• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
University of Manchester Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
"slavery"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Slavery)

We have 45 Masters Degrees (Slavery)

  • "slavery" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 45
Order by 
Our MA in International Slavery Studies is one of the few programmes in the world to offer students the chance to study forced labour and slavery in a wide variety of past and present contexts. Read more
Our MA in International Slavery Studies is one of the few programmes in the world to offer students the chance to study forced labour and slavery in a wide variety of past and present contexts. Your seminars, research and tutorials will range broadly, challenging you to analyse historical forms of slavery, to critique modern responses to human trafficking, to evaluate the legacies and memorialisation of slavery in contemporary society, and to apply critical and literary theories to surviving representations of slavery.

Drawing expertise from researchers across the University of Liverpool, students will benefit from our unique relationship with the International Slavery Museum. You will work with the Museum’s staff to study the commemoration and memorialisation of slavery, while the broader MA programme is a flagship activity for the Centre for the Study of International Slavery – a successful venture between the Museum and the University. As members of the Centre, students will meet the international cast of visitors who speak in our seminar series, presenting cutting edge research for criticism and debate.

Probing “slavery” as a category of cultural, legal, political and social analysis, students will confront the realities of un-free labour and asserted human ownership in ancient, modern and contemporary societies. However, there is plenty of potential to specialise in the areas and approaches that grab your interest. Besides the four modules concerning slavery, students will select their disciplinary training modules from a wide variety offered by historians, political scientists, literary scholars and other specialists, enabling you to select the right training for your own interests and aspirations.

All teaching takes place in small-group workshops, seminars and tutorials. Assessment tests students’ abilities through research essays, oral presentations and a 15,000 word dissertation, which is intended to be an original work of scholarship and research.

The course will appeal to you whether you want to develop the skills to work in a range of research careers, within the NGO, public and private sectors, to develop your experience in museum, political or campaigning work, or prepare for further academic research with a PhD. The distinctive choice of disciplinary training modules from across those offered in University departments provides the ideal opportunity for students to change direction from their undergraduate specialism or further their existing strengths. In approaching the topic of slavery and forced labour through a comparative, multidisciplinary perspective, this programme provides both variety and the opportunity to specialise in students’ chosen areas.

Why study International Slavery at Liverpool?

Our regular research seminars offer unparalleled opportunities to debate fresh approaches with a programme of renowned international speakers.

The unique partnership between the University and the International Slavery Museum offers students the opportunity to work with the curators of the Museum as they consider how to develop its galleries in the future.

Our library boasts a wide range of resources, many available online, with a particularly strong collection for the study of slavery, abolition and resistance.

This programme is a pioneering opportunity to choose your disciplinary skills training to suit your interests and aspirations, permitting you to pick from a wide variety of literary, historical and social science modules.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
There are more slaves alive today than at any point in history. Around the world, nearly 46 million people are forced to work against their will for no pay. Read more

There are more slaves alive today than at any point in history. Around the world, nearly 46 million people are forced to work against their will for no pay. Taught by academic and practitioner experts, this internationally recognised course is the first of its kind in the world. It will provide you with the academic grounding of the study of contemporary slavery as well as comprehensive training on how best to achieve the liberation and social reintegration of those in slavery. As this is a distance-learning course, the majority of content is taught online with two face-to-face modules at Nottingham, allowing you to connect with the programme and other students from across the globe.

MA duration is 1 year full-time, 2 years part-time.

PGDip duration is 9 months full-time,18 months part-time.

PGCert duration is 9 months full-time, 13 months part-time.



Read less
This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. Read more
This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. It's one of few programmes worldwide to offer you the chance to study the main characteristics of modern forms of slavery, their causes/roots, impacts, and ways (legal and others) of fighting/preventing them.

The degree is unique in examining, in an interdisciplinary manner, the intersection between human trafficking and migratory flows, and forced labour, and organised crime.

The programme combines vocational and theoretical components. You'll study the social conditions in which human trafficking occurs, including wealth, social and gender inequalities; migration due to political instability, war and poverty; and the role of criminal gangs and organised crime groups in the proliferation of this crime in recent years. The modus operandi of traffickers and their networks will be explored as will the challenges raised by the role in family members and communities in this increasingly complex issue.

You'll also engage critically with existing legal frameworks and policing in place to combat human trafficking. The degree also offers te chance to examine different discourses used to analyse the issue including debates about terminology, media representations, effectiveness of anti-trafficking policies and the efficacy of rescue and rehabilitation programmes.

Why St Mary's?

The MA programme is part of a wider commitment to addressing modern slavery and human trafficking through the work of the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, established at St Mary’s in 2015. The Centre was founded to develop an evidence based response to addressing the current intensification of human trafficking and slavery cases globally. It is part of the Santa Marta Group and has links to many external partners including Kevin Hyland, the UK’s first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner and Visiting Professor at St Mary’s University, policy makers, police, other academic institutions, safe houses, campaigners, international organizations and NGOs. Students on the MA in Human Trafficking, Migration and Organised Crime will have access to the resources of the centre, including cutting edge research and lectures by high profile experts in the field.

An inaugural conference, which took place in February 2017, was the first of an annual event, organised by the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery. With the aim of using research to fill the knowledge and evidence gaps experienced by policymakers and practitioners, the conference provides a space to promote debate and encourage collaboration on addressing the subject of human trafficking and modern slavery, with contributions from UK and international experts. Discussions between policymakers, practitioners and researchers will identify evidence gaps and tailor research to these needs. All MA students will be encouraged to engage with and contribute to future conferences and may choose to evaluate the experience and learning as part of their assessed work.

Course Content

All modules are listed on the St Mary's website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/human-trafficking

Career Prospects

This course will interest students who wish to pursue careers in the voluntary sector (in organisations that work with migrants and people who have been trafficked), in the public sector dealing with crime control and criminal justice, in law and human rights, and in campaigning and media. It will also appeal to people employed in professional and third sector organisations, such as police, health professionals, social workers and frontline support workers as part of their continuing professional development.

It will provide a critical and methodological platform for students who aim to extend their studies to doctoral level. And it will appeal to students who want to investigate the historical, social and cultural factors that contribute to the intersection of criminal justice, human trafficking and migration.

The Careers Service has more information on graduate careers and part-time work available during your course.

Read less
On the Medieval and Renaissance Studies pathway you’ll study the myriad ways in which power was understood, communicated and exercised during the Middle Ages and Renaissance period (c.300-c.1700 CE). Read more
On the Medieval and Renaissance Studies pathway you’ll study the myriad ways in which power was understood, communicated and exercised during the Middle Ages and Renaissance period (c.300-c.1700 CE).

The programme draws on our considerable medieval and early modern expertise across history, literature, languages, and archaeology (see here for our academics and their research interests: http://www.liv.ac.uk/cmrs/staff. We examine issues such as:-

the notions and exercise of secular and spiritual authority
the operation of power in medieval and early modern societies
the development of conceptions of and attitudes to gender
the construction of identities
You’ll become skilled in the advanced research methods and techniques needed to read and interpret original sources. There’ll also be training in languages and palaeography: vital attributes if you want to continue into doctoral research.

You will also have the opportunity to participate fully in the activities of Liverpool’s Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies http://www.liv.ac.uk/cmrs.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60- credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
This absorbing MA gives you the opportunity to study and reflect on major 20th century events, such as total war, the rise and fall of communism, the collapse of the European empires, the changing place of women in western society and the decline of traditional religious belief. Read more
This absorbing MA gives you the opportunity to study and reflect on major 20th century events, such as total war, the rise and fall of communism, the collapse of the European empires, the changing place of women in western society and the decline of traditional religious belief.

You’ll be able to:-

explore the features that made the twentieth century unique
study social and political developments that most defined the character of the twentieth century
focus in-depth on particular countries or themes that interest you
develop the research skills needed to complete your 15,000 word dissertation on the topic of your choice
This programme will appeal to a wide range of students, including those who’ve recently or have decided to return to university later in life.

The structure of the course provides a good grounding for those intending to proceed to doctoral research.



Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60- credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity. Read more
The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity.

On this absorbing MA programme you’ll study one of the most exciting fields of historical inquiry; cultural history examines the culture of the time in order to understand how people made sense of the world they inhabited.

It will introduce you to the specialist research methods used by cultural historians, to ongoing historiographical and theoretical debates and to related disciplines such as cultural studies, literary studies, history of art and sociology. You will also get the opportunity to explore the area of cultural history that interests you most in your dissertation.

The MA draws together case studies from across Britain and continental Europe, the European Empires and North America from the 18th century to the present day. Taking the Cultural History MA will:

- Deepen your understanding of the cultural history of Britain and its Empire, continental Europe and North America since the 18th century
- Encourage you to think about a broad range of questions and debates in cultural history
- Allow you to engage with current debates on such themes as gender, modernity, national identity, sexuality and the politics of culture
- Give you the chance to work closely with a dynamic group of young historians and established scholars who themselves research and write about the cultural history of Britain, continental Europe and North America.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
Members of the Centre for American Studies provide supervision in many aspects of American Studies. Supervision is team-based and reflects the active research interests of the Centre. Read more
Members of the Centre for American Studies provide supervision in many aspects of American Studies. Supervision is team-based and reflects the active research interests of the Centre.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

• The American West
• The Study of US Environmental Issues
• The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/8/american-studies

National ratings

School of English
In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of English was ranked 10th for research intensity and 15th for research power in the UK.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 95% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

School of History
In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of History was ranked 8th for research intensity and in the top 20 in the UK for research power.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
American Studies benefits from excellent library resources, and is especially strong in literature, film and history. Specialist collections include slavery and anti-slavery, a large collection of works on photography and contemporary images, and a slide library with well over 100,000 classified slides. The Library also houses the British Cartoon Archive. Kent is within easy reach of London’s major library resources.

Postgraduate students have access to the resources provided by the Centre for American Studies and its related departments. The Centre runs regular research events each year. Other schools and departments such as English, Film, Politics and International Relations, and History also host research seminars that students are welcome to attend.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of American Studies; American Review of Canadian Studies; European Journal of American Culture; and American Indian Quarterly. Details of recently published books can be found within the staff research interests section.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Recent postgraduates now work in media, publishing and a variety of businesses in the UK, Europe and the USA. Teaching is also a popular option, as are marketing and public relations. A Master’s in American Studies gives you an intellectual grounding suitable for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit. www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday. Read more
Find out more about this programme at our Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 22 March 2017. To register, visit: http://www.liverpool.ac.uk/pg/openday

The Eighteenth-Century Worlds pathw will take you on an investigative journey through the history, literature and visual and material culture of Europe and its interactions with the wider world, from the Atlantic to Asia.

This highly original interdisciplinary postgraduate course gives you the opportunity to study in one of Britain’s leading Atlantic ports; a city rich in eighteenth-century history, architecture and culture.

Researching the subject is a real pleasure in Liverpool. The city is home to more national museums and galleries than any other English city outside of London.

The expertise of our research-active tutors and the combination of modules makes this a unique course, following the trajectory to a global world during the eighteenth century.

ERASMUS Exchange with Paris Diderot

There is an opportunity for students to spend semester 2 studying at the University of Paris-Diderot, taking modules there while preparing their feasibility study. Further details will be available in due course. For students who do not choose to go abroad, the course is enhanced by the presence of a visiting lecturer from Paris in each academic year.

Eighteenth-Century Worlds Research Centre

All MA students are encouraged to take part in the activities of the Centre. These include research seminars with invited speakers and workshops and conferences, some designed specifically for postgraduates. Watch this space!

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MA programme has as its core one interdisciplinary module in each semester . These modules are team-taught by staff with expertise in British and Continental European literary, cultural and historical studies (including colonial and postcolonial studies) and in Classics. They are designed to introduce postgraduates to the range of disciplines covered by the MA, while raising awareness of methodological and theoretical concerns and some of the key themes in eighteenth-century studies. The other compulsory elements are a module on research methods, the Feasibility Study and the Dissertation. The choice of dissertation topic is up to the student, and the Feasibility Study and Dissertation can be supervised by staff from any of the participating Departments (History; English; Cultures, Languages and Area Studies; Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology).

All studies are co-ordinated by the Eighteenth-Century Worlds Centre at the University of Liverpool. The two core modules are worth 30 credits each, while the research methods module and Feasibility Study are both worth 15 credits. I. In addition to the compulsory modules, students select one 15-credit option in each semester from modules in English literature and the reception of classical antiquity. Over the summer students complete the 15,000-word dissertation which constitutes the final 60 credits of the MA programme.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in History. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in History. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

Read less
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. Read more
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. We encourage the study of the Caribbean in an Atlantic context, emphasising African, North and South American, Asian and European influences from a comparative, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective.

The Centre is an umbrella unit of academics drawn from different departments. If you are writing Caribbean dissertations supervised by these academics, you may be registered at the Centre or in the departments of the respective academics.

Research Areas

Current areas of research expertise are: Slavery and empire in the 18th and 19th centuries; Caribbean maritime worlds and networks; white identities; Caribbean writing in French and Spanish; postcolonial Caribbean texts; pre-1900 English Caribbean literatures; women's writing and feminist theory; disaster law and culture; slavery and law; the Haitian Revolution; postcolonial studies, world literature, literary and cultural theory; gender and slavery; enslaved runaways and maroons. Students will be supervised by faculty members with expertise in these areas.

Regular term-time seminars in Caribbean Studies and Comparative Caribbean Literatures are run within the Faculty of Arts, and form a compulsory element of our research degrees.

Read less
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

Read less
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our Department of History.

At Essex, you can progress onto our MA History, MA History (Cultural and Social History Pathway), MA History (Local and Regional History Pathway), or MA History (Public History Pathway).

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also gain knowledge of history and an understanding of the methods and techniques of the historical discipline.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our excellent history facilities:
-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Example structure

-English for Academic Purposes
-Making Histories: Concepts, Themes and Sources
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Public History Project Module: Bourne Mill, Colchester (From the 16th to the 21st Century) (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern England (optional)
-The Making of Modern Brazil (optional)
-Resistance and Rebellion in the World of Atlantic Slavery (optional)
-Revolutionary Encounters: China and the World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Mapping History and Heritage in Colchester (optional)
-Supernatural and Natural Worlds in Early Modern Europe (optional)
-Life in the Three Kingdoms: Societies and cultures in early modern Britain and Ireland (optional)
-Consensus Britain? The State and the People, 1945-79 (optional)
-'The Special Relationship'? Anglo-American Relations 1850-2005
-Sex, Class and War at the Movies: Britain, 1930-2000 (optional)
-Witch-Trials in Early Modern Europe and New England (optional)
-Medicine and Society in Britain and France 1700-1860 (optional)
-Reconstructing Family, Residence, Work and Communal Life in Victorian England (optional)
-The African American Experience (optional)
-Human Rights in Historical Perspective (optional)
-South Africa: The Road to Apartheid (optional)
-Literature and the Condition of England (optional)
-Between Protection and Control: Policing Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries (optional)
-The English Revolution (optional)
-British Social History 1830-1950 (optional)
-Crime and Punishment: England in Comparative Perspective 1650-1900 (optional)
-From Stalin to Putin (optional)
-The Tudors and Stuarts on Film (optional)
-Slavery and Plantation Societies in Latin America (optional)
-The British Empire in the Indian Ocean World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Women, Gender and Sexuality in US History (optional)
-Metropolis: Urban Germany 1900-1945 (optional)
-The United States and the Vietnam War (optional)

Read less
Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. Read more
Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations.

Emphasising the close relation between academic study and broader cultural interest in the past and its significance in everyday life, the programme enables the investigation of various cultural forms and practices, from oral history and autobiography to television and virtual reality.

The course comprises three pathways:

• Cultural Memory
• Making Histories: Public History and Heritage
• ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity

The general concerns of the masters programme are developed in relation to these pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus. The pathways also provide the basis for the PGCert and PGDip awards.

Why study with us?

• Chance to specialise through one of three pathways: Cultural Memory; Making Histories – Public History and Heritage; or Race, Nation and Ethnicity

• Practical emphasis on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations

• Lecturers with expertise across cultural, social and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies, and the history of ideas

• Interdisciplinary approach informed by cultural and critical theory

• Close relationship to the University of Brighton's Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories

• Flexible modes of study for students with personal or professional commitments

Syllabus

Cultural memory pathway:

Cultural History: Concepts, Theories and Methods
Cultural Memory in Ireland: Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles OR Holocaust Memory
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

Making histories pathway:

Making Histories: Making the History of Brighton and Hove
Slavery in the Atlantic World OR Britain in the Second World War
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

'Race', nation and ethnicity pathway:

Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities
The Making of the Black Atlantic: Transformations of History, Representation and Identity OR Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures: Fictions and Histories
Research Methods
Research Project
Optional module

To find out more about the course content please visit the website:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/cultural-history-memory-and-identity-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Careers and employability

The knowledge, intellectual skills and confidence acquired through study on this MA provides excellent training for doctoral research. All CHMI students are encouraged to participate in the rich programme of seminars, symposia and conferences, which includes an annual postgraduate conference organised by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, and the School of Humanities. CHMI graduates have a direct route on to our Humanities PhD programme, but have also gone on to doctoral research at other universities.

CHMI students have used the MA to secure work in the education, heritage and museum, health and voluntary sectors, and the course has proved attractive to those looking to develop their careers by augmenting existing skills and experience or by opening new professional paths within their workplace or organisation. We have established a small number of voluntary work placements for our students with the local community history group, Brighton and Hove Black History, and hope to maintain this opportunity as well as establish further volunteering opportunities in future.

Read less
The MA International Social Policy is designed to equip students with the knowledge and research skills that they will need to thrive in the globalised, interdependent societies of the twenty-first century. Read more
The MA International Social Policy is designed to equip students with the knowledge and research skills that they will need to thrive in the globalised, interdependent societies of the twenty-first century. The questions it addresses include:

• How are welfare states adapting to new economic and political realities?
• What are the implications of climate change and global warming for the future of social policy?
• What lessons about social reform can differing nations learn from one another?
• How should we explain differences in the financing and organisation of diverse welfare systems?
• To what extent can cross-national forms of provision and citizenship rights be devised?
• Is globalisation undermining the ability of national governments to determine welfare policies?
• What influence is exerted by organisations such as the World Bank, the IMF, the UN, the International Labour Organisation and the World Trade Organisation?
• What influence does the European Union have on national policy-making?
• What are the existing trends in, and future prospects for, levels of global poverty?
• To what extent are Non-Governmental Organisations influencing policy-making?

Our aim is to not simply to inform students about recent debates and literatures but to assist their ability to investigate these topics and develop their own independent research interests. We hope and expect that many students will later pursue research careers (including PhDs) and/or work in the field of policy-making.

The core modules are: Welfare Policy (10 credits), Research Methods & Research Management (20 credits), Climate Change & Social Policy (10 credits), Fundamentals of International Social Policy (20 credits), Globalisation, Europeanisation and Public Policy (20 credits), Dissertation (60 credits).

In addition there are a range of elective modules to choose from, including: Human Rights and Modern Slavery (10 & 20 credits), Migration, Multiculturalism and Mobilisation (10 & 20 credits), Civil Society: the Role of NGOs (10 & 20 credits), Leadership, Strategy & Performance in the Public Sector (10 & 20 credits).

Read less
Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. Read more
Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. This is a perfect programme to advance your academic career in archaeology; you will also develop employability skills including project management, report writing, problem-solving, independent working, and research.

Our Archaeology MPhil programme research degree, conducted as supervised independent study, assessed through a single written document that is supported with a viva voce examination.

Both degrees involve the production of new knowledge through original research and advanced scholarship, exploring a field of academic study in detail. This involves detailed understanding of the methods, techniques and approaches needed to produce such knowledge, and the wider context of the subject of study.

These programmes are based in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and cover a wide range of specialisms. Research supervision is available in the following periods and regions:

Later Prehistory

-Mesolithic/Neolithic transition in north-west Europe
-Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Britain and north-west Europe
-Copper and Bronze Age in Italy and the Mediterranean
-Iron Age/Roman transition

Classical Archaeology

-Roman Britain
-Roman Europe and Mediterranean
-Roman urbanism
-Greek and Byzantine archaeology
-The Roman/medieval transition

Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology

-Early medieval Britain and Europe
-Byzantine archaeology
-Medieval and post-medieval landscapes
-Church archaeology, historic buildings
-Post-medieval archaeology, colonialism, slavery

Thematic research is also strong at Newcastle and research supervision is available in the following areas of enquiry:

Bodies and Identity

-Personhood and identity
-The archaeology of the body and mortuary archaeology
-Art and identity

Landscapes

-Landscape archaeology
-Ritual landscapes
-Historic landscape characterisation

Material Culture

-Ancient technology and economy
-Ancient metallurgy
-Artefact analysis and material culture studies

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X