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Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Read more
Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in:
-Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data.
-Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.
-Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge.
-Reporting results in a clear and logical manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The six study lines are as follows:
Aerosol Physics
Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the most recent theoretical concepts, measurement techniques and computational methods applied in aerosol research.

Geophysics of the Hydrosphere
Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes.

Meteorology
Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example. As a graduate of the meteorology line, you will be an expert in atmospheric phenomena who can produce valuable new information and share your knowledge.

Biogeochemical Cycles
Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Remote Sensing
Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry. As a graduate of the remote sensing line you will have broad expertise in the operational principles of remote sensing instruments as well as methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Atmospheric Chemistry and Analysis
Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods. As a graduate of this line you will have understanding of the chemical processes of the atmosphere and the latest environmental analytical methods, so you will have vital skills for environmental research.

Programme Structure

The basic degree in the Programme is the Master of Science (MSc). The scope of the degree is 120 credits (ECTS). As a prerequisite you will need to have a relevant Bachelor’s degree. The possible major subjects are Physics, Meteorology, Geophysics, Chemistry, and Forest Ecology. The programme is designed to be completed in two years. Studies in ATM-MP consist of various courses and project work: lecture courses, seminars, laboratory work and intensive courses.

Your first year of studies will consist mainly of lecture courses. During the second year, you must also participate in the seminar course and give a presentation yourself. There is also a project course, which may contain laboratory work, data analysis, or theoretical or model studies. You will have to prepare a short, written report of the project. There are also several summer and winter schools as well as field courses for students in the Programme. Many of the courses take place at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. The intensive courses typically last 5–12 days and include a concise daily programme with lectures, exercises and group work.

Career Prospects

There is a global need for experts with multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and environmental issues. Governmental environmental agencies need people who are able to interpret new scientific results as a basis for future legislation. Industry, transportation and businesses need to be able to adapt to new regulations.

As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. Graduates of the Programme have found employment in Meteorological Institutes and Environmental Administration in Finland and other countries, companies manufacturing instrumentation for atmospheric and environmental measurements and analysis, and consultancy companies. The Master's degree in ATM-MP also gives you a good background if you intend to proceed to doctoral level studies.

Internationalization

The Programme offers an international study environment with more than 30% of the students and teaching staff coming from abroad.

The ATM-MP is part of a Nordic Nordplus network in Atmosphere-Biosphere Studies, which gives you good opportunities to take courses currently in fourteen Nordic and Baltic universities. There are also several Erasmus agreements with European universities. The PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX) project provides you with opportunities to carry out part of your studies especially in China and Russia.

Research Focus

All the units teaching in the Programme belong to the National Centre of Excellence (FCoE) in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM), which is a multidisciplinary team of the Departments of Physics, Forest Sciences and Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Eastern Finland (Kuopio) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

The main objective of FCoE ATM is to quantify the feedbacks between the atmosphere and biosphere in a changing climate. The main focus of the research is on investigating the following topics:
1. Understanding the climatic feedbacks and forcing mechanisms related to aerosols, clouds, precipitation and biogeochemical cycles.
2. Developing, refining and utilising the newest measurement and modelling techniques, from quantum chemistry to observations and models of global earth systems.
3. Creating a comprehensive understanding of the role of atmospheric clusters and aerosol particles in regional and global biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and their linkages to atmospheric chemistry.
4. Integrating the results in the context of understanding regional and global Earth systems.

In addition to the research focus of FCoE, current research in hydrospheric geophysics at Helsinki University has an emphasis on cryology, with a focus on the effect of aerosols on Indian glaciers, the impact of climate change on the Arctic environment, the dynamics of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard, and the winter season in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

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These courses provide epidemiological training for professionals in academic departments, research units, or in the health services. Read more
These courses provide epidemiological training for professionals in academic departments, research units, or in the health services.

Epidemiology is the key discipline underlying medical research, public health practice and health care evaluation. The understanding of its principles and practice is crucial for those involved in the design or assessment of epidemiological studies and programme evaluation. Epidemiological methods are also used to describe the size and nature of health problems, to investigate the aetiology of specific diseases, and to evaluate the impact of interventions for treating and preventing ill health.

These courses provide epidemiology training for professionals in academic departments, research modules or in the health services. They are suitable for those aiming for a career in epidemiology research, academics in other health areas and other health professionals. The courses are also of interest to people who require an understanding of epidemiology, such as medical journalists and scientific officers in government and industry.

The aims and learning outcomes of the courses are detailed in the programme specification.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/progspec_epidemiology.pdf)
- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/prospectus/lshtm-prospectus.pdf)

[[Free sessions from our Distance Learning Epidemiology course ]]
- EPM101 taster session This 10-minute taster session is taken from EPM101 Fundamentals of Epidemiology, the first core module of this Distance Learning Epidemiology course. It will introduce you to some epidemiological ideas and invite you to answer some of the questions that faced John Snow when he investigated the 1848 London cholera epidemic.

- EPM307 session on Cancer Epidemiology This 2-3 hour session is part of our Distance Learning Epidemiology module on the Global Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases. The session was jointly developed by the School and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The session covers how data about cancer are collected and used, how secular and geographic variations in cancer burden can be interpreted, the most common risk factors associated with cancer globally, and how cancer can be prevented and controlled. Note that this session includes video clips and may take a few minutes to open.

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsepp.html

Method of assessment

Assessment varies from module to module but will include a combination of unseen written examinations and written assignments. Details are given in the module specifications.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. We have examination centres in over 180 countries worldwide (for details please visit the assessment and examinations section).

Examinations are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt.

Credit awarded

Credits will be awarded to all modules (15 credits each) and (MSc only) the project (45 credits) successfully completed. To successfully pass an award, the following credits must be gained:

- Postgraduate Certificate – 60 credits
- Postgraduate Diploma – 120 credits
- Master's – 180 credits

Study materials

Most of the key study materials for the Epidemiology modules are in the form of interactive computer sessions (on CD-ROM or downloadable online), while two modules use a printed Study Guide. Workbooks, readers, textbooks and /or additional computer software (e.g. Stata) may be provided, depending on the modules studied. Materials are also provided online where possible, via the School's online learning site Moodle. Additional resources include past examination papers and Examiners’ reports, a Student Handbook and access to the School’s online library.

Flexible study

The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while two modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. The project work (MSc only) is carried out in the final year, with submission at the end of September.

Support

Support is available from teaching staff allocated to each module in the following ways:

- Facilitating discussion between students and answering student queries, using online discussion forums through the School’s online learning site Moodle

- Providing personalised feedback from teaching staff on assignments

- Holding real-time webinars in some modules

- Students undertaking a project are assigned personal supervisors.

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsepp.html#seventh

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The MSc in Glaciology is designed to provide you with a range of skills appropriate for the practical and theoretical challenges of glaciological research, but which are also highly relevant to wider Earth Science and Physical Geographical contexts and employment beyond. Read more
The MSc in Glaciology is designed to provide you with a range of skills appropriate for the practical and theoretical challenges of glaciological research, but which are also highly relevant to wider Earth Science and Physical Geographical contexts and employment beyond.

Supported by world-leading glaciology staff in the Department of Geography and Earth Sciences (DGES), you will gain high-level, subject-specific expertise in the critically-important study areas of glaciology, glacial geological and glacial geomorphological investigation. The department’s careful balance of tutoring and independent study will thoroughly prepare you for further doctoral study and specialist employment.

In addition, you will develop a broad range of personal and practical skills through new experiences in managing teams and individuals, planning, implementing and evaluating research programmes, and the use of field and remote sensing technology. Whether you progress into related geographical employment or not, these sought-after skills and experiences will enhance your employability and impress prospective employers. Your mastery of analytical and applied skills and strategies will stand you in good stead throughout your career in which ever sector you choose.

We invite applications from students from a range of related disciplines including geologists, geographers, environmental Earth scientists and computer scientists.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/glaciology-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to obtain a Master’s degree from an internationally-renowned research institute;
- If you have a 2:1 degree or higher in a related discipline;
- If you wish to gain academic expertise, field skills and technical experience a single course of study;
- If you wish to enter one of a diverse range of careers requiring research, analysis and practical excellence.

Course detail

The Master’s in Glaciology is a full-time programme taught over one year. Having completed your undergraduate degree in a related field, this MSc will enable you to bring your skills and knowledge up to date with a mastery of the latest technological tools and contemporary theoretical understanding. The course will also enhance your oral, visual and written communication skills, as well as your ability to work independently or in a team setting.

The course is divided into two parts over three semesters. In part one, you will establish a breadth of necessary skills in a number of core modules whilst directing your own study by choosing specialist modules. You will receive specific instruction in a wide range of specialist skills, including the programming and operation of automated instruments, interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, the use of computer software – especially quantitative analysis, GIS and remote sensing tools – and the use of field skills in sedimentological logging and landform interpretation.

In part two, you will apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. You will prove your mastery of the subject in this final 15000-word assessment and directly contribute to the knowledge base of DGES. For those considering progression into a PhD, the dissertation project can form the basis for a doctoral proposal and, subsequently, a foundation for a career in academia and further research.

Whatever your own previous experience or future aspiration, you will benefit from a superb variety of outside and in-class learning environments. Outside activities include field research expeditions, including a week in the European Alps, case study visits and team development activities. In-class activities include lectures, seminars, guest speakers and specialist technological workshops. Our small class sizes offer a friendly environment to encourage communication and sharing of experiences, opinions and observations between you and your colleagues.

As a graduate of the MSc in Glaciology, you will emerge with broadened horizons, technological and theoretical expertise and proven field experience.

Our lecturers are active researchers working at the cutting edge of their disciplines, and you will benefit from being taught the latest geographical theories and techniques. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework assessment (REF 2014) DGES retained its crown of the best Geography department in Wales, with 78% of the research being undertaken classified as either "world leading" or "internationally excellent”. DGES is also in the top ten of UK Geography departments with regard to research power, which provides a measure of the quality of research, as well as of the number of staff undertaking research within the department.

Format

Contact time approximately 8-10 hours a week in the first two semesters.

Assessment

The taught part of the course (Part1) is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises, case studies, course work and formal examinations. The subsequent successful submission of a 15,000 word research dissertation (Part 2) leads to the award of an MSc.

Employability

Every aspect of the MSc in Glaciology programme is designed to enhance your employability: indeed, successful completion of this degree is in itself certain to do so; but we set more store by the hugely enhanced knowledge, abilities and skills with which you will graduate. We believe that prospective employers take a similar view. This course will widen your knowledge, skills, experience and understanding of the subject in such a way that cultivates transferable skills which will benefit you in other disciplines of work and study.

In addition to building your CV, completion of this Master’s course demonstrates your passion for furthering human knowledge at a delicate stage in global affairs. Understanding the processes that govern glaciers and snow cover is not only crucial for developing models of the response to climatic change, but also for evaluating water and other natural resources, understanding waste disposal, assessing pollution and tracking earth-surface erosion.

By completing the Master’s in Glaciology, you will have aligned your passion to a unique and highly-desirable set of skills and experiences. Your tutored expertise, personal research and team experience in the field will make you an engaging candidate for areas of work relating to Geography, but also to more generic positions within companies that require thoroughness in research, clarity in analysis and fluency in communication. You will gain these skills and more as you progress through your studies at DGES.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Essex is one of the oldest inhabited areas of the British Isles, a landscape shaped by human history. Our MA Wild Writing allows you to explore this landscape and the wilder landscapes of Britain, as well as those across the world, through a combination of science and literature modules. Read more
Essex is one of the oldest inhabited areas of the British Isles, a landscape shaped by human history. Our MA Wild Writing allows you to explore this landscape and the wilder landscapes of Britain, as well as those across the world, through a combination of science and literature modules. Our field trips take you outside the classroom, often in sun, sometimes in snow or rain. You gain an understanding of key environmental challenges while building your own ways of approaching writing about the wild: creative, critical, and scientific.

One of only five universities in the UK to offer a taught postgraduate course on literature and the environment, we are unique in our combination of modules on contemporary nature writing, ecocriticism, and psychogeographic literature.

Our full-year focus on writing about landscape, place, and the environment allows you the choice of focusing on developing your scholarly abilities through exploring ecocriticism, or on developing your creative writing practice about the natural world – or you can aim to advance both.

Your core modules cover topics including:
-The emergent creative non-fiction genre exemplified by figures such as Robert Macfarlane, Kathleen Jamie, and Helen Macdonald
19th – 21st century environmental poetry and prose
-Contemporary ecocriticism and environmental literature
-Psychogeography

An unusual collaboration between the departments of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies and Biological Sciences, we also offer you the opportunity to gain a greater scientific depth of knowledge about the natural world as you develop as a writer. You might want to explore the impacts and management of pollution or the ecology of fisheries.

You will explore the literature of landscape and the environment both within the seminar room and beyond, exploring the wild spaces of Essex and East Anglia through field trips that take you to wonderfully wild worlds in the company of leading experts. We visit inspiring areas including Mersea Island, Orford Ness, Tilbury, and the Norfolk Fens.

Our expert staff

Our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies is ranked Top 200 in the QS World University Rankings (2016), with three-quarters of our research rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

Teachers on the course include the internationally renowned ecocriticism scholar Dr Susan Oliver, who is a specialist in Romantic and 19th-century studies; the poet and nature writer Dr Chris McCully; and, environmental scholar and writer Professor Jules Pretty.

The MA Wild Writing is led by the writer Dr James Canton, who recently spoke on Radio 4’s ‘Open Country’ about the landscapes of Essex, and specialises in nature and travel writing.

Specialist facilities

-Start to get some publications to your name by writing for our student nature writing blog Wildeasters
-Access our archives – the University of Essex is home to the notebooks, diaries, maps, letters, and binoculars of J. A. Baker, author of the critically acclaimed The Peregrine (1967)
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Hear writers talk about their craft and learn from leading literature specialists at the Essex Book Festival – the festival director is based in our department, and loads of events take place on campus
-Get involved onstage or behind the scenes at our on-campus Lakeside Theatre
-Learn a language for free alongside your course

Your future

A number of our graduates from the MA Wild Writing have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers; others are practicing artists, scholars or environmentalists. One now works on climate change in Washington, another is a “wild practitioner” who work on the relation between nature and mental health and another now works for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police around Chesapeake Bay!

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages. Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK, which means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

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This unique course allows you to study children’s literature in a flexible, part-time format. You’ll engage with staff working in the UK’s leading centre in the field and explore a range of landmark texts for young people, from fairy tales and picturebooks to classics and graphic novels. Read more

Summary

This unique course allows you to study children’s literature in a flexible, part-time format. You’ll engage with staff working in the UK’s leading centre in the field and explore a range of landmark texts for young people, from fairy tales and picturebooks to classics and graphic novels.

This programme invites you to explore the exciting and varied world of children’s literature, and to examine how texts aimed at young people convey and challenge ideas about childhood. You will be taught by a team of staff with international reputations and expertise in areas such as philosophy, popular fiction, adolescence, critical theory, landscape, and memory.

As a distance learner you will have access to specialist services, and a wide range of e-books and digitised items from the Children’s Literature Collection at the University Library which contains 3,000 critical, theoretical, bibliographical and reference works and approximately 40 specialist children's literature journals.

As a Children’s Literature student, you will become a member of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL), regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in Britain. The NCRCL has close links with organisations that work to further the study and teaching of children's literature, including The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children’s Books), and Booktrust. The University is also the exclusive Creative Partner of Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, London’s largest event dedicated to children’s writing. You can stay up-to-date with the NCRCL by following their blog.

Content

This programme asks you to think about children’s literature in new ways. In your first year you will be introduced to essential critical approaches, from feminist theory, psychoanalysis, and reader-response criticism, to new ideas about the child, power and ethics. Using these tools, you’ll study fairy tales such as 'Snow White' and 'Puss in Boots,' classic children’s literature including Kenneth Graham’s The Wind in the Willows and Judith Kerr’s landmark picturebook The Tiger Who Came to Tea, and the contemporary innovations of authors like Melvin Burgess, Shaun Tan and Jackie Kay.

In optional modules you can study the history of British children’s literature from its origins to the present day, as well as texts in translation, and visual and verse forms. Throughout the course you will gain knowledge of literary works produced for children, and the social, cultural and historical contexts of their production. The eclectic and rigorous nature of the programme allows you to contribute original work from a variety of perspectives, particularly in the extended critical Dissertation. The creative writing modules, ‘Writing for a Child Audience’ and ‘Creative Dissertation’ represent exciting additions to the programme, recognising the fact that many of our students have ambitions to write for children.

The Distance Learning MA is taught through a mixture of independent study, tutor feedback, and peer support. Most modules on offer include a course pack, with digital materials and links to an online learning environment. You will work through the materials, undertake learning activities, and discuss ideas with other students through online discussion boards and online seminars. At the end of each module, you will complete a piece of coursework, usually an essay, to demonstrate your understanding of the subject.

This MA can also be studied on site.

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The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology located in dedicated radio/television studios and multimedia newsrooms you work to real deadlines to make news programmes and upload your work to the internet. Your tutors are award-winning journalists with decades of front-line experience in national and international news. Every day starts with an editorial conference and the degree programme balances focus on journalism as practical reality with intense academic study and reflection.

This programme is especially designed for those students who do not intend to practise journalism in the United Kingdom.

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Journalism and Free Expression and Practical Multimedia Journalism introduce you to the intellectual and professional challenges of reporting for newspapers, radio, television and the internet. You choose optional academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Reporting Conflict; Communication and Humanitarianism, Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

You may choose to complete a dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

JN800 - Reporting (45 credits)
JN802 - Practical Multimedia Journalism (45 credits)
JN804 - Dissertation in Multimedia Journalism (30 credits)
JN814 - Journalism and Free Expression (30 credits)
JN815 - Political Reporting (15 credits)
JN816 - Propaganda-Media, Manipulation and Persuasion (15 credits)
JN806 - Reporting Conflict (15 credits)
JN807 - Advanced Multimedia Storytelling (15 credits)
JN808 - Communication and Humanitarianism (15 credits)
JN813 - Sports Journalism (15 credits)

Assessment

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- teach the professional and academic skills required to practise multimedia journalism to those wishing to pursue a career in the news industry

- educate you to think critically about the ethics, duties and responsibilities of journalism in democratic societies and in emerging democracies and thus improve the quality of journalism as a profession

- produce graduates with a courageous and principled vision of the purpose of journalism and its constitutional value in contemporary democratic societies

- develop a detailed and systematic understanding of particular forms of journalism and their historic and contemporary role in the shaping of culture and society

- develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the impact of new technologies on journalism

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills and research skills

- foster lifelong learning skills that will enable you to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to journalism and society

- bring scholarly and critical insights to bear on the subjects, activities and processes associated with multimedia journalism

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Centre for Journalism and elsewhere.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, documentary film, journalism technology, democracy, propaganda, global media

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Our students have obtained jobs at places such as Sky News, The Daily Mail, BBC Newsround and the Huffington Post.

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Develop the advanced skills you’ll need for a successful career in journalism. Create substantial pieces of journalism on aspects of arts, culture and lifestyle that you’re passionate about and learn from tutors with extensive professional experience of arts journalism in print, broadcast and online. Read more

Introduction

Develop the advanced skills you’ll need for a successful career in journalism. Create substantial pieces of journalism on aspects of arts, culture and lifestyle that you’re passionate about and learn from tutors with extensive professional experience of arts journalism in print, broadcast and online.

Content

MA Arts and Lifestyle Journalism prepares students for this important and growing field of journalism. From music magazines and newspaper arts supplements to specialist radio and TV programmes, websites and digital publishers, there is a huge demand for arts, lifestyle and cultural journalism.

Situated in the heart of city, London College of Communication is the ideal place to study this dynamic branch of journalism. Guided by tutors with professional, multi-platform experience gained at national newspapers and websites, the BBC, Sky TV and elsewhere, you will develop key practical journalistic skills and learn how to apply them to your particular area of interest in arts, culture and lifestyle.

You will gain invaluable work experience by undertaking a placement in a media organisation and benefit from our guest lecture programme that has included talks from Jon Snow of Channel 4 News, Luke Lewis of Buzzfeed, Mary Hockaday of the BBC and Bruno Bayley, editor of Vice UK (and a former student at LCC), as well as journalists from a range of national newspapers and other publications.

The course culminates in your producing a substantial piece of journalism in the medium or media of your choice.

Structure

Further information will be available shortly on the course webpage.

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This course is designed to give those aspiring to work in this burgeoning sector the best possible start on the road to success. It addresses subjects such as writing, subediting, production and design techniques, research skills and how to generate lively, interactive content for the web. Read more
This course is designed to give those aspiring to work in this burgeoning sector the best possible start on the road to success. It addresses subjects such as writing, subediting, production and design techniques, research skills and how to generate lively, interactive content for the web.

Key features

-Our tutors are practising journalists with a range of experience. You will also benefit from guest speakers from national magazines and newspapers in both print and online. Past speakers have included Guardian feature writers Simon Hattenstone and Decca Aitkenhead; Louise Court, editor of Cosmopolitan UK; Luke Lewis, editor of NME.com; campaigning journalist John Pilger; and Jon Snow of Channel 4 News.
-We have a successful partnership with Haymarket Network, the award-winning customer publishing division of the largest private magazine publisher in the UK, providing the opportunity to compete for Haymarket fellowships annually.
-You can choose to study this course in combination with Publishing.

What will you study?

You will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars and practical workshops focusing on hands-on activities, such as writing, interviewing, subediting, magazine production, blogging, and writing and uploading copy for the web. In collaboration with other students, you will produce a magazine (print and online), and will undertake at least one placement on a published title.

You will also have the opportunity to study feature writing, design and production, journalism practices and the business of magazines. Finally, you will carry out a 12–15,000-word dissertation or a related practical project.

Assessment

Articles, features, news, portfolios, case studies, presentations, essays, dissertation and work-based learning.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Creating Magazines: Content and Context
-Feature Writing
-Journalism in Context: Law, Ethics and the Industry
-MA Journalism Dissertation
-Practical Journalism Project

Optional modules
-Shorthand (Postgraduate)
-Specialist Journalism: Business
-Specialist Journalism: Fashion
-Specialist Journalism: Sport

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This MSc course offers an innovative interdisciplinary perspective on the study of cancer. Three core modules encompass biological and social sciences. Read more
This MSc course offers an innovative interdisciplinary perspective on the study of cancer.

Three core modules encompass biological and social sciences. These equip you to apply key theories and concepts critically, and to develop the skills required to engage in debates about the impact of cancer on the individual, the family and society.

A wide range of additional modules offers the opportunity to examine aspects of cancer in greater detail from different perspectives, ranging from professional practice to historical perspectives, from epidemiological and medical research to biotechnology.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/cancer-studies/

Why choose this course?

- Our lecturers maintain excellent practice links in their specialist areas locally, regionally and nationally.

- You will have access to state-of-the-art clinical skills simulation suites and resources.

- The department hosts the prestigious HRH Prince Sultan Chair in Cancer Care and the Cancer Care research group.

- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent.

- You will be undertaking advanced study in Oxford, which has a new Cancer Centre and a range of expert practitioners working in the cancer field.

- "Students on this course will gain important insights into the nature of cancer research and its broader implications." Sir Paul Nurse

Teaching and learning

You will be given opportunities to be involved in all aspects of your programme - its management and delivery.

Different students will bring varied experiences and cultures and will be encouraged to share these with each other. You will be expected to take responsibility for your own learning and also to contribute to the learning of your fellow students.

The programme includes a taught element, informed by relevant national and international research and evidence-based literature, designed to be a starting point for critical reading and reflection. Mutual support between students enhances the learning experience and will be strongly encouraged.

In order to make the most of the range of experience, skills and knowledge within the group, a variety of teaching and learning strategies will be employed.
- Lectures introduce you to new areas of study and provide the context for further independent reading and practical work.

- Group activities (eg seminars, workshops, presentations) are used as a means of sharing knowledge and experience, developing critical skills, and emphasising the inter-disciplinary nature of the course.

- Presentation skills are developed through student-led seminars, presentations to your fellow students for some of the assessments.

Studying on this course will give you in-depth knowledge of cancer from the molecular level to the personal, social, societal and international levels. In doing so, you will draw on knowledge from life sciences, psychology, sociology, history, and the health care professions. This means that the course requires a flexible mind and a willingness to see familiar subjects in challenging new ways.
This course does not provide a specialised clinical training in medicine or any other health profession, but it does provide professionals with an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the nature of cancer.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is designed to ensure that you develop and demonstrate the required knowledge and skills to successfully complete your programme. Types of assessments within your programme are varied and appropriate for individual module and programme learning outcomes and content, the academic standard expected and different learning styles.

Assessment is mainly by essay writing, helping you to develop high levels of critical analysis, original thinking and clarity of expression.

Assessments are used to give you an opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge as well as the critical and reflective analysis required for professional practice. You will be given the opportunity to submit draft work for feedback and formative assessment.

Endorsements

Sir Paul Nurse (Nobel Laureate and former chief executive of Cancer Research UK)

"Students on this course will gain important insights into the nature of cancer research and its broader implications. As the influence of science on society continues to grow, such insights are as important to scientists as they are to the wider public."

Jon Snow (Journalist, broadcaster and former Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University)

"Cancer and how it is dealt with needs to be seen in its wider social and political context. Oxford Brookes University provides a great environment in which students can engage with these issues."

Attendance pattern

Most modules on the programme involve attendance in the classroom once a week over a 12-week semester period.

How this course helps you develop

You will be given opportunities to develop your academic abilities at master's level, including critical reading and writing skills, digital literacy, communication and teamwork skills. Your contact with other students from different disciplines will provide you with networks that may be of value to you in the development of your future career.

Careers

You will be provided with additional knowledge and expertise to enable you to pursue your chosen career, whether this is in the biological, social sciences or humanities.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Cancer research is a key focus and the department hosts the prestigious HRH Prince Sultan Chair in Cancer Care. This is a very exciting addition to our portfolio, as it enables us to play a leading role in research development and education to improve the experience of patients undergoing cancer treatment and palliative care.

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, 98% of our research in Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy was rated as internationally recognised, with 82% being world leading or internationally excellent. The university has been careful to nurture emerging research strengths, and the international standing achieved by subjects allied to health demonstrates significant progress since 2008.

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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry.

Research programmes are best suited to students who have a clear and original idea of a topic that they would like to investigate in detail. The MA by Research entails producing a 40,000 word thesis; the MPhil programme demands a high level of research and analysis resulting in a dissertation of 50,000 words (MPhil).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/111/journalism

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

All first-year research students attend a Methodologies and Research Skills seminar. Through the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Centre provides training in methods of using sources and can assist in funding applications.

We welcome research applications across the range of expertise in the Centre and from all over the world.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, journalism technology, democracy

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

The resources for journalism research at Kent are led by the Drill Hall Library at Medway. The journalism collection includes a comprehensive range of texts on the history, principles and practice of journalism. Specialist resources include a complete microfiche archive of popular newspapers of the Second World War. Students have access to online full-text journals plus extensive online newspaper resources. The Centre subscribes to all relevant UK journals. Research students have access to the SCONUL access scheme to visit and borrow from other UK libraries. The Drill Hall Library contains more than 250 study spaces, 370 computers and more than 150,000 items.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); The Media, Politics and Public Life, Slow Living, Informing Voters? Politics, Media and the New Zealand Election 2008, Politics and the Media (Geoffrey Craig); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills

Careers

A postgraduate research degree in Journalism provides you with qualifications for a teaching career in Journalism or a related discipline. It can also provide you with expertise that can assist in a journalism career in a particular area of reportage. Other career options include public policy research, media promotions and public affairs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course gives you unique access to the television journalism industry with 96% employment rate in the TV or related industry and tailored work placements every week. Read more
This course gives you unique access to the television journalism industry with 96% employment rate in the TV or related industry and tailored work placements every week.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a first degree looking to become good all-round television journalists capable of working in newsrooms, on multi-media and in documentaries and current affairs. Applicants should have an interest in video and TV films and have a broad general knowledge including lifestyle, sport and politics. While this course is NOT about TV presenting, it’s important that you aren’t afraid to be in front of the camera and even more important that you are keen to write and provide material for others to present. Vitally, you should want to communicate using moving pictures and be excited by the wonderful world of television!

Objectives

The MA in Television Journalism has unparalleled contact with the TV industry and each Wednesday in term one and two, students work in the TV journalism industry. The course is designed for 30 students subdivided into teaching groups of 15 with daily personal contact with Professor Lis Howell, and award winning film maker Sally Webb. The documentary legend David Lloyd (formerly commissioning editor of Channel Four current affairs programmes) and ABC news producer Mike Trew make up the team. Students make half hour documentaries in teams of three in term three and these films have won awards like Guardian Young Journalists of the Year; The BJTC documentary award; and been re-worked for broadcast on BBC 2’s ‘Newsnight’. The course is grounded in news production but also branches out with a Question Time programme which has included guests such as Jeremy Corbyn; Stephanie Flanders; Jon Snow and Yasmin Alibi Brown plus may more.

Placements

MA TV have tailored placement each Wednesday. There is no doubt that the size of the City cohort means unique networking opportunities with present students and 4,000 alumni but at the same time every student is given personal help to achieve a job in broadcasting. Every student counts. Organisations that have taken our students for placements include:
-ABC
-Al-Jazeera
-BBC
-Blakeway Productions
-Blink
-CTVC
-Flame
-Hardcash Productions
-ITN
-ITN Sport (Olympics)
-NorthOne
-October Films
-OR Media
-Plum Films
-politics.com
-Reuters
-Sky
-Talkback

Academic facilities

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media simulated broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for people that want to become journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation.

Some courses are taught in lecture theatres but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics. Teaching hours are between Mondays to Fridays during working hours, and occasionally outside those times.

Assessment

Assessments vary from module to module but include coursework, practical work both in groups and individually, a Final Project, a written timed test, and essays.Activities include lectures, practical work in groups and individually, personal tutorials, and independent learning

This pathway is taught by professors, senior lecturers and lecturers, with industry practitioners as Visiting Lecturers, and a number of key industry visiting speakers.

Modules

All of our Television Journalism MA students must undertake underpinning core modules in Ethics, Rules and Standards and a Final Project. As a Television Journalism student you will have specialist core and elective modules that complement these projects.

Core modules
-Ethics, Rules & Standards (30 credits)
-Final Project (30 credits)
-Newsgathering for TV and Radio (30 credits)
-Newsdays Production (30 credits)
-Studio Production for TV or Radio (15 credits)
-UK Media Law (15 credits)
-Political Headlines (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Journalism Innovation (15 credits)
-Social & Digital Journalism (15 credits)

Career prospects

Our postgraduate courses have 96% employment rate across the journalism courses according to graduates responding to the 14/15 DLHE survey. Alumni include BBC’s Sophie Raworth and famous names such as:
-Dermot Murnaghan (Sky News)
-Barbara Serra (Al Jazeera)
-Jo Whiley (BBC Radio)

Recent graduates of the MA Broadcasting include:
-Ramita Navai, Emmy Award-winning documentary maker
-Chris Mason (BBC Political Reporter)
-Isobel Webster (Sky News)
-Darren McGaffrey (Sky News)
-Minnie Stephenson (ITN)
-Cordelia Lynch (Sky News Washington)

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Materials have always played a significant and defining role in human development, from the Stone Age to the material world of today. Read more
Materials have always played a significant and defining role in human development, from the Stone Age to the material world of today. Materials are central to our prosperity and new materials hold the key to our future development. Material engineers therefore have an essential role in developing the materials of today and the future and in taking performance to the next level.

Programme description

Material related issues can be found in all areas of life and engineering e.g. in biomedical, telecommunications, aeronautical, construction, chemical and mechanical, and in all aspects of a products life, from an idea or discovery to a prototype or finished product and recycling. In the puzzle of innovation, material engineers focus on the application of materials, where they test, develop and modify materials that are used in a wide range of products, from jet engines and snow skis to smartphones and diapers.

The ultimate performance of most products and processes is limited by the performance of materials, which are linked to the structure and resulting properties of a material. This in turn is affected by how the material is manufactured and processed. Materials must also perform in an economical and societal context. The challenge for the materials engineer lies in understanding the relationship between these aspects of materials, to improve their properties and to communicate these findings.

In addition, materials science and engineering is a key technology for environmentally sustainable development, and the importance of materials engineering is therefore growing in society.

The overall aim of the Materials Engineering Master’s programme is to offer both depth and flexibility in a comprehensive materials education focused on the application of materials. Courses are closely linked to the industry as well as contemporary research; the degree you receive here will have a wide application.

You will become an engineer of reality, a problem finder and developer both in theory and practice and besides becoming an expert on materials, you will also represent a bridge between researchers and constructors.

Educational methods

Contemporary challenges in materials cut across the traditional lines of engineering and science. Methods of modern materials engineering rely on the mix of competence and knowledge, presence where the problems occur, effective testing and model building. This is reflected in the education, which provides for example advanced experimental equipment, modern software for materials simulation applied on real material problems. In labs, with real life problems provided by the industry, you will learn through a make and brake pedagogy, exploring the limits of new materials and concepts through experiments in both theory and practice. We also emphasise that interdisciplinary intercultural international communication and teamwork are essential parts in successful projects.

Courses are run by faculty from departments of Materials and Manufacturing, Chemical and Biological engineering, applied Mechanics, Microtechnology and nanoscience, and applied Physics. Courses cover metals, ceramics, polymers and composites as well as topics of particular current interest in industry, such as material selection and design, environmental adaptation, failure analysis or materials innovation processes.

As a student, you will gain knowledge and skills to handle the complexity of materials problems and to find solutions to problems within the entire chain of a product from design, manufacturing and use to recycling. You will learn how to understand failures, select materials, develop processes and develop properties, making processes more efficient, cost-competitive, reliable and environmentally sustainable.

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