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The PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design is for UK/EU architecture graduates seeking Part 2 professional qualification. International students should apply for the MArch Architectural Design (International). Read more

Why this course?

The PgDip in Advanced Architectural Design is for UK/EU architecture graduates seeking Part 2 professional qualification. International students should apply for the MArch Architectural Design (International).

This two year course gives you the opportunity to explore architecture in a broad-based manner through theoretical and practical work. It demands a high level of design ability and self-motivation while giving you the chance to explore and develop projects related to your own interests.

You’ll appraise current theoretical approaches to architecture and urban design then assess and show their relevance in existing and proposed contexts. You’ll also develop and demonstrate formal and technical architectural ability.

If you complete all diploma work to a satisfactory standard you may have the opportunity to convert your diploma into a MArch. This requires an extra three months of study.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/advancedarchitecturaldesign/

What you'll study

As well as the areas of study you'll:
- complete comprehensive building design projects
- write a dissertation
- demonstrate awareness of management procedures relevant to design practice
- carry out a detailed examination of an issue or issues of particular architectural significance

Year 1

This year is centred on consolidating your architectural design skills. You’ll also be introduced to the idea of architecture as a responsive solution to fundamental social issues. You’ll choose an area of personal interest that you’ll research for your dissertation.

Year 2

You’ll undertake an architectural project. This requires you to take a viewpoint on contemporary architectural issues and choose a theme that reflects your own interests and creative ambitions. As well as studio-based activities you’ll follow your chosen theme through project work and optional classes. You’ll also attend a taught course in professional studies and a series of guest lectures.

Study trips provide opportunities for intensive examinations of the culture and built fabric in a variety of urban and rural locations both in the UK and overseas. Recent trips include Barcelona, Rome, Paris and Venice and the less familiar Gdansk, Toledo and Monte Caruso.

Study abroad

You’ll have the opportunity to study abroad (subject to academic performance). The department has the most expansive international exchange programme in the UK. We have agreements with 22 institutions across Europe, Canada, the Far East and South America.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).
We offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

Validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) (Part 2).
Accredited by the Architect’s Registration Board (ARB) for the purpose of eligibility for registration with that body.

Student competitions

We’ve an extensive programme of student awards provided by professional bodies, including:
- The RIAS Silver Medal: the premier Scottish award for student achievement
- The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) President's Medals
- The City of Glasgow- Eimear Kelt- Silver Medal: awarded annually by a panel of professional judges on behalf of Glasgow City Council.

Our students have been successful in many prestigious competitions including:
- ARCHIPRIX
- Building Design ‘Top 6’ UK
- APS
- RSA Awards
- A+DS and RIAS
- SEDA

Guest lectures

We run an exciting programme of guest lectures and recent speakers include:
- Joan Callis, Benedetta Tagliabue EMBT, Architects to the Scottish Parliament
- Prof Neil Spiller, Professor of Architecture and Digital Theory,
- Gordon Benson, Benson and Forsyth, Museum of Scotland, National Museum of Ireland

Learning & teaching

Each part of the course allows you to explore and develop projects related to your own interests in contemporary architecture.
The course is made up of studio design work, lectures, special projects and workshops.
The focus of study is on design project work including the analysis, synthesis and appraisal of design ideas. You’ll show your understanding of these ideas through drawings, physical and digital models, written and graphic work.

Assessment

The MArch degree normally requires further assessment over the summer semester. This will be on an aspect of the diploma project that is explored to a greater level of detail.
You’ll have exams in semesters 1 and 2 on all aspects of the course and are expected to present a complete academic portfolio based on advanced design study.

Careers

Career opportunities for Architecture graduates range from working in large multidisciplinary practices to smaller specialist firms.
Many of our graduates are employed by highly respected practices throughout the world, while others have set up their own businesses.
The Department has a growing reputation for developing entrepreneurial graduates who go on to make their mark in the sector independently in practices such as Page and Park, Tog Studio and Lateral North.

How much will I earn?

If you become an architect you can expect a starting salary of £15,000 to £20,000 after Part 1 (first degree qualification).*
Typical salaries after Part 2 (second degree or diploma) range from £20,000 to £26,000.*
The range of typical salaries after Part 3 (final exam leading to registration as an architect) or for those with experience rises to £26,000 to £35,000.*

*Information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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Since its inception in 2003, our distance learning MA Antiques course has been inspiring researchers and practitioners; individuals who want to develop a specialised interest in antiques without the necessity of on-campus attendance, and who wish to do so on a part-time basis. Read more
Since its inception in 2003, our distance learning MA Antiques course has been inspiring researchers and practitioners; individuals who want to develop a specialised interest in antiques without the necessity of on-campus attendance, and who wish to do so on a part-time basis.

Whether it’s a leisure activity, you wish to be an antique dealer or you want recognition of your professional status in antiques, our MA Antiques course appeals to a wide range of students. This postgraduate course has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via distance learning. Students tend to be adults in employment who want to take the course on a part-time basis to fit around their other working commitments.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The MA Antiques has been specifically designed to accommodate the needs of part-time provision via distance learning. Students tend to be adults in employment who want to take the course on a part-time basis to fit around their other working commitments. We accommodate such needs by offering a clear structure of progression, balanced by flexible personal tutorials: for which you can expect to have weekly one-to-one contact with academic staff via web based visual conferencing. It is this bespoke interaction with academic staff that our students tell us they find both supportive and inspirational. Our post graduate distance learning students come from a wide diversity of nationalities and locations: America, Canada, England, Germany, Greece, Scotland, and South Africa, to name a few.

Assessment is by 100 per cent coursework in the form of concise project reports or academic papers. For each of the 40 credit modules you undertake, you will have both a mid-module assignment and an end of module assignment to complete. Through weekly tutorials you will receive on-going formative feedback and guidance, but the final module mark and summative feedback is based on the end of module assignment only.

COURSE OUTLINE

MA Antiques offers:
-A postgraduate qualification in antiques with a proven success rate
-Marketing advantages for your business, and/or your own career development
-The opportunity, after the first year, to specialise in a field of your choice
-Support for students who, after a long period away from formal education, may find postgraduate study daunting at first
-Encouragement for individuals who may not have formal entry qualifications - experience counts
-Assessment by 100% coursework in the form of concise project reports or academic papers. So, no examinations, summer school or on campus requirements

OPPORTUNITIES

The course structure offers specific career progression through enabling individuals to apply themselves to one of three routes: academic publication, research funding, or exhibition/research project management. Previous topics from our graduates have included:
-The Hallmark System for English Silver: An Instrument of Enforcement or a Method to Identify Period Silver?
-A Web site Exhibition of Chinese Jade from the GvS Collection
-Regency Metamorphic Library Chairs (1790 -1840)
-Imitation or Innovation in Bretby Art Pottery
-Modern Art for the Table -The 1934 Harrods Exhibition
-Panelled Furniture: A Survey of 17th and 18th Century
-The contribution of Edmund Evans, Walter Crane, Randolph Caldecott and Kate Greenaway to the design of Victorian books for children

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This two-year course is for international students who are looking for a challenging programme of study that meets the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 educational criteria. Read more

Why this course?

This two-year course is for international students who are looking for a challenging programme of study that meets the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 educational criteria.

The course runs parallel to the MArch/Pg Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design. It shares the same curriculum so you’ll join students on this course in an exciting and challenging environment.

You’ll develop skills in advanced design, analysis and architectural critique designing complex buildings in a variety of contexts and addressing social, cultural and environmental issues.

This course demands a high level of design ability and self-motivation.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesigninternational/

You’ll study

- Year 1
The first year of study is centred on consolidating your architectural design skills.
You’ll be introduced to the idea of architecture as a responsive solution to fundamental social issues.
You'll take a subject class in an area of expertise aligned to the research in the department and research and produce a dissertation on a topic of personal interest related to design.

- Year 2
You’ll undertake a significant architectural project on which you're required to take a standpoint on contemporary architectural issues. This is developed through a theme that reflects your own interests and creative ambitions and is supported by subject classes.
You’ll also attend a taught course in professional studies and a series of guest lectures.
Students progressing from the Diploma to Masters undertake an additional semester of study to pursue an aspect of the thesis project to a greater level of detail.
Study trips provide opportunities for intensive examinations of the culture and built fabric in a variety of urban and rural locations both in the UK and overseas. Recent trips include Barcelona, Rome, Paris and Venice and the less familiar Gdansk, Toledo and Monte Caruso.

Study abroad

You’ll have the opportunity to study abroad, subject to academic performance. The department has the most expansive international exchange programme in the UK. We've agreements with 22 institutions across Europe, Canada, the Far East and South America.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).
We offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Student competitions

We’ve an extensive programme of student awards provided by professional bodies, including:
- The RIAS Silver Medal: the premier Scottish award for student achievement
- The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) President's Medals
- The City of Glasgow- Eimear Kelt- Silver Medal: awarded annually by a panel of professional judges on behalf of Glasgow City Council. This is for the best project submitted by a student either at the Glasgow School of Art or the Department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde

Our students have been successful in many prestigious competitions including:
- ARCHIPRIX
- Building Design ‘Top 6’ UK
- APS
- RSA Awards
- A+DS
- SEDA

Guest lectures

We run an exciting programme of guest lectures and recent speakers include:
- Joan Callis, Benedetta Tagliabue EMBT, Architects to the Scottish Parliament
- Prof Neil Spiller, Professor of Architecture and Digital Theory
- Gordon Benson, Benson and Forsyth, Museum of Scotland, National Museum of Ireland

Accreditation

The Masters in Architectural Design International is validated by the RIBA at Part 2.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The course is made up of studio design work, lectures, special projects and workshops.
The focus of study is on design project work including the analysis, synthesis and appraisal of design ideas. You'll then show your understanding of these ideas through drawings, physical and digital models, written and graphic work.
Each part of the course allows you to explore and develop projects related to your own interests in contemporary architecture.

Assessment

Full-time students are examined over Years 1 and 2 on all aspects of the course.
The MArch degree normally requires further assessment over the summer semester. This will be on an aspect of the diploma project that is explored to a greater level of detail.

Careers

Career opportunities for Architecture graduates range from working in large multidisciplinary practices to smaller specialist firms.
Many of our graduates are employed by highly respected practices throughout the world, while others have set up their own businesses.
The department has a growing reputation for developing entrepreneurial graduates who go on to make their mark in the sector independently in practices such as Page and Park, Tog Studio and Lateral North.

How much will I earn?

If you become an architect you can expect a starting salary of £15,000 to £20,000 after Part 1 (first degree qualification).*
Typical salaries after Part 2 (second degree or diploma) range from £20,000 to £26,000.*
The range of typical salaries after Part 3 (final exam leading to registration as an architect) or for those with experience rises to £26,000 to £35,000.*

*Information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This programme provides an opportunity for postgraduates with some knowledge and experience of radio to explore the medium in depth, both in theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-radio/. Read more
This programme provides an opportunity for postgraduates with some knowledge and experience of radio to explore the medium in depth, both in theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-radio/

-Facilities available are broadcast-standard with professional standard post-production suites
-Three sound studios are linked into a networked sound/ENPS electronic newsroom with subscriptions to news agencies broadcast services such as Sky, IRN, PA and AFP
-We also have our own student radio station broadcasting online and with an FM restricted service licence
-The course tutor is a practising broadcaster, and an experienced sound engineer runs the studio
-Our students have won industry awards, and our graduates are working at local, regional, national and international level
-The MA has been accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council
-MA Radio students are taught online production skills and fully involved in publishing multimedia journalism and creative features with a sound focus on their dedicated public platform Londonmultimedianews.com

Overview

The MA programme in its 20-year history has had the privilege of participating with students from all over the world from Mongolia, Japan and China to Australia, USA, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Egypt and many other countries. Home, EU and international students of all ages and backgrounds work together in a 70% practice to 30% theory practice Masters degree.

Students have an excellent record of employment and career development. MA Radio alumni include international award-winning foreign correspondents, the directors of national broadcasting channels, creative programme makers and broadcast journalists of distinction. But the course is also aimed at providing rich and valuable transferable skills so former students also find they have the springboard and confidence to develop and excel in other professional fields.

Award-winning students and graduates

MA students are consistently winning significant awards for their work. For example in 2012 MA Radio students had considerable success in the Charles Parker student radio feature awards and the Broadcast Journalism Training Council Awards for Best Radio News Feature and Best Online News Website as a result of their work for EastLondonLines.co.uk. Since 2013 MA Radio students have been working on a more specialist externally published broadcast online dimension.

In fact Goldsmiths MA Radio students have a longstanding tradition of success in the Charles Parker awards as you will see in the profile of winners between 2004 and 2012 and the fact that MA Radio students took Gold and Silver in the 2013 awards and their work was broadcast on BBC Radio 4Extra. Our graduates are winning awards for their work too, including Best Radio Feature at the UK Sony Awards

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Tim Crook.

Modules & Structure

You work in practice and theory groups, and take modules that cover:

-radio features and drama
-radio journalism and documentary
-key media law and ethical issues in relation to UK and US media law
-the cultural history of radio (primarily in Britain and the USA)
-adapting prose, film and theatre for radio dramatisation

Throughout the year, the programme includes workshops and seminars by visiting professionals and artists in the radio journalism and radio drama fields. We are happy to support work experience placements in professional newsrooms and radio drama productions. The programme offers students the opportunity to learn Teeline shorthand, television recording techniques and online applications for radio.

We also encourage you to support the Goldsmiths student radio station Wired FM.

Assessment

Portfolio of recorded work; unseen examination; essay; 30-minute radio drama script.

Skills & Careers

Throughout the MA you'll become familiar with a wide range of production techniques and practices, and an awareness of contemporary news values, media law and the operational practice of news stations.

You'll also develop valuable transferable skills including teamwork and communication skills.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Professional Diploma is a design-driven course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. Read more
The Professional Diploma is a design-driven course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 96.9% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

In an increasingly competitive profession we distinguish ourselves as an academic forum engaged responsibly and directly with the world around us. We are committed to expanding the creative possibilities through courageous and ambitious engagement with the world around us. Design drives the speculation within the school, used as both tool and intention.

The Professional Diploma is a design-based course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. The main areas of study are in design, technology and practice, and history and theory. Each area is taught through a wide choice of tutors, studios and interest groups with a strong emphasis on self-directed study and ambitious agendas. You are encouraged to explore particular lines of interest and develop ideas in depth.

The course as a whole encourages fresh thinking, experiment and risk. You will also be encouraged to understand and engage with the society you are part of and serve; and to engage with social, political and economic infrastructures that predetermine built form. Our students have had considerable successes in the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) President's medals, winning the RIBA Silver Medal in 2012, 2003 and 2002, and the Bronze in 2004.

The architecture subject area is housed in a purpose designed building on Whitechapel High Street, created by our own architects, ARU, and has access to the Graduate Centre, designed by renowned architect, Daniel Libeskind. Students benefit from the course's central London location and its close proximity to its internationally renowned creative and industry hubs. The School's extensive networks encourage graduates of the course to expand their knowledge and skills through lectures, events and careers advice, leaving them with excellent career prospects.

Assessment

Your design projects will be assessed via your portfolio and a presentation at the end of the course. The history, theory and practice coursework is assessed through seminar papers and an essay. The technology studies are examined in portfolio and through a technology dissertation, coursework and professional reports.

Professional accreditation

Our course is fully accredited by the RIBA and ARB. Upon graduation you will receive your RIBA part 2 qualification, the second stage of three in the professional qualification of an Architect in the UK.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advocacy: Practice Beyond Aesthetics (core, 20 credits)
-Applied Technology in Architecture (core, 40 credits)
-Design Level 4 Process and Proposal (core, 20 credits)
-Design Level 4 Subject and Context (core, 20 credits)
-Cinema and the City (option, 20 credits)
-Concepts of Space (option, 20 credits)
-Economics of Place (option, 20 credits)
-Forgetting of Air (option, 20 credits)
-Poetry and Architecture (option, 20 credits)
-Research for Spatial Planning and Specialism (option, 20 credits)
-Sustainable Communities and Governance of Place (option, 20 credits)
-The Problem of Irony (option, 20 credits)
-The Question of Technology (option, 20 credits)
-The Soundscape of Modernity (option, 20 credits)
-Urban Design (option, 20 credits)
-Writing About Architecture (option, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Design Thesis Project: Resolution (core, 40 credits)
-Design Thesis Project: Specialisation and Proposition (core, 40 credits)
-Integrated Design Study (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Changing Places (option, 20 credits)
-Critical Transformations (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Energy Comfort and Buildings (option, 20 credits)
-Histories (option, 20 credits)
-Interpretation (option, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Theory (option, 20 credits)
-Theories (option, 20 credits)

After the course

After securing a Professional Diploma in Architecture (RIBA 2), many students decide to study the Examination in Professional Practice (RIBA 3), following a period of practical experience. RIBA 2 also enables you to progress to a specialised Masters course.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Read more

Course outline

This unique MA in French and British Decorative Arts and Interiors focuses on the development of interiors and decorative arts in England and France in the “long” eighteenth century (c.1660-c.1830) and their subsequent rediscovery and reinterpretation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

A key element of the course is the emphasis on the first-hand study of furniture, silver and ceramics, where possible in the context of historic interiors. Based in central London at the European School of Economics, it draws upon the outstanding collections of the nearby Wallace Collection and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The MA is designed to appeal to those wishing to pursue careers in heritage organisations, antique-dealing and auctioneering, museums, conservation, interior design or university teaching and research. However, those with a strong personal interest in studying the subject for its own sake are also very welcome.

With its focus on first-hand study of decorative arts within historic interiors, the programme provides a vocational and academic training which has enabled students to pursue careers in museums, interior design, antique dealing, and auctioneering. Some of our past students now work at the Royal Collection, the National Trust and English Heritage (see What our students and alumni say).

The MA also provides an excellent spring-board for students wanting to do a PhD in art history or related disciplines.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching

Teaching is carried out through a combination of lectures supported by seminars and tutorials. A key feature of the Buckingham teaching method is the use of small tutorial groups which provide the most effective means of ensuring that the students benefit from the academic expertise at their disposal. It is also the philosophy of Buckingham’s faculty to be available to students outside the scheduled tutorial times and to encourage good working relationships between staff and students.

The MA is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, with the participation of outside experts from the Wallace Collection, the Victoria and Albert Museum, English Heritage, the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Soane Museum. There are also a number of renowned independent scholars who give lectures and lead some of the seminars and class trips.

UK Study Trips

There are frequent trips to collections in and around London, and a study week at Buckingham exploring local country houses such as Woburn Abbey, Waddesdon Manor, Boughton and Blenheim Palace, with their important decorative arts collections.

Paris Study Week

In the second term there is a study week in Paris, where students are granted privileged access to some of the private apartments at Versailles not normally accessible to the public, as well as a number of very important eighteenth-century private houses in Paris, open by special permission.

Professional Practice Projects and Placements in Museums and Galleries

Students also have the opportunity, through the Professional Practice Project to plan an exhibition in a museum, research a project to restore an historic interior, or undertake a part-time museum placement, thereby acquiring useful vocational skills and experience. Some of our students are currently doing placements at English Heritage and Strawberry Hill.

Course Structure

The course starts each September and finishes the following September. During the first term students study the development of the decorative arts and the interior in France and England between c.1660 and the end of the eighteenth century. In the second term students examine revivalism and the practical and historical problems of reinterpreting eighteenth-century interiors and objects. This is combined with a professional practice project designed to equip students with skills and experience applicable to careers in museums and built heritage.

Teaching takes place two days a week (excluding class trips) over two terms, or one day a week for part-time students. During the third term, students research a dissertation under supervision, which is written up over the summer for submission at the end of September. Assessment is by means of coursework and the dissertation.

Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director, there are some options for part-time study, one day a week over two years, or by deferral of the dissertation.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/decorativearts.

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This MSc is Europe's long-standing specialist graduate lighting programme. Read more
This MSc is Europe's long-standing specialist graduate lighting programme. It provides a holistic approach to lighting design considering the human response to light and lighting, the science and technology of the subject, together with the design of lighting, as an integrated component of architecture and the built environment.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of a wide range of topics associated with the design of the lit environment including lamp and luminaire technologies, the impact of light on architectural form and the human reaction to light. The programme provides a holistic approach to light and lighting so that graduates have both the vision to design beautiful lit environments and the skills necessary to ensure that they are successfully engineered.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and a light and lighting dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Lighting Fundamentals
-Lighting Applied Calculations
-Lighting Research
-Advanced Lighting Design

Optional modules
-Lighting Practice or another appropriate module from any UCL Bartlett MSc programme

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students submit a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic associated with light and lighting in the built environment.

Teaching and learning
The programme has formal elements of lectures and tutorials that are complemented with project work and site visits to study lighting. There are also other visits to laboratories and other facilities associated with the subject. Assessment is through coursework (essays and design projects), written examination and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Careers

The majority of graduates have either continued to work, or have gained employment in the lighting profession either in the lighting manufacturing industry or in lighting design. A number of students have used the MSc as a foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Lighting Designer, Arup
-Architect / Lighting Designer, Demicoli Associates
-Research- Architectural Lighting, University College London (UCL)
-Lighting Designer, Paul Nulty Lighting Design
-Lighting Designer, Projection Lighting

Employability
A number of students have gone on to win international awards in the field of lighting, including the Light Play prize at the Total Lighting Show, the RHS Silver Gilt Medal, and Lighting Designer of the Year. Several Light and Lighting graduates have received the Society of Light and Lighting Young Lighters of the Year award. Graduates have also delivered conference presentations at PLDC Madrid and Copenhagen.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

This MSc has at its disposal the Lighting Simulator, an advanced sunlight and daylight modelling facility employing both computer simulation and a sophisticated variable luminance artificial sky.

Many of our graduates have been successful in gaining awards and prizes from around the world including Lighting Designer of the Year, and the Society of Light and Lighting's Young Lighters of the Year award.

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The principal component of this degree is an intensive novel research project providing 'hands-on' training in methods and techniques at the cutting edge of scientific research. Read more
The principal component of this degree is an intensive novel research project providing 'hands-on' training in methods and techniques at the cutting edge of scientific research. The programme is particularly suitable for those wishing to embark on an academic career, with a strong track record of students moving into graduate research at UCL and elsewhere.

Degree information

Students develop a systematic approach to devising experiments and/or computations and gain familiarity with a broad range of synthetic, analytical and spectroscopic techniques, acquiring skills for the critical analysis of their experimental and computational observations. They also broaden their knowledge of chemistry through a selection of taught courses and are able to tailor the programme to meet their personal interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), four optional modules (15 credits each) and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules - all students undertake a literature project (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits), which are linked.
-Literature Project

Optional modules - students choose four optional modules from the following:
-Advanced Topics in Energy Science and Materials
-Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry
-Biological Chemistry
-Concepts in Computational and Experimental Chemistry
-Frontiers in Experimental Physical Chemistry
-Inorganic Rings, Chains and Clusters
-Intense Radiation Sources in Modern Chemistry
-Microstructural Control in Materials Science
-Numerical Methods in Chemistry
-Pathways, Intermediates and Function in Organic Chemistry
-Principles of Drug Design
-Principles and Methods of Organic Synthesis
-Simulation Methods in Materials Chemistry
-Stereochemical Control in Asymmetric Total Synthesis
-Structural Methods in Modern Chemistry
-Synthesis and Biosynthesis of Natural Products
-Topics in Quantum Mechanics
-Transferable Skills for Scientists

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words and a viva voce examination (90 credits).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory classes and research supervision. Assessment is through the dissertation, unseen written examinations, research papers, a written literature survey, and an oral examination. All students will be expected to attend research seminars relevant to their broad research interest.

Careers

This MSc is designed to provide first-hand experience of research at the cutting-edge of chemistry and is particularly suitable for those wishing to embark on an academic career (i.e. doctoral research) in this area, although the research and critical thinking skills developed will be equally valuable in a commercial environment.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Analyst and Adviser, Silver Peak
-Sales Associate, Sino Chen
-Phd in Nanoparticle Synthesis, UCL
-Secondary School Teacher (GCSE), Ministry of Education
-PhD in High Performance Organic Coating for Aerospace, University of Surrey

Why study this degree at UCL?

With departmental research interests and activities spanning the whole spectrum of chemistry, including development of new organic molecules, fundamental theoretical investigations and prediction and synthesis of new materials, students are able to undertake a project that aligns with their existing interests.

Students develop crucial first-hand experience in scientific methods, techniques for reporting science and using leading-edge research tools, as well as further essential skills for a research career.

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The MPhil and PhD programmes in Chemical Engineering attract students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds such as statistics, maths, electrical engineering, chemistry and physics. Read more
The MPhil and PhD programmes in Chemical Engineering attract students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds such as statistics, maths, electrical engineering, chemistry and physics. You may work on multidisciplinary research projects in collaboration with colleagues across the University or from external organisations.

Research in the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials is cross-disciplinary and our strategy is to ensure that our research groups grow and provide a balanced portfolio of activities for the future. This is achieved in part through MPhil and PhD supervision.

Advanced materials

Every article, instrument, machine or device we use depends for its success upon materials, design and effective production. We work on a wide range of materials topics including:
-New material development
-Optimising of materials processing
-Testing and evaluation at component scale and at high spatial resolution
-Modelling
-Failure analysis

Much of our work relates to materials and processes for renewable energy generation, energy efficiency, carbon capture and storage. We also use biological and bio-inspired processes to develop new functional materials.

The Group Head is Professor Steve Bull, Cookson Group Chair of Materials Engineering – high spatial resolution mechanics. His research focuses on development and testing of compliant and porous materials, and the use of sustainable materials. Professor Bull is the 2013 recipient of the Tribology Silver Medal presented by the Tribology Trust, the top national award in this area.

Electrochemical engineering science

Electrochemical Engineering Science (EES) arose out of the pioneering fuel cell research at Newcastle in the 1960s. We are continuing this research on new catalyst and membrane materials, optimising electrode structures and developing meaningful fuel cell test procedures.

We are investigating electrochemical methods for surface structuring, probing and testing at the micron and nanoscale. More recently, we have been using electrochemical analysis to understand cellular and microbial catalysis and processes.

Applications of our research are in:
-Energy production and storage
-Micro and nanoscale device fabrication
-Medical and health care applications
-Corrosion protection

The Group Head is Professor Sudipta Roy. Professor Roy's research focuses on materials processing, micro/nano structuring and corrosion.

Process intensification

Process intensification is the philosophy that processes can often be made smaller, more efficient and safer using new process technologies and techniques, resulting in order of magnitude reductions in the size of process equipment. This leads to substantial capital cost savings and often a reduction in running costs.

The Group Head is Professor Adam Harvey. Professor Harvey's research focuses on Oscillatory Baffled Reactors (OBRs), biofuel processing and heterogeneous catalysis.

Process modelling and optimisation

Our goal is to attain better insight into process behaviour to achieve improved process and product design and operational performance. The complexity of the challenge arises from the presence of physiochemical interactions, multiple unit operations and multi-scale effects.

Underpinning our activity is the need for improved process and product characterisation through the development and application of process analytical techniques, hybrid statistical and empirical modeling and high throughput technologies for chemical synthesis.

The Group Head is Professor Elaine Martin. Professor Martin's research focuses on Process Analytical Technologies, Statistical and Empirical Process Data Modelling, and Process Performance Monitoring.

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The Institute of Health and Society has an international reputation in translational research aimed at promoting evidence-based policy and practice for the benefit of patient and population health. Read more
The Institute of Health and Society has an international reputation in translational research aimed at promoting evidence-based policy and practice for the benefit of patient and population health. Postgraduate research supervision is available in applied epidemiology, decision making and organisation of care, life-course, development and ageing, and public health improvement.

Research in the Institute of Health and Society (IHS) is organised into four themes and underpinned by four discipline groups. As a research student, you will be fully integrated in a theme or group. You will have a team of supervisors, including clinicians or policy makers from a range of health and social care settings. Current research interests, projects and publications are available from our staff profiles.

Delivery

Attendance on campus is flexible, agreed between you and your supervisors depending on the requirements of your research project. You are expected to undertake 40 hours of work per week with an annual holiday entitlement of 35 days, which includes statutory and bank holidays.

You will receive formal, high quality subject-specific and generic skills training with modules including:
-Quantitative and qualitative methods
-Health and health care policy
-Health economics
-Health care quality

We have a thriving postgraduate community with friendly and supportive relations between students and staff. Although formal supervision takes place once a month, you will be encouraged to present your studies to your research theme and to the wider Institute.

Our Athena SWAN (Scientific Women's Academic Network) silver award was renewed in 2014. This recognises good employment practice and the promotion of women working in science, engineering and technology.

Facilities

We have a variety of learning and study spaces in the Baddiley-Clark Building and the Medical School. You will have access to video conference facilities and a dedicated audio-visual room for analysing both audio and video information.

You choose to be based with your research theme or in our Postgraduate Student Room, with computers and printers. You have access to an extensive range of specialist software.

We also host the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research Design Service North East.

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This MSc examines the theoretical and empirical issues raised by globalisation and its effects on Latin American economic development. Read more
This MSc examines the theoretical and empirical issues raised by globalisation and its effects on Latin American economic development. The programme highlights the importance of Latin American countries as dynamic emerging markets and explains the ways in which Latin American economic development is bound up with social and political processes.

Degree information

Students will gain a broad understanding of different theories of globalisation, key academic debates on economic growth and development, and current policy challenges to sustained and equitable economic growth in Latin America. Our programme prepares students for independent research, rigorous analysis of primary and secondary sources, and advanced level writing; and to foster students’ intellectual development and independent learning abilities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits).

Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core modules
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean
-Globalisation and Latin American Development: Latin America in the 21st Century

Optional modules - students choose four optional modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Democratization in Latin America
-Latin American Political Economy
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-From Silver to Cocaine: The History of Commodities in Latin America
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a research topic of their choice related to globalisation and economic development in Latin America.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, independent reading and research, seminar discussions and research skills training. Assessment is through essays, term papers, presentations, analytical exercises and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.
There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Some graduates from the MSc have gone on to PhD studies, while others have put their research skills to good use working in the policy sector. In terms of commercial opportunities, the alternative energy sector has provided employment for our graduates in recent years. Journalism is also a popular career path and the MSc has been used as a stepping stone into positions with global news agencies, broadcasting corporations and media groups. Many students find employment with NGOs and charitable organisations - working to improve the prospects of marginalised social groups in the region.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Partnership Officer, Imperial College London
-Economist Editor, The Economist
-Research and Policy Analyst, UK Collaborative on Development Sciences (UKCDS)
-Analysis Intern, AKE

Employability
Globalisation and Latin American Development MSc graduates will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. Numerous programme graduates have found employment in industry, state agencies and the third sector via these routes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of the Americas has the largest programme of teaching, research and events on the Americas in the UK, covering Latin America, the Caribbean, Canada and the United States.

In addition to tuition by world-leading scholars, students benefit from access to a wide range of events, seminars, and conferences on the Americas delivered by scholars, policy makers, diplomats, activists and other experts on the region.

The institute provides a unique environment in which to study the Americas and excellent networking opportunities are available through our strong links with academic, cultural, diplomatic, policy and business institutions with interests in the region.

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The MA Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Students have the opportunity to study some historical subjects if they so wish. Read more
The MA Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Students have the opportunity to study some historical subjects if they so wish. The study of ancient languages is an essential part of this degree, but no existing knowledge of either Greek or Latin is required for admission.

Course Overview

A degree in Classical Studies gives you the opportunity to study a wide range of modules from mythology to religion and all genres of ancient literature, such as epic, tragedy. As understanding texts in their original language is an essential part of further studies, the study of an ancient language is compulsory.

Modules

-Women in Ancient Myth
-Medicine in the Ancient World
-Erotic Poetry in the Ancient World
-Stories, Histories, and Ticket-Sales: Greeks and Romans on the Silver Screen
-Myth in Greek and Roman Epic

Key Features

The MA in Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study the ancient world with a focus on language and literature, and the interpretation of ancient texts. Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are better able to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Classical Studies with us here at University of Wales Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MA degree in Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint-based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in a clear, professional and lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

The assessment is on the student’s own subject of choice in relation to each module, always in consultation with the relevant tutor. Most modules are assessed by long essays, but some modules are assessed by alternative means, such as conference-style presentations.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Take your skills in chemistry further with a course that prepares you with the cutting-edge knowledge required for a career in the manufacturing or product development industries. Read more
Take your skills in chemistry further with a course that prepares you with the cutting-edge knowledge required for a career in the manufacturing or product development industries.

Formulation is a vital activity central to manufacturing in a wide range of industries. The course encompasses polymer and colloid science, building understanding of the physical and chemical interactions between multiple components in complex formulations, leading to a competitive advantage in product development and quality control.

You'll learn the trade secrets behind successful formulation,dealing with issues such as product stability, controlling flocculation, rheology and compatibility issues with multi-component systems. Whichever industry sector you're interested in working within, you'll develop the skills to deign formulations for a wealth of scenarios, for example food, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and more.

Key Course Features

-You will develop skills to design formulations for a wealth of industrial scenarios - from food, cosmetics and personal care, pharmaceuticals, paper production, inks and coatings, oil drilling and mining to name just a few.
-In your research project you will interface with specialists from manufacturing industries and undertake a programme of experiments designed to develop the skills you want to learn.
-On this course you will learn the trade secrets behind successful formulation - dealing with issues such as product stability (stabilising emulsions and dispersions), controlling flocculation, rheology (flow properties, mouthfeel, gelation), and overcoming compatibility issues with multi component systems. You'll be introduced to modelling, new trends in processing and high throughput formulation.

What Will You Study?

The course comprises 6 x 20 credit modules of taught content and a 60 credit Research Project. The taught element is delivered by a varied programme including lectures, seminars, and practical classes and may be studied on a full time or part time basis to suit you.

There is a strong emphasis on development of hands-on practical skills using a wide variety of advanced instrumentation.

TAUGHT MODULES
-Advanced Materials Science
-Chemistry & Technology of Water Soluble Polymers
-Formulation Science
-Research Methods
-Structure and Function of Industrial Biopolymers

The lectures and workshops are designed to train you in understanding interactions between polymer, solvent, and surfactant molecules with particles and surfaces. You will:
-Review the range of formulation types found in various industrial sectors, and their components.
-Master analytical techniques used to optimise product formulation, including measurement of molar mass distribution using gel permeation chromatography with multi angle laser light scattering (GPC-MALLS) and particle sizing techniques such as digital imaging and laser diffraction (to measure aggregates, flocs and emulsion droplets)
-Discover Green Chemistry and eco-formulation- exploring a whole range of biopolymers extracted from natural resources….including antimicrobial polymers from shellfish waste, gelling agents from seaweed, and oligosaccharides from locally grown grasses.
-Learn about man-made polymers and importantly, chemically modified biopolymers.
-Measure the viscosity and rheology of liquid formulations and see how this can be interpreted to yield structural information on thickened systems and gels, and particulate systems including fillers, additives and dispersants.

A module in Research Methods provides training in all aspects of undertaking research, from project management, through data analysis and statistics to communicating your results and writing your dissertation to ensure you are well quipped to undertake your project.

RESEARCH PROJECT
The course culminates in an industry-focused Research Project. For full-time students this may be partly or wholly undertaken within a local manufacturing company. For part-time students the project provider may be your current employer. The Research Project gives you the opportunity to undertake a piece of novel research, and will often be based around solving a formulation problem for the project provider. It allows you to put into practice the knowledge and skills gained in the taught elements of the course.

Because of the individual nature of the research projects, no two projects are the same. Below are some of the titles of previous research projects undertaken by previous masters students in our department:
-Aspects of Adhesive Bonding of Low Energy Polymers
-The Effects of Surfactants on the Rheological Properties of Hydrophobically Modified Cellulose
-Extensional Rheometry and Dynamic Light Scattering of Telechelic Associating Polymer Solutions
-Simple chemical syntheses of polymer/silver nanocomposites
-Phase Separation of Gum Arabic and Hyaluronan in Aqueous Solution
-Shear and extensional Rheology of Electron Beam (EB) Curable Paint

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

Assessment of the taught modules is intended to allow the learner to demonstrate skills that cover the entire breadth of the programme aims – knowledge and understanding, key practical skills, intellectual skills in planning experiments/interpreting data and communication of information in writing and verbally.

The research project is examined by a final dissertation.

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This course trains graduates with a chemistry background specifically for a career as a polymer or biopolymer scientist. Read more
This course trains graduates with a chemistry background specifically for a career as a polymer or biopolymer scientist. The content reflects global interest in sustainably-derived polymers which are increasing in demand in a variety of applications including food and beverages, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, personal care, paints and inks.

Our specialist course will equip you with the knowledge to understand the behaviour of both naturally occurring and synthetic water soluble polymers at the molecular level, and how this influences their bulk behaviour. Lectures are reinforced and expanded by study of real-life polymer systems in the laboratory.

You'll learn about the vital roles played by polymers in a rage of products, gain knowledge of biopolymer modification, polymer synthesis and a range of specialist characterisation techniques. During your research project you'll work with specialists from manufacturing industries and perform a programme of experiments designed to help you develop your skills.

Key Course Features

-You will learn about the vital roles played by polymers in a diverse range of high value products – e.g in mayonnaise, sun tan lotion, wound gels, liquid pharmaceuticals, paper, ink, water based paints and flotation aids in mining to name just a few.
-You’ll gain first-hand knowledge of biopolymer modification, polymer synthesis, and a wide range of specialist characterisation techniques.
-In your research project you will interface with specialists from manufacturing industries and undertake a programme of experiments designed to develop the skills you want to learn.
-Through case studies and your research project you will learn how to apply acquired knowledge in real world industrial scenarios, leading the way to success in subsequent employment.

What Will You Study?

The course comprises 6 x 20 credit modules of taught content and a 60 credit research project. The taught element is delivered by a varied programme including lectures, seminars, practical classes and may be studied on a full time or part time basis to suit you. There is a strong emphasis on development of hands-on practical skills using a wide variety of advanced instrumentation.

TAUGHT MODULES
-Advanced Materials Science
-Chemistry & Technology of Water Soluble Polymers
-Formulation Science
-Polymer Characterisation Case Study
-Structure and Function of Industrial Biopolymers

The lectures and workshops are designed to train you in understanding polymer molecules themselves, and the way they interact with each other, and with solvents, surfactants, particles and surfaces.

You will:
-Study the basic principles of polymer characterisation through a range of analytical techniques including FT-IR, UV-vis, NMR, ESR and fluorescence spectroscopy.
-Master the measurement of molar mass distribution using gel permeation chromatography with multi angle laser light scattering (GPC-MALLS), and gel electrophoresis.
-Use particle sizing techniques such as digital imaging and laser diffraction to measure aggregates, flocs and emulsion droplets.
-Discover Green Chemistry - exploring a whole range of biopolymers extracted from natural resources….including antimicrobial polymers from shellfish waste, gelling agents from seaweed, and oligosaccharides from locally grown grasses.
-Learn about man-made polymers and importantly, chemically modified biopolymers.
-Measure the viscosity and rheology of liquid formulations and see how this can be interpreted to yield structural information on thickened systems and gels.
-A module in research methods provides training in all aspects of undertaking research, from project management, through data analysis and statistics to communicating your results and writing your dissertation to ensure you are well equipped to undertake your project.

RESEARCH PROJECT
The course culminates in an industry-focussed Research Project. For full-time students this may be partly or wholly undertaken within a local manufacturing company. For part-time students the project provider may be your current employer. The Research Project gives you the opportunity to undertake a piece of novel research, and will often be based around solving a polymer application /characterisation problem for the project provider. It allows you to put into practice the knowledge and skills gained in the taught elements of the course.

Because of the individual nature of the research projects, no two projects are the same. Below are some of the titles of previous research projects undertaken by previous Masters students in our department:
-Aspects of Adhesive Bonding of Low Energy Polymers
-The effects of Surfactants on the Rheological Properties of Hydrophobically Modified Cellulose
-Extensional Rheometry and Dynamic Light Scattering of Telechelic Associating Polymer Solutions
-Simple chemical syntheses of polymer/silver nanocomposites
-Phase separation of Gum Arabic and Hyaluronan in Aqueous Solution
-Shear and extensional Rheology of Electron Beam (EB) Curable Paint

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

Assessment of the taught modules is intended to allow the learner to demonstrate skills that cover the entire breadth of the programme aims – knowledge and understanding, key practical skills, intellectual skills in planning experiments/interpreting data and communication of information in writing and verbally.

The research project is examined by a final dissertation.

Career Prospects

The EU is the leading chemical production area in the world and the chemical industry is the UK's largest manufacturing export sector.

MSc Polymer and Biopolymer Science combines delivery of key theoretical knowledge with hands-on application in extraction, modification and testing of polymers / biopolymers.

You’ll learn how to develop experiments at bench scale through to processes at pilot and manufacturing scale. A Masters degree in Polymer & Biopolymer Science from Glyndwr University gives you the skills employers are looking for.

You'll be ready to step confidently into a world of manufacturing with a wealth of information and skills to offer. The course provides excellent career opportunities across a wide range of industrial sectors. Graduates can expect to obtain a research and development position in areas related to biomedical devices, pharmaceutical formulation, food and beverages, petroleum recovery, agrochemicals, functional polymers/speciality chemicals, inks, paints and coatings or cosmetics and personal care products.

The course also provides a direct route to doctoral study, for those wishing to undertake further research training or pursue an academic career.

The Careers & Zone at Wrexham Glyndŵr University is there to help you make decisions and plan the next steps towards a bright future. From finding work or further study to working out your interests, skills and aspirations, they can provide you with the expert information, advice and guidance you need.

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