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Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a powerful methodology for achieving process efficiency and effectiveness which results in enhanced customer satisfaction and improved bottom line results. Read more
Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a powerful methodology for achieving process efficiency and effectiveness which results in enhanced customer satisfaction and improved bottom line results. It aims to achieve improvements in the most economical manner possible and is focused on reducing waste in business processes.

Our MSc Lean Six Sigma for Operational Excellence programme will build understanding of the tools and techniques of Lean Six Sigma methodologies and demonstrate the tangible and quantifiable results these bring to the bottom line. Students will learn state-of-the-art concepts, methods, principles, tools and techniques, relating to quality and process improvement for a broad range of organisations, such as manufacturing, service, public sector and third sector, set within a global context.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Six core modules are taken during semesters 1 and 2:

Fundamentals of Lean Six Sigma
Quality Management & Engineering
Leadership
Project Management
Strategic Change
Research Philosophy & Practice

A further two modules from a wide range of options such as operations management, organisational culture, and measuring performance are also taken.

The MSc dissertation is then completed between May and August.

ACCREDITATION

Students successfully completing the MSc Lean Six Sigma for Operational Excellence gain Lean Six Sigma Green Belt certification from the Institute of Six Sigma Professionals. The Lean Six Sigma Green Belt competence prepares individuals within an organisation to apply Lean / Six Sigma tools and techniques to define, measure, analyse, improve and control processes within any organisational setting irrespective of its nature and size.

Upon completion of the MSc students are also offered the opportunity to undertake Lean Six Sigma Black Belt certification,

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This course is focused on the integration of two world-class process excellence initiatives. - lean thinking. - six sigma. Lean Six Sigma is recognised as a leading process excellence programme. Read more

Why this course?

This course is focused on the integration of two world-class process excellence initiatives:
- lean thinking
- six sigma

Lean Six Sigma is recognised as a leading process excellence programme. A number of professional jobs in the global market seek qualifications in Lean Six Sigma for achieving competitive advantage. This course aims to develop the process excellence leaders of tomorrow.

You’ll be equipped with state-of-the-art concepts, methods, techniques and tools within Lean and Six Sigma methodologies. This'll allow you to contribute towards the competitiveness of industrial and commercial organisations worldwide.

This course is suitable for:
- recent and existing graduates who wish to move into careers in the process excellence field
- professionals with a background in support functions who wish to gain a better understanding of process excellence methodologies
- those planning to develop their careers as process excellence change agents within an organisation

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full time; 24 months part time
- PgDip: 9 months full time; 21 months part time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/leansixsigmaforprocessexcellence/

You’ll study

Successful completion of all compulsory modules, two optional modules and a group project will lead to the award of a Postgraduate Diploma. MSc students also undertake an individual project.

Teaching staff

This programme is delivered by the Strathclyde Institute for Operations Management (SIOM). The delivery team comprises leading academics from Strathclyde Business School and the Faculty of Engineering.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

For the Masters project, you’ll have the opportunity to select a thesis topic and supervisor from the wide range of experts in:
- process excellence
- operations management
- quality management

Assessment

Modules will be assessed by a mix of assignments and exams.

Careers

The demand for process excellence professionals is increasing across the world in all industrial sectors irrespective of the size and their nature.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Our MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management with Lean Six Sigma is designed to provide in-depth understanding of current practices, trends and issues in logistics and supply chain along with the tools and techniques of Lean Six Sigma methodologies. Read more
Our MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management with Lean Six Sigma is designed to provide in-depth understanding of current practices, trends and issues in logistics and supply chain along with the tools and techniques of Lean Six Sigma methodologies.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Eight core modules are taken over semester 1 and semester 2:

Strategies for Managing Supply Chains
Demand and Inventory Planning
Global Purchasing & Supply
Supply Network Design & Optimisation
Freight Transport and Warehouse Management
Quality Management & Engineering
Fundamentals of Lean Six Sigma
Research Philosophy and Practice

The MSc dissertation is then undertaken between May and August.

ACCREDITATION

The MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management with Lean Six Sigma is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport UK (CILT). This means that students who successfully graduate from degree will receive an exemption from the academic requirements for membership at either Chartered Member or Member level of the CILT. There may also be a reduction in the length of experience that they would require.

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The MSc in Biotechnology is a one-year course designed to provide you with the theoretical and practical skills for employment in the industries of biomedical research, biopharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and biotechnology. Read more
The MSc in Biotechnology is a one-year course designed to provide you with the theoretical and practical skills for employment in the industries of biomedical research, biopharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and biotechnology. The course curriculum consists of six months of lectures, laboratory practical sessions, career service workshops, industry-based seminars and a six-month research project. The curriculum has been developed with input from staff in local biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industries, to provide you with the necessary skills required by employers. Students have the choice to complete the six-month research project in a national or international industry or university environment.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr01/

Course Details

This is the most established MSc in Biotechnology course in Ireland and is the most popular MSc course in UCC. The international success of this course is attributed to the industry-led curriculum offered to students and the opportunity to complete a six-month placement in industry or an academic research lab. The global recognition of the course is also evident from our international alumni and receipt of several industry-sponsored scholarships available to students entering and on completion of the course.

The course will:

- introduce you to the theory and practice of bioanalytical chemistry?
- introduce you to molecular biotechnology, eukaryotic-, prokaryotic- and plant-biotechnologies, recombinant DNA technologies and their - application in the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industries
- introduce you to the principles of process and biochemical engineering?
- introduce you to the role of process validation and quality assurance in the pharmaceutical industry, and give you an awareness of the - - latest trends in good manufacturing, laboratory and validation practices
- introduce you to the principles of food and industrial microbiology
- provide you with the opportunity to conduct and complete a body of independent research in a biotechnology-related area and present your research findings in a minor dissertation.

Format

The curriculum consists of approximately 250 contact hours over two academic terms (October to December and January to March), consisting of eight course modules, set practical sessions, career service workshops and an industry lecture series.

During the third academic term (April to September), students complete a six-month research project on a topic related to biotechnology, biopharmaceutical or biomedical research. Industry-based projects in these areas are managed by a dedicated placement officer who facilitates career workshops during which you prepare for and are interviewed by staff from companies interested in hosting students. For students interested in a career in biomedical research or PhD, projects are offered in a broad range of research areas utilising modern research techniques. All research projects are undertaken in consultation with an academic supervisor and examiner.

The MSc in Biotechnology degree course consists of eight course modules, set practical sessions, career service workshops, an industry lecture series and a six-month research project.

Students study the following eight modules and complete a research project:

- Advanced Molecular Microbial Biotechnology
- Biopharmaceuticals: formulation design, secondary processing and regulatory compliance
- Bioprocess Engineering
- Cell and Molecular Biology
- Functional Foods for Health
- Genetic Engineering
- Modern Methods in Analytical Chemistry
- Plant Genetic Engineering

Research Project and Industry Placement

You will be required to complete a six-month research project based on your individual research and development in a selected field of modern science. You carry out your research in UCC’s laboratories or at an approved academic or industrial partner.

When you complete your research dissertation in an industrial setting, it provides the company with an opportunity to assess your skills and abilities and to screen potential future full-time employees.

Students who secure employment upon graduation fit into the organisation and contribute productively much sooner that other graduates. For students with an interest in biomedical research and future careers as PhD researchers, research projects are offered across a broad range of topics including but not limited to; cancer biology, neuroscience, immunology, microbiology and plant biotechnology.

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/science/page05.html#4%20

Assessment

The MSc in Biotechnology is awarded after passing written examinations across taught course units, the continuous assessment of practical work and completion of a six-month research project, which has to be written up in the form of a dissertation and approved by an external examiner. All students must complete written examinations (typically held over a two week period in March) and submit a research project. Full details and regulations governing examinations for each course will be contained in the Marks and Standards 2013 Book and for each module in the Book of Modules, 2015/2016 - http://www.ucc.ie/modules/

Careers

The course is suitable for students wishing to extend their specific undergraduate degree knowledge in biotechnology, and for those wishing to bridge their undergraduate degree and gain more specialised knowledge and training in biotechnology. The course allows you to follow a number of career pathways. Each year, over 70 per cent of our students gain employment while approximately 20 per cent of graduates progress to international PhD opportunities.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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An astonishing global revolution has taken place in mobile and satellite communications, the full impact of which is difficult to exaggerate. Read more
An astonishing global revolution has taken place in mobile and satellite communications, the full impact of which is difficult to exaggerate. The resulting growth in mobile and satellite communications industries has created a high demand for graduates with expertise in the key areas of digital, mobile and satellite communications and networking.

With significant input from industry, this course produces highly competent graduates who can fill key positions and play leading roles in shaping this rapidly evolving field. By graduation, you will be well-equipped to develop new engineering applications for the next generation of communication systems. You will also be given the chance to undertake a six-month unpaid internship*.

Your studies will include advances in antennas and propagation, digital transmission, satellite communications, mobile communications, satellite networks, wireless applications, digital signal processing and product management. All this is enriched with seminars, field trips and a period of internship* in industry. You will also learn to use the latest engineering design tools, including the Systems ToolKit (STK) used by NASA for planning space missions.

Routes of study:
The course is available to study via two routes:
- MSc Mobile and Satellite Communications (with internship)
- MSc Mobile and Satellite Communications (without internship)

Please note: *Internships are available to full-time students only. Internship places are limited. Students have the opportunity to work in a participating UK company or within a Research Centre at the University. You can also opt to study the course without an internship which will reduce your course length.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1431-msc-mobile-and-satellite-communications-with-internship

What you will study

You will study the following modules:
- Mobile Communication Technologies
- Satellite Communications
- Digital Communications Systems
- Applied Digital Signal Processing
- Product Management and Integrating Case Studies
- Six month Internship
- MSc Major Project

Optional modules:
- Wireless and Personal Communications
- Satellite Networking

Learning and teaching methods

You will be taught through lectures, tutorials and workshops involving hands-on systems modelling and simulations using state-of-the-art hardware and software facilities. Students will also engage in supervised research supported by full access to world-class online and library facilities.

The course is available to study via two main routes, you can opt to add further value to your studies by undertaking an internship or simply focus on building your academic knowledge through a on-campus study as detailed below:

MSc Mobile and Satellite Communications (with internship):

- Delivery: Full-time only | Start dates: September and February
If you choose to undertake an internship, your course will be delivered in four major blocks that offer an intensive but flexible learning pattern. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week. This is followed by 6 month period of internship, after which the student returns to undertake a 16-week major research project. Please note: Course length may vary dependent on your chosen start date.


MSc Mobile and Satellite Communications (without internship):

- Delivery: Full-time and Part-time | Start dates: September and February
The study pathway available without internship is available full-time and part-time. The full-time route is delivered in three major blocks. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week followed by a 16-week major research project. The full-time course duration is about 12 months, if you study part-time then you will complete the course in three years. Part-time study involves completing three modules in each of the first two years and a major research project in the final year. The use of block-mode delivery in this way allows flexible entry and exit, and also enables practising engineers to attend a single module as a short course.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Advancements in technology such as the increased use of Wi-Fi, are creating exciting career opportunities for graduates with the right skills. Graduates of this Masters award can enter the telecommunications industry in many different roles, conduct research or work towards a PhD.

Internship

Internships are only available to students studying full-time: Following successful completion of six taught modules, you will be competitively selected to join participating UK companies or University Research Centres on a six-month period of unpaid work placement before returning to undertake your major research project. All students who have an offer for the MSc Mobile and Satellite Communications (with internship) are guaranteed an internship either in industry or in a University Research Centre.

There are 25 internship places available. Students who wish to undertake an internship must apply for the MSc Mobile and Satellite Communications (with internship). It is anticipated that there will be significant demand for this programme and applicants are advised to apply as soon as possible to avoid disappointment. Applications will be considered on a first come first served basis and the numbers of students offered a place on the programme with internship will be capped.

If the course is already full and we are unable to offer you a place on the Masters course with internship, we may be able to consider you for the standard MSc Mobile and Satellite Communications (without internship) which is a shorter programme.

Assessment methods

Each of the six taught modules is typically assessed through 50% coursework and 50% closed-book class test. The major project is assessed through presentation to a panel of examiners, viva and written report.

Facilities

A state-of-the-art University library gives you access to most of the world’s leading publications. Other major facilities include a Cisco Academy networking laboratory, a Wireless Communications laboratory including a 1-65 GHz anechoic chamber and a satellite communication earth station, and a Communication Systems simulation laboratory equipped with PCs running the latest versions of MATLAB, SIMULINK, STK and other software.

In addition, we have recently opened a Calypto lab, which has software licences and support for the Catapult C toolset. This is used to develop advanced electronic products, such as the next generation of smart phones, more quickly and cost-effectively and to help engineers overcome design challenges in the increasingly complex world of board and chip design. The lab is sponsored by Calypto Design Systems Inc, a leader in electronic design automation. We are one of only four UK universities and 60 universities globally that have been granted permission to use the software worth £1.9m.

The new Renesas Embedded Systems lab comprises 25 new high-end terminals running cuttingedge tools. The facility was designed in collaboration with Renesas, the world’s leading supplier of microcontrollers, whose sponsorship helps ensure that students are always working with the latest technologies and development tools.

Teaching

The course is led by Professor Otung, a Chartered Engineer and internationally acclaimed author of Communication Engineering textbooks used in leading universities around the world, and supported by an impressive and highly-qualified teaching and supervision team. Generations of graduates from this course speak very highly of not only the cutting-edge expertise and technical skills that they developed on the course but also of the inspiration, professionalism and friendship of the entire teaching team.

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The optoelectronics market is expected to grow significantly in coming years. This specialist optoelectronics Masters course will give you access to optoelectronics expertise, so you can take advantage of new opportunities in this field. Read more
The optoelectronics market is expected to grow significantly in coming years. This specialist optoelectronics Masters course will give you access to optoelectronics expertise, so you can take advantage of new opportunities in this field.

Optoelectronics includes electronic devices that source, detect and control light. On this course you will benefit from high-level vocational training in lasers, LED lighting and semiconductors, tailored to the needs of the optoelectronics and optical communications industries.

As part of your studies, you will also benefit from the latest research within the field. You will be able to attend relevant research seminars and departmental seminars that are held regularly throughout the year. These events reflect the most up-to-date thinking from academics and specialists from industry.

The teaching team, many of whom have published research in optoelectronics, lead the University’s Wireless and Optoelectronics Research and Innovation Centre This informs our teaching, so you will benefit from cutting-edge Course Content that embodies the latest research.

Routes of study:
The course is available to study via two routes:
- MSc Optoelectronics (with internship)
- MSc Optoelectronics (without internship)

Please note: *Internships are optional and available to full-time students only. Internship places are limited. Students have the opportunity to work in a participating UK company or within a Research Centre at the University. You can also opt to study the course without an internship which will reduce your course length.

What you will study

You will study the following modules:
- Physics in Modern Optics
- Optoelectronics Devices for Telecommunications
- Optoelectronics Devices for Life Science & Measurement
- Applied Digital Signal Processing
- Embedded System Design
- Product Innovation and Entrepreneurship
- Six month Internship
- Masters Major Individual Project

Learning and teaching methods

The optoelectronics course offers an intensive but flexible learning pattern, with two start points each year – February and September. There are three major blocks during the 18 months’ study (full-time), which includes 12 months of teaching and a possible six months of internship*. Throughout your studies you will complete a 15-week final research project.

You will be taught through lectures, tutorials and workshops involving hands-on systems modeling and simulations using state-of-the-art hardware and software facilities (Zemax, Lightools etc). Students will also engage in supervised research supported by full access to world-class online and library facilities.

You are also expected to regularly attend relevant research seminars and departmental colloquia, which reflect the up-to-date research interests of the Wireless and Optoelectronics Research and Innovation Centre (WORIC).

The optoelectronics course is available to study via two main routes, you can opt to add further value to your studies by undertaking an internship or simply focus on building your academic knowledge through a on-campus study as detailed below:

- MSc Optoelectronics (with internship):
Delivery: Full-time only | Start dates: September and February

If you choose to undertake an internship, your course will be delivered in four major blocks that offer an intensive but flexible learning pattern. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week. This is followed by 6 month period of internship, after which the student returns to undertake a 16-week major research project. Please note: Course length may vary dependent on your chosen start date.

- MSc Optoelectronics (without internship):
Delivery: Full-time and Part-time | Start dates: September and February

The study pathway available without internship is available full-time and part-time. The full-time route is delivered in three major blocks. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week followed by a 16-week major research project. The full-time course duration is about 12 months, if you study part-time then you will complete the course in three years. Part-time study involves completing three modules in each of the first two years and a major research project in the final year. The use of block-mode delivery in this way allows flexible entry and exit, and also enables practising engineers to attend a single module as a short course.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Many industries need specialists in optoelectronics systems design. Careers are available in industrial and technology sectors such as automotives, computers, consumer electronics, communications, industrial optical sensing equipment and medical laser equipment.

The major project gives you a great opportunity to deepen your knowledge and hone your skills in a specialist topic informed by your planned career, and the period of internship gives you an industrial experience that can set you apart from others immediately upon graduation.

Internship

Internships are only available to students studying full-time: Following successful completion of six taught modules, you will be competitively selected to join participating UK companies or University Research Centres on a six-month period of unpaid work placement before returning to undertake your major research project. All students who have an offer for the MSc Optoelectronics (with internship) are guaranteed an internship either in industry or in a University Research Centre.

There are 25 internship places available. Students who wish to undertake an internship must apply for the MSc Optoelectronics (with internship). It is anticipated that there will be significant demand for this programme and applicants are advised to apply as soon as possible to avoid disappointment. Applications will be considered on a first come first served basis and the numbers of students offered a place on the programme with internship will be capped.

If the course is already full and we are unable to offer you a place on the Masters course with internship, we may be able to consider you for the standard MSc Optoelectronics (without internship) which is a shorter programme.

Assessment methods

Each of the six taught modules is typically assessed through 50% coursework and 50% closed-book class test. The major project is assessed through presentation to a panel of examiners, viva and written report. Work for lecture modules is assessed largely through examinations whereas the laboratory work is assessed in a continuous manner. Lecture courses are examined at the end of each teaching block.

Facilities

There are two optoelectronics and two RF laboratories equipped with £1million worth of experimental equipments and modeling facilities. These state-of-the-art facilities are home to:

The Innova® Sabre® MotoFreD™ ion laser
Newfocus TLM-8700 fast sweep tunable laser source
Agilent 8164B Lightwave Measurement System
RENISHAW ML-10 Measurement Systems
Beam profilers: Thorlabs BC106-VIS – CCD Camera Beam Profiler, Thorlabs BP109-IR – Beam Profiler
Scanning Fabry-Perot Spectrum Analyzer. e.g. Thorlabs SA200-5B, Coherence 0464H08
Anritsu MS9710B Optical Spectrum Analyzer
Ocean Optics spectrometers. e.g. HR4000 and USB4000
Edwards E306A Coating System Thermal Vacuum Evaporator
SCS G3-8 Spin Coater
ZEPTO laboratory plasma cleaner ZEPTO
FUJIKURA FSM-40S ARC FUSION SPLICER
National Instruments FPGA and Digitizer
Signal generator: TG210 2MhZ function Generator
Oscilloscopes: HP infinium Oscilloscope, HM507 Combiscope
Anechoic Chamber suitable for frequencies above 1 GHz.
Various measurement systems for 2, 10, 20, 40, & 60 GHz links
VubiQ 60 GHz development kits
Three 60 GHz Backhaul links (Sub10 Systems)
Antenna radiation patterns measurement system
Two equipped vans for outdoor measurements
Programmable or Reconfigurable Platform (DSPs, FPGAs, GPPs)
The modeling facilities include high performance computing facilities (e.g. a 24-core cluster) equipped with various optoelectronic and EM modeling packages such as FDTD solutions, Zemax, FEKO, and VPI Photonics suites. We also in-house novel RF Ray-tracing and Physical Optics EM planning tools developed by members of WORIC.

Teaching

The academic staff teaching on the MSc Optoelectronics are the same people who lead and work in the WORIC. This international centre has a significant track record of innovation in lasers, sensors, nanophotonics, wireless communications, telecommunications, and optical communications and aims to provide industry with access to cutting edge innovative ideas and knowledge. WORIC has won many grants from EPSRC, TSB, EADS, as well as A4B is keen to solve real industrial problems with innovation that provides enormous market.

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The Capital MBA tri-city experience, provided by INSEEC and the Swiss School of Management in Rome, takes you on a global journey over 18 months between the capital cities of Rome, Paris and London. Read more

ONE MBA: TWO YEARS, THREE CITIES ROME, PARIS, LONDON - MBA

The Capital MBA tri-city experience, provided by INSEEC and the Swiss School of Management in Rome, takes you on a global journey over 18 months between the capital cities of Rome, Paris and London. The final component is a mandatory six month internship. Students will be given an opportunity to interview for a paid (yes, paid) internship offered by one of our 10,000 partners throughout the world.

Accreditations:

INSEEC is a fully accredited University operating under the laws of the Ministy of Public Education in France and the EU.

SSM is a UNESCO/International Association of Universities approved school

SSM is accredited through the IACBE


SSM is a quality certified institution of higher education, certified by EduQua


SSM is an accredited institution by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs




EXTRAS

English Taught Courses in Europe are American Accredited:
•Study abroad in Europe and get an MBA that, under the delivery of the Swiss School of Management, is accredited by IACBE, the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education in the United States. INSEEC in Paris, which falls under the Bologna agreement in the EU, issues the formal transcripts providing validity in the EU as well.

Required Internship:
•INSEEC will assist MBA students in finding a paid internship with one of their 10,000 partners during the last six months of the program.

Customized Experience:
•Students are provided an option of tracks in both Paris and London that include Finance, Marketing and International Management. This allows you to choose the track that best fits your interests.

Real World Experience:
•Students will gain a real world perspective through our international speaker series and class trips to multinational corporations.

Entry Requirements:
•You need a Bachelor Degree in order to apply for our MBA Program. If you don't hold a Bachelor Degree, we can also help you getting one through our fast-track Bachelor Study Program.



OUR COURSES*

Rome: Swiss School of Management • Global Commerce Track

The global commerce track develops leaders to effectively manage global operations with a comprehensive curriculum that covers the core business competencies needed to succeed in today’s global economy.

Paris: INSEEC • International Business, Marketing or Luxury Brands Track (Choose one)

As you move into the second phase of the program, you will then dive further into international management and select the business track that best suits your career goals.

London: INSEEC • Corporate Finance, Financial Markets, Brand Management or International Business Management Track (Choose one)

In the third phase, you will learn the global competencies needed to strategically analyze business today. Students will continue to learn how to work effectively across markets and business cultures, analyze and address future opportunities.

Six Month Paid Internship • Required

Students must participate in a six month internship. With over 10,000 company partnerships around the world, INSEEC will assist students in finding a paid internship. Capitalize on that and you can consider it a six month job interview to launch your career.

Final Project

Students are required to do a business plan or thesis on the topic of their choice. They have six months to complete it on their own after their internship.

*Dates of program subject to change




ADMISSION & TUITION

Capital MBA Admission Requirements

• Bachelor’s degree or relevant undergraduate degree.

• Sound command of the English language, spoken and written.

• Work-experience is preferred but not required.



Intake and duration of the program

Your journey of the Capital MBA starts in February at the Swiss School of Management in Rome.

Here is the schedule:

Feb - July at SSM in Rome

Sept - Feb at INSEEC in Paris

Mar - Aug Internship in Paris

Sept - Feb INSEEC in London



Application

Please visit http://www.ssmrome.com/applynow and send to


Tuition

Application Fee (non refundable): €100

Program Fee: €2,000

Special 2014 Tuition €15,895

Total : (payment made in 3 installments) €17,995


OUR INSTITUTIONS

Students will be provided with the highest quality international education from both Groupe INSEEC and The Swiss School of Management. Based in Paris, London and Rome these institutions have come together to create a unique two year tri-city Capital MBA program. Our mission is to provide students the global business competencies required for leadership and success in demanding careers in the global economy.

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This MSc concentrates on the commercially important and rapidly expanding area of embedded digital systems. It is the ideal choice if you plan a career in embedded systems engineering, or for professional development if you already work in the engineering industry. Read more
This MSc concentrates on the commercially important and rapidly expanding area of embedded digital systems. It is the ideal choice if you plan a career in embedded systems engineering, or for professional development if you already work in the engineering industry.

Embedded systems are at the heart of many engineering devices and you will investigate how they are designed and implemented in hardware and software. You will learn how to critically understand and apply circuit and system simulation techniques, with an emphasis on products that incorporate embedded technology. You will also understand the design of embedded systems, including microcontroller architectures and real-time embedded hardware operating systems.

The course has significant input from industry and as part of the course you will be given the chance to undertake a 6-month unpaid internship*. Whilst not compulsory, internships provide the opportunity to put the theory you’ve learned in the classroom into practice in the real world.

Routes of study:
The course is available to study via two routes:
- MSc Embedded Systems Design (with internship)
- MSc Embedded Systems Design (without internship)

Please note: *Internships are available to full-time students only. Internship places are limited. Students have the opportunity to work in a participating UK company or within a Research Centre at the University. You can also opt to study the course without an internship which will reduce your course length.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1492-msc-embedded-systems-design-with-internship

What you will study

Modules include:
- Embedded Systems Design
- Designing with RTOS
- Digital Design with HDLs
- Research Methodology and Product Management
- Opto-Electronics Devices for Life Science and Measurement
- Applied Digital Signal Processing
- * Six month Internship*
- Msc Major Project (60 credits)

Learning and teaching methods

MSc Embedded Systems Design is delivered in three major blocks that offer an intensive but flexible learning pattern, with two entry opportunities for applicants each year in February and September. You will learn to use the latest computer-aided engineering tools and techniques for the design, manufacture and testing of electronic products. There are six taught modules and an 18-week major project. If you study part-time, you will study three modules per year.

The course is available to study via two main routes, you can opt to add further value to your studies by undertaking an internship or simply focus on building your academic knowledge through a on-campus study as detailed below:


MSc Embedded Systems Design (with internship):

- Delivery: Full-time only | Start dates: September and February
If you choose to undertake an internship, your course will be delivered in four major blocks that offer an intensive but flexible learning pattern. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week. This is followed by 6 month period of internship, after which the student returns to undertake a 16-week major research project. Please note: Course length may vary dependent on your chosen start date.


MSc Embedded Systems Design (without internship):

- Delivery: Full-time and Part-time | Start dates: September and February
The study pathway available without internship is available full-time and part-time. The full-time route is delivered in three major blocks. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week followed by a 16-week major research project. The full-time course duration is about 12 months, if you study part-time then you will complete the course in three years. Part-time study involves completing three modules in each of the first two years and a major research project in the final year. The use of block-mode delivery in this way allows flexible entry and exit, and also enables practising engineers to attend a single module as a short course.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Many industries need specialists in embedded systems design, and by the time you graduate, your skills and knowledge will be highly desired by employers. Careers are available in industrial and technology sectors such as embedded systems hardware or software development, telecommunication implementations, instrumentation, general real-time device applications, and signal processing development.

Internship

Internships are only available to students studying full-time: Following successful completion of six taught modules, you will be competitively selected to join participating UK companies or University Research Centres on a six-month period of unpaid work placement before returning to undertake your major research project. All students who have an offer for the MSc Embedded Systems Design (with internship) are guaranteed an internship either in industry or in a University Research Centre.

There are 10 internship places available. Students who wish to undertake an internship must apply for the MSc Embedded Systems Design (with internship). It is anticipated that there will be significant demand for this programme and applicants are advised to apply as soon as possible to avoid disappointment. Applications will be considered on a first come first served basis and the numbers of students offered a place on the programme with internship will be capped.

If the course is already full and we are unable to offer you a place on the Masters course with internship, we may be able to consider you for the standard MSc Embedded Systems Design (without internship) which is a shorter programme.

Assessment methods

Typically, each module will be assessed through coursework.

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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This programme is designed as a specialised extension to the study of electronics at undergraduate level. The programme provides students with specialist expertise across a wide range of electronic subjects including microelectronics, hardware design, communications, computer design and digital hardware. Read more

Aim

This programme is designed as a specialised extension to the study of electronics at undergraduate level. The programme provides students with specialist expertise across a wide range of electronic subjects including microelectronics, hardware design, communications, computer design and digital hardware. The programme is normally full-time, starts at the end of September and lasts for 12 months. Electronics with Professional Internship students have the opportunity to complete an industrial placement of up to six months as part of their studies.

Programme Content

The MSc programme consists of a practical project of a research nature (60 CATS points) plus six modules (120 CATS points)
The Postgraduate Diploma programme consists of six modules (120 CATS points).

Modules for both programmes are selected from the list below:

Digital Signal Processing
Intelligent Systems and Control
High Frequency Technology and Design
Microelectronic Devices & Technology
MEMS Devices & Technology
Wireless Communications Systems
Wireless Sensor Systems

In any given year further specialist topics may be available for selection or listed topics may not be offered.

Assessment

Assessment for MSc in Electronics: Coursework and written examination in six modules, dissertation on project.
Postgraduate Diploma: Coursework and written examination in six modules.

Career Opportunities

Our graduates have found that holding a prestigious MSc qualification from one of the UK's top engineering schools has significantly enhanced their job opportunities and employment prospects.

Graduates typically find employment in a wide range of fields including with semiconductor companies, electronic equipment manufacturers, design and service providers, software houses and in other electronic engineering-based industries.

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Prepare for the Bar with City’s Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) and study in London’s prime legal location. The BPTC is designed for aspiring barristers. Read more
Prepare for the Bar with City’s Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) and study in London’s prime legal location.

Who is it for?

The BPTC is designed for aspiring barristers. It attracts students from around the world and from all parts of the UK. Students will have already completed a qualifying law degree or a non-law degree plus a Graduate Diploma in Law.

From recent graduates to doctors and front bench opposition MPs, the programme caters both for those who have always been dedicated to a professional legal career as well as people seeking a career change, and those who are able to make use of the training together with a professional legal qualification in business, management or administration.

In particular, the course is designed for students who want to develop their skills as advocates, and those who want to research and apply the law to help clients in presenting legal cases in court. Bar students often have a deep commitment to helping those who need assistance in protecting their legal rights.

Objectives

The Bar Professional Training Course is a rigorous programme designed to reflect the modern working Bar. We replicate life in chambers, so you learn how to represent a range of clients and to prepare for the demands of court.

Studying at Gray's Inn Place, in the heart of legal London, City Law School students achieve impressive academic success. In 2015, our students represented half of the national BPTC cohort achieving a grade of ‘outstanding’* – the most prominent indicator of success in securing future pupillage.

* Bar Standards Board BPTC Key Statistics report 2016

The programme is taught by a team of professionally-qualified experts who are the authors of the BPTC manuals in use across the country. Internationally renowned and highly skills focused, City’s BPTC provides a bridge between academic legal study and professional practice and covers three essential areas:
-Advocacy
-Written and oral advisory skills
-Drafting skills.

Underpinning all of these areas is a foundation of analysis and legal research, combined with the need to set priorities and organise your work in order to meet deadlines.

Placements

Placements are not a formal requirement of the programme, but we encourage you to spend time in chambers doing mini-pupillages.

Pro bono is an opportunity to use your time and knowledge to provide legal advice to those who may otherwise not have access to such services. It provides you with invaluable experience and a chance to develop your legal skills further. At The City Law School you will have the opportunity to work with one of our pro bono volunteering organisations that needs assistance.

Mooting is a great way to develop important legal skills such as research and analysis whilst also learning how to structure a legal argument. At The City Law School, we run an annual internal mooting competition where students act as a counsel to argue a point of law before a judge.

Academic facilities

The Bar Professional Training Course is taught at Gray’s Inn Place campus. Here you will find the Atkin Building which houses the student common room and the large lecture theatre and teaching accommodation. The library, computer study areas and additional teaching accommodation are located in two nearby buildings.

The City Law School has its own dedicated administration team and its own online legal resource portal - Lawbore. You also have access to two legal libraries, one on site at the Gray’s Inn campus and one based at our Northampton Square campus.

Within the Gray’s Inn library you will find areas for group study and a room to record advocacy performances. There is a large suite of recording rooms nearby. You will also receive copies of the textbooks used on the course. These include:
-Practitioner books in civil practice and criminal practice.
-The City Law School BPTC manuals (published by OUP as the "Bar series").
-Textbooks in civil procedure, evidence and alternative dispute resolution.

Teaching and learning

Most of the course is taught in small groups where you will be studying with 12 other students, and in classes of six students for advocacy. You will also learn through one-to-one tuition in the advocacy skills part of the course.

Debating, mooting and mock trials also prepare you for pupillage interviews.

We also train students on how to give peer feedback and conduct client conferences, where you give an oral performance which is recorded for feedback. You also have the opportunity to cross-examine mock witnesses and clients in real time as part of the programme’s final assessment.

You will be assessed under examination conditions in the written skills and the knowledge-based areas of ethics, civil procedure and criminal procedure. You will also be assessed through replicated scenarios, which we would expect you to encounter in practice.

Teaching is supported by a range of materials, including a series of skills and subject manuals written by senior members of staff and members of the practising Bar. These manuals are published by Oxford University Press, have been adopted by other providers, and are widely recognised as leading and innovative texts on teaching legal skills. The course is also supported by a wide range of written and electronic resources.

Modules

Modules in the first two terms are compulsory (and are based on the Bar Standards Board requirements), and you can choose two options from 11 topics in the third term.

The course has been developed to give you the relevant legal skills and knowledge that all newly qualified barristers need, along with the detailed knowledge you will need for your chosen specialist areas/subjects. While there is a strong focus on advocacy, advisory and drafting skills are also important as well as knowledge of court procedures and evidence and the principles governing ADR and professional ethics. Three of the option subjects (FRU, domestic violence and social security) are pro bono based, which gives you the opportunity to get real-life experience as part of the programme.

There is a strong focus on preparation, participation and practice. Students are encouraged to recognise that work on the programme is set in a realistic context and to approach the work in a professional, ethical, practical and problem-solving way.

Core subjects in the first and second term
-Advocacy Cross Examination (10 credits)
-Advocacy Examination in Chief (10 credits)
-Advocacy Addressing the Court (10 credits)
-Civil Litigation, Evidence & Remedies 12 credits)
-Conference Skills (six credits)
-Criminal Litigation, Evidence & Sentencing (12 credits)
-Resolution of Disputes out of Court (ADR) (six credits)
-Drafting Skills (12 credits)
-Professional Ethics (six credits)
-Opinion Writing Skills (12 credits)

Other important areas covered within the context of the main subjects:
-Costs
-Human rights
-Risk analysis

Option subjects in the third term - you will choose two of the below elective modules:
-Advanced Criminal Litigation (12 credits)
-Commercial Law (12 credits)
-Company Law (12 credits)
-Domestic Violence (12 credits)
-Employment Law (12 credits)
-Family Law (12 credits)
-Fraud & Financial Crime (12 credits)
-Free Representation Unit (12 credits)
-Landlord & Tenant (12 credits)
-Professional Negligence (12 credits)
-Social Security (12 credits)

The range of options offered in any one year is subject to availability and demand, but we usually run all 11 options. The same range of options is offered to part-time BPTC students as to full-time ones, but subject to demand, some may only be delivered during the day.

Career prospects

Training for the Bar is a serious proposition because of the responsible role played by barristers in the administration of justice. It is also one of the most sought after and respected careers available. On successful completion of the course you will receive the Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Legal Skills and be eligible to be Called to the Bar of England and Wales by your Inn. At that stage you are entitled to describe yourself as a barrister, but will not be entitled to represent clients in court until you have completed the first six months of pupillage.

Pupillage is usually for 12 months, and is usually taken in one set of chambers, although sometimes pupillage takes place in two or more sets.

Minimum pupillage awards for the first year are £12,000. Some pupillage awards exceed £60,000. Tenants earn more than pupils.

We have a strong success rate with BPTC students gaining pupillage year on year. As soon as you accept your place on the City BPTC you can get individual guidance from our dedicated Pupillage Advisory Service to give you the best possible chance of entering the Bar. The service offers tailored advice about:
-Building links with the profession
-Applying for mini-pupillages
-Completing pupillage applications
-Preparing for interviews (including offering mock interviews)
-Getting ready for pupillage

If you decide the Bar isn't for you, you can receive expert advice about your career options from your personal tutor and City's Careers, Student Development & Outreach service. The service offers support for interviews, mock interviews and job searching techniques.

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This Masters course provides you with the professional skills for practising Cyber Security in the Digital World. The course is designed for those who wish to extend their capability for an accelerated early career in cyber/information security. Read more
This Masters course provides you with the professional skills for practising Cyber Security in the Digital World.

Who is it for?

The course is designed for those who wish to extend their capability for an accelerated early career in cyber/information security. It will prepare you for a successful career in the various roles directly and indirectly connected to the world of computer, network and information security.

The course would suit students who have completed a first degree in a computing subject (e.g. computer science, business computing) or a numerate subject (e.g. applied mathematics, engineering, physics) if that covered a significant computing component.

Objectives

The primary objective of MSc Cyber Security is to practise security with an interdisciplinary shared coursework that spans across all security related modules.
-In semester 1, you become an ethical hacker. You are challenged to identify flaws in computer system by breaking its crypto components and retrieve sensitive information of an e-commerce company.
-In semester 2 you become an investigator. You are challenged to analyse network traffic, logs and detect attacks in a company's network. It is essential to trace hackers and bring them to justice with concrete proofs and reporting.

Academic facilities

The Department of Computer Science has invested in the design and implementation of a virtual laboratory (CybSec) for the purpose and needs of the cyber security course. In particular, CybSec is a virtual networked lab where hacking, penetration testing, malware analysis, security monitoring are taking place in a controlled and isolated environment without violating City's IT Policy. In addition, the security analysis of practical cryptosystems requires high computational power and resources that are used for code breaking. CybSec lab supports our teaching efforts and enhances our research strengths.

Placements

You will be offered the opportunity to complete up to six months of professional experience as part of your degree.

Our longstanding internship scheme gives you the chance to apply the knowledge and skills gained from your taught modules within a real business environment. An internship also provides you with professional development opportunities that enhance your technical skills and business knowledge.

Internships delivered by City, University of London offer an exceptional opportunity to help you stand out in the competitive IT industry job market. The structure of the course extends the period for dissertation submission to January, allowing you to work full-time for up to six months. You will be supported by our outstanding Professional Liaison Unit (PLU) should you wish to consider undertaking this route.

The Cyber Security programme also offers internships in collaboration with our alliance of companies in security related jobs.

Teaching and learning

The MSc in Cyber Security is a one year full-time course. On completion of eight taught modules and an individual project you will be awarded a Master of Science (MSc) degree.

The teaching and learning methods used are such that the levels of both specialisation of content and autonomy of learning increase as you progress through the programme. This progress will be guided by active researchers in cyber security, culminating in an individual project, an original piece of research, conducted largely independently with appropriate academic supervision.

The standard format is that taught modules are delivered through a series of 20 hours of lectures and 10 hours of tutorials/laboratory sessions.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and explain the theoretical concepts underpinning a particular subject
-Highlight the most significant aspects of a module's syllabus
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

Tutorials are used to help you develop skills in applying the concepts covered in the lectures of the relevant module, normally in practical problem solving contexts. Laboratory sessions serve a similar purpose as the tutorials but their strategy is to demonstrate application of concepts and techniques through the use of state-of-the-art software development tools and environments.

You will be expected to undertake independent study and do substantial coursework assignments for each module, amounting approximately to 120 hours per module. The coursework takes many forms, including programs, theoretical work, and essays, and is primarily formative, but also contributes to module assessment.

Coursework will be used in a coherent manner across all of the security specific modules to ensure that you will also get appropriate hands-on operational experience of relevant aspects of cyber-security, including testing and analysis. Some of this course work may be organised in ways that shadow larger scale exercises, such as the Cyber-Security Challenge. The individual project (full-time) is carried out over the summer period, and if done without a placement, lasts approximately 14 weeks or 600 hours. If undertaken within an industrial or research placement, the project period extends to up to six months.

Modules

This course covers core areas of masters level computer science, such as research methods and scientific presentation and analysis skills.

It will enable you to specialise in some aspects of the area of cyber security with modules such as cryptography, network security, information security management, security audit and certification. You will engage with researchers to develop your scientific knowledge and skills. We offer options within the programme that allows you to develop your expertise in cyber crime, digital forensics, socio-technical aspects of security.

There are in total eight taught modules; six core and two elective modules with a full time individual project completed over the summer. You will choose electives to tailor the programme to your chosen career path.

In particular, the project component gives you an opportunity to carry out an extended piece of work at the cutting edge of games technology under the supervision of one of our specialist academic and research staff. Internship-based projects are also available.

Core modules
-Information security management
-Network security
-Security auditing and certification
-Cryptography
-Readings in Computer Science
-Research methods and professional issues
-Individual project (June to September or December)

Elective modules
-Digital forensics
-Cyber crime
-Sociotechnical systems security
-Advanced algorithms and data structures
-Data visualisation

Career prospects

MSc Cyber Security will prepare you for a successful career in the various roles directly and indirectly connected to the world of computer, network and information security. It will develop your specialist analytical, operational and development skills in both technical and socio-technical areas of cyber security.

The course is designed for those who wish to extend their capability for an accelerated early career in cyber security.

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