• Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Durham University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
National Film & Television School Featured Masters Courses
University of Pennsylvania Featured Masters Courses
"social" AND "accountabil…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Social Accountability)

We have 145 Masters Degrees (Social Accountability)

  • "social" AND "accountability" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 145
Order by 
The aim of our MA in Social Work is to provide students, who already hold a first degree, with a professional social work qualification at Master's level. Read more
The aim of our MA in Social Work is to provide students, who already hold a first degree, with a professional social work qualification at Master's level.

The course will enable you to be a confident, competent, qualified social work practitioner. We offer a well established course with a national reputation for producing high-calibre workers. Our course is designed, managed and delivered by a Programme Management Board that includes practice placement agencies, students, lecturers and practitioners. Stakeholder involvement ensures that our course maintains a dynamic, outward-looking approach towards social work education with a clear focus on the needs of service users.

The programme is built upon the following standards and requirements for social work training: the HCPC (Health and care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency for social care workers, the DOH (Department of Health) Requirements for social work training, The College of Social Work Professional Capabilities Framework and the QAA (Quality Assurance Agency) benchmark statements for social policy administration and social work.

On completion of the MA in Social Work you will have:
-Knowledge and Understanding of social work services and service users; the service delivery context; values and ethics; social work theory; the nature of social work practice.
-Discipline skills in assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation with individuals, families, carers, groups and communities; support of individuals to represent their needs, views and circumstances; the management of risk to users, self and colleagues; workload management and accountability; self reflective practice and professional competence.
-Transferable skills in the use of communication and information technology and numerical skills; problem solving skills including: problem management, information gathering, analysis and synthesis, intervention and evaluation; communication skills; skills in working with others; skills in personal and professional development.

Why Bradford?

-Social work is a profession regulated in England, since 1 August 2012, by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and this course is regulated by the HCPC.
-Bursaries are available through the NHS Business Services Authority.

Modules

Year 1
-Ethics, Professionalism and Reflective Practice
-Interviewing and Communication Skills
-Practice Placement Learning 1 (70-day placement from May-September)
-Social Work Theories and Methods
-Law for Social Work
-Social Work with Adults
-Social Work with Children and Families

Year 2
-Practice Placement Learning 2 (100-day placement from January-July)
-Interprofessional Working
-Research methods for Social Workers

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Read less
The Master of Social Work (Professional Qualifying) enables students with an existing undergraduate degree to undertake study leading to a professionally accredited social work degree, recognised by the Australian Association of Social Workers. Read more
The Master of Social Work (Professional Qualifying) enables students with an existing undergraduate degree to undertake study leading to a professionally accredited social work degree, recognised by the Australian Association of Social Workers.
Students will develop knowledge and skills necessary for professional practice in a range of practice fields, and the course has a very strong practical component, with students completing two field education placements.
The course offers maximum study flexibility with a range of delivery modes. Students studying in limited attendance mode are supported through print and online materials as well as annual, compulsory, on-campus residential workshops.
Students with significant social welfare and human services experience may be eligible for Recognition of Prior Learning for one field education placement.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Social Work (PQ), graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate understanding of an advanced and integrated body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying values, ethics, theories, research principles and methods, professional practice and workplace contexts in the social work discipline
*Reflect critically on the unique, complex and contemporary relationships between social work and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and their diverse histories and cultures
*Reflect critically on the impact of complex social, political and historical issues on environmental and social sustainability in Australia and internationally, with a focus on the tropics
*Investigate, analyse critically and transform complex social systems, institutions, structures, processes, practices and inequities
*Consolidate, synthesise, research and evaluate recent developments in social policy and evidence to devise practical and knowledge solutions that reduce social barriers, inequalities and injustice
*Interpret and communicate, to specialist and non-specialist audiences, theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions in the social work discipline through advanced literacy, numeracy and technological skills
*Design, plan and execute a substantial research based project
*Manage service provision and professional practice to engage with and enable individuals, groups and communities to achieve social and environmental justice
*Apply and adapt expert and specialised professional practice knowledge and skills, autonomously and in collaboration with others, to address social barriers, inequity and injustice across diverse contexts
*Demonstrate creativity and initiative, and expert judgement and adaptability in engagement, planning, decision-making, problem-solving, provision and evaluation of specialist advice and functions, to achieve practice, organisational, policy and/or system level outcomes
*Demonstrate high-level responsibility and accountability for own learning and professional development.

Award title

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (PROFESSIONAL QUALIFYING) MSW(PQ)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3c - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 7.0), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3c – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

Students will have access to The Cairns Institute – an important centre for national and international scholars. It brings together the expertise and intellectual resources of more than 20 academic disciplines, creating a uniquely robust and relevant research, consulting, training and teaching hub for Northern Australia, South and South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
***MA Social Work is available for Cambridge in September, but no longer available for Chelmsford***. Our full-time course combines in-depth professional training and tuition with high quality practice placements. Read more
***MA Social Work is available for Cambridge in September, but no longer available for Chelmsford***

Our full-time course combines in-depth professional training and tuition with high quality practice placements. Graduate and you’ll be eligible to register as a qualified social worker.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/social-work

We’ve designed our course for graduates with at least six months’ relevant work experience, who want to qualify as professional social workers.

An intensive orientation programme at the start of the course will develop your practical skills ready for your first placement, and will introduce you to theories and approaches within social work.

Your typical weekly pattern will then become one day of lectures and training on campus, with the rest of the week being either independent study or supported placement.

You’ll spend 70 days on practice placement in year 1 and 100 days in year 2. These practice placements will be in contrasting settings, one of which will involve statutory intervention and will include one placement in children’s services and one in adults. It’s likely that you’ll have to travel as part of your placement, so you’ll need your own transport to visit service users in the community, where public transport may not be available.

From communication skills to legal duties, professional decision-making to an understanding of socio-economic factors, our course will equip you fully for the challenges you’ll face in social work.

Upon graduating, you’ll be eligible for professional registration.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/social-work

Careers

You could build a career in the various branches of professional social work, including children’s services, adult services, mental health services, youth offending, residential social care and providing advocacy and support for vulnerable groups.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules:
Assessed Readiness for Direct Practice
Social Work Knowledge, Values and Skills
Well-being across the Life Course in a Diverse Society
Developing Professional Social Work Practice

Year two, core modules:
Analytical Thinking and Decision-Making in Professional Social Work
Powers, Duties and Accountability in Professional Social Work
Dissertation

Core modules available in all years:
Placement

Please note that you will need to complete all of the above core modules. This course does not have any optional modules. Modules are subject to change.

Assessment

We’ll assess you for your Master’s degree through academic assignments, practice debriefs and the portfolios you’ll build up, detailing your professional development.

Your final piece of work will be a Dissertation, which must be a substantial, research-based piece of work that demonstrates your knowledge, ideas and professional skills.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Read less
On this practice-based social work course, your studies will be supervised by experienced practitioners, and you can expect an induction, a protected workload and a study day most weeks while on placement. Read more
On this practice-based social work course, your studies will be supervised by experienced practitioners, and you can expect an induction, a protected workload and a study day most weeks while on placement.

All placements are under constant development with our employer partners, and you may be eligible for a bursary administered by the NHS Bursaries Unit.

Accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Why choose this course?

• Study the knowledge, skills and attributes necessary for social work practice at qualification level with adults and children in the private, voluntary and independent sectors
• Explore the role of social work, its inter-relationship with other disciplines, and the ethical base for practice where initiative is balanced with accountability to employers, the profession, service-users and carers
• Develop a deep and systematic understanding of current theoretical and methodological approaches, and acquire the skills necessary for analytical research-informed practice in areas of complexity, diversity and unpredictability
• Gain the skills in flexibility, critical reflexivity and emotional literacy which underpin collaborative social work practice and proactive professional development
• Benefit from classroom and placement activities which will enable you to develop collaborative and communication abilities that can be applied to complex problem-solving tasks.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/social-work#about

Course detail

Approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), this course offers students a rewarding career path. In addition to gaining a postgraduate qualification, successful students will be eligible to apply for professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council and when registered will be able to pursue a professional social work career in a range of settings.

On this practice-based social work course, your studies will be supervised by experienced practitioners, and you can expect an induction, a protected workload and a study day most weeks while on placement.

[[ Year 1]]

• Working with people: theories and methods for social work practice
• People in context: ethics, legislation and social policy for social work practice
• Skills development and first placement (70 days)

Year 2

• Knowledge for social work: critically reflective and research-informed practice
• Critical issues in specialist and inter-professional practice
• Last placement (100 days)

Assessment

Your academic learning will be assessed using a range of methods including reflective assignments, case studies, group and individual presentations, research tasks and examinations.

Assessments are designed to integrate theory and practice throughout the course and the variety of assessment methods used develops academic and professional skills in writing concisely and drawing on your knowledge with confidence, for different purposes and audiences.

Your practice learning will be supported by practice educators and assessed at each stage through observation of direct work, critical and reflective learning logs and reports contained in a portfolio of practice evidence.

Assessments throughout the course are designed to provide a range of opportunities for you to develop increasing confidence and autonomy and ultimately demonstrate your knowledge and skills in all areas necessary for competent practice as a newly qualified social worker.

Careers

Successful students will be eligible to apply to enter the HCPC Professional Register as qualified social workers and to work in a wide range of statutory, private, voluntary and independent organisations.

You will also have the benefit of an academic award at postgraduate level, demonstrating your capacity for deep understanding, initiative and the management of complexity.

These skills may equip you for further academic study such as a Professional Doctorate or PhD, or enable you to contribute to the knowledge base of your chosen profession with practice-based research.

As a qualified Social Worker, you will also be eligible, after a period of consolidation in practice, to apply for one of the University’s post-qualifying courses designed to support Social Workers in their continuous professional development.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

Read less
This course, accredited by the Institute of Healthcare Management, examines the social, political and economic context within which health and social services operate, locating this within the advanced study of social policy. Read more
This course, accredited by the Institute of Healthcare Management, examines the social, political and economic context within which health and social services operate, locating this within the advanced study of social policy. A particular feature of the curriculum is its focus on policy, management and collaborative working structures in the context of regulation, evaluation and accountability frameworks for service delivery.

More about this course

The course is designed to meet the needs of those working in health and welfare services as practitioners, managers or administrators.

The student group is therefore multidisciplinary, and most course members combine study with full-time work. The course is also suitable for graduates with a research interest in the changing nature of health and social care in the new mixed economy of welfare.

The course has recently been re-validated and re-focused. It now offers increased opportunities for you to combine your study of health and social policy with specialist modules in evaluation, management, social work practice, regeneration or public health.

Your learning is structured around weekly contact time with the teaching team and is complemented by your independent work based on guidance supplied in lectures, group work, and interactive workshops. Blended learning, enquiry based learning and problem based learning will be used to help you comprehend theoretical concepts.

You are assessed via essays, seminar papers, mini-projects, reports and management exercises.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institute of Healthcare Management.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Health and Social Care Management and Policy Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Impact Assessment (core, 20 credits)
-Management of Health and Social Services (core, 20 credits)
-Strategic Planning and Change Management (core, 20 credits)
-Understanding the Policy Process (core, 20 credits)
-Children and Families: Policy and Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Contextualising Management (option, 20 credits)
-Cross Cultural Management (option, 20 credits)
-Ethical Issues in Healthcare (option, 20 credits)
-Health in the City (option, 20 credits)
-Housing Strategy (option, 20 credits)
-Managing Change in Organisations and Systems (option, 20 credits)
-Managing Self and Others (option, 20 credits)
-Measuring and Monitoring Performance (option, 20 credits)
-Partnership Working (option, 20 credits)
-Perspectives of Ageing (option, 20 credits)
-Project Management (option, 20 credits)
-Researching Communities (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)

After the course

This qualification will enhance the career prospects of those working in many settings where knowledge and skills in health and social care management or policy making is relevant. Graduates from our existing programmes report improved career choices and advancement as a result of learning acquired on this programme.

Many have gone on to careers as drug and alcohol rehabilitation managers, managers of learning disability services, primary care trust business development managers, day centre managers, sure start programme managers, health visitor managers, prison service managers, residential and nursing care home managers, advisors in local authorities, community care managers, managed policy research, policy makers.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
This course prepares students for careers in international and community development with government, non-government and international organisations, such as the UN or the World Bank, and charities. Read more
This course prepares students for careers in international and community development with government, non-government and international organisations, such as the UN or the World Bank, and charities.

Students will have access to the School’s own research institute – The Cairns Institute – an important centre for national and international scholars. It brings together the expertise and intellectual resources of more than 20 academic disciplines, creating a uniquely robust and relevant research, consulting, training and teaching hub for Northern Australia, South and South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Social Science, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate and reflect critically on advanced and integrated knowledge of social theory, practice and professional ethics in a single discipline or interdisciplinary field of the social sciences
*Demonstrate knowledge of research principles and methods in a single discipline or interdisciplinary fields of the social sciences
*Analyse critically and evaluate social systems, institutions, structures and/or practices
*Generate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex perspectives, arguments and sources of qualitative and/or quantitative data pertinent to complex social, political, historical, economic, environmental and/or cultural issues, particularly those related to quality of life in the tropics worldwide
*Interpret and justify to a specialist and non-specialist audience theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and, where appropriate, numeracy skills
*Design and execute a substantial social science research-based project with a high level of autonomy and accountability
*Apply social theory to research, demonstrating advanced understanding of the relationship between theory and practice, including recent developments, in a single discipline or interdisciplinary fields of the social sciences
*Respectfully and responsibly apply expert knowledge of diversity and difference among people, especially vulnerable and Indigenous peoples, in scholarship and/or professional practice
*Adapt and apply knowledge and skills to identify complex problems and pose creative solutions to social and/or environmental challenges facing peoples and societies in diverse tropical contexts worldwide.

Award title

MASTER OF SOCIAL SCIENCE (MSocSc)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
Graduates will gain skills appropriate to employment in applied research, planning and evaluation, and related positions across local and national governments, international organisations (for example UNESCO), and NGOs associated with natural and cultural heritage/ resource management. Read more
Graduates will gain skills appropriate to employment in applied research, planning and evaluation, and related positions across local and national governments, international organisations (for example UNESCO), and NGOs associated with natural and cultural heritage/ resource management.
Students will have access to the School’s own research institute – The Cairns Institute – an important centre for national and international scholars. It brings together the expertise and intellectual resources of more than 20 academic disciplines, creating a uniquely robust and relevant research, consulting, training and teaching hub for Northern Australia, South and South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Social Science, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate and reflect critically on advanced and integrated knowledge of social theory, practice and professional ethics in a single discipline or interdisciplinary field of the social sciences
*Demonstrate knowledge of research principles and methods in a single discipline or interdisciplinary fields of the social sciences
*Analyse critically and evaluate social systems, institutions, structures and/or practices
*Generate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex perspectives, arguments and sources of qualitative and/or quantitative data pertinent to complex social, political, historical, economic, environmental and/or cultural issues, particularly those related to quality of life in the tropics worldwide
*Interpret and justify to a specialist and non-specialist audience theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and, where appropriate, numeracy skills
*Design and execute a substantial social science research-based project with a high level of autonomy and accountability
*Apply social theory to research, demonstrating advanced understanding of the relationship between theory and practice, including recent developments, in a single discipline or interdisciplinary fields of the social sciences
*Respectfully and responsibly apply expert knowledge of diversity and difference among people, especially vulnerable and Indigenous peoples, in scholarship and/or professional practice
*Adapt and apply knowledge and skills to identify complex problems and pose creative solutions to social and/or environmental challenges facing peoples and societies in diverse tropical contexts worldwide.

Award title

MASTER OF SOCIAL SCIENCE (MSocSc)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
Managers in international companies require an understanding of accounting and financial management. Read more
Managers in international companies require an understanding of accounting and financial management. With our programme you will gain an appreciation of economic, technical and institutional foundations of accounting and financial management and the importance of accountability and information, corporate governance, and ethics in global financial markets. After completing a series of core courses you can pursue electives in a range of management areas.

Key benefits

- You are taught in an internationally renowned department with impressive institutional and organisational links.

- You will study in the heart of London, the perfect location for building a career.

- Close links and regular speakers from outside organisations give you insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

Visit the website http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/accounting-accountability-and-financial-management-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description

Our programme provides a stimulating learning environment using various techniques to link theoretical knowledge to good business practice. You will have the chance to pursue your own interests through a selection of modules and dissertation topics. Our objective is to develop your accounting and financial management skills and provide you with the global capabilities required for business success.

After completing a series of core courses you may pursue electives in a range of management areas.

- Course purpose

Our MSc will enhance your knowledge of: theoretical foundations of accounting, accountability and financial management; application of technical accounting and financial management techniques to a variety of scenarios; internal workings of financial institutions and accounting firms and their inter-relationships; importance of accounting and financial management for businesses and financial institutions; need for accounting, accountability and financial management to incorporate corporate governance, social responsibility, the needs of a broad group of stakeholders and ethical considerations. Our MSc is international in its outlook.

Structure

Required Modules:
Dissertation - An original piece of research on an aspect of accounting and/or financial management undertaken by you under the supervision of a staff member.

- Corporate Governance & Accountability
- Financial Management
- Financial Reporting & Analysis
- Management Accounting & Control
- Research Methods

Optional Modules:
We review the modules offered on a regular basis in order to continue to offer innovative, exciting and relevant programmes, this list is therefore subject to change

- Accounting Organisations & Society
- Advanced Financial Management
- Advanced Financial Reporting
- Financial Statement Analysis

Course format and assessment

Term one: compulsory modules covering

- Financial management
- Reporting and analysis
- Management accounting
- Research methods

Term two:

- Compulsory module covering corporate governance and accountability
- Options covering advanced finance and other areas of management.

Term three:
- Individual research project.

Throughout the course you are assessed by a variety of methods, eg written examinations, coursework, individual or group projects, presentations, case studies, multiple-choice tests etc. More information on module-specific assessment can be found in module outlines. Assignment feedback is provided within four working weeks of submission.

Career prospects

Graduates from this programme will enter multinationals as well as smaller firms, across the business spectrum: financial institutions, management consulting, industry, or government bodies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

Read less
Corporate and business crime presents one of the key contemporary challenges to society, not only in terms of the difficulties it poses to the criminal justice system, but also in relation to the wider social harm it furthers. Read more

Corporate and business crime presents one of the key contemporary challenges to society, not only in terms of the difficulties it poses to the criminal justice system, but also in relation to the wider social harm it furthers. The study of this highly relevant and rapidly developing area of criminological research prepares students to make a real contribution to shaping policy around corporate accountability and corporate control.

The combination of analytic criminological knowledge and applied research skills on this programme will equip you with a sophisticated understanding of current challenges and perspectives in the area of corporate crime and corporate responsibility, whilst also enhancing your understanding of the main theories and ideas within contemporary criminology.

The Masters in Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) is aimed at graduates, professionals and practitioners with an appropriate first degree who have an interest in corporate crime or the fields of corporate ethics, governance and criminal behaviour.

It will also suit graduates and practitioners considering a PhD in this area; and practitioners and professionals in companies, business organisations, the criminal justice system and related government and voluntary agencies who wish to apply knowledge of criminology, corporate crime and corporate responsibility within their present position.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

The department supports students in finding three-to-four-week research placements during spring and summer vacation periods, and this approach has recently been supplemented to include strategies of support for students seeking a wider range of opportunities for professional development in the first-hand experience of research organisation – including such activities as part-time internships over longer periods, workplace visits, or shadowing research professionals.

This introduces further flexibility in a student-led process of professional development in light of increasing external pressures on students’ commitments and responsibilities. All, however, involve opportunities to consider issues in career development and professional skills.

The support process involves the department working closely with students on a one-to-one basis toward their goals and requirements, in association with the University’s Careers Service, to offer pastoral advice and support.

Organisations the department has worked with in the past have included the Office of National Statistics, Cabinet Office, HM Inspectorate of Prisons, Sussex Youth Offending team and Surrey Police.

In some cases, the work experience may also be with projects in academic contexts. Students seek experiential learning opportunities with the support of the department’s Senior Placement Tutor, and assistance from the Faculty Placement Office.

Educational aims of the programme

The MSc pathway in Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility will combine grounding in the discipline of criminology and training in the full range of qualitative and quantitative methods of social research with specialised understanding of the key issues attached to a criminal offending by corporate agents.

It is designed to meet the needs of students graduating from a first degree who have an interest in corporate crime, people who are currently employed and wish to apply knowledge of criminology, corporate crime and corporate responsibility within their present job, or those who wish to move into specialised research or practice in the fields of corporate ethics, governance and criminal behaviour. 

The degree provides an ideal foundation to undertake a part-time or full-time PhD.

The degree is suitable for a wide range of students in terms of age, professional background, and current occupation and circumstances.

Because of this diversity of experience, students on the degree learn a great deal from each other, including at the residential Weekend Conference in the middle of the first semester, and the Day Conference at the end of the first semester.

The full-time MSc is taught over 12 months and the part-time course over 24 months. Students who do not wish to undertake the Masters dissertation can obtain the Postgraduate Certificate in Criminology and Social Research (Corporate Crime and Corporate Responsibility) after gaining 60 credits, or the Postgraduate Diploma after gaining 120 credits.

Students studying for the MSc in full-time mode are required to submit their dissertation during the academic year in which they commenced registration.

It is expected that students studying part-time will have obtained a minimum of 60 credits by the end of the first 12 months of registration in order to proceed into the second year.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
Please note that this course is only open to applications for September 2018 entry. Read more
Please note that this course is only open to applications for September 2018 entry.

This graduate entry programme is designed to enable students to develop the required competences, skills and standards of proficiency to be eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as an Occupational Therapist with either the PgDip Occupational Therapy or the MSc Occupational Therapy. The award received depends on the modules passed.

The accelerated format allows the full-time professional training to be condensed into two years, rather than the traditional three-year route. Key features are the use of problem-based (PBL) and inquiry-based learning approaches. These educational approaches involve students working together in small groups and sharing responsibility for meeting module learning outcomes. The course therefore requires students to draw on a range of self-management skills and this experience acts as good preparation for entering the evolving world of health and social care as a qualified member of the workforce.

Occupational Therapy at LSBU has a dedicated team of tutors who utilise their wealth of knowledge, skills and clinical experiences of working in health and social care to inform the teaching programme. The team has a strong commitment to engaging with clinicians and service users in the teaching programme.

To support the teaching programme, the School of Health and Social Care has a dedicated suite of clinical skills labs, including two well-equipped Activities of Daily Living (ADL) suites plus large rooms for art, splinting and group skills sessions.

Modules

Year 1:

Introduction to occupational therapy and occupational science
Human function and occupational performance
Promoting health and wellbeing through occupation

Year 2:

Autonomy, accountability and development of professional identity
Person, environment and occupation
Contemporary Issues in occupational therapy

Students who successfully complete and pass 2 of the 3 first year modules at the first attempt have the option to transfer to the MSc pathway at the end of Year 1. One of these modules passed first time must be Module 3 - Promoting Health and Wellbeing Through Occupation.

School of Health and Social Care Dissertation (MSc pathway only)

All modules are assessed by a mix of written assignments, case studies, critical review, presentations, examinations, practice placements and a dissertation (MSc students only).

Timetable

Attendance is normally three to four days per week with the remaining time being used for self-directed study. There is often preparatory work for problem based learning groups as well as other teaching sessions. Whilst on placements students are full-time following the working hours of the setting.

Teaching and learning

The course uses a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, small group sessions, practical skills sessions, online and self-directed learning activities.

Placements

During the course you are required to successfully complete and pass over 1000 practice placement hours within a broad variety of health and social care settings; meeting the College of Occupational Therapists (2008), the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT, 2002) and the Health and Social Care Professions standards and requirements.

At LSBU, we work closely with a number of healthcare organisations to provide a wide range of suitable practice placements. You will therefore gain experience of working with:

• People of different ages, diverse backgrounds and life situations
• Acute and long standing health needs (including physical, mental health and learning disability)
• Services in a range of settings (hospital and community, urban and rural).

Structure of placement learning:

Practice placements are in four blocks and are developmental in nature as you progress through the course. Placements are full time following the working hours of the setting. Student work under the guidance and supervision of a state registered occupational therapist (practice educator).

Placement settings:

Placements will predominantly be within the Greater London area in the NHS, local authority, voluntary, social enterprise, charities and private sectors. Placements can be in established or emerging services. Applicants should be aware that they may need to cover travel costs and placements could require them to commute across London and beyond if necessary.

Professional links

We maintain very strong links with occupational therapists working in health and social care settings across the NHS London area. These expert clinicians contribute to the course design, delivery of teaching sessions and provision of practice placements.

The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council; the regulator of Health, Psychological and Social professionals.

The course is accredited by the College of Occupational Therapists; the professional association for occupational therapists.

The course is recognised by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists

Other professional links include the American Occupational Therapy Association, the Occupational Therapy Board of Australia, and the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy. You will be able to join the OT student society, which has won several LSBU awards.

Employability

Students who successfully complete the 6 core modules will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Occupational Therapy.

Students who successfully complete the 6 core modules and the additional School of Health and Social Care Dissertation module will be awarded an MSc in Occupational Therapy.

Graduates with either award are eligible to register as an Occupational Therapist with the HCPC. Registration allows you to practice as an Occupational Therapist within the NHS, community services and local authorities, as well as social enterprise and the private sector. Other settings include prisons, residential and nursing homes, schools and Social Services.

Read less
This programme will give you an international perspective on some of the most fundamentally important issues facing global business and society today and a theoretical and practical understanding of the fast-changing fields of governance and accountability. Read more
This programme will give you an international perspective on some of the most fundamentally important issues facing global business and society today and a theoretical and practical understanding of the fast-changing fields of governance and accountability.

Why this programme

◾While you will receive a grounding in finance and governance in the first part of the programme, you will have the opportunity to specialise in law, management, ethics or engage in further studies in accountancy or finance.
◾Your studies will balance critical engagement with theory and research, knowledge and understanding of techniques, and the development of the analytic skills needed for the effective management of governance and accountability in complex environments.
◾This programme will be of interest if you are considering a career in the ethical or compliance functions of businesses. It will also be of interest to non-financial managers who find themselves taking on compliance roles.
◾On completing the programme, you will have a competitive edge in the job market when looking for roles in financial services businesses, or (for existing business executives) governance positions at higher levels of the business.

Programme structure

This programme offers a strong financial theme in the first semester, but allows students the chance of specialisation through further studies in finance, management or law. Teaching is through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials.

You will take three core courses, three optional courses and complete a substantial independent piece of work, normally in the form of dissertation, on an accounting-related theme, which gives you the flexibility to specialise based on your chosen area of interest.

Core courses
◾Management accounting and control
◾Foundations of international corporate finance
◾International corporate governance and accountability.

Optional courses
◾Audit, risk and control
◾Accounting & business ethics
◾Governing risk & uncertainty
◾Human rights and business
◾Responsible banking and development finance
◾Social accounting, reporting and finance.

Career prospects

The central role of accounting and finance in today’s society makes our postgraduate degrees a sound basis for many stimulating and prestigious career opportunities and our graduates are in demand. On completing the programme, you will have a competitive edge in the job market when looking for roles in financial services businesses, or (for existing business executives) governance positions at higher levels of the business. Companies which have employed our graduates include Ernst & Young, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Coca Cola, and the United Nations.

Our dedicated College of Social Sciences Employability Officer works with students to enhance their employability.

Read less
This programme provides a solid understanding of corporate accountability issues involved in international finance and will improve students’ expertise and transferable skills for work in the finance and business sectors. Read more
This programme provides a solid understanding of corporate accountability issues involved in international finance and will improve students’ expertise and transferable skills for work in the finance and business sectors.

Through the programme students will develop knowledge of finance, business and corporate accountability, and acquire a critical awareness of current issues in both professional practice and the academic discipline.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Six core modules are studied over semester 1 and semester 2:

International Finance
Emerging Financial Markets
Corporate Social Responsibility
Derivatives
Corporate Governance
Research Methods

One further optional module is taken in each semester.

The MSc dissertation is then completed between May and August.

FIND OUT MORE



Read less
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

Read less
IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

Read less
Definitive Programme Document - http://apss.polyu.edu.hk/files/maspsd_dpd_1617_final.pdf. Read more
Definitive Programme Document - http://apss.polyu.edu.hk/files/maspsd_dpd_1617_final.pdf

Programme Aims

The MA in social Policy and Social Development Programme aims to prepare students to develop the necessary core professional and personal competence required to work in the field of social policy and to engage in professional practices in social development. This involves gaining critical knowledge and skills in analysing and appreciating local and global policy issues and the ability to formulate and assess policy options that ensure effective, appropriate and sustainable outcomes, uphold social justice and improve social well-being. To these ends, the programme is designed to bring together theory and practice that enables participants in the programme to meet challenges in social development ethically and imaginatively.

Special Features

Unlike most other postgraduate programmes in social policy, this MASPSD is designed for those who are either to embark on a career in Social Policy and Social Development or those who are already mid-career practitioners seeking to improve their knowledge about public and non-government sectors specialising in social policy and planning for social development. It is structured to offer rigorous, interdisciplinary and hands-on training across a number of academic, managerial and professional disciplines that prepare participants to transfer knowledge into action to bring about social development, especially through responsible policy analysis, formulation, impact assessment and evaluation.

The programme will provide students with a solid foundation in social policy analysis that can be adapted and applied in many fields of human service provision and practice in social development. Graduates are expected to gain the competence necessary to participate effectively in social policy processes, conduct needs assessments, evaluate policy impacts and develop appropriate and relevant policy options that respond responsibly to new challenges in social development.

Programme Structure

‌•MA : to be eligible for the award, students are required to take 30 credits (6 Required Subjects including the Integrative Project and 4 Elective Subjects).
‌•PgD : Students who have successfully completed 21 credits (5 Required Subjects and 2 Elective Subjects) can exit that programme with a Postgraduate Diploma.
‌•PgC : Students who have successfully completed 12 credits (2 Required Subjects and 2 Elective Subjects) can exit the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate.

Professional Recognition

Graduates of this programme may apply for membership of the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA).

Core Areas of Study

Required Subjects

‌•Policy Research Method
‌•Social Context and ethics
‌•Social Policy Analysis and Social Accountability
‌•Social Planning and the Policy Process
‌•Theory and Practice of Social Development
‌•Integrative Project


Elective Subjects

‌•Assessing Globalization and Social Development
‌•Managing Information in Social Service Organizations
‌•Organization Theories and Analysis
‌•Comparative Social Policy and Social Development
‌•Contemporary Issues in Social Policy
‌•Digital Technologies and Social Development
‌•Social Impact Assessment
‌•Social Policy and Social Development in China
‌•Social Policy Evaluation

Application Period and Submission of Application

Application period and submission of application
‌•Applicants can obtain the application material and submit online application via [email protected] during Application Period.

Application Period

‌•http://www.polyu.edu.hk/study > Postgraduate Programmes > Select a Programme
‌•Late applications will be considered subject to availability of places.

Submit an Application

‌•http://www.polyu.edu.hk/study

Enquiries

Please contact Mr. Ken WAN at 2766 5784 or e-mail to Ms Angel SHING at for enquiry

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X