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Masters Degrees (Sign Language)

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This specialisation in Sign Language and Deaf Studies is unique amongst existing Master’s degrees in including components in the psychology and linguistics and neuroscience of deafness and sign language, taught by staff at the Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre. Read more
This specialisation in Sign Language and Deaf Studies is unique amongst existing Master’s degrees in including components in the psychology and linguistics and neuroscience of deafness and sign language, taught by staff at the Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre. Students also have the opportunity to study introductory British Sign Language.

Degree information

Students take a set of core modules and then specialise in linguistics, psychology of language, and/or interpreting. In selecting the modules for specialisation, students are able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) consisting of two mandatory modules (45 credits), four core modules (60 credits), and one optional module (15 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate of four mandatory modules (60 credits) is also offered.

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications

Specialisation modules - students take four specialisation modules, students who already hold BSL CACDP Level 1 or equivalent choose three specialisation modules and two optional modules:
-Introduction to British Sign Language
-Deafness: Cognition and Language
-Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Introduction to Deafhood

Optional modules - students then select one optional module from all those offered within the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director (students who already hold BSL level one or equivalent select two). Recommendations include:
-Foundations of Linguistics
-Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
-Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
-Introduction to Children’s Language Development
-Multimodal Communication and Cognition
-Sociolinguistics

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of Language Science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research dissertation.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries, for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers, and in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable and very highly sought outside of academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The division undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the Language Sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Read more
The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program prepares teachers not only as effective and ethical practitioners but also as scholars and leaders in the profession.

Faculty members are international leaders in research and are highly skilled in the education of deaf people. A carefully designed system of faculty advisement is a prominent feature of the program. On-campus facilities, state-of-the-art technology, and a well-established system of educational access services combine to make this a vital program for both deaf and hearing students who desire careers as professional educators of deaf students.

Plan of study

Course work requires a minimum of four semesters. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 must be maintained. Before graduation, students are expected to have at least intermediate-level signing skills as determined by a Sign Language Proficiency Interview.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university,

- Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Have a basic knowledge of American Sign Language as measured by a departmental skill assessment, or willingness to take American Sign Language I (or its equivalent) at NTID or another college prior to beginning the program,

- Have a level of writing proficiency appropriate to graduate study as indicated by a review of undergraduate writing-intensive courses and an expository essay,

- Submit letters of reference and an expository essay that indicates evidence of professional commitment and potential for success in the program,

- Submit scores from Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Participate in an individual interview, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 213 (Internet-based) are required.

Additionally, 30 semester credit hours in a content area are required by the New York State Education Department for initial certification to teach a secondary (grades 7–12) content area. Students who do not have the required number of hours must complete the additional credits before applying for New York State certification. Secondary academic subjects include American Sign Language, English, mathematics, social studies, or science. Please note: The social studies content area includes economics and government, and at least 21 semester hours in the history and geography of the United States and the world.

Additional information

- Financial Aid

NTID graduate tuition rates are less than one-half of RIT’s tuition. Approximately 70 percent of students enrolled in the MS program in secondary education receive some type of financial assistance each year. Students complete only the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply for financial aid. Students enrolled in this program may be eligible for grant funding from the U.S. Department of Education. In addition, federal loan programs may be available.

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The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. Read more

The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. You will also be able to follow a number of lectures in Tilburg. Our programme is known to be challenging, but it also offers students a very large degree of choice.

Real language in real-life situations

Whenever we use language we are involved in communicating. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme. It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observation skills to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Challenging research environment

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in topics such as language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

Why study Language and Communication (Research) at Radboud University?

  • Radboud University offers this programme jointly with Tilburg University, so that our students can learn from and work alongside a large number of specialists. Our universities have experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication, multimodal messages and social media.
  • The programme is designed so that you can develop a unique professional profile by specialising in an area that meets your interests and research ambitions.
  • You’ll gain substantial hands-on research experience during two lab rotations, while you’ll also develop various research skills (incl. academic writing and grant proposal writing); the programme also challenges you to think about the valorisation process.
  • You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a selected group of highly motivated national and international students.
  • The Radboud campus in Nijmegen offers you a challenging research environment in which you could work together with specialists from four leading research institutes connected to this field: Centre for Language Studies, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Baby Research Centre, and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
  • Radboud University has excellent facilities for doing research, including the University Library with the largest collection in the field of linguistics in the Netherlands, and experimental labs and computer facilities with state-of-the-art equipment

General requirements:

  1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Communication Studies, in Linguistics, in a modern language or a related area with excellent grades. Your Bachelor's thesis or a dedicated research proposal will also need to demonstrate that you’re sufficiently talented for scientific research.
  2. Proficiency in English. Non-native speakers of English* need one of the following:
  • A TOEFL score of >600 (paper based) or >100 (internet based)
  • A IELTS score of >7.0
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Strong motivation

You have to be able to demonstrate your motivation for and affinity with international academic research. A selection committee will evaluate the motivation of each applicant separately.

Career prospects

The primary goal of the programme is academic training, which makes it ideal for those wishing to embark on a research career, for example by taking a PhD. But it also caters for the growing demand from the public and private sectors for people with academic insight and research skills. Many graduates will join research groups in the public and private sector. These may address a wide range of topics such as advanced Internet and enhancing professional communication in an international context.

Our approach to this field

Whenever we use language we are involved in communication with others - to persuade, to inform and to exchange ideas. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together in spoken language and non-verbal cues such as eye-contact or facial expression and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme.

It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. We invite you to discover exciting new areas of research, where language and communication are illuminated by developments in information and communication technology. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observations to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Our research in this field

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language



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We offer excellent candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain. We specialise in, and welcome applications from prospective PhD students interested in the following areas. Read more
We offer excellent candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain.

We specialise in, and welcome applications from prospective PhD students interested in the following areas: Corpus Research, Cognitive Linguistics and Psycholinguistics, Discourse Analysis and Stylistics, and Language Learning and Teaching.

The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice, for which an academic staff member will provide expert supervision.

The PhD – the most advanced research degree – leads to a dissertation of up to 80,000 words on a subject of your choice and under the expert supervision of an academic member of staff.

Our principal areas of research are:

Corpus Research - We are well known for our innovative approaches to the analysis of large corpora, which have had a strong impact on language teaching, dictionary development, and research into academic discourses. We are home to the Centre for Corpus Research (CCR), which supports the use of corpus analysis in research, teaching and learning. CCR provides access to a range of corpora and has a dedicated computer suite with specialist resources as well as an eye-tracking laboratory.

Cognitive Linguistics and Psycholinguistics - Our research in cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics covers a wide range of areas including figurative language, idioms, embodied cognition, language and perception, sign languages, second language acquisition, and construction grammar. We have particular strengths in British Sign Language, Australian Sign Language and gesture studies.

Discourse Analysis and Stylistics - We are known for the development of several highly influential discourse analysis frameworks, and for our work on narrative, the discursive representation of inequality, new media, the language of politics, as well as new ideas on evaluation and phraseology. Our research draws on a variety of linguistic and theoretical traditions, including: systemic-functional linguistics; critical discourse analysis; corpus linguistics; multimodal analysis; narrative analysis; conversation analysis, and genre analysis. Our particular strength at Birmingham is that we combine discourse analysis with corpus analytic methods of research.

Language Learning and Teaching - We research and publish in: academic literacies; phraseology; the teaching and learning of metaphor and other types of figurative language; applications of cognitive linguistics to second language learning and teaching; and the use of corpora in language teaching.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Learning outcomes -. This Second Cycle Degree Programme will provide advanced linguistic and cultural knowledge, analytical skills in the chosen foreign language as well as the necessary ability to interact with multidisciplinary and multicultural research groups. Read more
Learning outcomes -

This Second Cycle Degree Programme will provide advanced linguistic and cultural knowledge, analytical skills in the chosen foreign language as well as the necessary ability to interact with multidisciplinary and multicultural research groups.

According to their plan of study, students will acquire specific know-how in the historic, diachronic evolution of the language they choose, in the issues and tools concerning the teaching of Italian language, in the experimental phonetics and physics of acoustic (XML language, heuristic methods and accessibility indicators), in the linguistic tools to analyze language disorders and deafness, in the analysis of language and in the English language, culture and literature.

Languages available:

Albanian, Arabic, Czech, English, Hebrew, French, German, modern Greek, Italian Sign Language (LIS), Polish, Portuguese and Brazilian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish.

Curricula available -

• English Linguistics
• Language Sciences
• Language Sciences (in English)

Occupational profiles -

Second-cycle graduates may hold positions of high responsibility in linguistic education, international co-operation and international institutions, public utility services related to cross-cultural communication. Graduates may also deal with advance research on speech and languages at TAL research institutes and laboratories, carry out coordination activities in lifelong language learning programmes and in welcoming and Italian training of foreign students in schools, provide specialised consulting for multimedia publishing and communication, teach Italian to foreigners in Italian Cultural Institutes abroad, provide specialised consulting and collaboration within the medical research and finally work as communication assistants for the deaf and as experts of Italian Sign Language (LIS).

Attendance - Open attendance

Examination assessment and graduation -

Educational activities include classroom teaching, workshops and internships, in order to acquire wide-ranging skills that can be readily transferable into the world of work.

Knowledge gained by students will be assessed through written and oral exams during their entire university career.

The final exam consists in writing a thesis, which must possess the characters of originality, exhaustive documentation and scientific investigation and which will be discussed with a committee of university professors and experts.

Access to further studies -

Specialist Master’s Programmes (1st and 2nd level) and Research Doctorates

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The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments. Read more

Program overview

The master of science in health care interpretation is designed to meet the demand for nationally-certified sign language interpreters who wish to work in health care environments.

Health care interpreters work in various health care settings where hearing people and deaf or hard-of-hearing people need to interact and communicate. Interpreters may assist deaf patients and their families in understanding medical testing, treatments, and diagnoses; facilitate communication for deaf health care professionals with colleagues and patients; and/or provide interpretation for deaf individuals who are enrolled in health care-related degree programs or training courses designed to educate and prepare them for careers in health care-related professions. This unique program also prepares interpreters to work in administrative roles ensuring language access to patients in hospital settings. Successful completion of this program could lead to employment as a sign language health care interpreter and/or a language access coordinator of sign and spoken language interpreting services in one of the most important new fields of health care.

The program may be completed on a full- or part-time basis.

Curriculum

Health care interpretation, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Professional Seminar (summer)
-Human Body Systems/Diseases I (summer)
-Theories of Translation and Interpretation (summer) 3
-Health Care Practical Interpreting I
-Human Body Systems/Diseases II
-Research Methods
-Health Care Practical Interpreting II
-Health Care Governance and Economics
-Human Resources in Health Care
Second Year
-Health Care Interpreting Within a Diverse Deaf Community (summer)
-Capstone Professional Project or Research Paper (summer)

Other admission requirements

-Submit an ASL interpretation sample (audio/video file or text translation will be provided).
-Submit two letters of reference from individuals who have had the opportunity to observe the applicant's interpreting work.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a completed graduate application.
-Submit a personal statement describing the applicant's educational objectives.
-Provide proof of completion of a course in medical terminology. (This is required after admission to the program is offered. The course must be completed prior to the beginning of the summer session. This $99 self-paced online course is called Language of Medicine.)

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The Linguistics MA advances your knowledge of critical theory in theoretical linguistics and the philosophy of language, specifically with regard to the syntax/semantics interface, the semantics/pragmatics interface and grammar. Read more
The Linguistics MA advances your knowledge of critical theory in theoretical linguistics and the philosophy of language, specifically with regard to the syntax/semantics interface, the semantics/pragmatics interface and grammar.

The MRes is designed for students who already have some background in linguistics and intend to progress to PhD study. It is designed as an enhanced route of entry to a PhD programme, giving you an opportunity to develop research skills early in order to be fully prepared for your doctorate.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The Linguistics MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: analysing and evaluating different approaches to studying the structure of the English language; engaging with theoretical frameworks which attempt to account for meaning in language; and examining the relationship between the philosophy of language and linguistics on one hand, and the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language on the other.

Modules:

Grammar and the English Language
Semantics: Word Meaning
Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
Topics in Sociolinguistics
Research Methods
Dissertation

One from:

Discourses of Culture
Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The Linguistics MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.

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The English Language MA gives you the opportunity to investigate language in its social and cultural contexts. Read more
The English Language MA gives you the opportunity to investigate language in its social and cultural contexts.

You will examine theoretical and analytical frameworks that explore issues of language variation, language contact, language and identity; analyse the role of language in social relationships and practices; and look at how linguistic theory can be applied to the analysis of literature and culture.

The programme equips you with high-level research skills that you can apply in your dissertation, which allows you to address an issue of particular interest with the knowledge you have gathered throughout the course.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The English Language MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: examining theoretical and analytical frameworks that explore issues of language variation; analysing the role of language in social relationships and practices; and examining how linguistic theory can be applied to the analysis of literature and culture.

Modules:

Grammar and the English Language
Semantics: Word Meaning
Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
Topics in Sociolinguistics
Research Methods
Dissertation

One from:

Discourses of Culture
Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The English Language MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.

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The Linguistics MA aims to give students a thorough grounding in modern theoretical linguistics. Students gain a basic understanding of the three core areas of linguistics. Read more
The Linguistics MA aims to give students a thorough grounding in modern theoretical linguistics. Students gain a basic understanding of the three core areas of linguistics: phonetics and phonology; syntax; and semantics and pragmatics, and are then able to tailor the programme to meet their personal linguistic interests.

Degree information

Students gain knowledge and understanding of current research in theoretical linguistics and are prepared for independent research. On completion of the programme, they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, find and evaluate relevant literature, develop and test new hypotheses, and produce cogent, structured and professionally presented reports.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Syntax
-Semantics and Pragmatics
-Phonetics and Phonology
-Foundations of Linguistics

Optional modules - students choose one of the following:
-Advanced Phonological Theory
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Intermediate Generative Grammar
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Language Acquisition
-Linguistics of Sign Language
-Morphology
-Neurolinguistics
-Phonology of English
-Readings in Syntax
-Semantic-Pragmatic Development
-Sociolinguistics
-Stuttering

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project in any area of linguistics which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-orientated. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Many linguistics graduates from UCL carry on studying linguistics at MPhil/PhD level with a view to pursuing an academic career. Others go on to teach languages, especially English (as a first or foreign language) or embark on a range of other careers, from law, media, computing and speech and language therapy to all aspects of commerce and industry.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Lecturer, University of Saudi Arabia
-Software Developer, OpenBet Ltd
-Investigations Specialist, Amazon
-Translator, Hunan University
-PhD in Linguistics, University of Cambridge

Employability
Linguistics MA students acquire a wide range of transferable skills, which opens up opportunities in many different sectors include language teaching, translating and interpreting, marketing, communication, journalism, management, and law.

Graduates who achieve good results are well-placed to go on to a research degree in Linguistics at top universities, often with a view to pursuing an academic career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in linguistics, language, mind, and behaviour. More specifically, UCL Linguistics is one of the leading departments for research in theoretical linguistics in the UK and its staff includes world leaders in theoretical syntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonology, and experimental linguistics.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full range of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation, which is also reflected in other markers of excellence, such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/

Programme Overview

The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology.

Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide.

Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe.

Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital.

The MA programme draws upon:

- the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel;

- a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology;

- close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism;

- other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation;

- the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas;

- the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and

- the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study.

View a sampling of past MA dissertation titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/ma-anthropology-of-travel-tourism-dissertations.html)

View profiles of alumni and current students (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/student-profiles.html)

Language Study

Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite.

All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Learn more and reserve your place here: Language Entitlement Programme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecultures/studentinfo/language-entitlement-programme/)

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Programme Structure

The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research.

2. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region.

The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses.

Teaching & Learning

The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies.

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research.

While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (https://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Philosophy of Language MA is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language. Read more
The Philosophy of Language MA is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language.

The study of language has given rise to a number of distinctive philosophical problems that became central to Western philosophy in the nineteenth century and that have dominated research and discussion in the twentieth century.

Our philosophy modules give you a thorough grounding in philosophical insights, as you engage in critical reflection on the relationship between sociopolitical context and philosophical debate. You explore the history of philosophy from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century, examining the variety of critical and analytical traditions that have emerged from those foundations.

Philosophy of language modules examine the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language, focusing on the critical analysis of the relationship between the philosophy of language and linguistics.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The Philosophy of Language MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: analysing and evaluating aspects of philosophy that have had significant influence on the general understanding of what language is and how its use interacts with, and exploits, context; engaging with philosophical frameworks starting with Frege, through to Russell and Wittgenstein, which attempt to account for meaning in language; and evaluating philosophical foundations of critical theory that have contributed to debates on the understanding of history, politics and the nature of meaning.

Modules:

Grammar and the English Language
Semantics: Word Meaning
Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
Topics in Sociolinguistics
Research Methods
Dissertation

One from:

Discourses of Culture
Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The Philosophy of Language MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.

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The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Semantics is a research-oriented programme in formal semantics. The programme can prepare students for potential PhD research in semantics or overlapping disciplines, such as the syntax-semantics interface, pragmatic theory, psycholinguistics, and philosophy of language. Read more
The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Semantics is a research-oriented programme in formal semantics. The programme can prepare students for potential PhD research in semantics or overlapping disciplines, such as the syntax-semantics interface, pragmatic theory, psycholinguistics, and philosophy of language.

Degree information

Students will gain knowledge and critical understanding of current research in semantics and of the formal tools it employs, preparing them for independent research. On completion of the programme they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, evaluate current literature, and develop and test new hypotheses using appropriate formalisms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two obligatory core modules (30 credits), two pathway modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Semantics Research Seminar

Pathway modules (students select two from the list below):
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Interfaces
-Formal Methods in Philosophy
-Semantic Pragmatic Development
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics

Optional modules - a further four modules are selected, either from the list of non-compulsory core modules above or from the list of optional modules below:
-Advanced Phonological Theory A
-Animal Communication and Human Language
-Intermediate Generative Grammar A
-Sociolinguistics
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Language Acquisition
-Morphology
-Neurolinguistics
-Readings in Syntax
-Syntax Research Seminar
-The Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Or any statistical training outside the department.

Research project
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation in linguistics (advanced level) of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-oriented. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Although the degree can be an end in itself, this advanced programme is an excellent preparation for independent doctoral research in semantics. Graduates from our specialised Master's programmes in Linguistics have a very strong track record of securing funded doctoral studentships at institutions and have in recent years gone on to research at MIT, Cambridge, UCL, University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Employability
This Linguistics MA equips graduates with the necessary skills to carry out research in the specialised subject of formal semantics.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. UCL Linguistics is a leading department for research in the UK in semantics, with strengths at the interfaces with syntax, pragmatics and philosophy of language. Uniquely, our staff includes three experimental linguists with interests in semantics.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, cognition, and communication.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full width of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation which is also reflected in other markers of excellence such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Phonology is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for concentrated study in phonology, with a focus on theoretically-driven empirical research. Read more
The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Phonology is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for concentrated study in phonology, with a focus on theoretically-driven empirical research. Students will use typological comparison, data collection, experimental methods, or modelling techniques and will receive extensive training in research methods and the scholarly presentation of ideas.

Degree information

Students gain knowledge and understanding of current research in phonology and are prepared for independent research. On completion of the programme, they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, find and evaluate relevant literature, develop and test new hypotheses, and produce cogent, structured and professionally presented reports.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five pathway modules (60 credits), three optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Pathway modules - students select three from the list below:
-Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology A
-Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology B
-Advanced Phonology Theory A
-Advanced Phonology Theory B

In conjunction with the Programme Co-ordinator, students select two from a list which includes the following:
-Phonetic Theory
-Phonology of English
-Morphology
-Intermediate Generative Grammar A
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Readings in Syntax

Optional modules - a further three modules are selected, either from the list of non-compulsory core modules above or from the list of optional modules below:
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Advanced Semantic Theory B
-Animal Communication and the Human Language
-Communication and Human Language
-Interfaces
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Language Acquisition
-Neurolinguistics
-Pragmatic Theory
-Semantic-Pragmatic Development
-Semantics Research Seminar
-Sociolinguistics
-Stuttering
-The Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics
-Or any statistical training outside the department

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-oriented. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Although the degree can be an end in itself, this advanced programme is an excellent preparation for independent doctoral research in phonology. Graduates from our specialised Master's programmes in linguistics have a very strong track record of securing funded doctoral studentships and have in recent years gone on to research at UCL, MIT, Cambridge, University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Employability
This Linguistics MA equips graduates with the necessary skills to carry out research in the subject of phonology.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full width of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation which is also reflected in other markers of excellence such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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MA Deaf Education is taught over two years through a combination of face-to-face and online learning. Read more

MA Deaf Education is taught over two years through a combination of face-to-face and online learning. Approved by the Department for Education (DFE) to offer the Mandatory Qualification for Teachers of the Deaf, the programme integrates cutting-edge research knowledge with practitioner expertise to develop skilled, knowledgeable and critical practitioners. All students are enrolled on the MA Deaf Education (ToD) programme but they may choose to graduate with a Post Graduate Diploma (PG Dip) Deaf Education (Teacher of the Deaf). It is also possible to complete an MA Deaf Education without the teacher of the deaf qualification.

Central to the programme is an understanding that the establishment of language fluency and effective communication as a basis for cognitive development, social development and access to the curriculum must be the educational priority for all deaf learners. Individual auditory potential must be carefully evaluated and regularly reappraised in relation to the communicative and educational demands of the context, so that advances in personal and assistive hearing technologies combined with the latest thinking on optimal classroom management can be put into practice.

Unique to this programme is recognition of the plural and diverse linguistic contexts of deaf children’s lives. Through consideration of the roles of spoken and signed languages and increasingly sophisticated hearing technologies in deaf children’s lives and education, you will develop a broad language base and the skills to respond flexibly to deaf children’s dynamic and changing communication needs.

We welcome suitably qualified deaf and hearing applicants, and provide appropriate access and support arrangements for all students. Bursaries are offered to UK Deaf Education schools or services funding more than one student per school or service in a single year.

Course content

MA Deaf Education comprises four core modules delivered across two years. Your first module will be either Deafness and Development or Educational Audiology, depending on when you commence your studies.

If you are working towards the Teacher of the Deaf (ToD) award, you will also build a Professional Skills Portfolio throughout the two years. This applied aspect of the programme allows you to acquire and demonstrate the mandatory teaching, communication and audiological skills required of a ToD.

Course structure

Year 1

Compulsory modules

  • Educational Audiology 30 credits
  • Learning and Teaching in Deaf Education 30 credits
  • Professional Skills Portfolio (Teacher of the Deaf award only)

Year 2

Compulsory modules

  • Deafness and Development 30 credits
  • The Context of Deaf Education 30 credits
  • Dissertation in Deaf Education (not required for PGDip) 60 credits
  • Professional Skills Portfolio (Teacher of the Deaf) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Deaf Education (Teacher of the Deaf Qualification) MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Each core module comprises a study day or a short residential in Leeds, followed by twelve online taught sessions, two online tutorials and a regional tutorial. Bespoke online meetings, phone, email and Skype support is also available from tutors.

We expect you to commit the equivalent of a study day per week to this programme -- to be negotiated with your employer at the application stage. Some practical requirements of the programme are difficult to fulfil without this allocated time. We also ask you to identify someone in your school or service who will act as a mentor for you throughout the training.

Assessment

We assess the four core modules and dissertation through written assignments. The Professional Skills Portfolio is practically assessed and includes a minimum of a four-week supervised teaching placement.

Professional Skills Portfolio

The Professional Skills Portfolio module is compulsory if you are working towards the ToD qualification. The modules allows you to acquire and demonstrate the range of practical and practice based skills that you need as a Teacher of the Deaf. We outline the four strands to be completed below.

Audiology.

This strand provides guidance for developing practical skills with audiological technology and its management within different educational settings.

Communication

This strand focuses on the development of communication skills through reflective practice with both pupils and parents. It includes recording and analysing a pupil’s language use, evaluation of personal language use when teaching a pupil or group of pupils, and a reflective and critical review of a home visit.

Placement

This strand entails either one or two four-week teaching placements, depending on current and previous professional experience. At least one placement will be undertaken in an unfamiliar setting and be supported by a regional tutor.

Professional Competencies

This portfolio contains details of the ToD competencies against which you will track your progress throughout the two year course. It will also provide the means through which to identify objectives for continued professional development.

Career opportunities

MA Deaf Education provides Teachers of the Deaf with the specialist knowledge and skills they need to work across a range of settings in deaf education and provides the mandatory qualification required for England and Wales.

Graduates from the course have taken up a range of positions in specialist support services and schools. Many have subsequently progressed to management and leadership roles.

The programme also provides a route to further research and study at post graduate level via an EdD or PhD route. 



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The Linguistics with specialisation in Pragmatics MA is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for a concentrated course in pragmatics, with particular, but by no means exclusive, focus on the relevance-theoretic approach developed by Dan Sperber, Deirdre Wilson and Robyn Carston. Read more
The Linguistics with specialisation in Pragmatics MA is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for a concentrated course in pragmatics, with particular, but by no means exclusive, focus on the relevance-theoretic approach developed by Dan Sperber, Deirdre Wilson and Robyn Carston.

Degree information

Students gain knowledge and understanding of current research in pragmatics and are prepared for independent research. On completion of the programme, they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, find and evaluate relevant literature, develop and test new hypotheses, and produce cogent, structured and professionally presented reports.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two obligatory core modules (30 credits), four pathway modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules - compulsory:
-Pragmatics Research Seminar
-Dissertation in Linguistics - Advanced Level

Pathway modules (students select two from the list below):
-Pragmatic Theory
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Semantic-Pragmatic Development

In conjunction with the Programme Co-ordinator, students select two from a list which includes:
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Interfaces
-Semantics Research Seminar

Optional modules - a further three modules are selected from the list of optional modules below:
-Syntax 1
-Sociolinguistics
-The Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Phonetic Theory
-Animal Communication and Human Language
-Language Acquisition
-Neurolinguistics
-Morphology
-Pragmatic Theory
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Readings in Syntax
-Syntax
-Advanced Phonological Theory
-Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Intermediate Generative Grammar
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Stuttering
-Or any statistical training taken outside the department

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-oriented. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Although the degree can be an end in itself, this advanced programme is an excellent preparation for independent doctoral research in pragmatics. Graduates from our specialised Master's programmes in Linguistics have a very strong track record of securing funded doctoral studentships at institutions and have in recent years gone on to research at MIT, Cambridge, UCL, University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Employability
This Linguistics MA equips graduates with the necessary skills to carry out research in the specialised subject of pragmatics.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. More specifically, UCL Linguistics is the leading department for research in communication and pragmatics in the UK and its staff includes world leaders in theoretical pragmatics and in experimental pragmatics.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, cognition, and communication.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full width of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation which is also reflected in other markers of excellence such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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