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Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include. *Animal nutrition. Read more

What is tropical animal science?

Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include:
*Animal nutrition
*Applied pathology
*Aquatic pathobiology
*Epidemiology and biometrics
*Immunology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from agricultural science, animal science, rural science, and science or related degrees who want to specialise in tropical animal health and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Tropical animal science has become an area of global importance as world trade continues to expand and the challenge of future research is to develop better methods for improving production in all livestock species within tropical regions.
Tropical animal science covers the field of animal nutrition, welfare, and production with the aim of improving productivity of livestock, and better utilisation of animal resources in tropical, subtropical and similar agro-ecological environments.
Graduates of the Master of Tropical Animal Science will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments, in the area of tropical animal science and related professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks
*Demonstrate an integrated understanding of tropical animal science and its application to improve human quality of life by means of increased and cost effective food production in tropical regions
*Evaluate and apply established and evolving evidence and concepts to reflect critically on theory and professional practice
*Design, plan and ethically execute a research project related to tropical animal science
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Prepare a dissertation on a topic related to tropical animal science and compare and contrast the results obtained with those reported in the literature
*Demonstrate a high level of personal autonomy and accountability for their own future professional development through selection and integration of available subjects in tropical animal science
*Interpret and justify theoretical propositions, methodologies and conclusions to specialist and non-specialist audiences through high level written and oral communication and numeracy skills.

Award title

Master of Tropical Animal Science (MTropAnimSc)

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University has:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure. Read more

Overview

This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure.

Course Modules

The MSc programme is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis during two teaching blocks (semesters one and two) and a period of supervised and independent study (summer). It may also be completed over a two-year period on a part-time basis. The first two semesters (15 weeks each) include 4 taught modules. The dissertation is studied during the subsequent 20 week period in the summer. Each taught module is worth 15 credits whilst the dissertation is 60 credits.

Programme

Semester One (September to January)
Animal Physiology / Comparative Animal Nutrition / Wildlife Resources / Research Methods
60 Credits

Semester Two (January to May)
Animal Ethics and Welfare / Animal Protection and Habitat Conservation / Behaviour / Current Issues in Animal Science
60 Credits

Summer (May to September)
MSc Dissertation
60 Credits

The full MSc degree course consists of 120 compulsory taught credits plus 60 core credits from the dissertation. The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) can be awarded with 120 taught credits. Whilst a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) can be awarded on the successful completion of any 60 taught credits. Credits obtained from the dissertation can also be used when considering whether a postgraduate diploma can be awarded. Before progressing onto the Masters dissertation from the Diploma, students would need to complete the Research Methods module or its equivalent as a prerequisite.

Entry Requirements

Applicants will normally hold a good BSc Honours degree (2.2 or above) from a recognised university in a related science subject such as animal science, agriculture, biological sciences, zoology, veterinary or bioveterinary science or other appropriate life-science degree. Applicants with a BSc (Hons) 3rd class pass, with extensive industrial experience may also be considered for the Masters programme. Applications from non-UK students are particularly welcome. All applications received will be reviewed and decisions for admission to the programme will be made on individual merit. Applicants may be interviewed if there is some doubt over the extent of academic qualification or linguistic skills.

Applicants for whom English is a second language are required to demonstrate a level of competence that enables them to study at a postgraduate level. A test score of 6.5 is required in the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) tests.

Learning & Teaching Methods

The teaching methods are a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, visits and student managed learning. The self-guided study takes place under the supervision of experienced staff from the Centre of Equine and Animal Science at Writtle University College. Students are assessed using a number of methods, for example written examination, reports, essays, seminars, debates, oral presentations, case studies and project dissertation.

The research project is an essential part of the MSc programme and provides the opportunity to carry out an independent piece research, critically analyse data and write a dissertation. The project will normally include hands-on practical experimentation to teach students how to gather and process data and problem solve. The project is supervised by an academic member of staff and takes place over an extended period during the spring and summer. The project can be based either at Writtle University College or other suitable external institution.

Potential areas for dissertation projects

Investigation of keeper-animal relationships in zoos
Animal behaviour and welfare research in collaboration with Colchester Zoo
Assessment of prevalence and risk factors for obesity in companion animals
Lameness detection and measurement in dairy cows
Estimation endangered wild animal population densities
Use of molecular biology techniques in conservation genetics of captive wild animals
Incidence of small mammals in agricultural landscapes
Diet selection and nutrient intakes in captive animals
Behavioural indicators of welfare and performance using different castration methods in lambs

Careers

Graduates are likely to use their award to secure management-level jobs and/or to improve their promotion prospects if they are already employed both in international and national organisations. Many opportunities exist in either government services or related agencies services: for example senior positions in DEFRA as quarantine officers or animal health inspectors. There are also numerous career opportunities in companies specialising in farm animal nutrition and pet food manufacturing, breeding and reproduction, veterinary medicines and pharmaceuticals. There also opportunities in charities engaged in animal welfare such as the RSPCA, zoos, animal rescue centres and safari parks. Also, independent wildlife agencies such as the RSPB, Scottish Natural Heritage, Natural England, and the Countryside Council for Wales would be interested in Animal Welfare and Conservation graduates. Some graduates may take up lecturing positions in universities and colleges or proceed to do further postgraduate study e.g. PhD.

Fees and Financial Support

Part-time student fees for each semester will be charged on a pro-rata basis. There are limited bursaries for part-payment of fees (for UK students only) from the Alice Noakes Memorial Trust. Applications for these bursaries can only be made via the course manager on admission to the course.

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Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include. *Animal nutrition. Read more

What is tropical animal science?

Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include:
*Animal nutrition
*Applied pathology
*Aquatic pathobiology
*Epidemiology and biometrics
*Immunology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from agricultural science, animal science, rural science, and science or related degrees who want to specialise in tropical animal health and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Tropical animal science covers the field of animal nutrition, welfare, and production with the aim of improving productivity of livestock, and better utilisation of animal resources in tropical, subtropical and similar agro-ecological environments.
Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Tropical Animal Science will be able to:
*Apply advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments in animal production and health issues relevant to developing countries and tropical regions of the World
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Communicate theoretical knowledge using high level written English language and, where appropriate, numeracy skills, to a variety of audiences
*Make high level independent judgements in a range of professional functions, including professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks, with responsibility and accountability for personal outputs and all aspects of the work.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF TROPICAL ANIMAL SCIENCE (GCertTropAnimSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Tropical Animal Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course.

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University has:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)

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The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies (R(D)SVS) Clinical Training Programmes provide an opportunity for qualified veterinary surgeons to undertake a period of advanced clinical training in a variety of disciplines under the guidance and supervision of Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, European and American veterinary specialists. Read more

Research profile

The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies (R(D)SVS) Clinical Training Programmes provide an opportunity for qualified veterinary surgeons to undertake a period of advanced clinical training in a variety of disciplines under the guidance and supervision of Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, European and American veterinary specialists.

Our Senior Clinical Training Programmes (residencies) are designed to train research-literate clinicians with specialist knowledge and expertise in their chosen field thereby giving them the opportunity to pursue career goals in teaching, research, clinical service and/or specialist practice. The majority of our programmes are approved by the relevant UK and European Colleges (see individual programmes).

The most recent UK RAE results confirm the College as the UK’s top research medical school and its top research veterinary medical school.

Our research aims to enhance understanding of disease processes in animals and to translate that understanding into improved therapies for both animal and human disease.

Facilities

The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies offers state of the art clinical facilities for the treatment of large and small animals in the Small Animal and Large Animal Hospitals and the Riddell-Swan Cancer Imaging Centre, with diagnostic support from our on-site Veterinary Pathology Unit.

The School also has excellent large and small animal and exotics first opinion practices as well as a working dairy farm.

How to apply

Applicants must email us before applying for this programme:


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Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include. *Animal nutrition. Read more

What is tropical animal science?

Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include:
*Animal nutrition
*Applied pathology
*Aquatic pathobiology
*Epidemiology and biometrics
*Immunology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from agricultural science, animal science, rural science, and science or related degrees who want to specialise in tropical animal health and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Diploma of Tropical Animal Science will be able to:
*Apply advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments, in the area of Tropical Animal Science and related professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks
*Apply an integrated understanding of tropical animal science and its application to improve human quality of life by means of increased and cost effective food production in tropical regions
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Demonstrate a high level of personal autonomy and accountability for their own future professional development through selection and integration of available subjects in tropical animal science
*Interpret and justify theoretical propositions, methodologies and conclusions to non-specialist audiences through high level written and oral communication and numeracy skills.

Award title

Graduate Diploma of Tropical Animal Science (GDipTropAnimSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Master of Tropical Animal Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course.

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University has:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)

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MPhil - full time. minimum 12 months, part time. minimum 24 months. PhD - full time. minimum 36 months, part time. minimum 72 months. Read more

Course Description

MPhil - full time: minimum 12 months, part time: minimum 24 months
PhD - full time: minimum 36 months, part time: minimum 72 months

MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of research topics supported by research active academic staff. Our range of research areas relate to animal health and welfare, environmental impact of livestock systems, and safety and quality of livestock products.

The school of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development has an internationally recognised centre of excellence in Animal Sciences, drawing on fundamental research and applying it to areas of societal, industrial and policy importance.

Our research primarily involves:
•farm livestock, domesticated animal and wildlife applied research
•integrated livestock system development and evaluation
•animal behaviour, health and welfare
•survival, health and efficiency of nutrient utilisation

Opportunities are available for postgraduate research in the following areas:

Animal health and welfare:
Work ranges from understanding animal behaviour and behavioural problems, through development of practical on-farm monitoring and assessment methods to mechanistic studies of health and disease at the molecular level.

Environmental impact of livestock systems:
Our work examines the consequences of modifications in nutrition and husbandry and alterations in breeding strategies to improve the efficiency of resource use.

Safety and quality of livestock products, including milk, meat and eggs:
Our 'field to fork' expertise allows us to study the relationships between husbandry systems and nutritional inputs of animals and the composition of their products, with further implications for human diet and health.


Delivery

We offer a number of different routes to a research degree qualification, including full-time and part-time supervised research projects. We attract postgraduates via non-traditional routes, including mature students and part-time postgraduates undertaking study as part of their continuing professional development. Off-campus (split) research is also offered, which enables you to conduct trials in conditions appropriate to your research programme.

Facilities:

Farms:
Our multi-purpose farms provide demonstration facilities for teaching purposes, land-based research facilities (especially in the area of organic production) and they are viable farming businesses.

Cockle Park Farm is a 262ha mixed farm facility that includes the Palace Leas Plots hay meadow experiment and an anaerobic digestion plant that will generate heat, electricity and digestate - an organic fertiliser - from pig and cattle manure.

Nafferton Farm is a 300ha farm with two main farm units covering conventional and organic farming systems. The two systems are primarily focussed upon dairying and arable cropping. Both also operate beef production enterprises as a by-product of their dairy enterprises, although the organic system is unique in maintaining a small-scale potato and vegetable production enterprise.

Laboratories:
Our modern laboratories provide important teaching and research environments and are equipped with analytical equipment such as HPLCs, GCs, CNS analyser, centrifuges, spectrophotometers and molecular biology equipment. Our specialist research facilities include:
•tissue culture laboratory
•plant growth rooms
•class II laboratory for safe handling of human biological samples
•taste panel facilities and test kitchen
•thin section facility for soils analysis

We operate closely with other schools, institutes and the University's Central Scientific Facilities for access to more specialist analytical services. For work with human subjects we use a purpose built Clinical Research Facility which is situated in the Royal Victoria Infirmary teaching hospital and is managed jointly by us and the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

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This MSc will introduce students to interdisciplinary approaches and a diverse range of methods used to research our relationships with other species. Read more

Introduction

This MSc will introduce students to interdisciplinary approaches and a diverse range of methods used to research our relationships with other species. This course introduces a broad range of topics and considers human-animal interactions across a diverse range of contexts from pet owning to animal assisted interventions, zoos, farms and conservation.
Psychology at Stirling has a vibrant research culture and our taught postgraduate students are fully integrated in the research community, meeting up for weekly research seminars and informal specialist discussion groups. Psychology masters students have access to a dedicated suite of study and teaching rooms.

Key information

- Degree type: MA, MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Campus based, Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor Hannah Buchanan-Smith
- Location: Stirling Campus

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The course includes three core modules on different aspects of human-animal interaction:
- Humans and Other Animals
- Animals and Society
- Human-Animal Interaction in Applied Contexts

In addition, there is an external placement module and an individual research project. Optional modules include quantitative and/or qualitative research methods, and a choice of postgraduate modules to suit specific personal development needs (in agreement with the Course Director). The individual module components contribute towards 60 percent of the MA/MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent.
This is a one year (12 month) or 27 month part-time course and can be studied as an MA or MSc (dependent on whether the focus is on quantitative or qualitative methodologies). Selected components of this masters programme can also be taken to gain a postgraduate certificate (PGCert 60 credits, part time over 9 months) or a diploma (PGDip 120 credits over 9 months) as continuing professional development for those already working in this area.

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, or with first year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses). A range of assessment methods are used across the programme including:
- research proposals
- critical reviews
- reflective journals for placements
- oral presentations
- popular science articles
- dissertation

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Study abroad opportunities
As a 12 month course there is limited opportunity to study abroad. However, students may be able to undertake a placement or conduct data collection for their research project at suitable organisations outside the UK.

Career opportunities

The course is designed for those going on to do further research in the field of human- animal interaction, or in careers where a knowledge of the theoretical and practical aspects of this field would be beneficial. In particular, the placement and research project can enable students to gain direct experience tailored to individual career aspirations.

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Are you passionate about animal welfare and keen to shape the management of the zoos of the future? Students from over 20 nationalities have chosen our unique programme, the first of its kind in the world. Read more
Are you passionate about animal welfare and keen to shape the management of the zoos of the future? Students from over 20 nationalities have chosen our unique programme, the first of its kind in the world. Study factors affecting animal behaviour, conservation, welfare and their interactions, as well as international zoo management and collaboration. Our partnership with Paignton Zoo gives you regular access to their connections, research and expertise – so you’re primed to make a difference.

Key features

-Delivered in conjunction with the staff at Paignton Zoo and its parent body, the Whitley Wildlife Conservation Trust which also owns Newquay Zoo and Living Coasts.
-Develop your scientific knowledge, professional and technical skills as a conservation biologist. Learn how to manage animal collections for the purpose of education, conservation and wildlife research.
-Study aspects of animal behaviour and ecology, as well as how welfare, housing, nutrition and health all have a part to play in species management.
-Learn to troubleshoot problems at the level of a social group within a particular zoological collection, right up to the level of a species globally. Explore how breeding programmes for endangered species are international in scope.
-Benefit from the knowledge and guidance of Plymouth University’s expert staff with specialisms including the behaviour of captive animals, animal nutrition, the welfare of captive birds and the application of population genetics to captive and natural fish populations.
-Find out how the science of zoos is used to inform government policy. Two of our teaching team are the only academic representatives on the government’s Zoos Expert Committee.
-Get behind-the-scenes insight with a day of study each week with our partners at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park. Deepen your understanding of the business and conservation work of zoos, and how networks and collaborations work between them.
-Access the latest research and information from the Whitley Wildlife Conservation Trust, including information on their co-ordinated breeding programmes for endangered species.
-Be inspired by opportunities to visit a range of zoos in the region – including Dartmoor, Bristol and Newquay – and to travel abroad for research projects. A recent student travelled to Louisiana Zoo for her research project on golden tamarin monkeys.
-Graduates work in zoos as educators, researchers, managers and keepers. Many go on to PhD study or work in further education. Other employers include the European Association for Zoos and Aquaria; the Natural History Unit (BBC); national and international conservation organisations.

Course details

As a full-time student, you’ll study seven modules taking in everything from genetics to environmental enrichment, preventative health to budgeting. We update modules to reflect current thinking and you can specialise within them. If you’re interested in working with tigers, for example, this can be reflected across your work. You’ll be assessed through coursework with practical tasks focused on your future career. Core modules include introduction to zoo organisation, animal conservation, applied animal behaviour and management, animal metabolism and nutrition, animal health and welfare and business management. You’ll then do a final three-month research project of your choice. Previous investigations have included everything from female mate choice in white faced saki monkeys to how peripheral and/or invasive activity affects the behaviour and enclosure use of captive sand tiger sharks.

Core modules
-BIO505 Research Project
-ANIM5006 Contemporary Zoo Management
-BIO5131 Postgraduate Research Skills & Methods
-ANIM5005 Zoo Animal Behaviour and Welfare
-ANIM5007 Small Population Conservation
-ANIM5008 Conservation Ecology and Society
-ANIM5009 Zoo Animal Health, Nutrition and Management

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Our MSc Veterinary Microbiology programme, run in partnership with local world-leading veterinary research institutes (Pirbright, APHA and VMD), offers an in-depth understanding of veterinary infectious diseases and global issues such as AMR, and their associated impact on man. Read more
Our MSc Veterinary Microbiology programme, run in partnership with local world-leading veterinary research institutes (Pirbright, APHA and VMD), offers an in-depth understanding of veterinary infectious diseases and global issues such as AMR, and their associated impact on man.

It offers specialist practical training in the diagnosis of important viral and bacterial diseases of global animal and human health importance.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology.

This grounding leads into the study of the complex mechanisms of host/microbe interactions that are involved in the pathogenesis of specific animal diseases, and provides insights into diagnosis and interventions, such as vaccines, essential for disease control.

You will enhance your critical and analytical skills and gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of veterinary diseases, such that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Microbiology and Veterinary Immunology
-Microbial Genetics
-Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
-Transmission and Control of Infectious Diseases of Animals (Non-vector)
-Transmission and Control of Infectious Diseases of Animals (Vector)
-Infectious Diseases of Animals - Practical sessions (APHA, Pirbright ^ PHE/VMD)
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Gastro-intestinal Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Respiratory Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Multi-system Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: CNS/Skin Diseases of Animals
-Research Project

WHO IS THE PROGRAMME FOR?

This is a full or part-time programme, intended mainly for graduates, those already working in veterinary diagnostic/research laboratories and staff from other laboratories who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease.

Pharmaceutical research personnel, policymakers, veterinarians, public health personnel and environmental biologists will also benefit.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

This is a one year full-time programme aimed at preparing graduates to work in a range of fields in which a detailed understanding of veterinary microbiology is a valuable asset.

These fields include research, commerce, government and policy, reference laboratory and diagnostic work, epidemiology and disease mapping, veterinary science, farming especially animal production, wild and zoo animal conservation and education.

As such, it is intended that graduates will achieve the highest levels of professional understanding of veterinary microbiology within a range of contexts.

The programme combines the study of the theoretical foundations of, and scholarly approaches to, understanding the application and various practices of veterinary microbiology within the contexts described above along with the development of practical and research skills.

The main aims are to enable students to:
-Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of veterinary microbiology
-Develop the skills to perform relevant interpretation and evaluation of data
-Apply those acquired skills in practice through research
-To utilise acquired knowledge and evaluative skills to communicate successfully with stakeholders

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

The learning outcomes have been aligned with the descriptor for qualification at level 7 given in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) produced by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education.

Knowledge and understanding
-The main principles of current veterinary microbiology
-The methods and approaches used for the molecular characterisation, and diagnosis of disease agents
-The main principles of infectious diseases epidemiology
-The analysis of disease and disease carriage that impact on the development and application of control measures to combat diseases
-Modes of control of infectious diseases
-Modes of transmission
-The various aspects of host pathology and immune responses to disease agents
-Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-Critically appraise scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the various aspects of veterinary microbiology
-Critically analyse experimental data to enable the formulation of hypotheses
-Design relevant experiments to test formulated hypotheses
-Efficiently analyse new developments in technology and critically assess their utilisation to answer existing and new problems

Professional practical skills
-Plan and execute an experiment/investigation, act autonomously and demonstrate originality
-Analyse numerical data using appropriate computer tools including specialist computer packages
-Communicate experiments at a project level, including report writing
-Perform specific specialised experimental skills

Key/transferable skills
-Problem solve
-Evaluate and exploit new technology
-Communicate ideas, principles and theories effectively by oral, written and visual means
-Work effectively in small groups and teams towards a common goal/outcome
-Apply basic statistical and numerical skills to data
-Use information technology including specialist packages

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Our research aims to enhance understanding of disease processes in animals and to translate that understanding into improved therapies for both animal and human disease. Read more

Research profile

Our research aims to enhance understanding of disease processes in animals and to translate that understanding into improved therapies for both animal and human disease.

Research focuses on:

the improvement of health and welfare of domestic animal species;
the protection of public health;
alleviation of human poverty (in the context of tropical diseases).
providing holistic solutions to global challenges in human and veterinary medicine and the livestock industry.
Most of our research is carried out within The Roslin Institute, which is incorporated with the School and is the major centre of research.

Training and support

Studentships are of 3 or 4 years duration and students will be expected to complete a novel piece of research which will advance our understanding of the field. To help them in this goal, students will be assigned a principal and assistant supervisor, both of whom will be active scientists at the Institute.

Student progress is monitored in accordance with School Postgraduate (PG) regulations by a PhD thesis committee (which includes an independent external assessor and chair). There is also dedicated secretarial support to assist these committees and the students with regard to University and Institute matters.

All student matters are overseen by the Schools PG studies committee. An active staff:student liaison committee and a social committee, which is headed by our postgraduate liaison officer, provide additional support.

Students are expected to attend a number of generic training courses offered by the Transkills Programme of the University and to participate in regular seminars and laboratory progress meetings. All students will also be expected to present their data at national and international meetings throughout their period of study.

Facilities

The Veterinary Campus at Easter Bush includes the new “state-of- the-art” Roslin Institute Building, the Small Animal and Large Animal Hospitals, the Riddell-Swan Cancer Imaging Centre as well as the New Vet School. Our facilities include: rodent, bird and livestock animal units and associated lab areas; comprehensive bioinformatic and genomic capability; a range of bioimaging facilities; extensive molecular biology and cell biology labs; café and auditorium where we regularly host workshops and invited speakers.

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Our programme consists of 6 taught courses and a year of project planning and dissertation that link together to create an MSc Animal Osteopathy (Canine & Equine). Read more
Our programme consists of 6 taught courses and a year of project planning and dissertation that link together to create an MSc Animal Osteopathy (Canine & Equine). Three courses taken alone results in a PG Certificate and six courses, a PG Diploma.

Animal osteopathy is a relatively new and exciting field of osteopathic medicine and the European School of Osteopathy is the first UK Osteopathic Education Institution to offer validated programmes of study. Our programmes are open to qualified osteopaths as postgraduate awards.

Because of the nature of the work, life as an animal osteopath (AO) is both varied and highly rewarding. Some AO's work freelance, moving yard to yard, whilst others work side by side with paraprofessionals and vets.

If you want to work with animals and have an interest in anatomy, biomechanics and the use of manual therapy to help restore and support function in domestic pets and horses, animal osteopathy could be the career path for you.

Integrating the knowledge of osteopathy with veterinary science, behavioural science and methods used in rehabilitation, animal osteopaths add real value to any veterinary team and a gentle non-invasive solution to many functional conditions.

Canine pathways are taught at the ESO, Boxley, Maidstone, Kent. Equine pathways are taught at a mixture of locations, to include: the ESO, Hadlow College, Hadlow and Knightsplace Farm Equestrian Centre, Rochester.

The aims of the programme are:

- To educate osteopaths in the field of animal osteopathy (namely canine and equine osteopathy)

- To produce animal osteopathic practitioners who are independent, safe and highly skilled

- To graduate our students with a professional level of competencies that support critical thinking and reflective practice

- To produce graduates who are capable of contributing to the field of animal osteopathy in an evidence-based fashion.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/ani/ani-most

Animal Management

The care and welfare of both domestic and exotic animals has never been more important. By taking a course in Animal Management you could take part in the growth of this industry and be responsible for caring for a variety of species. Students benefit from highly practical training using purpose-built animal management facilities which house a range of aquatics, reptiles, invertebrates and small mammals.

What you'll study

- Canine Studies - 20 credits
- Advanced Canine Studies - 20 credits
- Canine Training and Rehabilitation - 20 credits
- Equine Studies- 20 credits
- Advanced Equine Studies - 20 credits
- Equine Training and Rehabilitation - 20 credits
- Project Planning and Dissertation – final year (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through written assignments, portfolio (reflective writing)and practical assessment.

Specialist equipment/facilities

Practical sessions on the equine programmes are taught at Hadlow College, Hadlow or Knightsplace Farm equestrian Centre, Rochester, Kent. Here the appropriate facilities, live models and safety practices, can be implemented.

Career options

Depending upon the animal osteopathic pathway you choose, various doors can be opened.

Those who complete the PG Certificate in Canine Osteopathy are likely to go into small animal practice within a veterinary surgery, whilst those who study equine osteopathy are more likely to work freelance alongside other paraprofessionals (vets, trainers, farriers etc.).

Some animal osteopaths also go on to teach on animal osteopathic programmes or run open lectures for the general public or veterinary professionals. So whether you're the hands on, team playing type, or someone who prefers a more academic approach, animal osteopathy can expand your horizons.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. Read more
This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. The qualification is recognised by both the RCVS and European College of Animal Reproduction (ECAR). It provides postgraduate education in an important aspect of the bovine health. The overall aims of the programme are to enable veterinary surgeons in regular contact with cattle to:

achieve a widely-based and deep understanding of bovine reproduction, which will enable them to provide sound scientific advice to the cattle industry;
develop appropriate skills; and
maintain a critical approach to their own work.

The programme is modular in structure, with eight residential weeks spaced over two years. Learning methods include lectures, demonstrations, videos, practical work, discussions, field visits and directed reading. Participants will be expected to satisfy essay and work based continual assessments for each module during the course; to pass written, practical and oral examinations of the final module at the end of the programme; and to present a dissertation, not exceeding 10,000 words, before the award of the Diploma.

Guidance is given by staff of the University of Liverpool and by invited contributors, each a recognised authority in a specialised field. Teaching takes place mainly at Leahurst, the University of Liverpool’s rural campus.

Although mainly restricted to the study of reproduction in cattle, the programme includes reference to other species to establish biological principles or to illustrate concepts for which information is not available in cattle and also covers key areas impinging on fertility such as nutrition and infectious disease.

Module Code Module Title Credits

Module DBRM611 Normal Non-Pregnant Female 15

Module DBRM612 Nutrition and Fertility 15

Module DBRM613 Fertility in Post-Partum Period 15

Module DBRM614 The Male 15

Module DBRM615 Genetics 15

Module DBRM616 Early Pregnancy 15

Module DBRM617 Late Pregnancy and Parturition 5

Module DBRM618 Synopsis and the Future 15

Module DBRM621 Dissertation 60

Key Facts

RAE 2008
In the latest Research Assessment Exercise, 45% of the School’s research activity was deemed world-leading or internationally excellent and a further 45% internationally recognised.

Facilities
The School has two bases: the University’s main campus in Liverpool and the Leahurst campus in Wirral. Leahurst has highly equipped research laboratories, which are shared with the research institutes of the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, as well as being home to the Philip Leverhulme Equine Hospital, the Farm Animal Practice and the Small Animal Teaching Hospital.

Our clinics provide numerous cases for clinical investigation, as do our co-operating veterinary surgeons in private practice. The School also has excellent relationships with farming enterprises and Chester Zoo.

Individual topics within the DBR are also offered as CPD for those who do not wish to attend the whole programme.
Why School of Veterinary Science?

Excellent reputation

The DBR has been successfully completed by over 100 vets whilst working in full time clinical practice. It has an academic and support structure proven to achieve a high completion rate whilst maintaining academic rigour validated by RCVS and ECAR external observers.

Many leading cattle clinicians have obtained the qualification and feedback from past students is excellent.

Consistently strong League Table and National Student Survey performance

Veterinary Science at Liverpool is consistently highly rated in The Times Good University Guide (rated 2nd in the UK in 2011), the Complete University Guide (rated 1st in the UK 2011), and in the National Student Survey (rated first or second for several years).

Collaboration across academic disciplines

Our staff work closely with colleagues from medicine, life sciences, and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, not only on animal disease and welfare, but on human health too – taking a ‘one health’ approach from long before the phrase was invented. We also collaborate with colleagues from social sciences to exploit fully the comparative nature of veterinary science. This greatly extends the postgraduate study and research opportunities at Liverpool.

Wide coverage across the postgraduate programmes

The School of Veterinary Science at the University of Liverpool provides excellent postgraduate scientific and clinical training, from population to whole animal studies to the molecular level.

Recognised by the European College of Animal Reproduction

Successful reproduction is the cornerstone of the dairy industry. The DBR has been rin for nearly 30 years and has been completed by some of the leading farm animal vets practicing in the U.K. They have also contributed back into the course to maintain its relevance to modern Cattle Practice.

The DBR is recognised as a Diploma level qualification by RCVS and a recognised training course by the European College of Animal Reproduction.

Career prospects

Course participants are in employment as veterinary surgeons and most become employed in specialist private practice. Some have moved to academia internationally.

Many practices are using the fact they have DBR holders and support such study when advertising for new staff and to gain farmer clients. Candidates use the qualification as a springboard to specialisation.

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This is the only programme offering a Master in Veterinary Public Health in Scotland and students enrol in January each year. -The University of Glasgow’s School of Veterinary Medicine is pre-eminent in teaching, research and clinical provision, and attracts students, researchers and clinicians from around the world. Read more
This is the only programme offering a Master in Veterinary Public Health in Scotland and students enrol in January each year.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow’s School of Veterinary Medicine is pre-eminent in teaching, research and clinical provision, and attracts students, researchers and clinicians from around the world.
-Our internationally accredited school provides an expert referral centre via the Small Animal Hospital, the Weipers Centre Equine Hospital and the Scottish Centre for Production Animal Health & Food Safety.
-In the recent Research Excellence Framework 2014 (REF 2014), the Grade Point Average for Glasgow's veterinary and animal health research activity was ranked top amongst the UK veterinary schools.
-The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons has accredited the different courses in the Veterinary Public Health degree programme.
You will have access to our virtual abattoir’, created to meet the need for veterinary students and others to understand the processes which take place in the slaughter of food animals for human consumption. Access to abattoirs for training purposes is increasingly difficult and the virtual abattoir takes you through each step of the process in order to maximise understanding and to ensure that you obtain most benefit from actual visits or work experience.
-You will have the opportunity to visit several establishments in the course of the Veterinary Public Health programme. These include Scotbeef Abattoir and processing facility, Stirling Livestock Market, Scottish Water and the Microbiological reference laboratory. Guest lectures are given by representatives from some of these companies.
-You will be taught by academics who are considered to be producing work that is world-leading.

Programme structure

You will be taught through lectures, seminars and tutorials. Project work and team work will be enhanced by UK study trips.

The programme comprises of six courses and a final dissertation. Each course consists of a one-week intensive residential component designed to familiarise you with your tutors, subject matter and peers, followed by directed reading and assessed assignments.

Taught modules are offered in three blocks of two courses. This means you are only required to be resident in Glasgow for three two-week periods during the programme. The remainder of each course is completed by web-supported distance education.

All courses and assignment work are taught and assessed by members of the School of Veterinary Medicine, Health Protection Scotland and City of Glasgow College.

Courses
-Global veterinary medicine
-Zoonoses and infectious disease
-Veterinary epidemiology: quantitative methods
-Hygienic production of food (I)
-Hygienic production of food (II)
-Veterinary epidemiology: methods in surveillance and filed investigation

Career prospects

Graduates with the MVPH degree will be highly qualified and employable for a range of positions from industry through public health practice to government agency.

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Do you want to develop your technical poultry production practice to postgraduate level?. Harper Adams University has developed a Masters degree in Poultry Production. Read more
Do you want to develop your technical poultry production practice to postgraduate level?

Harper Adams University has developed a Masters degree in Poultry Production.

The course

The poultry meat and egg sectors continue to show a consistent growth across all continents, with greater levels of expansion in developing regions of the world. Poultry meat production exceeded 100 milion tons in 2013 with broiler production accounting for all but 10 per cent of this production. With the anticipated expansion in world human population of 9.3 billion primarily in developing countries the demand four poultry meat is expected to continue into the future with India and China representing particularly large markets. Egg production is also expected to continue its expansion. Poultry is a major consumer of animal feed grain, with 40% of the total being used by poultry. There will be competing demands for this feed, which the poultry sector will need to respond to.

The UK poultry industry is characterised by a small number of large integrated companies a position increasingly mirrored on a global scale. Whilst there is a clear opportunity for growth there are a number of known challenges including feed price volatility in the short to medium term, the increased competition for raw materials in the longer term, poultry health, human health related issues (e.g. Campylobacter), concerns over antibiotic use.

The global poultry sector is particularly well placed to address the needs for increasing quantities of animal derived protein, this programme will provide the platform for students to address these and other emerging issues through focused and tailored assignments allowing students to plot their own pathway of learning.

The programme will serve to offer a portfolio of multidisciplinary topics within a selection of specialised integrative modules to advance students’ understanding of the relevant biosciences underpinning poultry farming. This will be presented within a theme of mono-gastric animal production where there are many similarities of principle and scientific approaches.

In summary the course:

Supports students to develop a level of understanding and knowledge that allows them to work as subject specialists and lead developments within poultry production systems.
Supports students to evaluate the wider consequences of animal production systems, mitigating any detrimental effects on animal welfare, food quality and the natural environment.
Supports students in their development of an advanced understanding of the biological factors that limit animal production and the scientific, technological, economic and social factors that influence animal production systems.

How will it benefit me?

The course will:

Prepare students for a career in Poultry Production.
Offer vocational training in the area of applied Poultry Production.
Prepare students for PhD studies.

Modules are usually delivered as an intensive short course, taught over a one week block, with a maximum of 5 days per 15 credit module providing in the region of 35 hours of contact time.
Teaching may consist of formal lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical exercises, laboratory sessions, study visits or the use of guest speakers.
The PgC, PgD and MSc are offered full-time and part-time to allow those in work to study towards an award at a pace that suits their needs and time available.
The PgC is particularly well suited to those currently working in the sector as a means of initial training or CPD.

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Veterinary Public Health (VPH) is a subject area which includes all aspects of public health that can be protected or improved by application of veterinary science. Read more
Veterinary Public Health (VPH) is a subject area which includes all aspects of public health that can be protected or improved by application of veterinary science. It links the animal and human health with the environment and plays a pivotal role in the development of an integrated ‘farm to fork’ approach to food safety. This programme is designed to provide postgraduate and professionally relevant advanced training in VPH. The programme focuses on the core domains of VPH in relation to the regulatory responsibilities of the official veterinarians for the protection of animal health and welfare and human health.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/201617/veterinary-public-health-9019

Course detail

- Description -

This programme enables official veterinarians to meet the demands for straightforward and clear answers regarding the potential risks (both microbial and non-microbial) associated with the consumption of, or exposure to, products of animal origin, issues of animal welfare and protection of the environment. This programme fulfils the additional requirement for the training of official veterinarians as set out in European Regulation 854/2004.

This is a part-time programme which is entirely internet delivered. European and global experts in veterinary science, law, economics, and policy contribute to the course. The awards are granted jointly between the Ulster University (UK), and University College Dublin (IRL).

- Purpose -

This programme provides students with broad knowledge and understanding of veterinary public health and promotes their ability to assess available evidence and data, make sound judgements and communicate findings effectively to all stakeholders in the food chain – producers, regulators, industry and consumers. Relevant EU food regulatory policy is integrated within the lectures and translated into a coherent regulatory framework so that students will grasp the complex idea of total regulation of the food chain from primary production through to consumer health issues. Core domains of VPH are addressed in relation to the regulatory responsibilities of the veterinarians and the protection of animal health and welfare and human health.

- Teaching and assessment -

Teaching is through online lectures, online discussions, individual support, video and internet links with staff, independent learning, and work in small groups.

Career options

Career options
The academic content of this programme helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of legislative, policy and scientific aspects of VPH as well as to acquire skills to disseminate and implement knowledge in practice. Graduates of the PgCert VPH could be eligible to obtain employment as Official Veterinarians employed by the competent authorities in any of the EU Member States (or applicant country), employment by government (EU and international) and non-government organisations. On successful completion of PgCert VPH students can also proceed to register for the PgDip and MSc Food Regulatory Affairs (VPH specialisation).

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why study at Ulster?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We are an international university with more than 2,000 international students from over 80 countries and Alumni from 121 countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/learnyourway

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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