• University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"sla"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Sla)

  • "sla" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 12 of 12
Order by 
The Diploma in TESOL at the University of Brighton is a postgraduate professional qualification for experienced English language teachers wanting to develop their practice and understanding of English Language Teaching (ELT). Read more
The Diploma in TESOL at the University of Brighton is a postgraduate professional qualification for experienced English language teachers wanting to develop their practice and understanding of English Language Teaching (ELT).

It is part of the School of Humanities ELTEP (English Language Teacher Education Programme) suite of courses, which includes the TESOL MA. Students wanting to go on to the MA after the Diploma can be accredited for previous study.

The Diploma in TESOL combines assessed teaching practice with academic study into aspects of language teaching and learning such as ELT methodology, use of technologies, materials, language analysis and exploration and second language acquisition.

A key component of the Diploma in TESOL is the development of teaching practitioners’ reflective ability. Our aim is to help teachers deepen their understanding about their own professional practice and this is integrated throughout the course.

Why study with us?

• Shared modules with the TESOL MA, meaning you can carry over up to 60 credits towards the masters programme

• Students from a range of cultural and teaching backgrounds – a variety that adds depth to seminar discussions

• Chance to apply the course to your own professional context and experience, and personalise it according to your needs

• Exploration of modern technology and its impact on education, reflecting the importance of English in the new media of global communication

• Preparation for the complexities of the global market through teaching that accounts for international contexts

Course structure

The course comprises five modules, which relate theories and research to professional contexts. Assessments are varied and most encourage the development of reflective practice, which plays a key part in professional development. This reflection is assessed in the form of a reflective blog that documents your teaching assessments, peer observations and reactions to and thoughts about issues relating to your experiences on the course, in your professional context and from your reading.

The Diploma in TESOL is validated by the University of Brighton and has the appropriate amount of assessed teaching practice and input hours set by British Council guidelines. The course is therefore equivalent to other ELT Diplomas such as the Cambridge DELTA or Trinity DipTESOL.

Areas of study

• ELT Methodology – Approaches and Methods

This module informs you of a range of developments in English language teaching methodology and extends your repertoire of teaching skills. It also familiarises you with a range of ELT resources for different contexts and enables you to approach a variety of teaching contexts reflectively.

The module is assessed by a portfolio with three components: a short Statement of Relevance where you relate an issue from the module to your practice; an in-class presentation; and a longer reflective essay.

• Language Awareness

This module develops an awareness of language systems. It helps you to critically evaluate analytical and classificatory frameworks of English grammar and pronunciation and to analyse the organisation of discourse in English. The modules is assessed by a three-hour exam.

• Second Language Acquisition

This module explores research on second language acquisition (SLA), from the analysis of learner language to current cognitive and sociocultural models. An important focus is the consideration of the implications of SLA research for English language teaching.

The module is assessed by a 4,000-word essay that applies SLA research to a professional context.

• Materials

This module focuses on the role, use and development of materials in the language classroom. It explores at the evaluation and design of materials as well as the use of new technologies.

• Teaching and Reflection

This is the most important module, allowing you to gain practical experience teaching English as a second language. Your classes need to demonstrate a variety of levels, content and approaches, as you are assessed in your place of work five times over the duration of the course.

From the five assessments, the top four make up your final module grade. Observations are recorded so you can look at your own practice and develop reflective skills and self-awareness. Even students who were at first apprehensive have responded very positively to this experience.

In addition, you are required to document your learning and developments through a reflective blog. This blog will contain reflections on your assessed teaching, peer observations and at least five ‘critical incidents’ that have made you question aspects of your own practice or the ELT context in general.

Support is provided through a series of Saturday workshops, tutor support and small action learning groups.

Careers and employability

The Diploma in TESOL at the University of Brighton is recognised as being equivalent to other similar Diplomas (DELTA, Trinity DipTESOL) as it has the required amount of teaching assessments and course content. As such, it equips language teachers with the skills needed to develop professionally within a wide range of ELT contexts.

Read less
This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

Read less
The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. Read more

Why take this course?

The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. As well as thoroughly reviewing developments in the field, this flexible course allows students to develop their expertise in areas of personal interest.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Extend your knowledge and understanding of learning and teaching as you upgrade your qualifications
Reflect on your teaching practice from theoretical and research-based perspectives
Improve your career prospects

What opportunities might it lead to?

Completion of the course will support further career options, including diversification into educational management or teacher education, among other paths. Many of our graduates have gone on to obtain jobs in universities in the UK and abroad, or have taken on greater responsibility in their existing institutions. Others have also taken advantage of the secure footing for doctoral-level study provided by the programme.

Module Details

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units. You will study:

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Theory and Practice of TESOL: Students consider the theory and practice that informs communicative language teaching and how individual and contextual factors impact on classroom practices and decision making. In so doing, they reflect on their own teaching and learning experiences. The unit also considers issues in curriculum and syllabus design, assessment and teacher education.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

plus two options from:

Using Technology and Corpora in Learning, Teaching and Research: Students are introduced to the ways in which they can make use of technology as both language teachers and language researchers. In particular, the unit focuses on the technological affordances of the internet and language corpora.

World Englishes: The English language has always been characterised by dynamic change. This unit considers the political, ideological and pedagogical aspects of English being used as a global lingua franca.

Analysing, Evaluating and Writing Material: This unit develops students’ abilities to analyse teaching materials, with particular emphasis on the perspectives of discourse, pragmatics and theories of second language acquisition. Students will focus on evaluating and writing material with particular teaching contexts in mind.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) entirely through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block (plus their dissertation). A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Typically each taught unit runs for twelve weeks and has four hours of teaching per week. Teaching takes place in small seminar groups, allowing students to analyse arguments, contribute ideas and ask questions. Tutors are also available to offer guidance to students on an individual basis.

Most units are assessed through at least two pieces of coursework (typically essays), amounting to 6,000 words in total for the unit.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research in teaching and related fields. Possession of a Master's qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position in either the private or public sectors or to diversify a career into areas such as educational management, materials evaluation and production, teacher education or external assessment.

Read less
The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. Read more

Why take this course?

The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. As well as thoroughly reviewing developments in the field, this flexible course allows students to develop their expertise in areas of personal interest.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Extend your knowledge and understanding of learning and teaching as you upgrade your qualifications
Reflect on your teaching practice from theoretical and research-based perspectives
Improve your career prospects

What opportunities might it lead to?

Completion of the course will support further career options, including diversification into educational management or teacher education, among other paths. Many of our graduates have gone on to obtain jobs in universities in the UK and abroad, or have taken on greater responsibility in their existing institutions. Others have also taken advantage of the secure footing for doctoral-level study provided by the programme.

Module Details

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units. You will study:

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Theory and Practice of TESOL: Students consider the theory and practice that informs communicative language teaching and how individual and contextual factors impact on classroom practices and decision making. In so doing, they reflect on their own teaching and learning experiences. The unit also considers issues in curriculum and syllabus design, assessment and teacher education.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

plus two options from:

Using Technology and Corpora in Learning, Teaching and Research: Students are introduced to the ways in which they can make use of technology as both language teachers and language researchers. In particular, the unit focuses on the technological affordances of the internet and language corpora.

World Englishes: The English language has always been characterised by dynamic change. This unit considers the political, ideological and pedagogical aspects of English being used as a global lingua franca.

Analysing, Evaluating and Writing Material: This unit develops students’ abilities to analyse teaching materials, with particular emphasis on the perspectives of discourse, pragmatics and theories of second language acquisition. Students will focus on evaluating and writing material with particular teaching contexts in mind.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) entirely through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block (plus their dissertation). A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Typically each taught unit runs for twelve weeks and has four hours of teaching per week. Teaching takes place in small seminar groups, allowing students to analyse arguments, contribute ideas and ask questions. Tutors are also available to offer guidance to students on an individual basis.

Most units are assessed through at least two pieces of coursework (typically essays), amounting to 6,000 words in total for the unit.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research in teaching and related fields. Possession of a Master's qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position in either the private or public sectors or to diversify a career into areas such as educational management, materials evaluation and production, teacher education or external assessment.

Read less
On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

Read less
This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/. Read more
This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/

The MA develops your understanding of historical and contemporary debates in (socio)linguistics and discourse analysis and enhances your analytic and linguistic skills by introducing different approaches to the analysis of written and spoken language use from a range of everyday and institutional contexts.

Topics covered include:

language and ideology
linguistic performances of identity (particularly language and gender, sexuality, ethnicity and social class)
language and the media
talk at work
English in a multilingual world
intercultural communication
multilingualism and code-switching
varieties of English
You're encouraged to engage with these topics by drawing on your own social, cultural and occupational backgrounds in class discussions and in your written work.

You're also encouraged to collect your own samples of written and spoken language use and learn to subject those to in-depth critical analysis.

This MA will draw on findings, theories and methodologies from: sociolinguistics, semantics, pragmatics, spoken and written discourse analysis, ethnography, semiotics, feminist stylistics; multimodal analysis; interactional sociolinguistics, conversational analysis, membership categorisation analysis, performativity and narrative analysis.

The programme’s distinct interdisciplinary ethos is also reflected in your opportunity to choose from a selection of relevant option modules in other departments in Goldsmiths.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

Modules & Structure

On this programme you will complete two core modules, two option modules and one dissertation.

Core modules:
Core Issues in English Language & Linguistics- 30 credits
Language in its Sociocultural Context- 30 credits

Option modules:
You may choose two linguistic options or one linguistic option and one option from other MA programmes within the College, where specifically approved by the Programme Co-ordinator.

Option modules from other departments:
You may also choose one non-linguistics module, either from our own department (English and Comparative Literature) or from another department. Please note that availability of options across the College varies, but typically you can choose from the following selection. Please note that your choice of option module from another deparment needs to be discussed with the Programme Co-ordinator of the MA Sociocultural Linguistics in advance.

Dissertation:
You also produce a dissertation. Dissertation topics in the past have included:

discursive construction of religious identities in interviews with British Muslim converts
code-switching practices in a Tunisian family
discourse and identities in the SLA classroom
language and gender in dream narratives
pauses and silences on Talk Radio
attitudes towards bilingual signs in Thailand
representations of parenthood in UK parenting magazines
political debates on Irish TV
lifetime narratives of older Asian immigrants in the UK
the language of text messaging
language and literacy practices on Facebook
attitudes to non-standard language use
discursive analysis of EFL textbooks
gendered speech style in an all-female group of Iranian friends
The best (UG or MA) linguistics dissertation is rewarded every year with the Hayley Davis Prize.

Approach to teaching

Our lecture/seminar sessions are designed to combine discussions of preparatory reading materials with tutor-led input and hands-on analyses of data/texts by students. We also tend to invite guest lectures for our option modules and introduce you to a number of linguistics talk series across the University of London.

Our MA group is usually very tight-knit, students and student reps organise study/revision groups, online discussion forums, outings to lectures across London, and a number of social events.

Assessment

Coursework; essays; examinations; dissertation.

Skills

Transferable skills, including enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate a wide variety of spoken and written texts from informal as well as institutional settings; an understanding of the concept of communicative competence; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Careers

Publishing, journalism, british council roles, public relations, teaching, research, translation, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
Combining recent developments in drama education, second language acquisition and ELT methodology, this course offers an innovative approach to teaching drama as a key way of promoting learning and language acquisition in more creative and personalised ways. Read more
Combining recent developments in drama education, second language acquisition and ELT methodology, this course offers an innovative approach to teaching drama as a key way of promoting learning and language acquisition in more creative and personalised ways. It is taught in conjunction with the Centre for Applied Linguistics, which has a particular expertise in ELT.

Balancing the study and practice of drama and ELT as both academic and practical subjects, it is suitable for experienced teachers interested in combining both disciplines (Drama and English Language Teaching) at Master’s level, or for teachers of English as a Foreign Language. You’ll examine how drama can motivate your students, improve their speaking confidence, and enable them to use language in cultural contexts, as well as improving your teacher-student relationships.

Core modules develop and extend your understanding of key approaches to Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and English Language Learning (ELT), and provide a solid grounding in drama techniques and approaches. You’ll also complete a dissertation based on an individual research project, with support from a member of academic staff.

Course structure

Students will split the taught aspects of the course between the Centre for Education Studies and the Centre for Applied Linguistics.

Core modules

-The Role of Story in Drama & Theatre Education
-Drama and Literacy
-ELT Methodology for pre-experience students
OR
-Issues and Research in ELT for post-experience students
-Second Language Acquisition and Classroom Language Learning
-Literature and Drama in ELT
-Research Methodology for ELT
-Dissertation

Optional modules

Students taking ELT Methodology will also take one of the following optional modules:
-Language Testing
-ICT in ELT
-English for Young Learners or Teacher Education and Development
-Teaching Language and Culture or Management and Leaderships of ELT Institutions

Course delivery and learning styles

The course is delivered through a range of teaching and learning methods: lectures, seminars, practical workshops which involve group work and self-study.

Read less
This course offers an advanced level professional qualification for practising and aspiring teachers of English and has been designed for both native and non-native English speakers. Read more
This course offers an advanced level professional qualification for practising and aspiring teachers of English and has been designed for both native and non-native English speakers.

Students have the opportunity to carry out a major piece of individual research on a topic of special interest.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/applied-linguistics

Course detail

• Study a distinctive course with assessed teaching practice enabling you, with the relevant teaching experience, to gain British Council ‘TEFL Q’ (qualified) status and its associated career advantages
• Explore practical issues relevant to your own professional working environment with an optional Professional Practice unit, which could involve opportunities to gain teaching experience abroad
• Develop your understanding of how language systems can be taught, as well as theories of language teaching such as language acquisition and intercultural communication
• Gain from access to the expertise of CRELLA, our world-renowned Centre for Research in English Language Learning and Assessment; nationally and internationally recognised as a leading UK-based centre for research into language learning and assessment
• Benefit from a course which gives you access to a range of careers in universities, colleges, and language schools in many countries; in ELT development and publishing; or further study at PhD level.

Modules

• Exploring Research: Concepts and Methods
• The Language System
• The Language System and Language Teaching
• The Methodology of Language Teaching
• Issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA)
• Professional Practices
• Teaching Practice
• L2 Materials Development
• Assessment and Accreditation
• Dissertation in Applied Linguistics (TEFL)

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used throughout the programme: a variety of group and individual assessments throughout the duration of the programme which underline research and independent thinking, critical knowledge theory and practice and the ability to make informed decisions. This is relevant to the intended learning outcomes of our programme.

We use a variety of different tasks as part of our assessment, for example:
• Academic papers, dissertation
• Oral presentations
• Materials evaluation and production for language teaching and learning purposes
• In-class tests and examinations
• Portfolios of small practical tasks

Careers

This MA in Applied Linguistics (TEFL) caters for those who want to develop their experience and research in a number of areas related to Applied Linguistics, particularly as it is specifically designed for those who are planning to become English Language teachers, those who wish to develop their knowledge and experience in L2 Materials Development and those who are looking to develop a critical insight into language assessment and testing.

This course is one of the few courses in the Higher Education market for masters in 'ELT and Applied Linguistics’ (English Language Teaching) as it allows experienced teachers to gain professional accreditation following British Council recommendations for TEFL qualifications in relation to gaining TEFL recognition (TEFLQ status to those who have a minimum of two years of teaching experience prior to the above mentioned teaching practice unit).

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

Read less
This course is ideal for you if you wish to develop your career in language testing and assessment – whether or not you already have experience in this area – and is the only full-time, face-to-face course in the UK specialising in this area. Read more
This course is ideal for you if you wish to develop your career in language testing and assessment – whether or not you already have experience in this area – and is the only full-time, face-to-face course in the UK specialising in this area.

The cutting-edge theory combined with practical experience will give you the expertise you need, and you will enjoy the opportunity to pursue your research interests in our world-leading research centre in language assessment.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/ma-applied-linguistics-testing-and-assessment

Course detail

• Study a mix of cutting-edge theory and practical real-world applications, building your knowledge and experience of classroom testing, assessing learning outcomes, course evaluation, and institutional tests and exams
• Explore your research interests with CRELLA, our world-renowned Centre for Research in English Language Learning and Assessment; recognised as a leading UK-based centre for research with 100% rating for research impact in the 2014 REF
• Gain from access to the expertise of the English Language and linguistics team with an excellent track record of high-quality teaching
• Benefit from a course which opens up opportunities in organisations, universities and ministries worldwide; to work with exam boards like Cambridge Language Assessment, Edexcel, or Pearson; for an education authority as tests and assessments specialist; or for further doctoral study with CRELLA.

Modules

• Exploring Research: Concepts and Methods
• The Language System
• Statistics in Language Testing
• Principles & Practice in Lang Assessment
• Testing Language Knowledge & Receptive Skills
• Testing Productive and Integrated Skills
• L2 Materials Development
• Professional Practices
• Assessment and Accreditation
• Issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA)
• Dissertation in Testing and Assessment

Assessment

A range of assessment methods is used throughout the course with the main emphasis on summative assessment but with also some focus on formative assessment. They include: academic papers, oral presentations, test materials and procedures evaluation, production of tasks and tests, in-class tests and examinations and portfolios of practical tasks. Assessments aim to develop independent, critical thinking and serve to reinforce our research culture.

You can expect to produce a critique of theory and current practices, and to evidence your ability to make informed decisions. Feedback plays an important role in the course and you will engage in self-assessment and peer feedback, especially in formative and presentation assessments.

Research Ethics is an integral part of the course and together with training in statistics provides the foundations for the final dissertation: the culmination of the course which entails managing the research project from start to finish.

Careers

Given the highly specialised focus of the course, we anticipate that students will progress onto a position that involves language testing or assessment.

This may involve working with one of the well-known exam boards like Cambridge Language Assessment, Edexcel, or Pearson, or perhaps for an education authority as the specialist on tests and assessments.

Some graduates whose background includes language teaching may secure a position within an educational establishment as the authority on course evaluation and assessment.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

Read less
Our M.A. programs offer training in the areas of French and Francophone Literature and Culture, Applied and Descriptive Linguistics, and Second-language Pedagogy. Read more
Our M.A. programs offer training in the areas of French and Francophone Literature and Culture, Applied and Descriptive Linguistics, and Second-language Pedagogy. Our programs are designed to promote professional development and preparation for the job market. To that end, qualified students awarded Graduate Teaching Assistantships learn to teach at the undergraduate level at the same time that they complete requirements toward the advanced degree. Many of them also present research at local and national conferences and publish their findings.

Students choose either the Standard (Literature) Track or the Applied Linguistics Track, each with or without thesis.

Standard (Literature) Track Degree requirements

33 credit hours of coursework without thesis; or 27 credit hours of coursework and 6 credit hours of thesis research (FR 599) resulting in a completed and approved thesis. Find out more information on thesis procedures.
At least one course in five of six fields:
- Medieval and Renaissance
- Early Modern (17th and 18th centuries)
- 19th century
- 20th and 21st centuries
- Francophone and French studies
- French linguistics
A comprehensive exam with written and oral components based on coursework completed in the five fields.*

*On the written portion of the comprehensive exam for the Standard Track, candidates may be exempted from examination in a maximum of two fields: by writing a thesis in a field; by presenting a research paper in a field at a professional conference; or by earning a grade of “A” or “B” in two courses in a field. For the oral portion of the exam, students present a topic assigned in advance.

Applied Linguistics Track Degree requirements

36 credit hours of coursework without thesis; or 30 credit hours of coursework and 6 credit hours of thesis research (FR 599) resulting in a completed and approved thesis. Find out more information on thesis procedures and consult the special instructions for French Linguistics students.

Coursework in three areas (French Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, French electives) as follows:
- French descriptive linguistics course for 3 credit hours (FR 561)
- 12 credit hours in SLA, pedagogy, and research (FR 512 and other approved courses)
- 21 credit hours of French electives (language, literature, film, culture, linguistics, etc.) for the non-thesis track; 15 credit hours of French electives for the thesis track.

A comprehensive written exam, based on the coursework.

Read less
Study a part-time distance learning course designed for in-service teachers who want to develop their language teaching skills and enhance their professional ability. Read more
Study a part-time distance learning course designed for in-service teachers who want to develop their language teaching skills and enhance their professional ability. The course guides you through aspects of analysing, teaching, learning and researching language. It encourages reflective practice and the application of theory to pedagogy in your own context as part of an international community of teachers.

This course is for experienced in-service English language teachers who wish to undertake professional work-based learning and develop their career potential. The course enables you to broaden your understanding of how language works, and how it is learned or acquired.

You explore a wide range of TESOL issues relevant to you and your institution, while developing experience in the methodologies that underpin educational research. You also enhance your ability to reflect on your own practice and working environment. This course provides the opportunity to:
-Extend your knowledge and understanding in specialist areas of TESOL.
-Evaluate critically areas of the TESOL profession’s theory and practice.
-Complete assignments and a research project related to your working situation. These projects aid your professional development and can benefit your workplace.

This distance learning course is supported with the university's virtual learning environment. No face-to-face attendance is required as you become part of an international community of teachers through on-line discussion and receive email and SKYPE support from tutors.

Course structure

Distance learning – typically 2 to 3 years. Starts October for PgCert and PgDip.

Course content
Postgraduate Certificate
-Phonetics and phonology
-Pedagogical and functional grammar
-Second language acquisition
-Teaching methodologies
-Classroom observation
-Reflection on practice

Postgraduate Diploma
-Course and syllabus design
-Self-prepared, published and electronic materials design and evaluation
-Self-prepared, published and electronic assessment and test design and evaluation
-Introduction to research methodology – focus groups, interviews, for teaching materials, assessments and course/syllabus
-Second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis
-Teacher education and development
-Global Englishes
-Teaching young learners
-Technology and language learning

Research project
-Design and implementation of a research project
-Research methodologies and methods (qualitative and quantitative)
-Research ethics
-Writing a dissertation

Assessment
-Oral presentation: 5,000 word reflective account
-SLA questionnaire design and evaluation: 2000 word essay
-Online discussions; 5,400 word small scale classroom based assignment
-Small scale group assignment; 5,400 word literature report
-1,000 word research proposal; 12,000-15,000 word research project and dissertation

Read less
This course is suitable for physiotherapists, GPs, doctors, occupational therapists, podiatrists, nurses and other allied Health professionals working in orthopaedics, rheumatology, neurological and musculoskeletal patient management. Read more
This course is suitable for physiotherapists, GPs, doctors, occupational therapists, podiatrists, nurses and other allied Health professionals working in orthopaedics, rheumatology, neurological and musculoskeletal patient management. It brings together the theory, practice, evidence, safety, ethical and legal aspects of injection therapy that enhances interdisciplinary working, professional development and reflective practice.

Routes are offered for both neurological injection (botulinum toxin) and joint and soft tissue injection (steroid injections). There are some joint sessions as well as both subject specialist theory and practical sessions with experienced, clinically based tutors to guide and support you throughout.

INDUSTRY LINKS

Most of the students completing this course are current NHS employees. We work closely with local NHS Trusts to support training and development and SLA funding is available through the CPD agreement. Please ask your manager for details if you are an employee of a local NHS Trust.

There is currently no legal obligation to have completed a specific training programme to practice injection therapy as an AHP. However, it is considered to be good practice by the relevant regulatory bodies to have a formal qualification such as this, which demonstrates good theoretical knowledge , practical skill and ability to consider best practice through evaluation of the evidence base for injection therapy practice.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The course is delivered in both the classroom and specialist practical teaching rooms.

There are two assessments for this course. The first requires 10 injections which are assessed and signed off by your nominated mentor in practice as well as a reflective case based assignment (3000 words).

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X