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This MSc in Development, Disorders and Clinical Practice combines theoretical grounding in development and its disorders, with practical experience in clinical assessment and diagnosis. Read more
This MSc in Development, Disorders and Clinical Practice combines theoretical grounding in development and its disorders, with practical experience in clinical assessment and diagnosis. This course embeds an understanding of cognitive neurodevelopmental disorders within the context of typical development, with a particular focus on dyslexia, specific language impairment, autism, ADHD, and dyscalculia. The course uniquely combines perspectives from cognitive psychology, developmental cognitive neuroscience, and applied clinical and educational practice. Topical issues in developmental disorders will be examined, including co-morbidity between disorders, and the implications of cognitive disorders for children’s mental health.

Research on developmental disorders has the potential in the long term to both inform research theoretically and to lead to substantial applications and practical implications.

This programme is therefore particularly suitable for students from Psychology or related disciplines who:
-Are seeking to build on their knowledge of developmental psychology and developmental disorders before embarking on PhD study. The acquisition of wide-ranging theoretical and practical knowledge of developmental psychology and disorders, as well as crucial research and project management skills will make students strong candidates for future positions in PhD programmes.
-Wish to boost their research skills and theoretical and practical knowledge of developmental disorders before progressing to careers in speech and language therapy, clinical psychology, educational psychology, teaching, or child health related disciplines.
-Have already qualified as clinical or educational professionals, behavioural therapists, care workers, speech and language therapists, but wish to supplement and enhance their research skills and extend their knowledge of developmental disorders.

Content

The programme combines specifically focused modules on development and disorders with courses teaching general principles of psychological research design, statistics and key transferable skills.
-Advanced Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
-Advanced Issues in Developmental Disorders
-Assessment and Treatment of Developmental Disorders
-Current Questions in Developmental Research
-Clinical Practice for Developmental Disorders

Empirical Projects
As part of this programme, you will be given the opportunity to undertake a novel piece of empirical work, on a topic at the cutting-edge of research in development and its disorders. You will be supervised by faculty with relevant expertise in fields including language and literacy development and dyslexia, numerical cognition and dyscalculia, socio-communicative skills and autism, genetic disorders (e.g. Down Syndrome, 22q deletion syndrome), and the impact of sleep on learning and memory.

Assessment
Modules are assessed through a variety of different assignments and exams including essays, critical analysis of published papers, presentations, short notes on a range of topics, practical reports, and a dissertation and poster presentation based on the Empirical Project.

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As a student on the PGDip in Sleep Medicine, you will spend two years engaging in a comprehensive taught programme covering the physiology of sleep, through to clinical practice and societal implications. Read more
As a student on the PGDip in Sleep Medicine, you will spend two years engaging in a comprehensive taught programme covering the physiology of sleep, through to clinical practice and societal implications. Delivery is mostly online, with a one-week residential component. You will engage regularly in real time with class mates and teaching faculty.

Structure, content and assessment
The PGDip is a part-time course, spread over two years. During that time you will complete eight modules, providing a comprehensive overview of sleep medicine that is in line with the European Sleep Research Society's teaching and training guidelines. These modules include:

The Physiological Basis of Sleep
Introduction to Sleep Medicine and Methodological Approaches
Circadian Rhythm Disruption and Sleep
Insomnias
Sleep Disordered Breathing and Sleep-related Movement Disorders
Hypersomnias and Parasomnias
Sleep in Specialist Populations
Sleep and Society

Each module will be assessed by an extended essay, entailing a total of four extended essays submitted every academic year: two at the end of the second and third terms.

Pattern of teaching, learning and supervision
The course is designed to give as much flexibility as possible, whilst still providing necessary support and community. Lectures are pre-recorded and sent for you to watch in your own time, alongside any relevant reading, case studies and activities. You will join regular discussion groups; these are run using conferencing software, allowing you to interact in real-time with classmates and teaching faculty and will typically last one hour. For these sessions you will be expected to prepare short essays and/or presentations for discussion. You will also be expected to attend a week-long residential school in person at Oxford.

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Structure, content and assessment. The MSc is a part-time course, spread over two years. During that time you will complete eight modules, providing a comprehensive overview of sleep medicine that is in line with the European Sleep Research Society's teaching and training guidelines. Read more
Structure, content and assessment

The MSc is a part-time course, spread over two years. During that time you will complete eight modules, providing a comprehensive overview of sleep medicine that is in line with the European Sleep Research Society's teaching and training guidelines. These modules include:

The Physiological Basis of Sleep
Introduction to Sleep Medicine and Methodological Approaches
Circadian Rhythm Disruption and Sleep
Insomnias
Sleep Disordered Breathing and Sleep-related Movement Disorders
Hypersomnias and Parasomnias
Sleep in Specialist Populations
Sleep and Society

Each module will be assessed by an extended essay, entailing a total of four extended essays submitted every academic year: two at the end of the second and third terms. Throughout the course you will be expected to work on your dissertation, which is the final piece of coursework, to be submitted at the end of the course. This will take the form of a systematic review and a research study design, including ethical considerations and budgeting. To support this process you will also have to complete two modules in research methods.

Pattern of teaching, learning and supervision

The course is designed to give as much flexibility as possible, whilst still providing necessary support and community. Lectures are pre-recorded and available for you to watch in your own time, alongside any relevant reading, case studies and activities.

You will join regular online discussion groups. These are run using conferencing software, allowing you to interact in real-time with classmates and teaching faculty and will typically last one hour. For these sessions you will be expected to prepare short essays and/or presentations for discussion.

For the purposes of the dissertation you will be assigned an academic advisor, who you will meet with as and when necessary. You will also be expected to attend a week-long residential school in person at Oxford. A significant component of the course involves self-directed learning to build on taught materials.

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This Masters programme in Applied Neuropsychology is designed for those who have qualified in clinical psychology overseas. ◾The programme has been developed in partnership with NHS Education for Scotland and offers specialist knowledge for clinical psychologists working in the area of clinical neuropsychology. Read more
This Masters programme in Applied Neuropsychology is designed for those who have qualified in clinical psychology overseas.

Why this programme

◾The programme has been developed in partnership with NHS Education for Scotland and offers specialist knowledge for clinical psychologists working in the area of clinical neuropsychology.
◾The University has a strong tradition of research in clinical neuroscience and neuropsychology.

Programme structure

The majority of students on this programme come to Glasgow for a full year of study. This will provide you with the opportunity to carry out a research project which will usually be based in one of our research groups.

All our lectures are given by subject specialists, including clinical academics at the University as well as many other specialists from around the UK and occasionally internationally.

You will take a total of eight courses, arranged into blocks of teaching. Each teaching block lasts two weeks and covers two courses.

Courses
◾Context and perspectives in clinical neuropsychology
◾Professional issues and research methods
◾Neuroscience
◾Epilepsy, seizure and sleep disorders
◾Acquired brain injury and disorders of memory, attention and executive functioning
◾Degenerative conditions
◾Stroke and disorders of perception, language, praxis and calculation
◾Paediatric neurology and neuropsychology.

Plus a research project for MSc students.

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This Masters programme in Clinical Neuropsychology is designed for those who are eligible for registration in the UK's Health Professions Council as a clinical psychologist. Read more
This Masters programme in Clinical Neuropsychology is designed for those who are eligible for registration in the UK's Health Professions Council as a clinical psychologist.

Why this programme

-The Clinical Neuropsychology programme has been developed in partnership with NHS Education for Scotland and offers specialist knowledge for clinical psychologists and other healthcare professionals working in Scotland and the rest of the UK.
-Why study Neuropsychology at the University of Glasgow? The programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society Division of Neuropsychology and provides the underpinning knowledge component of the Qualification in Clinical Neuropsychology (QiCN).
-The University has a strong tradition of research in clinical neuroscience and clinical neuropsychology.

Programme structure

The majority of students on this programme are clinical psychologists working in the NHS and most complete their programme working part-time over two years, although a small number complete all the teaching blocks in one year.

All our lectures are given by subject specialists, including clinical academics at the University as well as many other specialists from around the UK and occasionally internationally.

You will take a total of eight courses, arranged into blocks of teaching. Each teaching block lasts two weeks and covers two courses.

Courses
-Context and perspectives in clinical neuropsychology
-Professional issues and research methods
-Neuroscience
-Epilepsy, seizure and sleep disorders
-Acquired brain injury and disorders of memory, attention and executive functioning
-Degenerative conditions
-Stroke and disorders of perception, language, praxis and calculation
-Paediatric neurology and neuropsychology

Plus a research project for MSc students.

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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This course is for you if you are looking for a distance learning course that is written, taught and assessed by specialist mental health pharmacists. Read more
This course is for you if you are looking for a distance learning course that is written, taught and assessed by specialist mental health pharmacists. This qualification is often a requirement for specialist clinical mental health positions in the NHS. This course is supported by the CMHP.

Course outline

You will take six modules in total, two of which are introductory with the following four covering the major therapeutic areas of psychiatry:
-An Introduction to Psychiatry
-Underlying Principles
-Schizophrenia
-The Affective Disorders
-Anxiety and Sleep Disorders
-The Dementias and Related Disorders

Learning, teaching & assessment

You will encounter the following learning methods:
-Study of authored text material, directed reading and self assessed exercises
-Formative exercises and assignments
-Additional reading
-Application within professional practice
-Assessment is by assignments and multi-response question papers, plus a final examinations

Your future career prospects

This course is the first stage for pharmacists in becoming a specialist mental health pharmacist. It is also under taken by mental health nurses to increase their knowledge base especially those practicing or intending to practice as non-medical prescribers.

General practitioners and psychiatrists as well as graduates working in the pharmaceutical industry have also taken this course.

Professional accreditation

The programme is supported by the College of Mental Health Pharmacy (CMHP).

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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