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Masters Degrees (Skeleton)

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Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more

Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips you with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and will prepare you for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract/commercial archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

  • Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
  • Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
  • Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
  • Themes in Palaeopathology
  • Dissertation (double module).

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of you to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow you to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge. External speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, you will have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide you with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



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The Radiographic Reporting programme offers a depth and scope of knowledge, which incorporates a high level of clinical skill in the practice of image evaluation and reporting of the skeletal system. Read more
The Radiographic Reporting programme offers a depth and scope of knowledge, which incorporates a high level of clinical skill in the practice of image evaluation and reporting of the skeletal system. The modules fully integrate theoretical knowledge with practical skill, facilitating your development as a competent and reflective practitioner.

The programme incorporates key lectures and guided work-based learning, along with practice assessment, evaluation and report writing for radiographic images of the skeletal system. It also offers the option of pathways in skeletal and/or chest reporting.

This programme has significant work-based elements, therefore it is essential you have effective support and mentorship in your base department. The work-based learning component is well structured and monitored by us through clinical visits. The LSBU PACS has a wide range of relevant cases that will supplement work-based experience.

We have a highly motivated team of in-house and guest specialists from a variety of hospitals, with over 14 years experience successfully delivering the Radiographic Reporting programme.

Modules

The PgCert is typically achieved in Year 1 and credit carried forward to further study in Year 2 to achieve PgDip. Year 3 completes the MSc with a dissertation. The awards are flexible to suit individual needs:

PgCert (60 credits)

Foundations of image interpretation (20 credits)
Plus optional modules worth 40 credits

PgDip (120 credits)

Foundations of image interpretation (20 credits)
Research in health and social care (20 credits)
Plus optional modules worth 80 credits

MSc (180 Credits)

Foundations of image interpretation (20 credits)
Research in health and social care (20 credits)
Dissertation (40 or 60 credits)
Plus optional modules worth 80 - 100 credits

Optional modules:

Radiographic Skeletal Reporting: Appendicular skeleton (40 credits)
Radiographic Skeletal Reporting: Axial Skeleton (20 credits)
Advances in Specialised Skeletal Imaging (20 credits)
Radiographic Chest Reporting (40 credits)

Professional links

The programme is approved by the Society and College of Radiographers.The Society and College of Radiographers represents the whole radiographic workforce in the UK.

Employability

This programme will assist in developing graduates career options as a practitioner, or into specialist, advanced and consultant practice, research or management areas. The course offers a flexible and responsive education and training provision which follows the requirements in respect of Continuing Professional and Personal Development (CPPD), linked to professional regulation and the Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF).

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Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history. Read more

Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history. Bioarchaeology (the study of archaeological human remains) is an exciting field that draws on a variety of techniques, ranging from visual examination of the whole skeleton to the biomolecular analysis of small bone samples. Demographic shifts, environmental changes, migrations, the spread of diseases and the impact of violence and conflict all leave traces on the skeleton.

This MSc provides the skills required to understand skeletal biographies and interpret them in their cultural context at the individual and the population level. Combining theoretical learning with hands-on practice, we will provide you with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills essential to your handling and analysis of specimens recovered from archaeological sites.

Programme structure

Throughout the programme, you’ll take part in lectures, seminars and practical work with archaeological skeletal assemblages and reference collections. Drawing on Edinburgh’s long history in the study of the human body, you will also have the opportunity to visit Surgeons’ Hall Museum and anatomy department, which provide unique collections of pathological and anatomical study specimens.

You will complete six compulsory courses and select one further option. You will be assessed through reports, lab exams, oral and poster presentations, and essays. You will also submit a dissertation on a research topic of your choosing. Past dissertations have ranged from experimental projects on violence in prehistory to dietary studies of Chalcolithic Turkey and considerations of disease and impairment in post-medieval England.

The compulsory courses on this programme are:

  • Human Musculo-Skeletal Anatomy
  • Analytical Methods in Human Osteology
  • Quantitative Methods and Reasoning in Archaeology
  • Skeletal Pathology
  • Bioarchaeological Analysis and Interpretation
  • Research Sources and Strategies in Bioarchaeology

Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Exploring the past with data science
  • Practical Zooarchaeology

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to:

  • identify and interpret human skeletal remains from archaeological sites
  • develop hypothesis testing skills
  • carry out relevant scientific analyses, often in cooperation with experts in other disciplines
  • engage in theoretical and methodological discussions relevant to osteoarchaeology
  • design research strategies based on transferable skills providing a basis for advanced studies (PhD and beyond)

Career opportunities

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police.

An archaeology degree does not, of course, restrict you to a career in archaeology. The programme also equips you for advanced study.



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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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This programme develops the skills and expertise required to undertake skeletal image interpretation and the provision of associated definitive clinical reports. Read more
This programme develops the skills and expertise required to undertake skeletal image interpretation and the provision of associated definitive clinical reports. Modules within the programme will build on previous learning. Starting with appendicular skeleton interpretation and reporting the programme then moves to consider axial skeleton image interpretation and reporting. Students will have opportunities to complete a research methodology module to equip them as comfortable research users and develop skills as researchers who add to the evidence base.

Staff running and teaching on the programme have extensive image interpretation and reporting experience and expertise and provide stimulating and informative lectures. Lectures are supported through blended learning delivered via our online platform and formative self-assessments to allow students to check their own progress.

Programme structure

The programme has a modular structure which when completed will ensure that graduates meet the standard requirements for reporting radiographers. The programme structure consists of two 30 credit modules for the PG Cert, with further 60 credits of modules for the PG Dip, and the addition of the 60 credit MSc research project for the full MSc.

Modules

Module titles are as follows:
• Fundamentals and principles of clinical image interpretation and advanced practice
• Musculoskeletal Pathology
• Appendicular Skeletal Image Interpretation
• Axial Skeletal Image Interpretation
• Applied Research methods
• Research/Dissertation

Please note the modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. For an up to date list please see the website http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/medicine/medicalimagingmsc/#Programme-structure

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This course is designed for practitioners who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills in the interpretation of medical images, and is jointly validated by the College of Radiographers. Read more
This course is designed for practitioners who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills in the interpretation of medical images, and is jointly validated by the College of Radiographers. It provides support for developing service requirements for reporting radiographers at consultant and advanced practitioner levels.

The teaching team, which includes consultant radiologists and reporting radiographers (advanced practitioners/consultant radiographers), has specialist knowledge and research interests in the range of subject areas offered.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/clinical-reporting.aspx

Postgraduate Certificate

Module 1 – Foundations of Clinical Reporting.

This module is compulsory for all students, and provides the core elements that underpin and complement the rest of the course. You must then complete pairs of modules (one being practice¬-based).

In addition to the Foundations Module, to be eligible for an award. The Foundations Module plus two other modules e.g. Appendicular Skeleton I and Appendicular Skeleton II would enable a you to exit with a PgC.

Postgraduate Diploma

If you wish to continue your studies to gain a PgD you must study Module 10, which focuses on Quality and Audit of Reporting in Practice. As this is a work¬ based course, it is not subject to the norms of the academic year.

You'll be expected to complete a Postgraduate Diploma (six modules) in 18 months or a Postgraduate Certificate (three modules) in twelve months. Approximately 10 hours per week is spent on independent study, giving you considerable flexibility in managing your learning time.

MSc Clinical Reporting

Having completed six modules (Postgraduate Diploma) you can achieve the MSc Clinical Reporting by completing:

• Research Approaches and Methods module
• Research Dissertation (counts as 2 modules)

Format

In keeping with the University’s Learning and Teaching strategy, the programme is learner centred and is orientated significantly towards workplace partnerships; using work based materials and the normal work environment as a source and site of learning.

Regular briefing sessions are held at the University throughout the programme to direct learning activities, and provide tutorial support. Teaching for the Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma is delivered by senior lecturers, experienced reporting radiographers and Consultant Radiologists. At each briefing block students complete test banks and regular vivas are undertaken to test knowledge and progression.

You should expect to commit around ten hours per week in independent study.

Assessment

Your knowledge and skills will be informally assessed on an on­going basis throughout the pathway through a range of methods and processes. You will have opportunity to receive formative feedback on your work at various points during the course through a variety of learning activities.

Formal or summative assessment will take place throughout the pathway and are scheduled to meet University guidance and to enable appropriate feedback to be returned to students in between assessments.

Assessment of knowledge and skills may include written essays/reports, reflective writing, case studies, oral/poster presentations or Objective Structured Examinations (OSE). All assessments focus on your ability to progress and integrate theory and practice.

What can I do next?

Successful completion of this course provides you with the skills and knowledge to enter or continue your career as an advanced practitioner or consultant within the radiography profession. Those who would like to continue to further pursue their academic potential will be able to apply for a place on the doctoral programme (MPhil/PhD) at Canterbury Christ Church University.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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What do Facebook, the financial system, Internet or the brain have in common?. "Everything is connected, all is network". Read more
What do Facebook, the financial system, Internet or the brain have in common?

"Everything is connected, all is network"
From the underlying skeleton of social relations, the interdependent evolution of our financial system, to the emergent collective computation in the brain, most of the complex systems that appear in society, technology, and nature are ultimately characterised by a nontrivial pattern of inter-relations. This underlying architecture is in turn shaping how information diffuses and spreads, how resilient the system is against attacks or perturbations, or how complex patterns emerge at the systemic level from the aggregation of seemingly simple individuals.

Our MSc Network Science will provide a thorough grounding in the core principles of modelling and analysis of complex and networked systems, along with the principal analytical and numerical methodologies. This will open to students a host of career opportunities in systems and networks modelling industries, spanning the IT, financial, and biomedical sectors, that are now requiring such specialist knowledge and skills.

Network Science is a very active and rapidly evolving research field with high societal impact, which stands at the crossroads of graph theory, complexity and data analysis. Addressing the description and modelling of the architecture and dynamics of complex systems -systems composed by many interacting units that show collective behaviour- it stands as a new kind of science to cope with some of the most challenging endeavours we face today, in an ever increasingly more connected society.
Its impact and applications outside academia pervades technological sectors such as communications and infrastructures (Internet, transportation networks, energy networks, urban mobility), finance (financial risk and systemic instability, financial networks, interbank cross-correlations), marketing and IT (social media, data analytics), public health (epidemic spreading models), or biostatistics and network biology (brain modelling, protein interaction networks, postgenomic era), to cite a few. This specialist masters programme aims at providing graduate students and professionals with a rigorous training in the underlying mathematical concepts, the analysis and modelling of complex networks and networked systems, complemented with training in computing, numerical simulations and massive data analysis. It is aimed towards students with a mathematical background who wish to enter a career involving analysis and optimisation of diverse kinds of networks, networked dynamics and models.

Why study your MSc Network Science at Queen Mary?
This is a pioneering MSc in the UK, a joint programme, taught by our Schools of Mathematical Sciences, and Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, drawing on their strengths in research and teaching in the area of complex networks, mathematical modelling of complex systems, and data mining.

We teach what we know and what we do best. Within the School of Mathematics, the Complex Systems & Networks group is one of the biggest hubs in Network Science within the UK, where we address both fundamental and applied challenges in the mathematical modelling of complex systems with clear societal impact, in collaboration with several industrial stakeholders. Within the School of Electronic Engineering, the Networks group was founded in 1987, and has hugely expanded ever since, bringing their expertise in online social networks, data mining and cloud computing. The coalescence of both groups expertises has fostered the creation of this unique MSc.

More about our two schools

Queen Mary is a member of the prestigious Russell Group of leading UK universities, combining world-class research, teaching excellence and unrivalled links with business and the public sector. The School of Mathematical Sciences has a distinguished history on itself. We have been conducting pioneering mathematical research since the 1950s, and as one of the largest mathematical departments in the UK, with over 50 members of staff, the school can offer diverse postgraduate study opportunities across the field, from pure and applied mathematics, to finance and statistics. Along with the MSc in Network Science, our cohort of postgraduate students specialise in Mathematics and Statistics, Mathematical Finance and Financial Computing. We are one of the UK’s leading universities in the most recent national assessment of research quality, we were placed ninth in the UK (REF 2014) amongst multi-faculty universities. This means that the teaching on our postgraduate programmes is directly inspired by the world-leading research of our academics. Our staff includes international leaders in many areas of mathematical research, and the School is a hive of activity, providing a vibrant intellectual space for postgraduate study.

The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science is internationally recognised for their pioneering and ground-breaking research in several areas including machine learning and applied network analysis. This expertise uniquely complements the more theoretical knowledge offered by the School of Mathematical Sciences, providing a well balanced mix of theory and applications and offering a deep and robust programme that combines the foundations of the mathematics of networks with the latest cutting edge applications in real world problems.

Additionally, Queen Mary holds a university-level Bronze Award for the Athena SWAN Charter, which recognises and celebrates good employment practice for women working in mathematics, science, engineering and technology in higher education and research.

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On this established and well respected course, you gain the knowledge, skills and attributes needed to be an effective sport and exercise science practitioner and/or researcher. Read more

On this established and well respected course, you gain the knowledge, skills and attributes needed to be an effective sport and exercise science practitioner and/or researcher. You develop strong technical, analytical, practical and professional skills, alongside specialist skills in • biomechanics and performance analysis • physiology and nutrition • strength and conditioning.

The course enables you to

  • develop your understanding of science
  • develop your ability to apply theory to practice in sport and exercise
  • work towards British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accreditation, (at the discretion of BASES, graduates are able to apply for exemption from some elements of the BASES supervised experience accreditation scheme)
  • conduct independent research, for which you can seek publication through our project module
  • gain experience as a sport or exercise science consultant

We offer a first-class suite of research and teaching laboratories alongside excellent facilities offered by our partnership venue at the English Institute of Sport, Sheffield. Our laboratories are all British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accredited.

The four overarching themes in the programme are

  • analysis of performance
  • improving performance
  • research methods and data analysis in both research and applied practice
  • professional practice

Many of the teaching staff support elite athletes as part of their work and undertake research in sport and exercise. We benefit from the expertise of our staff in the Centre for Sport and Exercise Science (CSES). The team for sport performance have worked successfully with athletes competing at the Olympics, Paralympics, and Winter Olympics. They have provided, or are currently providing, sport science research and consultancy services at elite level for the • Amateur Boxing Association • Amateur Swimming Association (diving and swimming) • British Cycling • British Speed Skating Association • British Skeleton-Bob Team • English Bowls Association • English Golf Union • Royal Yachting Association • GB table tennis • GB volleyball.

You benefit from CSES' activities as they allow us to keep course content at the cutting edge, based on our knowledge and experience of sport and exercise science delivery. You can also benefit from a work-based learning programme to help develop your experience of working in multidisciplinary teams, supporting athletes and coaches.

During the course you use a mix of traditional and online learning resources to ensure the course is flexible and can fit in with your existing commitments.

The quality of our provision was rated 24/24 by the Higher Education Council.

Sheffield Hallam are a Skills Development Partner of the Chartered Institute for Managing Sport and Physical Activity.

Professional recognition

This course is designed to meet some of the needs of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES), and the United Kingdom Strength and Conditioning Association accreditation.

Course structure

The masters award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

Core modules

  • Analysis and evaluation of performance: technical and tactical (15 credits)
  • Analysis and evaluation of performance: functional and metabolic (15 credits)
  • Inter-professional practice in sport and exercise science (15 credits)
  • Work-based learning in sport and exercise science (15 credits)
  • Research methods (15 credits)
  • Data analysis (15 credits)
  • Project (60 credits)

Optional modules

30 credits from:

  • Improving performance: strength and conditioning (15 credits)
  • Improving performance: physiology and nutrition (15 credits)
  • Applied performance analysis (15 credits)
  • Applied movement analysis (15 credits)
  • Human factors in sports engineering (15 credits)

Assessment

  • laboratory reports
  • project/ethics proposal
  • needs analysis
  • qualitative data analysis
  • managing projects
  • problem solving exercises
  • group work
  • oral presentations
  • poster presentations
  • case study defence or report
  • quantitative data analysis examination
  • project file
  • abstract writing
  • article prepared for publication (MSc only)
  • reflective portfolio
  • technology-based communication package

Employability

As a graduate you benefit from the skills and experience gained from the employability modules and our connections with industry.

Previous graduates have gone into careers as • developers for suppliers of sport equipment • sport science officers • advisors for national governing bodies and the English Institute of Sport • coaches • developing corporate wellness programmes in the health and fitness industry • advisors to local authorities and local health trusts • strength and conditioning coaches • sport and exercise nutritionists • researchers • technicians • university lecturers.

The course's strong focus on research skills provides an ideal platform for further study at PhD level. It is also an important first step into employment and can open many other doors into further training.

Sport scientists

Sport scientists support athletes or sports clubs, they generally provide advice and support, designed to monitor and improve sport performance, alongside a team of specialists including coaches, psychologist, performance managers and medical staff. Areas of expertise include • strength and conditioning • physiology • nutrition and analysis of movement and tactical performance.

Exercise scientists

Exercise scientists are more concerned with improving a person's health and helping them recover from illness through a structured programme of physical activity and other health-based interventions. They are also involved with preventative treatments and work closely with GPs and primary care trusts or private healthcare organisations. Exercise scientists might be employed by local authorities to run community based health and exercise initiatives.

It may be possible to move into a particular clinical area, such as cardiology, or work as a health promotion specialist for a local authority or healthcare trust. Our close links with the National Centre for Sport and Exercise medicine, part of which is based in Sheffield, will provide additional opportunities to those wishing to pursue careers in this area.

Other careers

Other careers also include • the pharmaceutical industry • the armed and uniformed services • journalism • teaching. If you are thinking about an academic career, many universities with sport-related courses require staff to have a higher degree.



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Programme description. Read more

Programme description

The DClinDent in Oral Surgery is a three-year, full-time programme which will allow the candidate to achieve specialist-level training in oral surgery, together with a taught professional Doctorate, preparing them for the Speciality examination of Membership in Oral Surgery (MOralSurg) of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons (Tricollegiate Edinburgh, Glasgow, England) UK.

The DClinDent aims to provide doctoral level educational opportunities to enable students to develop, consolidate and enhance their range of academic and clinical competencies to enable independent and reflective practice at the standard of a specialist in oral surgery.

Programme structure

This programme is for dental surgery graduates who wish to extend their knowledge, clinical practice experience and expertise in oral surgery.

The programme will give you theoretical and practical understanding of oral surgery and how it relates to other dental specialities.

The syllabus components are based on the core competencies for oral surgery training as set out by Specialty Advisory Committee (SAC) for Oral Surgery, The Faculty of Dental Surgery The Royal College of Surgeons of England (2014) :

  • extraction of teeth & retained roots/pathology
  • management of associated complications including oro-antral fistula
  • management of odontogenic and all other oral infections
  • management of impacted teeth
  • management of complications
  • peri-radicular surgery
  • dentoalveolar surgery in relation to orthodontic treatment
  • intraoral and labial biopsy techniques
  • treatment of intra-oral benign and cystic lesions of hard and soft tissues
  • management of benign salivary gland disease by intra-oral techniques and familiarity with the diagnosis and treatment of other salivary gland diseases
  • insertion of osseointegrated dental implants including bone augmentation and soft tissue management
  • appropriate pain and anxiety control including the administration of standard conscious sedation techniques
  • management of adults and children as in-patients, including the medically at risk patient
  • management of dento-alveolar trauma and familiarity with the management and treatment of fractures of the jaws and facial skeleton
  • management of oro-facial pain including temporomandibular joint disorders
  • clinical diagnosis of oral cancer and potentially malignant diseases, familiarity with their management and appropriate referral
  • the diagnosis of dentofacial deformity and familiarity with its management and treatment
  • diagnosis of oral mucosal diseases and familiarity with their management and appropriate referral
  • control of cross-infection
  • medico-legal aspects of oral surgery

For Year 1 and Year 2 students, there will be a written exam at the end of each term.

In addition to the above, at the end of Year 2, students will also have oral exams in June and in August/September.

Successful completion of the first two years of the programme will allow students to proceed to Year 3 of the programme. In Year 3, students will present the following:

a) a clinical governance project b) a systematic review of a topic related to Oral Surgery c) two fully documented patient case presentations d) two unseen (diagnostic) cases will also form part of this examination

The third year of the DClinDent programme will be structured over three semesters and during this time the student will be timetabled to four protected academic sessions each week with the remaining time dedicated to primarily independent clinical practice and inter-disciplinary patient management.

Year 1 courses:

  • Basic science in relation to oral surgery
  • Clinical knowledge 1
  • Oral Surgery - Clinical Patient Care 1
  • Pathology of the Oral and Dental Tissues
  • Research Methodology, Statistics, Clinical Governance and Audit
  • Resuscitation and Management of Emergencies
  • The NHS

Year 2 courses:

  • Clinical knowledge 2
  • Oral Surgery - Clinical Patient Care 2
  • Dissertation
  • Systemic disease in relation to Oral Surgery
  • Management of Pain and Anxiety

Year 3 courses:

  • Systematic Review
  • Clinical Governance Project
  • Specialist-Level Clinical Case-Reports
  • Clinical Patient Care 3

Learning outcomes

  1. Ability to produce good clinical care whilst maintaining good clinical practice
  2. Good understanding of the basic biological science relevant to oral surgery
  3. Ability to carry out the extraction of teeth and retained roots and management of complications
  4. Knowledge to deal with odontogenic and all other infections of the orofacial region and benign salivary gland disease
  5. Fluent in the management of impacted and unerupted teeth and dentoalveolar surgery in relation to orthodontic treatment , peri-radicular surgery, treatment of benign cystic lesion of the oral hard and soft tissues
  6. Familiarity with appropriate anxiety management techniques and management of orofacial pain
  7. Familiarity with the management of benign and malignant lesions arising in, or presenting in the oral cavity

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed for dental surgery graduates who wish to specialise in oral surgery.



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The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. Read more
The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. The one-year degree is uniquely designed for students who already hold a degree in a relevant biomedical science and wish to pursue further study in Forensic Anthropology.

Why study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Our course provides you with training in dedicated laboratory areas with exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID). The programme offers a unique mix of theoretical subject matter combined with hands on practical experience which is delivered by case active academic staff who are world leaders in the field.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). The award winning staff of CAHID are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. The Centre is regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. The cases in which staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen's Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK's universities and colleges.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee

Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
Access to several unique skeletal collections
Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
We teach and train towards RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by a team based in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). Specialist teaching is undertaken by case-active forensic practitioners. The cases in which our staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community. In turn, this research feeds into our teaching.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis.

How you will be taught

The programme will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures and on-line learning resources as well as a large practical involving direct examination of the adult human skeleton.

Course Structure

This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Osteology (20 Credits)
- Peri and Post mortem processes (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (20 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Developmental Juvenile Osteology (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

How you will be assessed

Assessments will take the form of in-course essays, paper appraisal and presentation exercises in addition to final degree examinations and MSc research dissertation.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic osteology or DVI.

Where are our graduates now?

Previous graduates in Forensic Anthropology have progressed to become teachers and researchers in the field with some going on to provide their skills and services on both the national and international forensic front.

Some of our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in biomedical research, scene of crime analysis, forensic science, human biology and osteological research.

Many have chosen to enter a degree in medicine or dentistry and have found that the skills they have acquired in Forensic Anthropology stand them in good stead, particularly with regards to radiology, paediatrics, gerontology and orthopaedics.

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What do Facebook, the financial system, Internet or the brain have in common?. All are connected in a network. Read more
What do Facebook, the financial system, Internet or the brain have in common?

All are connected in a network. From the underlying skeleton of social relations, the interdependent evolution of our financial system, to the emergent collective computation in the brain, most of the complex systems that appear in society, technology, and nature are ultimately characterised by a nontrivial pattern of inter-relations. This underlying architecture is in turn shaping how information diffuses and spreads, how resilient the system is against attacks or perturbations, or how complex patterns emerge at the systemic level from the aggregation of seemingly simple individuals.

Our MSc in Network Science will provide a thorough grounding in the core principles of modelling and analysis of complex and networked systems, along with the principal analytical and numerical methodologies. This will open to students a host of career opportunities in systems and networks modelling industries, spanning the IT, financial, and biomedical sectors, that are now requiring such specialist knowledge and skills.

Network Science is a very active and rapidly evolving research field with high societal impact, which stands at the crossroads of graph theory, complexity and data analysis. Addressing the description and modelling of the architecture and dynamics of complex systems -systems composed by many interacting units that show collective behaviour- it stands as a new kind of science to cope with some of the most challenging endeavours we face today, in an ever increasingly more connected society.
Its impact and applications outside academia pervades technological sectors such as communications and infrastructures (Internet, transportation networks, energy networks, urban mobility), biostatistics and network biology (brain modelling, protein interaction networks, postgenomic era), public health (epidemic spreading models), marketing and IT (social media, data analytics) to cite a few. This specialist masters programme aims at providing graduate students and professionals with a rigorous training in the underlying mathematical concepts, the analysis and modelling of complex networks and networked systems, complemented with training in computing, numerical simulations and massive data analysis. It is aimed towards students whose undergraduate degree is in mathematics or a cognate discipline who wish to enter a career involving analysis and optimisation of diverse kinds of networks, networked dynamics and models.

Why study your MSc Network Science at Queen Mary?
This is a pioneering MSc in the UK, a joint programme, taught by our Schools of Mathematical Sciences, and Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, drawing on their strengths in research and teaching in the area of complex networks, mathematical modelling of complex systems, and data mining.

We teach what we know and what we do best. Within the School of Mathematics, the Complex Systems & Networks group is one of the biggest hubs in Network Science within the UK, where we address both fundamental and applied challenges in the mathematical modelling of complex systems with clear societal impact, in collaboration with several industrial stakeholders. Within the School of Electronic Engineering, the Networks group was founded in 1987, and has hugely expanded ever since, bringing their expertise in online social networks, data mining and cloud computing. The coalescence of both groups expertises has fostered the creation of this unique MSc.

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This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. Read more

This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. With a solid grounding in skeletal and dental anatomy, students learn about morphological variation, development, methods for biological profiling, human disease and forensic approaches to trauma and taphonomy.

About this degree

Students will learn procedures for interpretation and analysis of human skeletal remains - considering both archaeological and modern forensic contexts. There is a unique opportunity to analyse recently excavated human remains, utilising methods and techniques learned during the programme. While the focus of this programme is primarily on modern humans, late Pleistocene hominids are also considered.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Dental Anthropology
  • Forensic Anthropology
  • Methodology and Issues in Bioarchaeology and Palaeoepidemiology
  • Morphology and Palaeopathology of the Human Skeleton
  • Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull

Optional modules

Students choose one optional module from the following list or from the wider range of Master's optional modules available. Please note that some core modules are normally only available to those enrolled for the degree in question. If you wish to take a core module from another degree as an option certain restrictions may apply. Please consult the programme co-ordinator before choosing your optional module.

  • Advanced Forensic Anthropology
  • Archaeologies of the Modern World
  • Archaeology of Early Modern Humans
  • Forensic Geoscience (by arrangement with the Jill Dando Centre for Forensic Sciences)
  • Funerary Archaeology
  • Human Evolution (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
  • Palaeoanthropology (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
  • Zooarchaeology in Practice
  • Other Master's options available at the Institute of Archaeology.

Please note that not all options run every year. 

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical classes. This MSc has strong links with the Forensic Archaeological Science MSc which gives individual programmes an interesting mix of participants and provides many opportunities for discussion. Assessment is through essays, class tests, reports and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Bioarchaeological and Forensic Anthropology MSc

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies, while others go on to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological roles as osteoarchaeological specialists, members of the police, curators and political researchers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse archaeology department in the UK, offering students a range of opportunities.

This particular MSc is unique, offering a combination of bioarchaeological and forensic principles for the study of human remains unlike anything else available in the UK. Students further benefit from access to a large collection of skeletal material for study, including dental and palaeopathology reference collections. Access to sophisticated equipment and techniques (laser scanner, SEM, thin sectioning, CT) is also available.

Some lectures will take place at the Royal College of Surgeons and students have access to their teaching collections and museums, including the Wellcome Museum of Anatomy and Pathology.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This course is designed for experienced postgraduate physiotherapists working within neuro-musculoskeletal clinical practice. It is also suitable if you have studied manual therapy at a high level on clinically-based courses, such as with the International Maitland Teachers Association (IMTA). Read more

This course is designed for experienced postgraduate physiotherapists working within neuro-musculoskeletal clinical practice. It is also suitable if you have studied manual therapy at a high level on clinically-based courses, such as with the International Maitland Teachers Association (IMTA). You can have relevant clinically focussed learning recognised and the credits transferred via a recognition of prior learning (RPL) process.

The course enables you to advance your clinical, therapeutic and reasoning skills within the field of neuro-musculoskeletal practice. You engage in debate and develop skills which enhance your ability to facilitate service development and enhance patient care. Successful completion of the course leads to the opportunity to meet the requirements for registration with the Musculoskeletal Association of chartered Physiotherapists (MACP).

The course is structured around two core manual therapy modules that focus on the upper and lower quadrant. The upper quadrant includes key aspects of evidence, theory and reasoning that inform clinical practice. The lower quadrant considers different dysfunctions and also different principles that guide our practice. These modules develop and challenge your clinical handling and reasoning skills.Together these modules form a Postgraduate Certificate in Manual Therapy.

At postgraduate diploma level you choose optional modules relevant to your personal and professional development. This enables you to either increase the breadth of your learning or maintain a focus on developing clinical skills relevant to your physiotherapy practice dependent on your goals. One module which allows you to continue developing advanced clinical skills is the MACP clinical placement in neuro-musculoskeletal physiotherapy.

Your assessments are designed to fulfil the aims and learning outcomes of modules, as well as replicate the challenges you may face within your clinical field. This provides authentic experience and the opportunity to develop skills that are directly transferable to practice.

You learn from enthusiastic tutors including academics who have physiotherapy research published in peer reviewed journals. This includes Dr Stephen May, who is an internationally renowned physiotherapist who has contributed to several well known textbooks including the key text on the McKenzie Approach 'Lumbar Spine: Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy'.

Distance learning study

To aid your professional and clinical development we use a range of online learning and teaching activities, such as interactive tutor and peer group discussions. Experienced tutors also provide regular personal guidance and feedback.

Recognition for prior learning

Physiotherapy students who have successfully completed 2a, 2b, and 3 International Maitland Teachers Association (IMTA) modules can gain credits against specific modules from the MSc Manual Therapy. This can be achieved through the recognition for prior learning (RFPL) process. For more information read our IMTA guidance.

Course structure

The masters (MSc) is achieved by successfully completing the postgraduate diploma plus dissertation (180 credits).

The postgraduate certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing manual therapy for the upper quadrant and manual therapy for the lower quadrant (60 credits).

The postgraduate diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing the postgraduate certificate plus 60 credits to include project design and planning (120 credits).

Core modules

  • Manual therapy for the upper quadrant (30 credits)
  • Manual therapy for the lower quadrant (30 credits)
  • Project design and planning (15 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modules

You study 45 credits worth of modules, which could include teaching and learning, leadership skills or more clinically relevant topics such as:

  • MACP clinical placement in neuro-musculoskeletal physiotherapy (30 credits)
  • Pain management (15 credits)
  • Musculoskeletal radiographic image interpretation – axial skeleton – acute and emergency care (15 credits)
  • Concepts of learning and teaching (15 credits)
  • The leadership landscape (15 credits)

Assessment

  • presentations
  • practical assessment
  • vivas
  • written assessment

Employability

Previous students have gained employment in physiotherapy in a variety of settings, including

  • the NHS
  • overseas in public sector posts
  • private clinics and private hospitals
  • advanced practice roles, such as emergency department physiotherapist
  • extended scope practitioner (specialist physiotherapists or those who work in an extended role alongside a medical consultant)
  • research
  • teaching.


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This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context. It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry. Read more
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context.

It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry.

The course strongly emphasises the integration of biological and archaeological evidence to address problem-orientated research themes and the application of scientific methods to unravelling the human past.

It provides advanced instruction in the identification and analysis of human remains, the techniques and methods applied to understanding human skeletal morphological variation, and the means by which to assess pathological conditions affecting the skeleton.

The course can be used either as vocational training or, for the MSc, as a foundation from which to commence further research. The course is normally offered on a full-time basis but a part-time route is feasible as well. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/human-osteology-and-palaeopathology-msc-part-time

Professional Accreditation

The course provides access to our world renowned collection of reference material (The Bradford Human Remains Collection), hands-on experience in the School's laboratories, and a substantial individual research dissertation.

A part-time route is feasible, accumulating module credits over a period of study. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option
Semester 1 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules):
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (C)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (C)
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Musculoskeletal Anatomy (20 Credits) (C)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Palaeopathology (30 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis (10 Credits) (O)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (O)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Career destinations after the MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology have included:
-Lecturers, teaching assistants and post-doctoral researchers at universities in the UK and overseas
-Osteologists and archaeologists working in commercial archaeology
-Research, curatorial and education staff in museums
-Other professional careers

The MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology has also produced a large number of doctoral research students. They have undertaken research in Bradford and at other universities in the UK and overseas, including Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Canada.

Read less
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context. It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry. Read more
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context.

It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry.

The course strongly emphasises the integration of biological and archaeological evidence to address problem-orientated research themes and the application of scientific methods to unravelling the human past.

It provides advanced instruction in the identification and analysis of human remains, the techniques and methods applied to understanding human skeletal morphological variation, and the means by which to assess pathological conditions affecting the skeleton.

The course can be used either as vocational training or, for the MSc, as a foundation from which to commence further research. The course is normally offered on a full-time basis but a part-time route is feasible as well. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

Professional Accreditation

-The course provides access to our world renowned collection of reference material (The Bradford Human Remains Collection), hands-on experience in the School's laboratories, and a substantial individual research dissertation.
-A part-time route is feasible, accumulating module credits over a period of study. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/human-osteology-and-palaeopathology-pgdip-part-time

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules):
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (C)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (C)
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Musculoskeletal Anatomy (20 Credits) (C)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Palaeopathology (30 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis (10 Credits) (O)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (O)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Career destinations after the MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology have included:
-Lecturers, teaching assistants and post-doctoral researchers at universities in the UK and overseas
-Osteologists and archaeologists working in commercial archaeology
-Research, curatorial and education staff in museums
-Other professional careers

The MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology has also produced a large number of doctoral research students. They have undertaken research in Bradford and at other universities in the UK and overseas, including Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Canada.

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