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The Radiographic Reporting programme offers a depth and scope of knowledge, which incorporates a high level of clinical skill in the practice of image evaluation and reporting of the skeletal system. Read more
The Radiographic Reporting programme offers a depth and scope of knowledge, which incorporates a high level of clinical skill in the practice of image evaluation and reporting of the skeletal system. The modules fully integrate theoretical knowledge with practical skill, facilitating your development as a competent and reflective practitioner.

The programme incorporates key lectures and guided work-based learning, along with practice assessment, evaluation and report writing for radiographic images of the skeletal system. It also offers the option of pathways in skeletal and/or chest reporting.

This programme has significant work-based elements, therefore it is essential you have effective support and mentorship in your base department. The work-based learning component is well structured and monitored by us through clinical visits. The LSBU PACS has a wide range of relevant cases that will supplement work-based experience.

We have a highly motivated team of in-house and guest specialists from a variety of hospitals, with over 14 years experience successfully delivering the Radiographic Reporting programme.

Modules

The PgCert is typically achieved in Year 1 and credit carried forward to further study in Year 2 to achieve PgDip. Year 3 completes the MSc with a dissertation. The awards are flexible to suit individual needs:

PgCert (60 credits)

Foundations of image interpretation (20 credits)
Plus optional modules worth 40 credits

PgDip (120 credits)

Foundations of image interpretation (20 credits)
Research in health and social care (20 credits)
Plus optional modules worth 80 credits

MSc (180 Credits)

Foundations of image interpretation (20 credits)
Research in health and social care (20 credits)
Dissertation (40 or 60 credits)
Plus optional modules worth 80 - 100 credits

Optional modules:

Radiographic Skeletal Reporting: Appendicular skeleton (40 credits)
Radiographic Skeletal Reporting: Axial Skeleton (20 credits)
Advances in Specialised Skeletal Imaging (20 credits)
Radiographic Chest Reporting (40 credits)

Professional links

The programme is approved by the Society and College of Radiographers.The Society and College of Radiographers represents the whole radiographic workforce in the UK.

Employability

This programme will assist in developing graduates career options as a practitioner, or into specialist, advanced and consultant practice, research or management areas. The course offers a flexible and responsive education and training provision which follows the requirements in respect of Continuing Professional and Personal Development (CPPD), linked to professional regulation and the Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF).

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Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history. Read more

Human skeletal remains are the most direct evidence of past lifeways and their scientific investigation gives unique insights into human history.

Bioarchaeology (the study of archaeological human remains) is an exciting field that draws on a variety of techniques, ranging from visual examination of the whole skeleton to the biomolecular analysis of small bone samples. Demographic shifts, environmental changes, migrations, the spread of diseases and the impact of violence and conflict all leave traces on the skeleton.

This MSc provides the skills required to understand skeletal biographies and interpret them in their cultural context at the individual and the population level. Combining theoretical learning with hands-on practice, we will provide you with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills essential to your handling and analysis of specimens recovered from archaeological sites.

Programme structure

Throughout the programme, you’ll take part in lectures, seminars and practical work with archaeological skeletal assemblages and reference collections. You will complete six courses that are assessed through reports, lab exams, oral and poster presentations and essays.

Drawing on Edinburgh’s long history in the study of the human body, you will also have the opportunity to visit Surgeons’ Hall Museum and the Anatomy Department, which provide unique collections of pathological and anatomical study specimens.

You will also submit a dissertation on a research topic of your choosing. Past dissertations have ranged from experimental projects on violence in prehistory to dietary studies of Chalcolithic Turkey and considerations of disease and impairment in post-Medieval England.

The courses on this programme are:

  • Analytical Methods in Human Osteology
  • Bioarchaeological Interpretation
  • Human Musculoskeletal Anatomy
  • Practical Osteology
  • Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology
  • Skeletal Pathology

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the programme, you will be able to:

  • identify and interpret human skeletal remains from archaeological sites
  • develop hypothesis testing skills
  • carry out relevant scientific analyses, often in cooperation with experts in other disciplines
  • engage in theoretical and methodological discussions relevant to osteoarchaeology
  • design research strategies based on transferable skills providing a basis for advanced studies (PhD and beyond)

Career opportunities

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police.

An archaeology degree does not, of course, restrict you to a career in archaeology. The programme also equips you for advanced study.



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Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques. Read more
Study for this Masters in Bioarchaeology at Liverpool John Moores University and gain hands-on experience at the archaeology excavation at the Poulton Project, carry out novel research and discover new laboratory techniques.

-Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
-Masters course developed and delivered by leading researchers in the field
-Excavation and bioarchaeological analysis of real human remains
-Gain hands-on experience in field and laboratory techniques using specialised bioarchaeological labs and facilities
-Substantial bone selection for research and for experience as teaching toolstools


Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing science that combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences. Study focuses on the key topics pertaining to human remains from archaeological sites.

Bioarchaeology includes areas of scientific investigation including palaeodemography, past behaviour, biological affinity, subsistence strategy, and health and well-being in the past.

The MSc in Bioarchaeology will help you to develop a broad understanding of these issues, through the excavation and analysis of human and animal remains. Analytical techniques will cover dental and osteological analyses, archaeological field methods, and ancient genetics.

The programme aims to develop your advanced practical skills in skeletal analysis, making use of the department’s well-equipped specialist laboratories and reference collections.

A particular strength of our provision and Faculty expertise is that we are able to address the bioarchaeology of many world areas and time periods. When you complete the course, you will have all the skills necessary to continue into an academic career or gain employment in research, museums, education or commercial organisations.

During the year you will be given a personal tutor that will support you throughout your time at LJMU and be following both your academic and professional development.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Semester 1 (three core modules)

Advanced Osteology and Skeletal Pathology
Provides students with an advanced knowledge of the human skeleton and the ability to identify animal bones, methods of curation of skeletal collections and understanding of pathological modifications.
Research Design and Quantitative Methods
Provides extensive training in generic research knowledge and statistical techniques for the Natural Sciences. Students design a research project and are assessed via the preparation of a full grant application for the project.
Dental Anthropology
Provides students with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience required by bioarchaeologists to identify and examine human teeth.
Semester 2 (two core modules and one option)

Bioarchaeology: Bones, Teeth and Genes
Focuses on the different methods used to study human remains in archaeological and anthropological contexts. Delivery is through a combination of lectures, practicals, workshops and seminar sessions by experts in different fields, followed by reading and in-class discussion of recent literature.
Excavation
Covers field survey, site management, excavation and related data analysis. In addition to practicals and lectures, the course includes a non-residential field experience.
Dissertation
Comprises an independent, in-depth scientific research study on a chosen relevant topic. The following options are typically offered:
Ballistics and Arson Investigation
Teaches the fundamental principles of fire science, fire dynamics and material science, enabling students to demonstrate their application of fire investigation.
Taphonomy Trauma Analysis
Provides students with an extensive understanding of the biomechanics of human bones and the reaction of bones to the environment for a taphonomic history of the remains. Students gain a broad appreciation of different types of weapons to reconstruct a traumatic event using skeletal evidence.
Human Identification and Forensic DNA
Analyses the issues related to the identification of an unknown subject from both skeletal and genetic features. The module also introduces students to the use of a DNA typing approach for the identification of human remains.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains. Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Read more
This new MSc programme equips you with the ability to excavate and analyse human remains.

Learn the practical skills needed to recover human remains in the field. Gain the theoretical knowledge needed to reconstruct biological profiles from hard tissue, supported by laboratory based training.

You learn from a team of internationally respected academics with extensive professional experience. You have the opportunity to access one of the largest human skeletal collections in the UK, with extensive skeletal pathology and accompanying radiographs. The collection is curated by the Skeletal Biology Research Centre, in the School's Human Osteology Research Laboratory.

The programme is suited for students from a wide range of BA and BSc backgrounds. This MSc will provide a firm foundation for continued work, or PhD research, in anthropology, archaeology and related forensic fields.

For more information about this new MSc programme please contact the programme director Dr Chris Deter:

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

With specialisation in forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes Kent is one of the largest institutions for biological anthropolgy. The School also houses the Skeletal Biology Research Centre (SBRC) which brings together innovative research, novel methodologies and international collaborations. Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) is an enterprise unit based within SBRC offers osteological analyses of human skeletal remains.

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany). We maintain an active research culture, with staff working in many different parts of the world.

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia.

Careers

Higher degrees in forensic anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, archaeology, police sector, the civil service and non-governmental organizations through work in areas such as human rights. A forensic anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

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Key Facts. All courses are accredited by the College and Society of Radiographers and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
Key Facts:
All courses are accredited by the College and Society of Radiographers and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The skills obtained are transferable to all NHS Trusts and recognised Overseas.


Entry Requirements:
You should possess a BSc (Hons) in Diagnostic / Therapeutic Radiography or equivalent qualification e.g. a Diploma of the College of Radiographers. Applicants who are applying outside of the UK require an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 7 with no element below 6.5.

For reporting qualifications you should be currently practising, with at least two years’ post-qualification experience as a radiographer.

If you apply for the named Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) reporting awards in Adult Chest and Abdomen, CT Head, Appendicular and Axial Skeletal reporting you must also have a clinical supervisor within your own department who is willing to support you through the course, together with written approval from the Trust or hospital employing you for clinical practice.


Course overview:
The Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences has a reputation for developing innovative courses to meet the demands of NHS Trusts who require staff training in order to meet the demands of an ever changing NHS.

The courses are aimed at those with a current qualification and registration as radiographer, or other health care professional, registered with the HCPC who wish to enhance their qualifications and skills and to prepare themselves for the extended roles that they are expected to embrace. Applications are welcome from nurses who wish to enhance their scope of practice.

The available courses are designed to enable you to evaluate the relationship between technology, managerial responsibility and policy. As increasing emphasis is being placed on hospital-based research to support evidence-based practice, the courses also aim to enhance your abilities to critically evaluate research findings to benefit service provision, and thus ensure that the patient remains at the centre of everything that we do.

We'll equip you with specialist knowledge and skills to meet the ever-changing needs of this fast developing sector. All modules are delivered by highly skilled lecturers with the support of dedicated visiting lecturers from the clinical setting. 90 per cent of course delivery is face to face.


Course structure:
The available accreditations can be studied part time to fit around your personal and professional commitments.

Each single module requires a notional 200 hours of study. Most single modules are delivered either during the afternoon or evening or, on the named pathways, on a two or three day block-release basis, with the clinical component taking place in your workplace under the direction of a clinical supervisor.

Most students are successful at their first attempt of assessment.

The named pathways for Appendicular and Axial Skeletal Reporting have attracted students from as far afield as Denmark and Holland.

Learning Experience / Modules Studied:
The suite of courses offers opportunities to study Radiography at Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert), Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) or Master’s (MSc) level:

PgCert Radiography [Appendicular Reporting]
PgCert Radiography [Axial Reporting]
PgCert Radiography [Adult Chest and Abdomen reporting]
PgCert Radiography [CT Head Reporting]
PgCert Radiography [Computed Tomography]
PgCert MRI
PgDip MRI
PgDip Image Reporting
PgDip Radiography and MSc Radiography

Regardless of the specialist area, a PgCert involves three single 20 credit modules or one double (40 credit) and one single (20 credit) module.
The PgDip involves an additional three single or one single and one double module provided you have already gained the PgCert. Otherwise, the PgDip involves a total of six single modules or two double and two single modules. You must study the single module Leadership for Advanced Professional Practice for the PgCert and Research; Methods of Enquiry module for the PgDip award as this will help prepare you for your dissertation towards your MSc Radiography.

For a Master’s, you must have completed a total of 120 credits. You will then undertake a research project where you will be offered workshops and tutorials and will be required to submit a dissertation not exceeding 20,000 words.
Available 20 credit single modules, which can also be accessed on an individual basis, include:

Leadership for Advanced Professions; Practice (compulsory for all PgCert awards)
Cross Sectional Anatomy
Image Interpretation for Comment Systems
Fundamentals of MRI
MRI Principles and Practice
MRI Student Negotiated
MRI Specialist Techniques
Introduction to Image Interpretation of the Chest and Abdomen
Technological Developments in Radiotherapy
Applications of Imaging and Verification in Radiotherapy
Paediatric Imaging
Forensic Radiography
Ethical and Legal Issues For Advanced Practice
Research: Methods of Enquiry (compulsory for PgDip)

Available 40 Credit modules which can also be accessed on an individual basis are:

Foundations and Practice of Appendicular Skeletal Reporting
Foundations and Practice of Axial Skeletal Reporting
Foundations and Practice of Adult Chest and Abdomen Reporting
Foundations and Practice of CT Head Reporting
Advanced CT Applications and Imaging Science

Each named award has its own clinical and academic requirements. Expected durations may also vary slightly. Applicants are advised to contact the Faculty for more detailed course information.


Assessment:
Modules are assessed independently using a variety of methods, which may include assignments, annotated bibliography, student presentations and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs)

Visit the MSc Radiography page on the Birmingham City University website for more details!

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Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing field which combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences to study key topics such as past health and well-being, diet, ecology, subsistence strategies and environmental impacts. Read more
Bioarchaeology is an exciting and fast-advancing field which combines archaeology with branches of the natural sciences to study key topics such as past health and well-being, diet, ecology, subsistence strategies and environmental impacts.

The MSc in Bioarchaeology aims to develop a broad understanding of these issues through the study of human remains. Students on this programme will also have the opportunity to study animal remains, as well as floral and faunal evidence.

The programme develops advanced practical skills in skeletal analysis, making use of the department’s well-provisioned specialist laboratories and reference collections. A particular strength of our provision is that we are able to address the bioarchaeology of both the New and Old Worlds. Those completing the Course acquire the skills necessary to continue into academic research or employment, as an osteologist in field units, museums or Cultural Resources Managament companies.

The programme allows you to specialise in one of two named pathways: Human Osteoarchaeology (physical anthropology and funerary archaeology) or Zooarchaeology (animal bones and other faunal remains).

Learning and teaching

Most of the formal classes that you attend will be based on a mixture of lectures, seminars, and workshops. The precise mix will vary between modules. These aim to outline the principal issues of the module, to explore some detailed issues, and, where relevant, to give you experience of working with a particular technique or data set.
All members of staff are actively engaged in research, both in Britain and abroad, and regularly attend conferences, symposia and workshops. It is through this active engagement in the discipline that we are able to supply top quality teaching by experts in their field and as a result we have a 24/24 grading for our teaching from the Quality Assurance Agency.
In addition to our established palaeobotany, experimental archaeology, and microscopy laboratories, we have a new bioarchaeology lab dedicated to the study of anatomical variation, palaeopathological conditions, and the funerary context of human and animal remains. The laboratory, accompanied by a designated store for the Department's collection of human remains, provides facilities for use by researchers and students for examining skeletal remains recovered from archaeological sites. Equipment includes anatomical casts and demographic reference standards used to determine the sex, age-at-death, stature and body proportions from human remains.

Research areas

Bioarchaeological research at Exeter combines the study of archaeology with branches of the natural and physical sciences to address questions of health and well-being, diet, ecology, subsistence strategies and natural and human-induced environmental impacts in the past.

Our approach is holistic and inter-disciplinary, drawing its inspiration from both definitions of ‘bioarchaeology’: as a study applied to human remains (human osteoarchaeology) and, as originally defined by Grahame Clark, as related to the integration of environmental archaeology, floral and faunal evidence – archaeobotany and zooarchaeology – in archaeological research.
Active field research programmes in North and South America and Eurasia link with extensive laboratory research to address questions of social structure and social organisation, the process of animal and plant domestication, the development of social inequality and power relations, violence and warfare, the rise of élites and craft specialists, and division of labour.

Programme Structure

This programme includes 135 credits of compulsory modules and 45 credits of optional modules.

Pathways

The two available pathways are; Human Osteology (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/archaeology/bioarch/humanosteology/) and Zooarchaeology
(http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/archaeology/bioarch/zooarchaeology/)

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules for each of the pathways can include the following; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Musculo-skeletal Anatomy; Advanced Zooarchaeology; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology (Masters level); Bioarchaeology Dissertation and Bioarchaeology Dissertation Zooarchaeology.

Optional modules

The following is a list of the possible optional modules; Advanced Project; Experimental Archaeology in Practice; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Material Culture; Advanced Human Osteology; ;Zooarchaeology (Masters level); Palaeobotany (Masters level); Funerary Osteoarchaeology (Masters level); Musculo-skeletal Anatomy and Researching the Historic Environment Online.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. Read more
The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. The one-year degree is uniquely designed for students who already hold a degree in a relevant biomedical science and wish to pursue further study in Forensic Anthropology.

Why study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Our course provides you with training in dedicated laboratory areas with exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID). The programme offers a unique mix of theoretical subject matter combined with hands on practical experience which is delivered by case active academic staff who are world leaders in the field.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). The award winning staff of CAHID are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. The Centre is regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. The cases in which staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen's Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK's universities and colleges.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee

Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
Access to several unique skeletal collections
Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
We teach and train towards RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by a team based in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). Specialist teaching is undertaken by case-active forensic practitioners. The cases in which our staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community. In turn, this research feeds into our teaching.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis.

How you will be taught

The programme will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures and on-line learning resources as well as a large practical involving direct examination of the adult human skeleton.

Course Structure

This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Osteology (20 Credits)
- Peri and Post mortem processes (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (20 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Developmental Juvenile Osteology (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

How you will be assessed

Assessments will take the form of in-course essays, paper appraisal and presentation exercises in addition to final degree examinations and MSc research dissertation.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic osteology or DVI.

Where are our graduates now?

Previous graduates in Forensic Anthropology have progressed to become teachers and researchers in the field with some going on to provide their skills and services on both the national and international forensic front.

Some of our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in biomedical research, scene of crime analysis, forensic science, human biology and osteological research.

Many have chosen to enter a degree in medicine or dentistry and have found that the skills they have acquired in Forensic Anthropology stand them in good stead, particularly with regards to radiology, paediatrics, gerontology and orthopaedics.

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This Masters course at Liverpool John Moores University provides the skills and knowledge to forge a career in forensic anthropology. Read more
This Masters course at Liverpool John Moores University provides the skills and knowledge to forge a career in forensic anthropology. You will also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the field and carry out novel research.

•Complete this masters degree in one year (full time)
•Stratigraphic excavation techniques to solve missing person cases
•Specialised forensic science labs and facilities
•Study a course developed and delivered by leading researchers
•Gain hands-on experience in the field
•Employment opportunities in forensic anthropology and related fields
•Optional module in skeletal anatomy – a complete introduction to working with bones


Forensic Anthropology is the combination of physical anthropological knowledge, and the application of forensic methods and techniques. The discipline is used by the justice system to solve cases where a missing person or an unknown murder victim is involved.

The MSc in Forensic Anthropology will provide you with the skills and knowledge required to pursue a career in the search for missing people, recovery of evidence and human remains from clandestine graves and identification of unknown corpses by osteological analysis.

The programme will develop a broad understanding of these issues, including excavation, laboratory analysis and the courtroom skills necessary to present findings in a trial. You will also have the opportunity to learn analytical techniques, taphonomic analysis, field methods and genetic applications.

The programme develops a high profile curriculum, which is supported by a structured lecture programme, workshops and seminars in the department’s well-equipped specialist laboratories.

The MSc in Forensic Anthropology is also supported by a skeletal reference collection and staff members are currently involved around the world as practitioners in forensic cases. When you complete the course you will have the skills to continue into academic research or employment as a forensic anthropologist.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Level 7

Advanced research methods
Project management and employability skills
Academic and non-academic dissemination
Human identification from skeletal remains
Human identification from genetic evidence
Dental anthropology
Biomechanics and trauma analysis
Taphonomy
Excavation techniques
Paleopathology
Laws and courtroom skills
Crime scene investigation
Forensic sciences, chemistry and biosciences

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. Read more
This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. With a solid grounding in skeletal and dental anatomy, students learn about morphological variation, development, methods for biological profiling, human disease and forensic approaches to trauma and taphonomy.

Degree information

Students will learn procedures for interpretation and analysis of human skeletal remains - considering both archaeological and modern forensic contexts. There is a unique opportunity to analyse recently excavated human remains, utilising methods and techniques learned during the programme. While the focus of this programme is primarily on modern humans, late Pleistocene hominids are also considered.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Dental Anthropology
-Forensic Anthropology
-Methodology and Issues in Bioarchaeology and Palaeoepidemiology
-Morphology and Palaeopathology of the Human Skeleton
-Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull

Optional modules
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Archaeology of Early Modern Humans
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Geoscience (by arrangement with the Jill Dando Centre for Forensic Sciences)
-Funerary Archaeology
-Human Evolution (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Palaeoanthropology (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Zooarchaeology in Practice
-Other Master's options available at the Institute of Archaeology.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical classes. This MSc has strong links with the Forensic Archaeological Science MSc which gives individual programmes an interesting mix of participants and provides many opportunities for discussion. Assessment is through essays, class tests, reports and the dissertation.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies, while others go on to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations as osteoarchaeological specialists, the police, curators and political researchers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse archaeology department in the UK, offering students a range of opportunities.

This particular MSc is unique, offering a combination of bioarchaeological and forensic principles for the study of human remains unlike anything else available in the UK. Students further benefit from access to a large collection of skeletal material for study, including dental and palaeopathology reference collections. Access to sophisticated equipment and techniques (laser scanner, SEM, thin sectioning, CT) is also available.

Some lectures will take place at the Royal College of Surgeons and students have access to their teaching collections and museums, including the Wellcome Museum of Anatomy and Pathology.

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This programme develops the skills and expertise required to undertake skeletal image interpretation and the provision of associated definitive clinical reports. Read more
This programme develops the skills and expertise required to undertake skeletal image interpretation and the provision of associated definitive clinical reports. Modules within the programme will build on previous learning. Starting with appendicular skeleton interpretation and reporting the programme then moves to consider axial skeleton image interpretation and reporting. Students will have opportunities to complete a research methodology module to equip them as comfortable research users and develop skills as researchers who add to the evidence base.

Staff running and teaching on the programme have extensive image interpretation and reporting experience and expertise and provide stimulating and informative lectures. Lectures are supported through blended learning delivered via our online platform and formative self-assessments to allow students to check their own progress.

Programme structure

The programme has a modular structure which when completed will ensure that graduates meet the standard requirements for reporting radiographers. The programme structure consists of two 30 credit modules for the PG Cert, with further 60 credits of modules for the PG Dip, and the addition of the 60 credit MSc research project for the full MSc.

Modules

Module titles are as follows:
• Fundamentals and principles of clinical image interpretation and advanced practice
• Musculoskeletal Pathology
• Appendicular Skeletal Image Interpretation
• Axial Skeletal Image Interpretation
• Applied Research methods
• Research/Dissertation

Please note the modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. For an up to date list please see the website http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/medicine/medicalimagingmsc/#Programme-structure

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Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more
Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips students with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and prepares students for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

-Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
-Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
-Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Dissertation (double module)

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow students to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. External speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, all students have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

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This course aims to develop qualified health care professionals to meet the challenge of specialist, advanced and consultant practitioner status in the field of medical imaging within a rapidly evolving health service. Read more
This course aims to develop qualified health care professionals to meet the challenge of specialist, advanced and consultant practitioner status in the field of medical imaging within a rapidly evolving health service.

You can further your professional development by taking a PGC in skeletal reporting, CT head reporting, all aspects of Ultrasound, or Mammography. Alternatively you could take a single module in a specific area, including Barium swallow and VF, CTC, cardiac stress testing or HSG - please enquire for other areas. Qualified sonographers can develop niche areas of practice such as vascular and breast imaging. If you want to develop ultrasound competencies in MSK, abdominal, obstetrics and gynaecology scanning then you should follow the MSc in Ultrasound Imaging route.

We have a wide range of options for breast imaging including mammography (equivalent to the College of Radiographers' postgraduate certificate in principles and practice of mammography); mammogram image interpretation; MRI breast reproting; interventional procedures; and breast ultrasound. Pick and choose your preferred options and modules to build a bespoke Masters qualification focused around breast imaging.

Key benefits:

• Our ultrasound modules are fully accredited by the Consortium for the Accreditation of Sonographic Education (CASE)
• Experienced, enthusiastic and friendly staff committed to supporting you through your study
• Access to our excellent onsite clinical facilities, including ultrasound machines, digital imaging suite and a 16 slice CT scanner.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/advanced-medical-imaging

Suitable for

This programme will appeal to a variety of health care professionals engaged in current practice including radiographers, radiologists, speech and language therapists. You will need access to a relevant caseload for clinically-related modules.

Programme details

This is a part-time course which enables you to continue working in your clinical placement, so that you gain the necessary practical experience while learning the academic information to develop your skills. It provides a highly flexible approach to developing competence in niche areas of practice.

You have the choice to exit with the following awards:

• Postgraduate Certificate: two (30 credit) modules over one year or 18 months
• Postgraduate Diploma: four (30 credit) modules over two years
• Master of Science: four (30 credit) modules plus the dissertation module (60 credits) over three years

Your module choice will depend on your practice area and the profile of your award which should be discussed with the course team prior to commencement to establish a Negotiated Learning Agreement. This means your course is tailor-made to meet your exact learning requirements.

Students can opt to take a medical imaging specialism pathway in year 1 and 2. Details of these routes can be seen at the bottom of the page.

Format

The course is delivered by:

• Classroom based lectures
• Tutorials
• Seminars and student discussion groups
• Skills lab based practicals
• Self-directed study
• E-based learning
• Work based learning, some modules include visits to Centres of Excellence

Module titles

• Advancing Practice in Medical Imaging
• Screening and Diagnosis
• Publishing and Presenting in Health Care
• Fundamentals of Radiological Reporting
• Radiology Image Interpretation
• Fundamentals of Mammography Practice
• Advanced Technique in Mammography Practice
• Research Methods
• Ultrasound focused areas of practice (vascular and breast)
• Mammography practice
• Reporting (skeletal, breast, CT head)
• GI technique only (barium swallow & VF, CTC)
• GI techniques with reporting, HSG with reporting
• HSG technique only, Breast Intervention, Cardiac stress testing

Assessment

Assessment methods are designed to suit a variety of learning styles and include;

• Assignments
• Viva Voce
• Exams
• Portfolio
• Objective structured assessment
• Poster presentation

The percentage depends on the individual modules.

Career potential

Most students have been seconded from and return to their work in the National Health Service with advanced practitioner status, and a number have gone on to become consultant practitioners. Students will also be supported to apply for Advanced Practitioner Accreditation with the College of Radiographers.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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Our Forensic Anthropology course is concerned with the application of biological anthropological techniques to the analysis of human skeletal remains within a legal context and provides a vital suite of expertise and skills that can be applied to answer both modern and archaeological questions. Read more
Our Forensic Anthropology course is concerned with the application of biological anthropological techniques to the analysis of human skeletal remains within a legal context and provides a vital suite of expertise and skills that can be applied to answer both modern and archaeological questions.

Specialist anthropological skills can contribute, not only to our understanding of the past, but also to the effective investigation of serious incidents in the modern world, particularly murder, genocide and human rights violations within the constraints of the criminal justice system. Such skills have also proved increasingly useful in recent years in the wake of mass disasters, both natural and man-made.

This course was previously called Forensic Osteology.

Core units:
Bodies of Evidence-Skeletal Changes Before & After Death
Crime Scene Management & Forensic Science
Human Functional Anatomy
Principles & Methods in Human Osteology
Professional Practice in Forensic Science
Research Project

Optional units (Choose 1):
Forensic Archaeology
Techniques of Archaeological Recovery & Recording

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Biological Anthropology is the study of evolution and variation in human populations and of the interactions between human biology and environment. Read more
Biological Anthropology is the study of evolution and variation in human populations and of the interactions between human biology and environment. This combines our international reputation for anthropology, archaeology and biology, specifically including studies in primatology, evolutionary anthropology, human osteology, zooarchaeology, but also (paeleo-) ecology and behaviour.

This exciting course gives a core grounding in human evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, the origins of human behaviour and how hominines adapted to their environment, as well as human and animal skeletal analysis. Ultimately this course offers a uniquely wide range of suitable project topics that can prepare you for a career in a variety of aligned fields.

Core units:

Human Evolution
Human Functional Anatomy
Primate Behaviour & Ecology
Principles & Methods in Zooarchaeology
Research Project

Optional units (choose one of):
Principles & Methods in Human Osteology
Techniques of Archaeological Recovery & Recording

And one of:
Archaeology of Human Remains
Bodies of Evidence - Skeletal Changes Before & After Death
Humans, Animals & Diet

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