • Neural Computation: Models of Brain Function
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Understanding Individuals and Groups
  • Social Neuroscience
  • Social Cognition, Affect and Motivation
  • Current Issues in Attitude Research
  • Talent Management
  • Business Psychology Seminars
  • Interpretation of Forensic Evidence
  • Consulting Psychology
  • Neuroscience of emotion and decision-making
  • Evolution and Social Behaviour

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, class presentations, and practical, statistical, computational and experimental class work. Student performance is assessed through online tests, coursework, essays, practical experimental and computational mini-projects, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Cognitive and Decision Sciences MSc

Careers

Students have gone on to find employment in the following areas: research, teaching, lecturing, consultancy, finance, and marketing. 

For more detailed careers information please visit the department website.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Change Management Consultant, HCL AXON
  • Project Research Officer, Government Office for Science
  • Research Assistant, Imperial College London / University of Oxford
  • PhD in Financial Computing
  • Assistant Policy Adviser, Cabinet Office Behavioural Insights Team

Employability

On completion of the programme, students will have acquired theoretical and empirical knowledge in cognition science and decision-making, and a broad range of practical research skills. They will have made original contributions to this field in their research projects, and will understand how to apply their knowledge to real-world decision problems. They will also have developed various analytical and logical reasoning skills which can be applied to many domains of research and non-academic work. They will, in addition, have an understanding of the philosophical issues underlying cognitive science and neuroscience.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme draws on an outstanding academic staff, ranging across many disciplines, including internationally renowned researchers in psychology, computational modelling, neuroscience and economics.

London is one of the global hotspots for research in cognition, decision-making, and neuroscience; and it is an intellectual hub with a high density of research seminars and scientific meetings that attract leading international researchers.

London is also one of the world's foremost commercial and political centres, with consequent opportunities for high-level applied research; and it is a vibrant, culturally diverse and international city, with world-class music, theatre and galleries.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Studying in the School of Experimental Psychology will give you the opportunity to be part of a vibrant postgraduate community and a world-class department. Read more
Studying in the School of Experimental Psychology will give you the opportunity to be part of a vibrant postgraduate community and a world-class department. Our postgraduate students are a very important part of the departmental research culture and are a key component in maintaining our international research reputation.

Before submitting an application, we recommend that potential applicants make informal contact with the member of academic staff whose research you are interested in.

Research groups

Research activity in the school is organised into two research themes: Cognitive Processes and Brain, Behaviour and Health. Within each theme, there is a set of focused research groups. An important feature of this research structure is the extent of collaboration across research groups and across the themes. All groups address fundamental questions and look at the impact of their work more broadly in industry, healthcare, education and society. Across these thematic research groups, there are particular strengths in computational neuroscience and neuropsychology.

Cognitive Processes
Focused research groups in cognitive processes are:
-Developmental (includes the Bristol Cognitive Development Centre and Bristol Autism Research Group).
-Language (speech comprehension, speech production, reading and dyslexia, language and thought).
-Memory (short-term memory, modelling, dynamics, lifespan memory).
-Social (social cognition and evolutionary social psychology).
-Vision (fusing cognitive science and information technology to tackle research problems that cannot be comprehensively addressed by the single disciplines alone).

Brain, Behaviour and Health
Focused research groups in brain, behaviour, and health are:
-Neuropsychology (neural basis of both typical and pathological cognition, using a range of methodologies including EEG and fMRI).
-Nutrition and Behaviour Unit (effects of substances on cognition and performance; appetite, weight control, and diet).
-Tobacco and Alcohol Research Group (social drugs and social cognition; plain packaging of tobacco products; carbon-dioxide inhalation model of anxiety).
-Decision-making and rationality (areas of current focus include selecting the appropriate movement response; how properties of the environment shape decisions; structuring the world to facilitate good decisions; food choice and dietary decisions; the origins of supernatural beliefs).

Careers

Many of our PhD graduates work in academia; others work in the private sector or in government institutions.

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more

Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.

At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.

Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.

At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:

- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly

Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:

- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots

- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction

- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry

- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions

- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones

- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays

- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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About the MSc Programme. This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. Read more

About the MSc Programme

This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. You will examine cognitive development from a cross-cultural perspective in a Department which combines a strong tradition of fieldwork-based research with innovative experimental research.

Compulsory components include a general core course in Social Anthropology, a specialist core course in The Anthropology of Learning and Cognition, and a 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic within the subfield of anthropology of learning and cognition subfield.

This programme will be of special interest to those who want to study the psychological mechanisms that make human cultures possible and want to study human psychology from a cross-cultural perspective. It is suitable for graduates with a degree in any discipline, and prior knowledge of anthropology is not essential. It is suitable either as an introduction to the subject for those intending to proceed with other careers, or is an ideal preparation for further research work in anthropology and related disciplines.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in anthropology and related fields.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines. Read more

Strongly interdisciplinary in nature, the Institute for Language, Cognition and Communication (ILCC) is dedicated to both basic and applied research in the computational study of language, communication, and cognition, in both humans and machines.

As technology focuses increasingly on language-based communication tools, research into the automation of language processing has become vital. ILCC offers you the broadest research scope in the UK, and a strong computational focus.

Our primary areas of research are:

  • natural language processing and computational linguistics
  • spoken language processing
  • dialogue and multimodal interaction
  • information extraction, retrieval, and presentation
  • computational theories of human cognition
  • educational and assistive technology
  • visualisation

Much of our research is applied to software development, in areas as diverse as social media, assisted living, gaming and education.

You may find yourself working closely with other departments of the University, particularly the School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences.

Many of our researchers are involved in cross-disciplinary research centres; for instance:

Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR)

The Centre for Speech Technology Research (CSTR) is an interdisciplinary research centre linking Informatics and Linguistics. Founded in 1984, it is now one of the world's largest concentrations of researchers working in the field of language and speech processing.

CSTR is concerned with research in all areas of speech technology including speech recognition, synthesis, signal processing, acoustic phonetics, information access, multi-modal interaction and dialogue systems.

The Centre is home to state-of-the-art research facilities including specialised speech and language-orientated computer labs, a digital recording studio, perception labs and a meeting room instrumented with multiple synchronised video cameras and microphones. There is also access to high-performance computer clusters, the University storage area network, a specialist library, and many speech and language databases

Centre for Design Informatics

Data driven innovation is transforming society and the economy. In the Centre for Design Informatics, we design systems for better human data interaction, in diverse settings such as health, culture, mobility and finance. We explore design from, with, and by data: the central concern is the design of flows of data which sustain and enhance human values. Relevant technologies range from the internet of things, through blockchains, to robotics, speech recognition, data visualisation, interaction design, and social computing.

Data Science EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training

The EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Data Science, based at the University of Edinburgh, is training a new generation of data scientists, comprising 50 PhDs over five intake years, with the technical skills and interdisciplinary awareness necessary to become R&D leaders in this emerging area.

Training and support

You carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

The award-winning Informatics Forum is an international research facility for computing and related areas. It houses more than 400 research staff and students, providing office, meeting and social spaces.

It also contains two robotics labs, an instrumented multimedia room, eye-tracking and motion capture systems, and a full recording studio amongst other research facilities. Its spectacular atrium plays host to many events, from industry showcases and student hackathons to major research conferences.

Nearby teaching facilities include computer and teaching labs with more than 250 machines, 24-hour access to IT facilities for students, and comprehensive support provided by dedicated computing staff.

Among our entrepreneurial initiatives is Informatics Ventures, set up to support globally ambitious software companies in Scotland and nurture a technology cluster to rival Boston, Pittsburgh, Kyoto and Silicon Valley.

Career opportunities

While many of our graduates pursue an academic career, others find their skills are highly sought after in the technology industry. A number of our students serve internships with large UK and international software developers, while others take up positions with major social media companies.



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The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researchers. Read more

The Anthropology MRes offers students a thorough grounding in a wide range of biological or social science methodologies and methods, an advanced knowledge of contemporary questions in anthropology, and training in statistical and professional skills, which prepare graduates for doctoral research or employment as social science researchers.

About this degree

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of topics in one of the sub-disciplines of anthropology (biological, social, medical or material culture). They are prepared for advanced level research through a general training in social science research methods and specialised research training in broad-based anthropological research methods and techniques.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (105 credits).

Core modules

  • Research Methods and Skills
  • Ethnographic Area: Critical Literature Review

Optional modules

The following is a selection of possible optional modules:

  • Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
  • Art in the Public Sphere
  • Anthropological Theory
  • Primate Evolution
  • Anthropology of Socialist and Post-Socialist Societies
  • Anthropology of the Built Environment
  • Ecology of Human Groups
  • Evolution of Human Brain, Cognition and Language
  • History and Aesthetics of Documentary
  • Mass Consumption and Design
  • Medical Anthropology
  • Medical Anthropology and Primary Care
  • Palaeoanthropology
  • Population and Development
  • Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
  • Primate Socioecology
  • Risk, Power and Uncertainty
  • Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Employment
  • Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report

All MRes students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 17,000 words (inclusive of notes).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, video, and film and web-based courses. Assessment is through coursework, unseen and take-home examination, laboratory books, posters and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Students usually conduct fieldwork over the summer after the end of the third term. The research carried out will inform the final dissertation,

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Anthropology MRes

Careers

With the completion of the MRes, we expect students to be highly competent professionals, who will either continue to the MPhil/PhD level or who will be well equipped to apply their knowledge of social science methodologies and methods and their specific anthropological expertise in a range of settings.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Civil Service Resilience Officer, Department for Communities and Local Government
  • Research Analyst, Mind
  • PhD in Anthropology, University of Oxford

Employability

The MRes enhances the profile of students who already have a strong background in anthropology by training them in professional skills, statistics and various other social science methods. Exposure to positivist social science methodologies makes graduates attractive candidates for positions in NGOs or work in applied social science. Emphasis on research design and data collection through field research prepares graduates to be independent researchers. The general social science orientation of the degree qualifies students to apply for research positions on grants in various disciplines, and it opens the way to doctoral study in anthropology and other social science subjects.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological, social, medical and material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Anthropology

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The overall aim of the course is to provide students with a structured introduction to undertaking research in social and developmental psychology, and in particular. Read more
The overall aim of the course is to provide students with a structured introduction to undertaking research in social and developmental psychology, and in particular:

- to provide students with the opportunity to study at an advanced level substantive topics at the forefront of current research and theorising - in social and developmental psychology;
- to enable students to acquire the skills necessary for undertaking independent research in social and developmental psychology;
- to prepare students for research at the doctoral level or its equivalent in other professional contexts.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blpympsdp

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- A command of current research in specific areas of social and developmental psychology;
- The skills necessary to conduct independent research and practical experience of their use;
- Knowledge of the methodological, philosophical and ethical issues in psychological research;
- The ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

Students attend lectures during the first and second terms. Social psychology lectures focus on fundamental concepts in social cognition, personality and individual differences, gender, and social representations. Developmental psychology lectures focus on child development and adjustment in changing family and social contexts, developmental psychopathology, children and the law, and gender development.

Assessment

- A thesis, of not more than 15,000 words in length, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

- Two essays, one of no more than 4,000 words and one of no more than 5,000 words on topics falling within areas of study to be prescribed by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology.

- An exercise of approximately 3,000 words in length, consisting of a critical appraisal of a research paper specified by the Degree Committee.

Continuing

MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD may apply to do so.

However, candidates should be aware that successful entry onto the MPhil does NOT guarantee
acceptance for the PhD. Every application will be considered on its merits and must compete with all other applicants for a place on the PhD programme.

Successful applicants will need to achieve a final mark of at least 70% in their MPhil in order to meet the condition of entry.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Cognitive psychology and neuropsychology bring together a range of different theoretical frameworks. This MSc programme provides an overview and critical evaluation of the major issues, investigative strategies, and empirical findings of recent attempts to integrate these different approaches to 'brain cognition'. Read more
Cognitive psychology and neuropsychology bring together a range of different theoretical frameworks. This MSc programme provides an overview and critical evaluation of the major issues, investigative strategies, and empirical findings of recent attempts to integrate these different approaches to 'brain cognition'.

Examine how cognitive psychological, neuropsychological, neurobiological and computer science approaches can be combined to understand how the human mind/brain solves a variety of complex problems, such as recognising objects, remembering previous experiences, reading, speaking and reasoning.

The programme gives you a detailed understanding of the major analytic techniques and research methodologies employed by cognitive psychologists and neuropsychologists. Study a range of general, historical, theoretical and philosophical issues underlying the discipline that will equip you with specialist knowledge and systematic understanding and prepare you for a career in academia or as a practising psychologist.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/65/cognitive-psychology-neuropsychology

About the School of Psychology

As a student within the School of Psychology at Kent, you benefit from our supportive, dynamic and diverse environment for creative research and learning.

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Conducting both basic and applied research in several areas, Psychology at Kent is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research. Our long-established international reputation in social psychology is complemented by our strengths in cognitive, developmental and forensic psychology. We attract excellent visiting scholars and postgraduate students from both within the UK and overseas.

Some of our PhD students are self-funded, and others are funded by grants or awards either from the School, UK or their countries of origin. Some are also paid to undertake part-time teaching within the School. We have a strong track record of attracting ESRC research studentship funding, which involves partnerships with external organisations such as Age UK and the Equality and Human Rights Commission and collaborative studentships with partners such as People United.

Modules

The modules below are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SP827 - Current Issues in Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology (40 credits)
SP998 - Advanced Research Project in Psychology (60 credits)
SP846 - Cognitive Neural Networks (20 credits)
SP850 - Advanced Cognitive (Neuroscience) Methods in Practice (20 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP853 - The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (20 credits)
SP854 - Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology (20 credits)
SP829 - Advanced Topics in Cognition in Action (20 credits)

Assessment

The programme mainly involves lecture and seminar based teaching. In addition, particular option units (such as computational modelling) require 'hands-on' experience and learning of particular skills. Staff contact time is eight hours per week. You are expected to study for 1,800 hours over 45 weeks.

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000 word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster your intellectual development by providing you with specialised knowledge of a range of theoretical approaches to cognitive psychology/neuropsychology and statistical and methodological expertise in order that you should be well equipped to make your own original contribution to psychological knowledge

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as psychologists
satisfy the academic requirements of the knowledge base specified by the British Psychological Society

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Research themes

The School of Psychology is highly regarded as a leading European centre for postgraduate research, with an international reputation for excellence in social psychology (including group processes and intergroup relations); cognition and neuroscience; developmental psychology; and forensic psychology. We have staff who can supervise research degrees in all of these areas. The research environment is designed to sustain a strong, vibrant research culture, encourage collaboration, and unite staff and students with shared research interests. Our themes ensure critical mass and create a highly energetic and stimulating intellectual climate.

Research activity is supported by:

- centrally co-ordinated provision and use of laboratories and technical support

- selection of speakers for our weekly departmental research colloquia

- weekly research meetings within each theme

- developing, reporting and analysing research, and hosting our many visiting scholars

- several monthly small meeting series on specific areas of cross-cutting research (such as forensic, social development, emotion, social cognition and health).

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

The programmes we offer help you to develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Professional recognition

All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MSc in Social and Applied Psychology gives you the opportunity to sample a range of modules from our Group Processes and Developmental programmes as well as other modules related to social and applied psychology. Read more
The MSc in Social and Applied Psychology gives you the opportunity to sample a range of modules from our Group Processes and Developmental programmes as well as other modules related to social and applied psychology.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Key benefits

- Much of our social psychology research is co-ordinated through the Centre for the Study of Group Processes (CSGP), the largest research group in this area in Europe. The Centre attracts a stream of major international social psychology researchers, who regularly visit to work with our staff and are officially affiliated to the Centre.The Social Psychology group also includes the co-editor of Group Processes and Intergroup Relations (Abrams).

- Social psychology research at Kent is funded by a variety of British and international sources, currently and recently including ESRC, British Academy, Leverhulme, Age Concern, European Commission, European Science Foundation, Home Office, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Nuffield, and Joseph Rowntree Foundation, as well as government departments such as the Department for Communities and Local Government and the Department for Work and Pensions.

- All of our taught Master’s (MSc) programmes have been recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the nationally recognised criteria for preparation training for PhD research.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/75/social-and-applied-psychology

Course detail

This programme considers how social psychology can be applied to a wide range of social problems and answer key questions such as: How are attitudes formed and developed, and how do they relate to behaviour? What are the key motives that affect people’s reactions to the social world? What social psychological processes are implicated in the form and content of language and communication?

Our teaching and research covers the psychology of intergroup behaviour, group decision and performance, attitudes and persuasion, organisational psychology, social cognition, children’s self-concept and social attitudes, and cross-cultural questions, relating social psychological research in these areas to social problems. Course tutors include academics and experts who work in the media, the health service and other applied settings.

Purpose

You will gain a thorough grounding in research methods, and conduct a project in an area of social/applied psychology that interests you. The programme is taught by the School’s outstanding research group in social psychology.

Course structure

The programme consists of 4 compulsory modules and 2 option modules.

Core modules include:

• Advanced Statistics and Methodology
• Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology I: Theory
• Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology II: Applications
• Dissertation

You also select two from a choice of the following:

• Advanced Topics in Intergroup Relations
• Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development
• Advanced Developmental Social Psychology
• Advanced Topics in Group Processes
• Developmental Psychology in Professional Practice
• The Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony
• Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychopathology

Assessment is mainly by coursework assignment (4-6,000-word essays), examination (for the Advanced Statistics and Methodology module only), plus the dissertation.

Careers

Our postgraduate students commonly go into the fields of health, teaching or further education. For instance, many of our graduates take up roles as assistant psychologists in the NHS with a view to becoming a professional clinical or forensic psychologist. Upon completing our Master’s courses, graduates have also pursued doctoral study and academic careers at higher education institutions.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. Read more
The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. From the basic biology of neurons through to complex processes of perception and decision-making behaviour, we address how the mind, brain, and body work together and translate this knowledge into clinical applications for patient benefit.

We offer MPhil supervision in the following research areas:

Motor systems development, plasticity and function

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies of normal and abnormal development and plasticity of the motor system. We run functional studies and computer modelling of motor system activity throughout the neuraxis. We also research the development and assessment of novel therapies for motor disorders/lesions including stem cell and brain-machine interface.

Visual system development, plasticity and repair]]
We research the development and assessment of novel neuro-technological approaches to retinal dystrophy repair including brain-machine interface and stem cells. We use in vitro approaches to look at retinal development and visual system wiring.

[[Neural computation and network systems
We conduct experimental and theoretical (computational) studies aimed at understanding how neurones throughout the brain interact in localised networks to compute complex tasks. Our research looks at the role of network activity in a wide range of neurological, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

Auditory neuroscience

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies aimed at understanding the brain mechanisms involved in detection, discrimination and perception of sound. We are interested in how these mechanisms are affected in individuals with brain disorders, including dementia, autism and stroke.

Pain

Our research focuses on:
-Understanding mechanisms underlying pain, analgesia, and anaesthesia
-The development of methods to assess pain and to alleviate pain in animals and humans

Psychobiology

We conduct studies in laboratory animals, healthy volunteers and patient populations investigating the mechanisms underlying mood, anxiety and addiction disorders and their treatment. Allied research looks at normal neuropsychology, and the physiology and pharmacology of neurotransmitter and endocrine systems implicated in psychiatric disorders.

Neurotoxicology

Our research focuses on delineating the effects and understanding the mechanisms of action of established and putative neurotoxins, including environmental and endogenous chemicals, and naturally occurring toxins.

Forensic psychiatry and clinical psychology

Our research covers:
-The assessment, treatment and management of sex offender risk
-Development and assessment of cognitive models
-Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for bipolar disorder, psychosis, anxiety and developmental disorders
-Developmental disorders of perception and cognition

Systems and computational neuroscience

We conduct theoretical (computational) and experimental studies aimed at understanding the neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology of vision, visual attention and episodic memory.

Behaviour and evolution

Many research groups take an evolutionary and comparative approach to the study of brain and/or behaviour, comparing brain function and behaviour among such disparate groups as insects, birds and mammals, and studying the ecological and evolutionary functions of behaviour. Much of our work is at the forefront of the fields of neuroethology, behavioural ecology and comparative cognition, and has important implications for the study and practice of animal welfare.

Visual perception and human cognition

We research:
-Colour and depth perception - perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention - memory
-Word learning in children
-Body image dysfunction
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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As an MSc Social Psychology student you will learn theories, methods, and empirical findings in the field of social psychology, which are relevant to current social issues. Read more

As an MSc Social Psychology student you will learn theories, methods, and empirical findings in the field of social psychology, which are relevant to current social issues.

These include: prejudice and discrimination; the relationship between moral judgement and emotions; the study of how individuals and groups interact to construct and maintain identities; and how these are related to social change and influence in contexts such as family systems and romantic dyads.

The programme aims to provide you with an awareness of the historical and philosophical background of social psychology, an in-depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches and research findings, and the ability to conduct quantitative and qualitative research in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Funding

Occasionally, students receive financial support from industry through sponsorship, negotiated by individual students.

This would involve students undertaking research for their dissertation which would be of interest and value to industry or commerce, in return for which they will be given a grant by the commissioning company. In practice, though, most students are self-funded.

Social psychology research

The social psychologists at the University of Surrey have an international reputation in research and teaching. Students on the MSc in Social Psychology are encouraged to participate in the School of Psychology’s ongoing activities, particularly research seminars.

The social psychologists at Surrey have undertaken research for the EU, UK research councils, government departments and agencies, industry and commerce, and the charitable sector. They have attracted a large number of research projects to the School, including:

  • Social and behavioural consequences of AIDS/HIV (ESRC)
  • Cross-national studies of the social and psychological determinants of pro-environmental attitudes and behaviours (EU)
  • The 16–19 initiative project on the political and economic socialisation of 16–19 year olds (ESRC)
  • Monitoring and modelling consumer perceptions of food-related risks (MAFF)

Educational aims of the programme

  • To provide students with theoretical and qualitative/quantitative methodological expertise to conduct social psychological research by training them in the informed and systematic conduct of basic and applied research involving the critical reading of theories and empirical findings
  • To provide students with an in depth knowledge of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline
  • To enable students to link theoretical and empirical questions to social issues and to provide them with an in depth understanding of the practical applications and action implications of social psychological theories and empirical findings
  • To provide students with the skills to evaluate possible interventions in a variety of social domains
  • To offer opportunities to develop the basic interpersonal, technical and creative skills required for the effective analysis and formulation of problems into research questions and, where appropriate, testable hypotheses

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Of contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches to social psychology
  • Of the practical applications and action implications of social psychological theories and empirical findings
  • Of the principles of research design
  • Of quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies to manage and analyse psychological data
  • Of ethical considerations when undertaking research and framing interventions

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • To critically assess and comment on sources of research relevant to social psychology
  • To critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of social psychological theories and research methods in addressing social problems
  • To evaluate actual and potential psychologically informed interventions in a variety of social domains
  • To design, conduct and evaluate social psychological research
  • To apply insights from social psychological theory and research to other domains of psychology

Professional practical skills

  • Communicate work in a professional manner for academic and non-academic audiences in written and verbal formats
  • Apply problem solving techniques to social and psychological topics effectively
  • Use effective learning strategies
  • Analyse and interpret social psychological theoretical analyses and quantitative and qualitative empirical evidence in a competent and critical manner

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate theories and methods in relation to social psychology by oral and written means
  • Use information technology effectively
  • Manage own personal development

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Industrial/Organisational and Business Psychology deals with human capital issues and is instrumental in helping businesses become more effective and profitable, as well as improving employees' wellbeing and performance. Read more

Industrial/Organisational and Business Psychology deals with human capital issues and is instrumental in helping businesses become more effective and profitable, as well as improving employees' wellbeing and performance. This brand new MSc will prepare students for academic research and professional practice in this field.

About this degree

Our students will be exposed to the latest psychological tools and interventions currently used in business and other applied fields. Some of the key areas that we will be covering are: talent management, consultancy skills, and business seminars. In the latter, students will follow a series of talks from professionals in the area, which provide a great opportunity to explore the latest techniques as well as network with like-minded professionals in the area.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Consulting Psychology
  • Talent Management
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Business Psychology Seminars
  • Influence and Negotiation
  • Statistics

Optional modules

Students choose two of the following:

  • Applied Decision Making
  • Judgment and Decision Making
  • Social Cognition
  • Current Issues in Attitude Research
  • Understanding Individuals and Groups
  • Social Psychology
  • Principles of Cognition
  • Strategic Project Management
  • Mastering Entrepreneurship
  • Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, case studies, practical experiments and statistical and computational work. Assessment is through examinations, essays, group projects, dissertation and oral examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Industrial/Organisational and Business Psychology MSc

Careers

After the successful completion of the programme our students are eligible to apply for a number of consultancy roles. One of the most popular routes has been management consulting, where graduates are currently enjoying successful careers. In addition, a number of our applicants have found positions as HR professionals within established as well as boutique firms in the UK and internationally. Finally, given the diverse and well-rounded training, some graduates have entered the word of marketing and communications where they apply the theories they have learnt to communicate with other companies and consumers more effectively.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Business Psychologist, YSC
  • Business Analyst, Mercuri Urval
  • Defence Psychologist, Ministry of Defence (MoD)
  • Human Resources (HR) Practitioner, United Nations (UN)
  • Project Co-Ordinator, STO

Employability

UCL's Industrial Organisational and Business Psychology group includes luminaries from the talent management and consumer psychology industries, as well as illustrious academics. In addition, our programme features speakers from Google, RBS, Havas Worldwide, Dunnhumby, Sainsbury's, Quantcast and many more.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

One of the key principles that govern this programme is our focus on preparing practitioners utilising the latest theories in the area of organisational and business psychology. This unique focus drives our teaching methodology (applied workshops and training courses) and pedagogical focus (experiential learning).

Our cohort of students comes from a very diverse background and we make sure that we create an environment in which everyone can learn from one another. The modules, created by experts in their fields, have been designed to deepen students' understanding as well as prepare them for successful careers in the area of industrial organisation and business psychology.

A number of the tutors hosting our business seminars are among the leading professionals in the area of business psychology. This is an excellent opportunity for our students to be exposed to the latest thinking, and to network and develop projects.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The first MSc in the world that applies psychology within fashion to improve understanding of human behaviour by using predominantly quantitative methods. Read more

Introduction

The first MSc in the world that applies psychology within fashion to improve understanding of human behaviour by using predominantly quantitative methods.

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). Accreditation is a high quality benchmarking process that promotes psychology as a science and offers the opportunity for graduates to gain Graduate and/or Chartered membership of the Society.

Content

The MSc Applied Psychology in Fashion is situated in the Graduate School and has been developed to address the need of the fashion industry for psychologically literate graduates who possess relevant skills in research, analysis, information synthesis, communication, IT and data handling, who can solve problems and work effectively in teams or independently. This Masters programme is the first MSc in the world (with the MA Psychology for Fashion Professionals) to apply the scientific study of psychology to fashion. The course has been accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). BPS accreditation is a high-quality benchmarking process that prospective students and employers understand and value. It offers graduates the opportunity to apply for Graduate membership of the Society. With further study, Graduates of this course could apply to become Chartered Psychologists. Accreditation is evidence that the course meets BPS requirements in covering and assessing learning on core areas of psychology through promoting psychology as a science.

The MSc course emphasises quantitative methods and statistical analysis that enable generalisation of results. In addition, to complement the units studied on the MSc, students are encouraged to attend the MA units Design Matters and Qualitative Research Methods and Data Analysis, but are not assessed on these. The MSc Applied Psychology in Fashion is designed to appeal to applicants from a broad range of backgrounds including psychology and other sciences, business, humanities and fashion.

By applying the scientific study of human behaviour in the context of fashion, students on the MSc Applied Psychology in Fashion develop the ability to identify current issues in the broad context of fashion that are worthy of investigation, conduct rigorous studies to address these issues, and analyse and interpret resultant data using an evidence-based approach. The aims of the course are to apply psychological science in the context of fashion to make a positive difference through increasing knowledge, improving performance and enhancing well-being. Therefore, Graduates from this course will be able to investigate, analyse, interpret and predict human behaviour in a broad range of fashion contexts. The focus on the course will be on enabling students to develop strong research skills to enhance employability in many different roles within the fashion industries and beyond.

Structure

12 months 3 terms level 7 120 credits

September - February

Research Methods in Psychology (20 credits)
Cognition and Creativity (20 credits)
Personality and Individual Differences (20 credits)

February - June

Quantitative Research Methods and Data Analysis (20 credits)
Collaborative Unit: Psychology (20 credits)
Social Cognition and Lifespan Development (20 credits)

June-September

Masters Project: Psychology (60 credits)

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The first MA in the world to apply psychology in fashion will help students gain a deeper understanding of a particular aspect of human behaviour in a fashion context using qualitative approaches (focus groups, interviews or case studies). Read more

Introduction

The first MA in the world to apply psychology in fashion will help students gain a deeper understanding of a particular aspect of human behaviour in a fashion context using qualitative approaches (focus groups, interviews or case studies).

Content

The MA Psychology for Fashion Professionals is situated in the Graduate School and has been developed to address the need of the fashion industry for psychologically literate graduates who possess relevant skills in research, analysis, information synthesis, communication, IT and data handling, who can solve problems and work effectively in teams or independently. This Masters programme is the first MA in the world to apply the scientific study of psychology to fashion.

The MA Psychology for Fashion Professionals emphasises qualitative methods and analysis that lead to deep, rich data and interpretation. In addition, to complement the units studied on the MA, students are encouraged to attend the MSc units Personality and Individual Differences and Quantitative Research Methods and Data Analysis, but are not assessed on these.

The MA Psychology for Fashion Professionals is designed to appeal to applicants from a broad range of backgrounds including psychology and other sciences, business, humanities and fashion.

By applying the scientific study of human behaviour in the context of fashion, students on the MA Psychology for Fashion Professionals develop the ability to identify current issues in the broad context of fashion that are worthy of investigation, conduct rigorous studies to address these issues, and analyse and interpret resultant findings using qualitative methodologies.

The aims of the course are to apply psychological science in the context of fashion to make a positive difference through increasing knowledge, improving performance and enhancing well-being. Therefore, graduates from this course will be able to investigate, analyse and interpret human behaviour focusing on small samples and case studies in a broad range of fashion contexts. The focus on the course will be on enabling students to develop strong research skills to enhance employability in many different roles within the fashion industries and beyond.

Structure

September - February

Research Methods in Psychology (20 credits)
Cognition and Creativity (20 credits)
Design Matters (20 credits)

February - June

Qualitative Research Methods and Data Analysis (20 credits)
Collaborative Unit: Psychology (20 credits)
Social Cognition and Lifespan Development (20 credits)

June-September

Masters Project: Psychology (60 credits)

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